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1940 | Nevada Senior Guide

The Aging Process: Can It Be Reversed?

June 6, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Aging Process: Can It Be Reversed?
Filed under: General 

With regard to fitness, for many years, I have been outspoken about my support of sports and strength training as good alternatives to redundant exercises like treadmill workouts. Steve Holman, editor-in-chief of Iron Man Magazine, has taken that idea to the extreme with a new body shaping program designed to slow down and even reverse the aging process. But he’s not the only one interested in the concept of aging.

You may also be familiar with the Real Age Program, or with one of its founders, Dr. Mehmet Oz. Real Age asserts that your actual age is often not in synch with the biological condition of your body. Based on your level of conditioning and diet and other factors, your body may be aging at an accelerated rate. Real Age calculates your age based on your body’s condition and compares it your chronological age. The goal is to improve the body so its actual “real age” is at or below one’s biological age. To me, that is the basis for Holman’s approach: return the body to the youthful condition that it was in before declining fitness and other factors accelerated the aging process.

According to Steve Holman, after we reach the age of 40, our bodies start aging at a faster rate than they had to that point. Studies have shown that without the proper nutrients and exercise, our bodies are aging about 6 months extra for every year that passes! So, let’s say you’re 40. By the time you reach 50, you will look and feel 55. By the time you reach 60, you will look and feel 70 years old! I don’t know about you but that kind of aging does not appeal to me a whole lot.

Did you ever notice that the folks who stay the most physically active seem to be aging more slowly than others who don’t? In my mind, I picture a 63-year old woman gardening while her 65-year-old husband is chopping wood nearby and they both look like they’re in their 50s. Hmm… maybe that was a scene from a 1940s movie but I think it makes the point. They kept active with muscle taxing activities and no doubt felt and looked younger because of it. Steve Holman says that 90% of people over the age of 35 lose enough muscle every year to burn off an additional 4 pounds of body fat. The aging process really starts to catch up with us at that point. Muscle gives shape and strength to our bodies. As we know, when you lose muscle mass, you gain fat, even if the calories you take in stay the same. We don’t feel or look as good. Then we get depressed because we don’t feel and look as good. Then we give up on retaining our youth and it’s all downhill from there. Wow. That was depressing, huh?

Fear not! That doesn’t have to happen.

Both the folks at Real Age and Steve Holman insist that all of this accelerated aging is reversible. According to them, there are specific ways to move and eat that will slow down the rapid aging process to the point where you’re aging less than a year for every year. That means we can look younger in a few years than we do now? Now that is an aging plan we could get behind, right?

Not so fast. Are there drugs, supplements or expensive supplies to buy? No. Just food choices and targeted short-duration exercises are involved. Steve Holman says his years as a fitness magazine editor have allowed him to pick up tips, tricks and strategies from anti-aging experts over the years. And they don’t involve cycling classes or elliptical machines.

According to Steve, to get started, there are 5 rules one must absolutely follow if he or she wants to “slow the aging process, reclaim your health and achieve your ideal body”:

Forget low-fat diets. They lead to sugar addiction and we all know what that causes – fat storage!
Work out less. Resistance training done the right way burns fat and is a great cardiovascular workout, as well. Sports that tax muscles over the entire body can be effective, as well.
Drink water. Water renews your skin, helps burn fat, suppresses hunger and allows your kidneys to operate under less strain which allows your liver to burn fat like it’s supposed to.
Stop endless cardio workouts. Cardiovascular conditioning can be gained with far less time and effort. New studies are showing that long-duration exercise accelerate the aging process by increasing free radicals. These free radicals are scavengers that prey on your body’s essential nutrients and tissues.
Don’t blame your age for all your fitness issues. Studies have shown that men and women of every age, even those in their 90s, were able to gain muscle tone in just a matter of weeks of simple weight training.
Well, those are good guidelines to use to begin combating the aging process. There’s an old saying that goes something like, “I want to die as young as possible at as old an age as possible” (or something like that). I do follow the 5 steps already, though I would admit to not doing enough of #2. How about you? I have been told I look younger than I really am and that’s nice. Now if only I could reverse the aging process so I would feel younger…

Hi. This is Mike. As I mentioned, playing sports can give you a great full body workout and help reverse the aging process. If you are just getting started or getting restarted after a layoff, we can help you with information about supplies and equipment at our site: [http://www.roundballgames.com/sample-page]. Or read our blog @ [http://www.roundballgames.com]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Michael_Piccoli/1556773

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Enjoyable Activities for a Senior Citizen Party by Misha Anatolia

May 3, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

Senior citizens are not too old to enjoy themselves, especially if the right  activities are chosen for a party. Great senior party activities keep seniors  engaged, ignite their imaginations, and let them rest. Here’s what to consider  when planning a party for seniors.

Give it a purpose Senior citizens are in their golden years, and they’ve  earned their rest. They’ve also earned the right to strong opinions, and  sometimes have very strong ideas about what they will and will not do. When  planning a party for senior citizens, don’t assume you know what is best for  your guests. Plan the party with a purpose, give them a reason to be interested,  but leave the joining in activities to the participants. Some good activities  that bring a sense of purpose to a party involve charity. You can plan a party  around knitting, sewing, quilting, or crocheting for charity. Lilybug is a  charity that makes blankets and caps for babies in the neonatal intensive care  units of hospitals. Operation Caregiver is a knitting charity that creates warm  handknits for hardworking men and women in service. Having a clear purpose when  at a party allows guests to relax into the experience.

Ignite their imaginations One of the best things about growing older is  being able to lay down the mantel of hard work and eventually return to a sense  of childlike play. Believe it or not, seniors often like to engage in art,  crafts, and imaginative play. Engage this sense of imagination with activities  like calligraphy lessons, watercolor painting, or crochet. Hire a magician,  musician, or storyteller, and then let the guests have the floor while they tell  their own stories. Decorate the party with lots of color or with sweeping themes  to create a wonderland for your guests to lose themselves in.

Let them rest Great party activities, like dancing, get guests moving.  Choose music from every era of their lifetime, and get their memories moving  along with their bodies. At a party for senior citizens, it is important to have  adequate rest, as well. Plan a high tea with finger sandwiches, ladyfingers,  tea, and petit-fours. Arrange furniture in conversation circles near tables  laden with refreshments. Host a film noir movie night where guests can attend as  their favorite old film stars, but can also feel free to put their feet up or  doze when the movie runs too long.

Cater to seniors’ imagination, sense of play, and desire to be a part of the  world. Make the party mean something. Give the party a theme and a purpose. Then  let your guests be your guides. If they want to spend the entire party standing  by the refreshments and reminiscing over the last time they encountered  croissants as fluffy as these, but they don’t have any interest in the ceramics  lesson you’ve got planned, float with it. Let the party go where it will. Being  a good host is about letting the party become a success in spite of you, not  because of you.

Misha Anatolia is a relationship and bridal shower writer. For more bridal shower planning tips and other bridal shower information, go to bridal-showers.org. If you  want more articles, visit our site and click on the Contact Us link.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Misha_Anatolia

 

Marketing to Senior Citizens – Assume Nothing! by Marte Cliff

May 3, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Once upon a time, senior citizens were old people. They were assumed to be  suffering from ill health and in need of care. They sold their homes so they  could move in with children or move to a care facility. Not any more.

Now senior citizens exhibit the same variety of health and fitness as  people much younger. In fact, those who have actively taken care of  themselves are probably more fit than those in their teens and 20’s who shun  exercise and live on junk food.

So, assume nothing, because senior citizens come in many varieties,  with many different goals.

Many choose to remain in their homes, while others want a change of scenery.  But even those want to sell have different reasons.

Some want to get away from excessive maintenance chores. They’ll  choose a smaller home with a smaller yard – or perhaps a condo. They may be in  failing health, but don’t assume so. They may just want to pursue hobbies or  take up volunteer work or be free to travel. Many have something they want to do  that they couldn’t do before, and they don’t want to be tied down by a high  maintenance home.

Others want to find a new home with a large yard, or even acreage, so  they can take up gardening or buy a horse or raise dogs.

Some just want to get away! They’ll sell the old homestead and move  into a motor home so they can see the places they’ve been dreaming about for all  those years when they were tied to work.

Some want to move to a more temperate climate – they’re tired of the  cold and snow and want to get outdoors and play all year. Some have always  dreamed of living on a lake or in the mountains or on the desert. Some wanted to  get away to a small town with a slower pace – or to move to a city with opera  houses and art galleries and the theater. But until now, they were stuck because  they were afraid to move away from their work. Now they can go where they  want.

Of course, there still are those seniors who are selling because they do need  to move in with the kids or to an assisted living facility.

Your job as an agent is to not assume anything. If you want  to sort your lists, set up a capture on your website with information about  downsizing to a smaller home, and a separate capture with information about  transitioning to assisted living. You could even have different pages on your  site – just like you might have different pages and different information for  first time buyers and move-up buyers.

When you get a call to list a home for a senior citizen, go with no pre-set  ideas. Wait and talk to the homeowner before you try to anticipate just what  kind of assistance they need. Otherwise, you’ll risk alienating a new client  before you get a chance to show your stuff!

Marte Cliff is a Freelance Copywriter who specializes in writing for real  estate and related industries.

She’ll help you with one letter, or an entire marketing plan. For Real Estate  agents and brokers who are ready to get full value from their websites, she’ll  be happy to put together an entire package – from the web copy to the lead  generation packages that make an agent’s phone ring.

For busy agents on a budget, Marte offers pre-written letter sets for use in  postal mail or in e-mail continuity campaigns. The current selection includes  letters for FSBO’s, Expired Listings, Short Sale sellers, First Time Buyers, and  a set for new agents to send to buyers. Read what’s included in these sets by  visiting http://www.copybymarte.com/pro/prospecting.html

Marte’s weekly ezine for real estate professionals offers tips and hints for  building a successful business. To subscribe, and to see other resources  available for real estate sales professionals, visit her at http://www.copybymarte.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Marte_Cliff

 

What Makes Someone a Senior Citizen? by Lynn Dorman, Ph.D.

April 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Good question!

Developmental Psychologists have long used either ages or stages to define  segments of the population. Many developmental textbooks are divided into  chapters based on one or the other of these definitions.

Age definitions are ones that use numbers – such as: being 65 or older means  you are a senior citizen; or all over 55 get a senior citizen discount.

Stage definitions are usually feeling and behavior related – along the lines  of: “you are only as old as you feel or act.”

Over the last few decades, as we learn more and more about the later  stages/ages of the lifespan, the thinking about aging is changing – and so are  the textbooks. But the definitions are still stuck in the past.

The field of Developmental Psychology is itself aging – as are the original  developmental psychologists – and more information is becoming known and  understood about the lifespan.

Add to this that we are living longer. In 1940, the average life expectancy  at birth in the USA was 62.9 years; in 1960 it was 69.7; by 1980 it was 74.1 and  in 2000 it was 77.2. [The statistics differ by sex and ethnicity but these are  the averages for all persons.]

Average only is a middle figure. Half die before and half after the ages  cited. And if one lives past infancy, life expectancy increases and it increases  every year one is still alive. So those who were born in 1940, and are obviously  now well past 62.9, have a far different life expectancy than when they were  born. That expectancy is now somewhere into their mid 80s.

So as to defining what makes you a senior citizen? It is often left up to the  language or stereotypes we use and some legal definitions.

Most jurisdictions rely on when you can start collecting social security  benefits to define what is their senior population. Eligibility for full Social  Security benefits will increase to age 67 for those born in 1960; yet as we can  still sign up for Medicare at age 65 – 65 seems still to be the “age” definition  of senior citizen.

Will that change? It might…but not for those who are already at or near 65.  We ARE labeled senior citizens.

And what about behavioral definitions – the stages aspect?

That is up to us. We can continue to do what we have been doing – living life  to the fullest and not becoming the stereotypes many have about senior  citizens.

We are who we are – and are the ages we have accumulated!

If we let someone else’s characterizations of “senior-ness” define us or our  behavior – then we are falling prey to their stereotypes. Create your own  definition of senior.

I am of the thought that we are only as old as we feel and act! So feel  and act young!

You may still be called a “senior” but you’ll wind up confounding a lot of  people.

I invite you to read more of my take on aging at http://growolderbetter.com – and where you can sign up for  even more tidbits.

From Lynn Dorman, Ph.D., a developmental psychologist who was around way back  then and is now a 70-year-old-senior-citizen who is still figuring out what she  will do when she grows up.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lynn_Dorman,_Ph.D.

Who Wants to Be a Senior Citizen? By Lynn Dorman, Ph.D.

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Funny, people want to be Senior Product Managers and Senior  Developers, but who wants to be a Senior Citizen? Sarah E. Bourne

 

Often, the very same word or words, in differing contexts, have very  different meaning. The word Senior when used in industry, medicine, research, or  municipal agencies, means a higher-level job, higher income, or a more  prestigious position. Even being, or becoming, a High School Senior is an  admired level of life.

Yet that same word, senior, or the words Senior Citizen, when applied to  people over 65 is all too often seen as derogatory.

Why? How did the word senior get to be seen as so negative for just this one  group?

Some random thoughts on this issue:

Was the negativity because of some feelings the younger persons had about the  use of “their” terminology to describe “old folks”?

Those using the word senior to describe their own achievements [Senior  Associate, Senior Resident, Senior Analyst, etc.] may have felt that using the  word for older persons denigrated it’s use for them?

Was Senior Citizen at one time also meant to imply higher status or was it  always “negative”

Using the Internet, it seems the term Senior Citizen was first used in 1938  in the United States – but the word senior was used “way back when” in reference  to the father of a son with the same name [i.e. Senior and Junior]

In 1938, the life expectancy of that Senior Citizen was approximately 75ish.  The life expectancy of a person who is 65 now [2010] is approximately 80ish. Add  to this that we now live more healthy older lives; it may be that in the early  1940’s the term was used to describe a person who was unhealthier or more frail  than that 65-year-old is today.

And so the term may have become a negative one as it might have been  describing in reality what we now see as stereotypical thinking about seniors.  Back then these descriptions [frail, sick, bent over] may have been more  accurate for the then senior citizen cohorts.

But – getting back to today: The term Senior citizen needs to be itself  “retired” or there needs to be a move to bring this term into the positive realm  of those other “senior” labels.

It’s probably easier to work at changing the connotation than it is at  deleting the words – they have been part of our popular vocabulary for too  long.

So – here’s to making it as prestigious to be Senior Citizens as it is to be  Senior Product Managers or Senior Developers!

Please go to http://growolderbetter.com and let’s have a discussion about  making Senior Citizen an honorable title!

We can chat about other aging topics as well…

From Lynn Dorman, Ph.D. who at 70 is fighting stereotypes as she skis, bikes  and hikes – and writes about active healthy “older” persons – no matter what  they are labeled.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lynn_Dorman,_Ph.D.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4822620

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!