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Cheap Discount Dental Plans For Senior Citizens – Maintaining Dental Health Without Paying Too Much by Marcia Templer

May 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As you age dental care becomes more important and essential. You can no  longer afford to put off treatments that you need today, until tomorrow or next  month. The neglect of minor treatments can lead to bigger and riskier health  problems down the line.

What is a senior citizen discount dental plan?

Discount dental plans allow senior citizens over the age of 65 to get access  to treatments and procedures, while paying as little as possible. Senior  citizens can save up to 60% on routine checkups and procedures. Unlike dental  insurance, dental plans require very little paperwork and there are no health  restrictions.

My income is limited, how do I ensure that I get access to treatments when  I need them?

The fact is a lot of senior citizens live on limited income. This income must  be distributed on a monthly basis to cover housing, healthcare, automobile,  food, entertainment and other daily living expenses. This fact unfortunately  leads some seniors to treat dental care as a luxury rather than an essential  part of their lives.

Since plans do not have health restrictions, it is relatively easy to enroll  in one and gain access to routine dental checks – which are important to ensure  that minor issues do not become big dental problems in the future.

Will I qualify, if I have existing dental problems?

Yes, plans do not have pre-existing conditions or health restrictions so  almost anyone can qualify – even if you have less-than-perfect dental  health.

How are plans priced?

Most plans are priced based on your zip code. A reputable plan network allows  you to search for plan rates with no commitments and compare various networks  before making any purchases.

Search dental  plan rates at http://www.cheapdentalplanfinder.com. Dental plan rates are  offered for consumers in all 50 states. With over 30 dental networks, you can  compare plan rates and save money.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Marcia_Templer

 

Strength Training Tips for Senior Citizens by Aaron Dorksen

May 7, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many senior citizens wouldn’t even consider lifting weights or performing  strength training exercises, thinking that’s something for much younger, fitter  people to do.

A person is never too old to perform strength training exercises, though. In  fact, frequent exercise is the best prescription for independent, active and  healthy aging, according to the A.A.R.P., the National Institute on Aging and  the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Studies show that all adults, even seniors, can benefit from as little as 15  minutes a day of moderate cardio exercise. Thirty minutes a day of light to  moderate cardio exercise is the optimum level, and the good news is the cardio  exercises can be broken up into segments (ie: brisk walk in morning, afternoon  swim).

Adults, including seniors, are also recommended to perform strength training  exercises two-three times per week.

Although exercise programs for seniors (generally considered people age 50-60  and older) are modified considerably from what younger generations are doing in  the gym, senior strength training can help people of any age increase muscle  strength, strengthen bones, fight off and-or delay the effects of arthritis, and  improve balance and mobility. Regular exercise is also important to help  maintain strong heart function and a healthy weight.

Jim Androsik, a physical therapist for Wooster Commuinty Hospital’s  HealthPoint Health and Wellness Center in Ohio, has witnessed great benefits  from the seniors he’s worked with who have followed a strength and conditioning  program.

“Generally, the senior citizens we work with are people 60 years-old and up  who are referred to us by a physician,” Androsik said. “Doctors give us some  guidelines, such as the frequency and duration a person should exercise for and  comments on their health in general.

“We then develop a program for them.”

Exercise programs for seniors can obviously vary greatly depending on age and  health, but typically there are basic guidelines Androsik has his seniors  follow.

“We generally recommend that a senior perform strength training exercises two  to three times a week,” he said. “We look at their needs to determine exactly  what exercises they’ll do, such as if they’re experiencing back pain, shoulder  pain, arthritis, etc.”

Here’s a basic exercise program for seniors based on Androsik’s advice and  other research I’ve conducted. Again, these are general recommendations and  seniors should consult with a physician before beginning an exercise program. It  would also be highly beneficial for seniors to exercise as part of a group or  class, to help with motivation, to make sure they’re using the right techniques  and, of course, to enjoy the social aspect of exercising):

Cardio exercise (3-4 times per week)

Tip: Perform low-impact exercises that are easy on your joints. Start very  slowly before increasing duration and resistance. Start with 5 minute cardio  workouts and slowly progress to 15 minutes or more if you can.

Pick from the following: Treadmill, walk on track, exercise bike, pool  workout, yard work, etc.

Weight lifting/strength training (2-3 times per week) Tip: Androsik says it’s  important to do high repetitions on exercises with low resistance or weights. Do  light stretches before performing strength training exercises. Here’s a sample  strength training program a senior might perform:

* Good mornings 1 x 15 (one set of 15 reps) tip: stand straight, slowly bend  down to touch toes or reach down as far as comfortable, rise back up and  repeat.

* Shoulder rotations 1 x 15 tip: stand straight with arms out parallel to  side, rotate shoulders 15 times in each direction. Good warmup exercise.

* Sit Ups – 1 x 15

* Side Bends – 1 x 15

* Squats – 1 x 12-15 tip: Use barbell, machine or without weights. Keep back  straight by looking straight ahead at spot on wall, go down as tolerated but no  lower than parallel with knees.

* Lunge – 1 x 12-15 tip: hold dumbbells to make harder

* Calf Raise – 1 x 12-15 tip: hold dumbbells to make harder or use  machine.

* One Arm Rows – 1 x 12 – 15 tip: balance one knee on bench, other leg on  floor. Pull dumbbell up and down with arm on side of body planted on floor.  Builds shoulder strength.

* Rotator cuff with band or machine – 1 x 12-15 internal rotation, 1 x 12-15  external rotation. tip: have a doctor or trainer show you how to do these, great  for preventing shoulder pain.

* Dumbbell curl – 1 x 12 – 15 tip: do them seated or standing

* Dumbbell bench press – 1 x 12 – 15 tip: do them lying on a bench

* Dumbbell flyes – 1 x 12 – 15 tip: do them lying on a bench

* Triceps extension – 1 x 12 – 15 tip: use machine or dumbbell. This is just  a general plan to give seniors some ideas, but it’s best to work with a trainer.  Tweak as needed. Remember to use light weights and do high reps.

“Exercise can provide lifelong benefits,” Androsik said. “It can minimize or  slow down arthritic changes.”

Basically, exercise can delay the aging process to a large degree in many  people and if seniors find a program they enjoy it can actually be fun. What are  you waiting for seniors – get back into the gym!

Find exercise equipment  stores Arizona and more with our fitness experts. At Home Fitness consultant  Aaron Dorksen’s blog deals with a variety of fitness topics, ranging from  workout tips, motivational ideas and feature stories on how exercise impacts  people’s lives. Consult a doctor before making any significant changes in your  exercise routine or diet. E-mail him with comments, questions or ideas for  future blogs at aaron@athomefitness.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Aaron_Dorksen

 

Things Senior Citizens Do to Enjoy Life by Julia McCartney

May 3, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

What do you think most senior citizens do for fun? Well, that can be a long  list with so many, but I’m sure it would be a fun one. Considering most seniors  citizens grew up in an era that didn’t need technology or a lot of people to  have fun. I want to look at some of the ways of those who came before us and  even reflect with those who are senior citizens. I like to call them the young  at heart.

One thing that remains the same is the health of most baby boomers. I have  always wondered what their secret was to a healthy and enjoyable life and  talking to a few seniors I’ve uncovered some of those things.

One of the things most seniors say keeps them going is Music. Music in the  years was filled with several dance steps that most still enjoy to date. I can  remember watching aunts and uncles at weddings, birthday celebrations and when  the music comes on they are up and on the dance floor “cutting a rug” as they  call it. The music and dancing was a mere means to get the exercise that they  needed while having fun.

Some seniors even enjoy the everyday nature aspect of life. Fishing, hiking  and gardening are a few of the top things that most enjoy. You see them even  every movie or television show that comes on. Someone in the park taking a  stroll and some young person bumps into them. I’m sure you have seen the water  scenes and you notice two older men in the background on a small boat with  fishing rods hoping for a catch. To date more and more older women enjoy just  going outside and getting down and dirty gardening. There’s nothing like peace  of mind when it comes to living a stress free life.

I can’t recall seeing people in my generation being able to just enjoy the  simple things as fishing, hiking or even gardening. Those things are to old  school for my generation.

More and more seniors are starting to get into journaling. I remember clips  showing people writing letters in older films showing how everyone use to  communicate with each other and wait for the letter to come in the mail. I  didn’t realize that it helped penmanship and helped stimulate the thoughts in  our heads to express what we felt. In this age we email and text. There’s no  communication outside of that.

There are also some senior citizens who enjoy technology and learning how to  use different forms of it. The sentiments during the technology boom for most  seniors were they didn’t understand any of it, however, over time that all  change with a new appreciation for it.

One of the last things I’ve seen in most of the elderly is there love of  outdoor games and sports. I’ve seen more seniors with playing “Hopscotch and  Kick Ball,” in the past few months than I have since I were a kid in the 1980’s.  I guess it’s another great way for them to enjoy the fresh outdoors and keep  their heart rate pumping.

Maybe, everyone can take an example from there book when it comes to enjoying  life and making every moment count.

Julia McCartney Senior  Care Alzheimer’s Care

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Julia_McCartney

 

Enjoyable Activities for a Senior Citizen Party by Misha Anatolia

May 3, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

Senior citizens are not too old to enjoy themselves, especially if the right  activities are chosen for a party. Great senior party activities keep seniors  engaged, ignite their imaginations, and let them rest. Here’s what to consider  when planning a party for seniors.

Give it a purpose Senior citizens are in their golden years, and they’ve  earned their rest. They’ve also earned the right to strong opinions, and  sometimes have very strong ideas about what they will and will not do. When  planning a party for senior citizens, don’t assume you know what is best for  your guests. Plan the party with a purpose, give them a reason to be interested,  but leave the joining in activities to the participants. Some good activities  that bring a sense of purpose to a party involve charity. You can plan a party  around knitting, sewing, quilting, or crocheting for charity. Lilybug is a  charity that makes blankets and caps for babies in the neonatal intensive care  units of hospitals. Operation Caregiver is a knitting charity that creates warm  handknits for hardworking men and women in service. Having a clear purpose when  at a party allows guests to relax into the experience.

Ignite their imaginations One of the best things about growing older is  being able to lay down the mantel of hard work and eventually return to a sense  of childlike play. Believe it or not, seniors often like to engage in art,  crafts, and imaginative play. Engage this sense of imagination with activities  like calligraphy lessons, watercolor painting, or crochet. Hire a magician,  musician, or storyteller, and then let the guests have the floor while they tell  their own stories. Decorate the party with lots of color or with sweeping themes  to create a wonderland for your guests to lose themselves in.

Let them rest Great party activities, like dancing, get guests moving.  Choose music from every era of their lifetime, and get their memories moving  along with their bodies. At a party for senior citizens, it is important to have  adequate rest, as well. Plan a high tea with finger sandwiches, ladyfingers,  tea, and petit-fours. Arrange furniture in conversation circles near tables  laden with refreshments. Host a film noir movie night where guests can attend as  their favorite old film stars, but can also feel free to put their feet up or  doze when the movie runs too long.

Cater to seniors’ imagination, sense of play, and desire to be a part of the  world. Make the party mean something. Give the party a theme and a purpose. Then  let your guests be your guides. If they want to spend the entire party standing  by the refreshments and reminiscing over the last time they encountered  croissants as fluffy as these, but they don’t have any interest in the ceramics  lesson you’ve got planned, float with it. Let the party go where it will. Being  a good host is about letting the party become a success in spite of you, not  because of you.

Misha Anatolia is a relationship and bridal shower writer. For more bridal shower planning tips and other bridal shower information, go to bridal-showers.org. If you  want more articles, visit our site and click on the Contact Us link.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Misha_Anatolia

 

Former NAELA President Appointed to Long-Term Care Commission

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi appointed Judith Stein, longtime member, Past President, and Fellow of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA), to the National Commission on Long-Term Care. Leader Pelosi’s other appointments include SCAN Foundation President Dr. Bruce Allen Chernoff, and activist and philanthropist George Vrandenberg.

The 15-member Commission was established by the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (ATRA) to develop a plan to establish, implement, and finance a high-quality long-term care system that ensures long-term care services and supports for individuals with substantial cognitive and functional limitations for older Americans and individuals with disabilities. The Commission’s role is to examine the interaction between Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurers.

Charles P. Sabatino, fellow NAELA member and Director of the American Bar Association (ABA) Commission on Law and Aging, congratulated Stein on this tremendous achievement: “[She is] the foremost and most tireless national advocate for Medicare beneficiaries…this is also a conspicuous achievement in NAELA’s history in having one of its members appointed to such a high-level national body, charged with charting the nation’s course in meeting the long-term care needs of seniors and persons with disabilities. It is also a cause for some real optimism in our future.”

Stein is the founder and Executive Director of the Center for Medicare Advocacy, Inc. She has focused on legal representation of the elderly since beginning her legal career in 1975. From 1977 until 1986, Stein was the Co-Director of Legal Assistance to Medicare Patients (LAMP), where she managed the first Medicare advocacy program in the country. She served as NAELA’s 13th president from June 2000 – May 2001.

She has extensive experience in developing and administering Medicare advocacy projects, representing Medicare beneficiaries, producing educational materials, teaching, and consulting. She is also the editor and co-author of several books, articles, and other publications regarding Medicare and related issues. Stein has been lead or co-counsel in numerous federal class action and individual cases challenging improper Medicare policies and denials.

About NAELA
Members of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA) are attorneys who are experienced and trained in working with the legal problems of aging Americans and individuals of all ages with disabilities. Established in 1987, NAELA is a non-profit association that assists lawyers, bar organizations, and others. The mission of NAELA is to establish NAELA members as the premier providers of legal advocacy, guidance, and services to enhance the lives of people with special needs and people as they age. NAELA currently has members across the United States, Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom. For more information, visit NAELA.org.

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!