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acfas | Nevada Senior Guide

Sunscreen on Your Feet?

July 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Sunscreen on Your Feet?
Doctors Urge Sunscreen Use and Exams to Prevent Skin Cancer on Feet

CHICAGO—July 8, 2013 Many people do not think about their feet when applying sunscreen, but did you know that the skin on your feet is highly susceptible to melanoma and other forms of skin cancer? The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) warns that skin cancer of the foot is prevalent and can even be fatal if not caught early.

While all types of skin cancer, including squamous cell and basal cell carcinoma, can be found on the foot, the most common is the most serious form, melanoma. Symptoms can be as subtle as an abnormal-looking mole or freckle found anywhere on the foot, and often go unnoticed without routine foot exams.

The foot and ankle surgeons of ACFAS offer these tips to keep your feet safe this summer:

  • Lather up with sunscreen from head to toe—literally—when at the pool or beach to protect your skin from the harmful rays of the sun.
  • Check your feet and toes regularly for symptoms such as an abnormal-looking mole or freckle anywhere on the foot – even under toenails and on your soles.
  • Look for moles or freckles that change in size or shape. If you notice anything suspicious, promptly schedule an appointment with your foot and ankle specialist to have the mark examined.
  • Schedule routine exams with your foot and ankle specialist so he or she can keep track of suspicious, changing marks.

According to Boston foot and ankle surgeon Thanh Dinh, DPM, FACFAS, early diagnosis is key to effective treatment for the condition. But because people aren’t looking for the early warning signs or taking the same precautions they do for other areas of the body, often times skin cancer in this region is not diagnosed until later stages.

For more information on skin cancer of the foot or other foot and ankle health information, visit the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeon’s patient education website, FootHealthFacts.org,

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The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of over 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons. Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research, provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its patient education website, FootHealthFacts.org.

Headed to the Beach? Don’t Let Your Feet Ruin Your Vacation

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Headed to the Beach? Don’t Let Your Feet Ruin Your Vacation

CHICAGO—July 2, 2013 As millions of Americans hit the beach this summer, the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons offers these foot safety tips:

  • Wear shoes to protect your feet from puncture wounds and cuts. Sea shells, broken glass and other sharp objects when stepped on can ruin your day at the beach. Avoid the water if your skin gets cut – bacteria in oceans and lakes can cause infection. If you do suffer from a puncture wound, have it treated by a foot and ankle surgeon within 24 hours to avoid complications.
  • Feet get sunburned, too. Rare but deadly skin cancers, such as melanoma, can occur on the foot. Prevent skin cancer on your feet by lathering up with sunscreen. Don’t forget to apply to both the tops and bottoms of your feet!
  • Wear shoes to protect your soles from getting burned as you walk on blistering-hot sand, sidewalks and pavement. Take extra precaution if you have diabetes.
  • Be careful with your footing while playing beach sports such as Frisbee or volleyball – walking, jogging and playing sports on soft, uneven surfaces frequently leads to arch pain, heel pain, ankle sprains and other injuries. It’s best to wear supportive shoes while playing beach sports. If injuries occur, use rest, ice, compression and elevation to ease pain and swelling. Any injury that does not resolve within a few days should be examined by a foot and ankle surgeon.
  • Remember jellyfish stings can still occur even if it’s washed up on the beach. Remove any tentacles that may stick to the foot or ankle, and protect your hands. Vinegar, meat tenderizer or baking soda reduce pain and swelling. Most jellyfish stings heal within days, but if they don’t, see a doctor.
  • Diabetes Risks: People who have diabetes face serious foot safety risks at the beach. The disease causes poor blood circulation and numbness in the feet. A person with diabetes may not feel pain from a cut, puncture wound or burn. Any type of skin break on a diabetic foot has the potential to get infected and ulcerate if it isn’t noticed right away. People with diabetes should always wear shoes to the beach, and remove them regularly to check for foreign objects like sand and shells that can cause sores, ulcers and infections.

For more information on foot and ankle health, visit the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeon’s patient education page at FootHealthFacts.org.


About ACFAS

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of more than 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons. Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research and provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its consumer website, http://FootHealthFacts.org.

Things Senior Citizens Do to Enjoy Life by Julia McCartney

May 3, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

What do you think most senior citizens do for fun? Well, that can be a long  list with so many, but I’m sure it would be a fun one. Considering most seniors  citizens grew up in an era that didn’t need technology or a lot of people to  have fun. I want to look at some of the ways of those who came before us and  even reflect with those who are senior citizens. I like to call them the young  at heart.

One thing that remains the same is the health of most baby boomers. I have  always wondered what their secret was to a healthy and enjoyable life and  talking to a few seniors I’ve uncovered some of those things.

One of the things most seniors say keeps them going is Music. Music in the  years was filled with several dance steps that most still enjoy to date. I can  remember watching aunts and uncles at weddings, birthday celebrations and when  the music comes on they are up and on the dance floor “cutting a rug” as they  call it. The music and dancing was a mere means to get the exercise that they  needed while having fun.

Some seniors even enjoy the everyday nature aspect of life. Fishing, hiking  and gardening are a few of the top things that most enjoy. You see them even  every movie or television show that comes on. Someone in the park taking a  stroll and some young person bumps into them. I’m sure you have seen the water  scenes and you notice two older men in the background on a small boat with  fishing rods hoping for a catch. To date more and more older women enjoy just  going outside and getting down and dirty gardening. There’s nothing like peace  of mind when it comes to living a stress free life.

I can’t recall seeing people in my generation being able to just enjoy the  simple things as fishing, hiking or even gardening. Those things are to old  school for my generation.

More and more seniors are starting to get into journaling. I remember clips  showing people writing letters in older films showing how everyone use to  communicate with each other and wait for the letter to come in the mail. I  didn’t realize that it helped penmanship and helped stimulate the thoughts in  our heads to express what we felt. In this age we email and text. There’s no  communication outside of that.

There are also some senior citizens who enjoy technology and learning how to  use different forms of it. The sentiments during the technology boom for most  seniors were they didn’t understand any of it, however, over time that all  change with a new appreciation for it.

One of the last things I’ve seen in most of the elderly is there love of  outdoor games and sports. I’ve seen more seniors with playing “Hopscotch and  Kick Ball,” in the past few months than I have since I were a kid in the 1980’s.  I guess it’s another great way for them to enjoy the fresh outdoors and keep  their heart rate pumping.

Maybe, everyone can take an example from there book when it comes to enjoying  life and making every moment count.

Julia McCartney Senior  Care Alzheimer’s Care

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Julia_McCartney

 

Marketing to Senior Citizens – Assume Nothing! by Marte Cliff

May 3, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Once upon a time, senior citizens were old people. They were assumed to be  suffering from ill health and in need of care. They sold their homes so they  could move in with children or move to a care facility. Not any more.

Now senior citizens exhibit the same variety of health and fitness as  people much younger. In fact, those who have actively taken care of  themselves are probably more fit than those in their teens and 20’s who shun  exercise and live on junk food.

So, assume nothing, because senior citizens come in many varieties,  with many different goals.

Many choose to remain in their homes, while others want a change of scenery.  But even those want to sell have different reasons.

Some want to get away from excessive maintenance chores. They’ll  choose a smaller home with a smaller yard – or perhaps a condo. They may be in  failing health, but don’t assume so. They may just want to pursue hobbies or  take up volunteer work or be free to travel. Many have something they want to do  that they couldn’t do before, and they don’t want to be tied down by a high  maintenance home.

Others want to find a new home with a large yard, or even acreage, so  they can take up gardening or buy a horse or raise dogs.

Some just want to get away! They’ll sell the old homestead and move  into a motor home so they can see the places they’ve been dreaming about for all  those years when they were tied to work.

Some want to move to a more temperate climate – they’re tired of the  cold and snow and want to get outdoors and play all year. Some have always  dreamed of living on a lake or in the mountains or on the desert. Some wanted to  get away to a small town with a slower pace – or to move to a city with opera  houses and art galleries and the theater. But until now, they were stuck because  they were afraid to move away from their work. Now they can go where they  want.

Of course, there still are those seniors who are selling because they do need  to move in with the kids or to an assisted living facility.

Your job as an agent is to not assume anything. If you want  to sort your lists, set up a capture on your website with information about  downsizing to a smaller home, and a separate capture with information about  transitioning to assisted living. You could even have different pages on your  site – just like you might have different pages and different information for  first time buyers and move-up buyers.

When you get a call to list a home for a senior citizen, go with no pre-set  ideas. Wait and talk to the homeowner before you try to anticipate just what  kind of assistance they need. Otherwise, you’ll risk alienating a new client  before you get a chance to show your stuff!

Marte Cliff is a Freelance Copywriter who specializes in writing for real  estate and related industries.

She’ll help you with one letter, or an entire marketing plan. For Real Estate  agents and brokers who are ready to get full value from their websites, she’ll  be happy to put together an entire package – from the web copy to the lead  generation packages that make an agent’s phone ring.

For busy agents on a budget, Marte offers pre-written letter sets for use in  postal mail or in e-mail continuity campaigns. The current selection includes  letters for FSBO’s, Expired Listings, Short Sale sellers, First Time Buyers, and  a set for new agents to send to buyers. Read what’s included in these sets by  visiting http://www.copybymarte.com/pro/prospecting.html

Marte’s weekly ezine for real estate professionals offers tips and hints for  building a successful business. To subscribe, and to see other resources  available for real estate sales professionals, visit her at http://www.copybymarte.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Marte_Cliff

 

Pediatric Flatfoot – Cause for Alarm?

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Untreated Flat Feet in Children Can Result in Chronic Pain, Reduced Mobility

and an Increased Risk for Obesity

 

Parents keep a close eye on their growing children, watching for proper development and alert for any sign of a problem because small problems can have big implications. Surgeons at the Annual Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) this week are conferring with one another on Pediatric Flatfoot, a childhood condition that, if left untreated, can result in permanent deformity in adulthood. Flatfoot deformity makes mobility and exercise painful, increasing the risk of reduced cardiovascular health and obesity.

“Parents never want their child to undergo a surgical procedure,” says Mary Crawford, DPM, FACFAS, an Everett, Washington foot and ankle surgeon and conference presenter. “But uncorrected symptomatic flatfoot can lead to chronic pain and instability as the child ages into adulthood. Children will be on their feet for a long time to come. It’s vital to keep those feet healthy. A foot and ankle surgeon can help parents understand the options – surgical and non-surgical – for treating pediatric flatfoot.”

 

Not all children have symptoms, but others will complain of pain, tenderness or cramping in the foot, leg, and knee. Parents may notice an outward tilting of the heel, awkwardness or clumsiness in walking and difficulty with shoes. Pediatric flatfoot makes participating in activities more difficult, so parents should take note if their child is unable to keep up with playmates, tires easily or voluntarily withdraws from physical activities.

 

To diagnose a pediatric flatfoot, a foot and ankle surgeon examines the child’s foot in weight bearing and non-weight bearing positions, both in and out of shoes. The physician also notes how the child walks and evaluates the foot’s range of motion. In some cases, flat feet are associated with issues of the hip and knee, so the physician may examine those as well.

 

For further detailed analysis, the physician may order imaging tests such as x-ray, a CT scan, MRI or bone scan. Family history will be evaluated as well, since the presence of flatfoot disorder in the family increases the possibility of flatfoot in the child.

 

“There are different types of flatfoot deformities,” notes Crawford. “Thorough testing helps us pinpoint the causes of the flatfoot disorder and develop an appropriate treatment plan.”

 

Pediatric flatfoot can be divided into two categories, flexible and rigid. Flexible flatfoot is characterized by a normal arch when non-weight bearing, or sitting, and disappearance of the arch when standing.  There may or may not be symptoms. In the case of rigid flatfoot, however, the arch is stiff and flat when both sitting and standing. In most cases, children with rigid flatfoot display symptoms associated with the condition. In either case, flexible or rigid flatfoot, there are a variety of underlying reasons, requiring different treatments.

 

Babies often appear to have flat feet due to cramped positioning inside the womb, and the symptoms will abate with time. In other cases, the surgeon recommends stretching exercises or a soft brace for a short period. Children who do not exhibit symptoms typically do not require treatment, but will be monitored and reevaluated periodically by the foot and ankle surgeon.

 

For children who do exhibit symptoms, the physician may recommend physical therapy, shoe modifications, anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen to reduce pain and inflammation, or an orthotic device. This device fits inside the shoe and supports the structure of the foot. In some cases, surgery is the best alternative.

 

For more information on pediatric foot and ankle conditions or injuries, visit the ACFAS patient health education website, FootHealthFacts.org.

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The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of over 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons.  Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research and provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its consumer website, FootHealthFacts.org.

Lisfranc Injury: Easy to Miss, Hard to Get Over

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care 

Left untreated, this little-known foot injury can lead to serious long-term problems

 

Elite athletes like NFL quarterback Matt Schaub and wide receiver Santonio Holmes had productive seasons ended by the little-known and often overlooked Lisfranc injury, a serious foot injury that few have heard of and no one wants.  But foot and ankle surgeons at the Annual Scientific Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) this week are evaluating how to effectively diagnose and treat this injury, which can result in severe long-term complications like chronic pain, osteoarthritis and even foot deformities.

Relatively uncommon, found in only 1 of every 55,000-60,000 people annually, Lisfranc injuries occur in the midfoot – where the long bones leading up to the toes (metatarsals) connect to the bones in the arch (tarsals).  “The Lisfranc complex is a critical joint in propulsion during walking and running.  Unfortunately, injuries there are easily overlooked.  As many as thirty percent of Lisfranc injuries are missed at initial diagnosis by providers who are not foot and ankle specialists.  The long-term effects can be debilitating,” observes Cleveland, Ohio foot and ankle surgeon Mark Hardy, DPM, FACFAS, and a conference presenter.

 

Diagnosis can be difficult because the signs, even during examination and imaging, can be extremely subtle. Injuries most often occur to car accident victims where the foot is jammed into the floorboard or to athletes when the foot is planted and twisted.  Direct trauma injuries can result when a heavy object is dropped on the foot.  “Most people don’t have an appreciation of the amount of force required to disrupt the Lisfranc complex.  Whether you’re an athlete or a laborer, early and appropriate treatment is mandated,” says Hardy.

 

Lisfranc injuries can also result simply from missing the last step on the stairs; even a minor slip and fall can cause serious injury. Symptoms of a Lisfranc injury may include swelling of the foot, pain throughout the midfoot upon standing or during examination, inability to bear weight, bruising on the bottom of the foot in the arch area, and an abnormal widening of the foot, possibly signaling dislocation.

 

Lisfranc injuries fall into three categories; sprains, fractures and dislocations. Sprains typically do not require more than rest and recuperation time, as they are comparable to ankle sprains.  In a fracture, a break in a bone in the Lisfranc joint occurs. In a dislocation, the bones are forced from their normal positions. In severe cases, both fractures and dislocations occur. In fractures and dislocations, surgery is often the best option. Patients hope for a non-surgical response, but foot and ankle surgeons are well aware of the dangers associated with putting off necessary surgery.

 

“A number of factors impact the surgeon’s decision on treatment options; the patient’s age, overall health and activity level,” says Hardy. “Because of the possible long-term impact of this injury, our chief objective is ensuring a positive outlook for the future.”

 

Wires, pins and even surgical buttons can be used to stabilize the joint, both permanently and in some cases temporarily. Some promising studies have focused on the effectiveness of a minimally invasive technique that can help reduce the recuperation period.

 

“Lisfranc injuries can be successfully treated when properly diagnosed and treated in a timely manner.  If you have experienced any sort of foot trauma and symptoms appear, it’s time to see a foot and ankle surgeon,” urges Hardy. “Especially in the case of Lisfranc injuries, the earlier someone visits a foot and ankle surgeon, the greater the likelihood of a positive outcome.”

 

For more information on foot and ankle injuries and conditions, visit the ACFAS patient education website, FootHealthFacts.org.

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The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of over 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons.  Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research and provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its consumer website, FootHealthFacts.org.

National Surgical Association Comes to Las Vegas

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) is hosting its 71st Annual Scientific Conference in Las Vegas on February 11-14, 2013 at Mandalay Bay Resort & Conference Center. ACFAS is a professional society of more than 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons dedicated to promoting the art and science of foot, ankle, and related lower extremity surgery; addressing the concerns of foot and ankle surgeons; and advancing and improving standards of education and surgical skill.

This year’s conference will bring about 1,500 surgeons and 150 exhibiting companies to the city of Las Vegas and we are looking forward to the Las Vegas experience! During the conference our surgeons will discuss the latest trends and procedures in foot and ankle surgery to help improve the health and quality of life for patients. Three of those topics have been turned into consumer-aimed press releases for distribution during the conference. The three press releases, which are embargoed until the conference, include:
Smoking and Bone Healing – A Risky Combination: Smokers take nearly 50 percent longer to heal after surgery than non-smokers. For every non-smoking patient whose bones heal normally, four smokers will experience non-union, or failure of the bone to mend. Surgeons discuss ways to treat this challenging patient population.
Lisfranc Injury – Easy to Miss, Hard to Get Over: Left untreated, this little-known and often overlooked foot injury can lead to serious long-term problems like osteoarthritis, chronic pain and even foot deformities. Surgeons assess the best treatment options for this complex injury that seems to be afflicting more and more professional athletes.

Pediatric Flatfoot Deformity – A Cause for Alarm? Left untreated, pediatric flatfoot poses a serious developmental threat to children. Foot and ankle surgeons re-examine the best course of treatment for optimal long-term health.
Please contact Tracy Hulett or Melissa Matusek if you are interested in receiving advance copies of these embargoed releases, or if you are interested in setting up interviews/photo opportunities with the College’s physician media spokespeople. You can reach us by e-mail at the below addresses or by phone at 773-693-9300. You can also visit FootHealthFacts.org, the College’s patient education website for more valuable foot and ankle health information.
Thank you and we hope to see you in Vegas!
Tracy Hulett
Manager, Public Relations and Communications
tracy.hulett@acfas.org
Melissa Matusek
Director of Marketing and Public Relations
melissa.matusek@acfas.org

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!