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Goodbye, Signs of Aging

June 19, 2016 by · Comments Off on Goodbye, Signs of Aging
Filed under: General 

Everyone is affected with signs of aging at some point in their life, be it visible wrinkles, blemishes, pigmentation changes, expression lines, discolorations, poor texture, or other environment-related conditions of the skin. As we age, the production of skin reviving and plumping collagen gradually slows, revealing fine lines and wrinkles.

Anti-aging creams promise to reduce these signs of aging. Yet, despite the ever-rising demand and great popularity, there has been skepticism and anxiety related to anti-wrinkle creams. Many believe that anti-aging creams are but fads, and do not work at all. Debates still continue whether anti-aging creams are cosmetics or drugs. Many argue that most of the anti-aging creams only enhance the outward appearance of the skin and only temporarily at that; and therefore should be placed on equal footings with other cosmetics.

So the promises of younger, fresher looking skin are nothing but lies? No. Fortunately for wrinkle-cream customers, that’s not always so. Granted, in most scenarios, wrinkle creams only offer what can already be achieved through the use of moisturizers and sunscreens. But with a little knowledge of active ingredients used nowadays in certain anti-aging creams, the promises may as well be fulfilled.

Anti-aging creams come under the category of “cosmeceuticals”, mixture of cosmetics and pharmaceuticals; which means they are cosmetic products containing certain biologically active ingredients claiming to give medical or drug-like effect. With ample scientific research and knowledge collected thus, researchers HAVE found out such ingredients which are almost just as effective and relatively inexpensive compared to medical cosmetic procedures.

Active Anti-aging Ingredients:

Most people usually stick to buying cosmetic products of their favorite brands. But to actually gain satisfactory results from anti-aging creams, you’ll have to go an extra mile and start with researching products containing active ingredients which really work on aging skin.

Retinoid:

The active ingredient in Retin-A is tretinoin. The chemical is the only one till date to achieve FDA approval ratings for anti-aging as well as anti-sun damage properties. Retinoid prevents the loss of collagen from skin due to excessive exposure and consequent photo-damage.

In anti-aging creams, retinoid-derivatives in the form of retinol and retinyl palmitate (combination of pure retinol and cleansing agent palmitic acid) are used. However, these must be present at a sufficiently high concentration of 0.04% to 0.07% to be effective. Customers should also take care to note the expiry date of the product, since products containing retinoid tend to expire after a month or so post opening.

Side effects may include mild irritation and redness. Customers with sensitive skin should use a much lower concentration of retinol (approx. 0.025%). It is also advisable to avoid the use of products containing retinoid during pregnancy or breast feeding period, since it is a Vitamin A derivative which is associated with birth defects.

Alpha Hydroxy Acids (AHAs):

Various alpha and beta hydroxy acids are already popular ingredients in various cosmetic products like cleansers, moisturizers, toners, etc. Two most popular AHAs are lactic acid and glycolic acid, known for their ability to efficiently penetrate skin.

AHAs have superb exfoliation properties helping in removal of dead skin cells and growth of new ones. Effectiveness of anti-wrinkle creams containing AHAs depends upon concentration (5% to 8% are sufficient) and frequency of application.

AHAs can increase sun-sensitivity by almost 50%, therefore an effective sunscreen providing UVA and UVB protection is an FDA requisite in final product formulation. Irritation, redness and possible scarring can also occur as side effects. Some people tend to be allergic to certain hydroxy acids. Therefore it’s best to consult a physician before trying a product with an AHA mentioned in ingredients.

Peptides:

Peptides are short-chained proteins which occur naturally in the skin, mainly acting as messengers (in the form of signal peptides) or hormones. They are well known for their natural skin-healing benefits. Peptides such as oligopeptides work as collagen boosters, while Palmitoyl Tripeptide-5 and Tripeptide-1 stimulate the skin for synthesizing collagen of types I and III, and simultaneously decreasing enzyme production to protect collagen and elastin integrity. Pentapeptide-18 and Acetyl hexapeptide-8 (Argireline) are peptides that are known to tighten the skin, thereby reducing the appearance of wrinkles.

There are minimal side-effects related to use of peptides for anti-aging treatment. Not only they help against wrinkles, they also increase skin’s moisture retaining ability, elasticity, and resilience.

Anti-oxidants:

Anti-oxidants are substances that are known to protect the body from damage caused by free radicals-unstable molecules that damage cell membranes, proteins, lipids, and DNA. Free radicals are also one of the major causes of premature aging. Anti-oxidants are already popular for their extraordinary health benefits, and their use in anti-aging products is relatively new yet promising.

Green tea, rosemary, grapes, and tomatoes contain the most effective anti-oxidants and products containing extracts of same can give visible satisfactory results with regular application. A 10% concentration of green tea extract in a given product is especially effective for fighting aging.

It should be noted that although anti-oxidants can be used in diet and applied topically, the effectiveness of an anti-oxidant diet for anti-aging is somewhat debatable. Also, most anti-oxidants will only help in prevention of wrinkles, and may not work to remove those which already exist.

Sunscreens:

Excess exposure to sun leaves visible skin prone to aging effects of UVA and UVB rays. Increased levels of exposure can cause wrinkling, discoloration, formation of freckles and dark spots, damaging of elastin and collagen, skin cancer, as well as DNA mutations. Yes, those 2 minutes you saved by opting out sunscreen application will take its heavy toll.

Sunscreens and sunblocks are applied topically in various forms to prevent such skin related hazards. Following the age old adage of “prevention is better than cure”, sunscreen application substantially reduces chances of photo aging.

Nowadays, sunscreens with active anti-aging ingredients are on rise. These will not only prevent photo aging, but will also treat existing signs of aging. The most effective ones contain tretinoin, the efficacy of which has been already discussed in the Retinoid section as a miracle chemical with proven anti-aging as well as anti-sun damage properties. Other anti-aging sunscreens contain anti-oxidants in the form of minerals.

Vitamin C:

Vitamin C is one of the most widely used skin-care ingredient, given its astounding skin healing properties. It skin rejuvenation and anti-wrinkle properties have been scientifically proved: It is essential for synthesis of collagen in skin, thus curing wrinkles and fine lines; and it is a well-known anti-oxidant, capable of preventing skin-damage due to free radicals.

Vitamin C on its own is rather tricky, since it oxidizes instantly and may cause more harm than good when used topically. To overcome this barrier, anti-aging creams use the vitamin’s more stable and effective derivatives like magnesium ascorbyl phosphate, ascorbyl palmitate, etc.

Vitamin C taken in dietary form is good for health, but provides insubstantial anti-aging benefits for skin, since higher concentrations for anti-wrinkle properties are required than those available to skin through vitamin rich diet.

Anti-aging creams do work, wonderfully. The effects of a given anti-aging product will depend upon active ingredients in its formulation, their respective concentrations, and frequency and regularity of application. Also keep in mind that many of the active ingredients listed above work best in ‘synergy’, i.e. combined form, than by themselves. For instance, AHAs sun-sensitivity factor can be negated by adding sunscreen in its formulation, and a sunscreen with retinoid will work wonders on wrinkle-ridden skin.

For more information about anti wrinkle creams please visit: [http://www.antiwrinklecreamsblog.com/]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Binh_Hanh_Thai_Nguyen/1413972

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7273758

Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias

June 12, 2016 by · Comments Off on Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias
Filed under: General 

Australian business is starting to see the light when it comes to their hiring policies for mature aged employees, and the positive impact they can have on the workplace. A brief visit to main street shopping centre and you will begin to see a few more weathered faces at work than you would have seen a few years ago.

However, if you scratch below the surface, you begin to see this trend still has a long way to play out. A few older workers get hired into the senior ranks where experience and maturity are greatly valued, more older workers are now being hired at the lower end of the corporate scale into unskilled roles, however the numbers being hired into the mid tier ranks remains low.

This barbell approach to hiring mature workers at the top and bottom of an organisation reflects an ongoing bias that remains difficult to overcome. A company is a microcosm of society, and in a perfect world employers should (within reason) seek diversity in the workplace and value skill, experience and aptitude, regardless of age, race or gender.

Unfortunately, we live in a far from perfect world. When it comes to mature aged workers they tend to be penalised on two fronts. Often the first to be made redundant in uncertain economic times, this setback is then compounded when they are regularly overlooked for someone younger as they begin searching for a new job.

As a result of these two biases towards mature aged job seekers, once out of work, the journey back can often be long and arduous. This is reflected in RBA statistics which indicate long-term unemployment at approximately 40% for those aged 45-64, compared to about 25% for those aged between 25 and 44.

So what are the reasons employers provide for not hiring mature aged workers? Typically, reasons include being overqualified or over-experienced. Taken at face value being overqualified or experienced might not seem so bad, but when you hear the same reason trotted out time and again, it becomes less palatable.

Openly negative feedback from employers tend to include perceptions that mature aged workers are not as IT savvy, do not possess the latest skills, or are not as flexible as their younger counterparts. While these reasons may hold true in many instances, many of the older job seekers I speak to, believe these are often used as convenient excuses to exclude them.

Employer feedback that you are not likely to hear include concerns about health (and subsequent cost) or worse insecurity. There are many poor managers in the workplace that may be intimidated by the experience a mature applicant brings to the role. Rather than leveraging the knowledge and experience an older worker can bring to the workplace, the insecure hirer is concerned about the potential competition, and the presence of someone who may know more than they do.

Dealing with many of these preconceived concerns and fears remains an ongoing challenge for the mature aged job seeker. Perhaps the following facts should be mandatory reading for hiring managers. These facts debunk many of the concerns and myths that persist in the workplace relating to mature aged workers;

    • Mature aged workers can deliver cost savings to employers through increased retention rates. For example, workers over 55 are five times less likely to change jobs compared to workers aged 20-24, reducing both recruitment and training costs. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006)Labour Mobility Survey,
    • Mature workers can deliver an average net benefit of $1956 per year to their employer compared to other workers due to high retention rates, lower rates of absenteeism, decreased recruitment costs and greater return on investment.Business, Work and Ageing (2000) Profiting from Maturity: The Social and Economic Costs of Mature Age Unemployment
    • Australians are living longer and are healthier.2005 ABS survey found the proportion of Australians aged 55-64 reporting their health as ‘good’, ‘very good’ or ‘excellent’ was 75.5% – an increase of four per cent since 1995. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006) National Health Survey: Summary of Results, 2004-05
    • Mature workers were the least likely group to take days off due to their own illness or as a carer. In the two week period prior to the survey nearly half the number of mature workers had days off compared to workers aged 25-34. ibid
    • ABS data shows that Australians aged 55-64 are the fastest growing users of information technology. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2005) Year Book Australia,
  • Australian Health Management which examined the daily work habits of 4000 employees found that workers aged 55 years and over performed at their best for approximately seven hours out of an eight-hour day-an achievement that other workers in the study were unable to match. Australian Health Management (2006), Baby boomers give employers a bang for their buck

While government has been doing its part to address mature aged unemployment through initiatives like DEEWR Experience+, the introduction of the Age Discrimination Act (2004) and appointment of an Age Discrimination Commissioner, it remains imperative that older job seekers directly address some of these age bias issues themselves if they are to enhance their prospects for employment.

Following are some helpful hints that mature aged workers can utilise to make themselves more appealing to employers and thus improve their chances of a speedy return to the workforce;

Government or Community Assistance– Take advantage of government or community based initiatives and assistance. There is a considerable amount of free information and assistance available, and I would strongly recommend looking into these resources. For example, the DEEWR “Experience+” initiative provides free career planning and advice for over 45’s until June 2016, along with an Assistance Program delivering refresher and basic training in IT and social media applications.

Value Proposition– Whether writing your resume or cover letter, or sitting in an interview, ensure the focus of discussion clearly remains on the value that you can bring to an organisation. Discuss how you can help, what you have done in the past and what you can deliver going forward. Outline how your experience might bring special insights and perspectives that other candidates may not possess.

Training– Undertake relevant training or up-skilling. Keeping ‘up to date’ is critical if you expect serious consideration for any position, especially if there is a technical element. The benefit will be that an employer will see that you have not fallen behind and therefore will not require retraining, along with any associated cost.

Resume– You will need a properly structured and well written resume to be considered for most roles. Use an appropriate resume style that is tailored to your strengths, skills and experience. Also ensure primary focus of your resume is on the last 5-10 years (include older information where pertinent). Think about getting assistance from a professional resume writer, whocan add significant value if you are looking to ‘get it right the first time’.

Age Bias – To counter potential impact of age bias, you will need to carefully address the following with any potential employer;

Health– Don’t hesitate to communicate your good health and fitness to potential employers at opportune moments. Inform them if you play sport, run, walk or go to the gym regularly. This should allay any potential concerns about health.

IT Savvy –Take every opportunity to indicate your IT capability. Whether it’s your ability to use specialised systems, the MS Office suite or even your use of Facebook or Twitter, this will highlight your ability to embrace new technology.

Adaptability – Highlight your adaptability in the workplace, providing actual examples where appropriate. If you don’t know something, indicate you are keen to learn (and not that you wouldn’t know where to start). Highlighting your adaptability will help to dispel concerns of rigidness and inflexibility.

Team Player –Communicating that you work well as part of a team is critical. It shows a willingness to take direction and work for the common good, and can present you as less threatening, especially if the hirer feels concerned by a mature more experienced candidate.

Be Positive –Though you need to be fully prepared to discuss negative issues, make every attempt to keep the discussion on a positive footing. Unless specifically requested, there is no need to volunteer information of a negative nature.

While industry is beginning to see the light when it comes to acceptance of mature aged workers, the pace of change remains slow. While providence is on the right side due to the ageing Australian population and the inevitable necessity to hire older workers, the fact remains that age discrimination is still entrenched in much current thinking.

As a result, dealing with age bias will continue to be a challenge for the foreseeable future. However with the combination of positive government policy, changing attitudes and a proactive attitude to making oneself more appealing to employers (as outlined above), the situation is not without promise.

Honing your individual approach and message will take time and effort. To strike the right balance the mature job seeker will need to walk a fine line between sounding experienced, but not old, adaptable, but not inflexible and appear keen, not desperate. There is no magic formula for success except practice, perseverance and occasionally seeking help where necessary.

A.J. Bond, is the proprietor of Absolute Resume Writing Services ( http://absoluteresume.com.au ), an Australian based consultancy specializing in the provision of Resume and Cover Letter writing services.

Absolute Resume assists a broad range of job seekers to find their preferred roles, including mature aged job seekers, individuals out of work for a period of time and those made redundant.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7334746

The Development of Old Age and Related Issues

April 18, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Development of Old Age and Related Issues
Filed under: General 

In traditional Chinese and other Asian cultures the aged were highly respected and cared for. The Igabo tribesmen of Eastern Nigeria value dependency in their aged and involve them in care of children and the administration of tribal affairs (Shelton, A. in Kalish R. Uni Michigan 1969).

In Eskimo culture the grandmother was pushed out into the ice-flow to die as soon as she became useless.

Western societies today usually resemble to some degree the Eskimo culture, only the “ice-flows” have names such a “Sunset Vista” and the like. Younger generations no longer assign status to the aged and their abandonment is always in danger of becoming the social norm.

There has been a tendency to remove the aged from their homes and put them  in custodial care. To some degree the government provides domiciliary care services to prevent or delay this, but the motivation probably has more to do with expense than humanity.

In Canada and some parts of the USA old people are being utilised as foster-grandparents in child care agencies.

SOME BASIC DEFINITIONS

What is Aging?

Aging: Aging is a natural phenomenon that refers to changes occurring throughout the life span and result in differences in structure and function between the youthful and elder generation.

Gerontology: Gerontology is the study of aging and includes science, psychology and sociology.

Geriatrics: A relatively new field of medicine specialising in the health problems of advanced age.

Social aging: Refers to the social habits and roles of individuals with respect to their culture and society. As social aging increases individual usually experience a decrease in meaningful social interactions.

Biological aging: Refers to the physical changes in the body systems during the later decades of life. It may begin long before the individual  reaches chronological age 65.

Cognitive aging: Refers to decreasing ability to assimilate new information and learn new behaviours and skills.

GENERAL PROBLEMS OF AGING

Eric Erikson (Youth and the life cycle. Children. 7:43-49 Mch/April 1960) developed an “ages and stages” theory of human development that involved 8 stages after birth each of which involved a basic dichotomy representing best case and worst case outcomes. Below are the dichotomies and their developmental relevance:

Prenatal stage – conception to birth.

  1. Infancy. Birth to 2 years – basic trust vs. basic distrust. Hope.
  2. Early childhood, 3 to 4 years – autonomy vs. self doubt/shame. Will.
  3. Play age, 5 to 8 years – initiative vs. guilt. Purpose.
  4. School age, 9to 12 – industry vs. inferiority. Competence.
  5. Adolescence, 13 to 19 – identity vs. identity confusion. Fidelity.
  6. Young adulthood – intimacy vs. isolation. Love.
  7. Adulthood, generativity vs. self absorption. Care.
  8. Mature age- Ego Integrity vs. Despair. Wisdom.

This stage of older adulthood, i.e. stage 8, begins about the time of retirement and continues throughout one’s life. Achieving ego integrity  is a sign of maturity while failing to reach this stage is an indication of poor development in prior stages through the life course.

Ego integrity: This means coming to accept one’s whole life and reflecting on it in a positive manner. According to Erikson, achieving integrity means fully accepting one’ self and coming to terms with death. Accepting responsibility for one’s life and being able to review the past with satisfaction is essential. The inability to do this leads to despair and the individual will begin to fear death. If a favourable balance is achieved during this stage, then wisdom is developed.

Psychological and personality aspects:

Aging has psychological implications. Next to dying our recognition that we are aging may be one of the most profound shocks we ever receive. Once we pass the invisible line of 65 our years are bench marked for the remainder of the game of life. We are no longer “mature age” we are instead classified as “old”, or “senior citizens”. How we cope with the changes we face and stresses of altered status depends on our basic personality. Here are 3 basic personality types that have been identified. It may be a oversimplification but it makes the point about personality effectively:

a. The autonomous – people who seem to have the resources for self-renewal. They may be dedicated to a goal or idea and committed to continuing productivity. This appears to protect them somewhat even against physiological aging.

b.The adjusted – people who are rigid and lacking in adaptability but are supported by their power, prestige or well structured routine. But if their situation changes drastically they become psychiatric casualties.

c.The anomic. These are people who do not have clear inner values or a protective life vision. Such people have been described as prematurely resigned and they may deteriorate rapidly.

Summary of stresses of old age.

a. Retirement and reduced income. Most people rely on work for self worth, identity and social interaction. Forced retirement can be demoralising.

b. Fear of invalidism and death. The increased probability of falling prey to illness from which there is no recovery is a continual source of anxiety. When one has a heart attack or stroke the stress becomes much worse.

Some persons face death with equanimity, often psychologically supported by a religion or philosophy. Others may welcome death as an end to suffering or insoluble problems and with little concern for life or human existence. Still others face impending death with suffering of great stress against which they have no ego defenses.

c. Isolation and loneliness. Older people face inevitable loss of loved ones, friends and contemporaries. The loss of a spouse whom one has depended on for companionship and moral support is particularly distressing. Children grow up, marry and become preoccupied or move away. Failing memory, visual and aural impairment may all work to make social interaction difficult. And if this then leads to a souring of outlook and rigidity of attitude then social interaction becomes further lessened and the individual may not even utilise the avenues for social activity that are still available.

d. Reduction in sexual function and physical attractiveness. Kinsey et al, in their Sexual behaviour in the human male, (Phil., Saunders, 1948) found that there is a gradual decrease in sexual activity with advancing age and that reasonably gratifying patterns of sexual activity can continue into extreme old age. The aging person also has to adapt to loss of sexual attractiveness in a society which puts extreme emphasis on sexual attractiveness. The adjustment in self image and self concept that are required can be very hard to make.

e. Forces tending to self devaluation. Often the experience of the older generation has little perceived relevance to the problems of the young and the older person becomes deprived of participation in decision making both in occupational and family settings. Many parents are seen as unwanted burdens and their children may secretly wish they would die so they can be free of the burden and experience some financial relief or benefit. Senior citizens may be pushed into the role of being an old person with all this implies in terms of self devaluation.

4 Major Categories of Problems or Needs:

Health.

Housing.

Income maintenance.

Interpersonal relations.

BIOLOGICAL CHANGES

Physiological Changes: Catabolism (the breakdown of protoplasm) overtakes anabolism (the build-up of protoplasm). All body systems are affected and repair systems become slowed. The aging process occurs at different rates in different individuals.

Physical appearance and other changes:

Loss of subcutaneous fat and less elastic skin gives rise to wrinkled appearance, sagging and loss of smoothness of body contours. Joints stiffen and become painful and range of joint movement becomes restricted, general mobility lessened.

Respiratory changes:

Increase of fibrous tissue in chest walls and lungs leads restricts respiratory movement and less oxygen is consumed. Older people more likelyto have lower respiratory infections whereas young people have upper respiratory infections.

Nutritive changes:

Tooth decay and loss of teeth can detract from ease and enjoyment in eating. Atrophy of the taste buds means food is inclined to be tasteless and this should be taken into account by carers. Digestive changes occur from lack of exercise (stimulating intestines) and decrease in digestive juice production. Constipation and indigestion are likely to follow as a result. Financial problems can lead to the elderly eating an excess of cheap carbohydrates rather than the more expensive protein and vegetable foods and this exacerbates the problem, leading to reduced vitamin intake and such problems as anemia and increased susceptibility to infection.

Adaptation to stress:

All of us face stress at all ages. Adaptation to stress requires the consumption of energy. The 3 main phases of stress are:

1. Initial alarm reaction. 2. Resistance. 3. Exhaustion

and if stress continues tissue damage or aging occurs. Older persons have had a lifetime of dealing with stresses. Energy reserves are depleted and the older person succumbs to stress earlier than the younger person. Stress is cumulative over a lifetime. Research results, including experiments with animals suggests that each stress leaves us more vulnerable to the next and that although we might think we’ve “bounced back” 100% in fact each stress leaves it scar. Further, stress is psycho-biological meaning the kind of stress is irrelevant. A physical stress may leave one more vulnerable to psychological stress and vice versa. Rest does not completely restore one after a stressor. Care workers need to be mindful of this and cognizant of the kinds of things that can produce stress for aged persons.

COGNITIVE CHANGE Habitual Behaviour:

Sigmund Freud noted that after the age of 50, treatment of neuroses via psychoanalysis was difficult because the opinions and reactions of older people were relatively fixed and hard to shift.

Over-learned behaviour: This is behaviour that has been learned so well and repeated so often that it has become automatic, like for example typing or running down stairs. Over-learned behaviour is hard to change. If one has lived a long time one is likely to have fixed opinions and ritualised behaviour patterns or habits.

Compulsive behaviour: Habits and attitudes that have been learned in the course of finding ways to overcome frustration and difficulty are very hard to break. Tension reducing habits such as nail biting, incessant humming, smoking or drinking alcohol are especially hard to change at any age and particularly hard for persons who have been practising them over a life time.

The psychology of over-learned and compulsive behaviours has severe implications for older persons who find they have to live in what for them is a new and alien environment with new rules and power relations.

Information acquisition:

Older people have a continual background of neural noise making it more difficult for them to sort out and interpret complex sensory input. In talking to an older person one should turn off the TV, eliminate as many noises and distractions as possible, talk slowly and relate to one message or idea at a time.

Memories from the distant past are stronger than more recent memories. New memories are the first to fade and last to return.

Time patterns also can get mixed – old and new may get mixed.

Intelligence.

Intelligence reaches a peak and can stay high with little deterioration if there is no neurological damage. People who have unusually high intelligence to begin with seem to suffer the least decline. Education and stimulation also seem to play a role in maintaining intelligence.

Intellectual impairment. Two diseases of old age causing cognitive decline are Alzheimer’s syndrome and Pick’s syndrome. In Pick’s syndrome there is inability to concentrate and learn and also affective responses are impaired.

Degenerative Diseases: Slow progressive physical degeneration of cells in the nervous system. Genetics appear to be an important factor. Usually start after age 40 (but can occur as early as 20s).

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE Degeneration of all areas of cortex but particularly frontal and temporal lobes. The affected cells actually die. Early symptoms resemble neurotic disorders: Anxiety, depression, restlessness sleep difficulties.

Progressive deterioration of all intellectual faculties (memory deficiency being the most well known and obvious). Total mass of the brain decreases, ventricles become larger. No established treatment.

PICK’S DISEASE Rare degenerative disease. Similar to Alzheimer’s in terms of onset, symptomatology and possible genetic aetiology. However it affects circumscribed areas of the brain, particularly the frontal areas which leads to a loss of normal affect.

PARKINSON’S DISEASE Neuropathology: Loss of neurons in the basal ganglia.

Symptoms: Movement abnormalities: rhythmical alternating tremor of extremities, eyelids and tongue along with rigidity of the muscles and slowness of movement (akinesia).

It was once thought that Parkinson’s disease was not associated with intellectual deterioration, but it is now known that there is an association between global intellectual impairment and Parkinson’s where it occurs late in life.

The cells lost in Parkinson’s are associated with the neuro-chemical Dopamine and the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s are associated the dopamine deficiency. Treatment involves administration of dopamine precursor L-dopa which can alleviate symptoms including intellectual impairment. Research suggests it may possibly bring to the fore emotional effects in patients who have had psychiatric illness at some prior stage in their lives.

AFFECTIVE DOMAIN In old age our self concept gets its final revision. We make a final assessment of the value of our lives and our balance of success and failures.

How well a person adapts to old age may be predicated by how well the person adapted to earlier significant changes. If the person suffered an emotional crisis each time a significant change was needed then adaptation to the exigencies of old age may also be difficult. Factors such as economic security, geographic location and physical health are important to the adaptive process.

Need Fulfilment: For all of us, according to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs theory, we are not free to pursue the higher needs of self actualisation unless the basic needs are secured. When one considers that many, perhaps most, old people are living in poverty and continually concerned with basic survival needs, they are not likely to be happily satisfying needs related to prestige, achievement and beauty.

Maslow’s Hierarchy

Physiological

Safety

Belonging, love, identification

Esteem: Achievement, prestige, success, self respect

Self actualisation: Expressing one’s interests and talents to the full.

Note: Old people who have secured their basic needs may be motivated to work on tasks of the highest levels in the hierarchy – activities concerned with aesthetics, creativity and altruistic matters, as compensation for loss of sexual attractiveness and athleticism. Aged care workers fixated on getting old people to focus on social activities may only succeed in frustrating and irritating them if their basic survival concerns are not secured to their satisfaction.

DISENGAGEMENT

Social aging according to Cumming, E. and Henry, W. (Growing old: the aging process of disengagement, NY, Basic 1961) follows a well defined pattern:

  1. Change in role. Change in occupation and productivity. Possibly change in attitude to work.
  2. Loss of role, e.g. retirement or death of a husband.
  3. Reduced social interaction. With loss of role social interactions are diminished, eccentric adjustment can further reduce social interaction, damage to self concept, depression.
  4. Awareness of scarcity of remaining time. This produces further curtailment of activity in interest of saving time.

Havighurst, R. et al (in B. Neugarten (ed.) Middle age and aging, U. of Chicago, 1968) and others have suggested that disengagement is not an inevitable process. They believe the needs of the old are essentially the same as in middle age and the activities of middle age should be extended as long as possible. Havighurst points out the decrease in social interaction of the aged is often largely the result of society withdrawing from the individual as much as the reverse. To combat this he believes the individual must vigorously resist the limitations of his social world.

DEATH The fear of the dead amongst tribal societies is well established. Persons who had ministered to the dead were taboo and required observe various rituals including seclusion for varying periods of time. In some societies from South America to Australia it is taboo for certain persons to utter the name of the dead. Widows and widowers are expected to observe rituals in respect for the dead.

Widows in the Highlands of New Guinea around Goroka chop of one of their own fingers. The dead continue their existence as spirits and upsetting them can bring dire consequences.

Wahl, C in “The fear of death”, 1959 noted that the fear of death occurs as early as the 3rd year of life. When a child loses a pet or grandparent fears reside in the unspoken questions: Did I cause it? Will happen to you (parent) soon? Will this happen to me? The child in such situations needs to re-assure that the departure is not a censure, and that the parent is not likely to depart soon. Love, grief, guilt, anger are a mix of conflicting emotions that are experienced.

CONTEMPORARY ATTITUDES TO DEATH

Our culture places high value on youth, beauty, high status occupations, social class and anticipated future activities and achievement. Aging and dying are denied and avoided in this system. The death of each person reminds us of our own mortality.

The death of the elderly is less disturbing to members of Western society because the aged are not especially valued. Surveys have established that nurses for example attach more importance to saving a young life than an old life. In Western society there is a pattern of avoiding dealing with the aged and dying aged patient.

Stages of dying. Elisabeth Kubler Ross has specialised in working with dying patients and in her “On death and dying”, NY, Macmillan, 1969, summarised 5 stages in dying.

  1. Denial and isolation. “No, not me”.
  2. Anger. “I’ve lived a good life so why me?”
  3. Bargaining. Secret deals are struck with God. “If I can live until…I promise to…”
  4. Depression. (In general the greatest psychological problem of the aged is depression). Depression results from real and threatened loss.
  5. Acceptance of the inevitable.

Kubler Ross’s typology as set out above should, I believe be taken with a grain of salt and not slavishly accepted. Celebrated US Journalist David Rieff who was in June ’08 a guest of the Sydney writer’s festival in relation to his book, “Swimming in a sea of death: a son’s memoir” (Melbourne University Press) expressly denied the validity of the Kubler Ross typology in his Late Night Live interview (Australian ABC radio) with Philip Adams June 9th ’08. He said something to the effect that his mother had regarded her impending death as murder. My own experience with dying persons suggests that the human ego is extraordinarily resilient. I recall visiting a dying colleague in hospital just days before his death. He said, “I’m dying, I don’t like it but there’s nothing I can do about it”, and then went on to chortle about how senior academics at an Adelaide university had told him they were submitting his name for a the Order of Australia (the new “Knighthood” replacement in Australia). Falling in and out of lucid thought with an oxygen tube in his nostrils he was nevertheless still highly interested in the “vain glories of the world”. This observation to me seemed consistent with Rieff’s negative assessment of Kubler Ross’s theories.

THE AGED IN RELATION TO YOUNGER PEOPLE

The aged share with the young the same needs: However, the aged often have fewer or weaker resources to meet those needs. Their need for social interaction may be ignored by family and care workers.

Family should make time to visit their aged members and invite them to their homes. The aged like to visit children and relate to them through games and stories.

Meaningful relationships can be developed via foster-grandparent programs. Some aged are not aware of their income and health entitlements. Family and friends should take the time to explain these. Some aged are too proud to access their entitlements and this problem should be addressed in a kindly way where it occurs.

It is best that the aged be allowed as much choice as possible in matters related to living arrangements, social life and lifestyle.

Communities serving the aged need to provide for the aged via such things as lower curbing, and ramps.

Carers need to examine their own attitude to aging and dying. Denial in the carer is detected by the aged person and it can inhibit the aged person from expressing negative feelings – fear, anger. If the person can express these feelings to someone then that person is less likely to die with a sense of isolation and bitterness.

A METAPHYSICAL PERSPECTIVE

The following notes are my interpretation of a Dr. Depak Chopra lecture entitled, “The New Physics of Healing” which he presented to the 13th Scientific Conference of the American Holistic Medical Association. Dr. Depak Chopra is an endocrinologist and a former Chief of Staff of New England Hospital, Massachusetts. I am deliberately omitting the detail of his explanations of the more abstract, ephemeral and controversial ideas.

Original material from 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

In the lecture Dr. Chopra presents a model of the universe and of all organisms as structures of interacting centres of electromagnetic energy linked to each other in such a way that anything affecting one part of a system or structure has ramifications throughout the entire structure. This model becomes an analogue not only for what happens within the structure or organism itself, but between the organism and both its physical and social environments. In other words there is a correlation between psychological conditions, health and the aging process. Dr. Chopra in his lecture reconciles ancient Vedic (Hindu) philosophy with modern psychology and quantum physics.

Premature Precognitive Commitment: Dr. Chopra invokes experiments that have shown that flies kept for a long time in a jar do not quickly leave the jar when the top is taken off. Instead they accept the jar as the limit of their universe. He also points out that in India baby elephants are often kept tethered to a small twig or sapling. In adulthood when the elephant is capable of pulling over a medium sized tree it can still be successfully tethered to a twig! As another example he points to experiments in which fish are bred on

2 sides of a fish tank containing a divider between the 2 sides. When the divider is removed the fish are slow to learn that they can now swim throughout the whole tank but rather stay in the section that they accept as their universe. Other experiments have demonstrated that kittens brought up in an environment of vertical stripes and structures, when released in adulthood keep bumping into anything aligned horizontally as if they were unable to see anything that is horizontal. Conversely kittens brought up in an environment of horizontal stripes when released bump into vertical structures, apparently unable to see them.

The whole point of the above experiments is that they demonstrate Premature Precognitive Commitment. The lesson to be learned is that our sensory apparatus develops as a result of initial experience and how we’ve been taught to interpret it.

What is the real look of the world? It doesn’t exist. The way the world looks to us is determined by the sensory receptors we have and our interpretation of that look is determined by our premature precognitive commitments. Dr Chopra makes the point that less than a billionth of the available stimuli make it into our nervous systems. Most of it is screened, and what gets through to us is whatever we are expecting to find on the basis of our precognitive commitments.

Dr. Chopra also discusses the diseases that are actually caused by mainstream medical interventions, but this material gets too far away from my central intention. Dr. Chopra discusses in lay terms the physics of matter, energy and time by way of establishing the wider context of our existence. He makes the point that our bodies including the bodies of plants are mirrors of cosmic rhythms and exhibit changes correlating even with the tides.

Dr. Chopra cites the experiments of Dr. Herbert Spencer of the US National Institute of Health. He injected mice with Poly-IC, an immuno-stimulant while making the mice repeatedly smell camphor. After the effect of the Poly-IC had worn off he again exposed the mice to the camphor smell. The smell of camphor had the effect of causing the mice’s immune system to automatically strengthen as if they had been injected with the stimulant. He then took another batch of mice and injected them with cyclophosphamide which tends to destroy the immune system while exposing them to the smell of camphor. Later after being returned to normal just the smell of camphor was enough to cause destruction of their immune system. Dr. Chopra points out that whether or not camphor enhanced or destroyed the mice’s immune system was entirely determined by an interpretation of the meaning of the smell of camphor. The interpretation is not just in the brain but in each cell of the organism. We are bound to our imagination and our early experiences.

Chopra cites a study by the Massachusetts Dept of Health Education and Welfare into risk factors for heart disease – family history, cholesterol etc. The 2 most important risk factors were found to be psychological measures – Self  Happiness Rating and Job Satisfaction. They found most people died of heart disease on a Monday!

Chopra says that for every feeling there is a molecule. If you are experiencing tranquillity your body will be producing natural valium. Chemical changes in the brain are reflected by changes in other cells including blood cells. The brain produces neuropeptides and brain structures are chemically tuned to these neuropeptide receptors. Neuropeptides (neurotransmitters) are the chemical concommitants of thought. Chopra points out the white blood cells (a part of the immune system) have neuropeptide receptors and are “eavesdropping” on our thinking. Conversely the immune system produces its own neuropeptides which can influence the nervous system. He goes on to say that cells in all parts of the body including heart and kidneys for example also produce neuropeptides and neuropeptide sensitivity. Chopra assures us that most neurologists would agree that the nervous system and the immune system are parallel systems.

Other studies in physiology: The blood interlukin-2 levels of medical students decreased as exam time neared and their interlukin receptor capacities also lowered. Chopra says if we are having fun to the point of exhilaration our natural interlukin-2 levels become higher. Interlukin-2 is a powerful and very expensive anti-cancer drug. The body is a printout of consciousness. If we could change the way we look at our bodies at a genuine, profound level then our bodies would actually change.

On the subject of “time” Chopra cites Sir Thomas Gall and Steven Hawkins, stating that our description of the universe as having a past, present, and future are constructed entirely out of our interpretation of change. But in reality linear time doesn’t exist.

Chopra explains the work of Alexander Leaf a former Harvard Professor of Preventative Medicine who toured the world investigating societies where people  lived beyond 100 years (these included parts of Afghanistan, Soviet Georgia, Southern Andes). He looked at possible factors including climate, genetics, and diet. Leaf concluded the most important factor was the collective perception of aging in these societies.

Amongst the Tama Humara of the Southern Andes there was a collective belief that the older you got the more physically able you got. They had a tradition of running and the older one became then generally the better at running one got. The best runner was aged 60. Lung capacity and other measures actually improved with age. People were healthy until well into their 100s and died in their sleep. Chopra remarks that things have changed since the introduction of Budweiser (beer) and TV.

[DISCUSSION: How might TV be a factor in changing the former ideal state of things?]

Chopra refers to Dr. Ellen Langor a former Harvard Psychology professor’s work. Langor advertised for 100 volunteers aged over 70 years. She took them to a Monastery outside Boston to play “Let’s Pretend”. They were divided into 2 groups each of which resided in a different part of the building. One group, the control group spent several days talking about the 1950s. The other group, the experimental group had to live as if in the year 1959 and talk about it in the present tense. What appeared on their TV screens were the old newscasts and movies. They read old newspapers and magazines of the period. After 3 days everyone was photographed and the photographs judged by independent judges who knew nothing of the nature of the experiment. The experimental group seemed to have gotten younger in appearance. Langor then arranged for them to be tested for 100 physiological parameters of aging which included of course blood pressure, near point vision and DHEA levels. After 10 days of living as if in 1959 all parameters had reversed by the equivalent of at least 20 years.

Chopra concludes from Langor’s experiment: “We are the metabolic end product of our sensory experiences. How we interpret them depends on the collective mindset which influences individual biological entropy and aging.”

Can one escape the current collective mindset and reap the benefits in longevity and health? Langor says, society won’t let you escape. There are too many reminders of how most people think linear time is and how it expresses itself in entropy and aging – men are naughty at 40 and on social welfare at 55, women reach menopause at 40 etc. We get to see so many other people aging and dying that it sets the pattern that we follow.

Chopra concludes we are the metabolic product of our sensory experience and our interpretation gets structured in our biology itself. Real change comes from change in the collective consciousness – otherwise it cannot occur within the individual.

Readings

Chopra, D. The New Physics of Healing. 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

Coleman, J. C. Abnormal psychology and modern life. Scott Foresman & Co.

Lugo, J. and Hershey, L. Human development a multidisciplinary approach to the psychology of individual growth, NY, Macmillan.

Dennis. Psychology of human behaviour for nurses. Lond. W. B.Saunders.

[http://www.psychologynatural.com/DepressionBroch.html]

Dr. Victor Barnes is an Adelaide psychologist and hypnotherapist. He has also had three decades of experience in adult education including serving as Dean of a Sri Lankan college (ICBT) teaching several Australian degrees. His overseas experience includes studies and consulting experience in USA, PNG, Poland and Sri Lanka.

Tropicana Palms Las Vegas – Nevada Senior Guide

February 14, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Las Vegas, Single Family Homes 

www.cal-am.com

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6420 E Tropicana Ave, Las Vegas NV 89122

Amenities

• Billiards • Bingo
• Clubhouse • Courtesy Patrol
• Exercise Classes • Fitness Center
• Heated Pools and Spa • Horseshoe Pits
• Hot Tub • Jewelry Making
• Large Screen TV • Lighted Tennis Courts
• Monday Night Bingo • On site Home Sales
• Ping Pong • Planned Activities
• Putting Green • RV and Boat Storage
• Sauna • Shuffleboard Courts
• Themed Events

 

 

Welcome to Tropicana Palms… Your Oasis in the Las Vegas Desert

Quench your thirst for the good life at Tropicana Palms!

If billiards or cards is your game, then our in-community leagues are what you are looking for! Begin your day with a game of tennis or a work out in our well-equipped fitness centers.

Tropicana Palms offers you easy access to all the southwest has to offer. Enjoy the crystal blue skies of Nevada as you explore breathtaking hiking and biking trails just minutes away. Pick up your clubs and take a swing at some of the best professional golf courses in the country. How does a day on the lake racing around or just relaxing by the shore with a pole in your hand sound? Lake Mead is just a short drive from Tropicana Palms and offers the best in water sports.

Enjoy the Area

Ready to take on the Las Vegas nightlife? Ready for the best in entertainment? Restaurants? Gaming? Then get ready to experience the glamour that is second to none. Explore the ever changing social life that is the Las Vegas strip that is waiting for you.

Tropicana Palms………Where you’ve got it made in the shade.

Shopping
Albertsons
Home Depot
Antiques at the Market
East Valley Plaza

Hospitals
Desert Springs Hospital
Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center

Entertainment
Las Vegas Strip
Royal Links Golf Course
Century 18 Sam’s Town
Cox Pavilion
Horseman and Dog Fancier’s Park

 

National Report: Oral Health of Older Americans In A ‘State of Decay’

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Oral Health America Launches First-of-its-Kind Website to Connect Older Adults to Affordable Dental Care and Resources

The oral health of older Americans is in a state of decay, according to a new national report released today by Oral Health America (OHA).  A State of Decay, a state-by-state analysis of oral healthcare delivery and public health factors impacting the oral health of older adults, reveals more than half of the country received a “fair” or “poor” assessment when it comes to minimal standards affecting dental care access for older adults. Florida and Arizona, areas with large older adult populations, rank in the bottom five states due to a shortage of oral health coverage, a strained dental health work force, and deficiencies in prevention programs.

“While we are seeing improvements in certain areas of older adult dental care, there is still a lack of progress in advancing the oral health of such a vulnerable population,” said Dr. Ira Lamster, Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, ColumbiaUniversity, Mailman School of Public Health. “Older adults face significant health challenges if their oral health is poor, and there is no coordinated program to help fund necessary services.”

A State of Decay gave a rating of “fair,” “poor,” “good,” or “excellent” based on state level data analyzing five variables impacting older adult oral health: adult Medicaid dental benefits, inclusion of older adult strategies in state oral health plans, edentulism (loss of teeth), dental health professional shortage areas, and community water fluoridation.

The final evaluations in the report for each state are mixed, with several states performing well in some variables, but still in need of improvement in other important areas. The top findings of this report that require scrutiny and action are:

  • Persistent lack of oral health coverage across much of the nation. Forty-two percent of states (21 states) provide either no dental benefits or provide only emergency coverage  through adult Medicaid Dental Benefits.
  • Strained dental health work force. Thirty-one states (62 percent) have high rates of Dental Health Provider Shortage Areas (HPSAs), meeting only 40 percent or less of dental provider needs.
  • Tooth loss remains a signal of suboptimal oral health. Eight states had strikingly high rates of edentulism, with West Virginia notably having an adult population that is 33.8 percent edentate. Photo – PRN Photo Desk, photodesk@prnewswire.com
  • Deficiencies in preventive programs. Thirteen states (26 percent) have upwards of 60 percent of their residents living in communities without water fluoridation (CWF), despite recognition for 68 years that this public health measure markedly reduces dental caries. Hawaii (89.2 percent) and New Jersey (86.5 percent) represent the highest rates of citizens unprotected by fluoridation, an unnecessary public peril.

Daily, 10,000 Americans retire and only 2 percent do so with a dental benefit plan. The State of Decay analysis provides a tool for states to use in addressing shortfalls in oral health status, dental professional access sites, dental benefits for low-income adults, and population-based prevention, all of which affect the oral health of older adults, the fastest growing segment of the American population.

To help older adults and their caregivers address oral health needs and overcome many of the barriers to accessing affordable dental care, OHA launched toothwisdom.org. The website is a first-of-its-kind online tool that connects older adults to dental care and educates on the importance of maintaining oral health with age. The American Dental Hygienists’ Association (ADHA) and Special Care Dentistry Association (SCDA) supported OHA and the launch of the website by encouraging their members to provide meaningful articles for the toothwisdom.org.

“Dental Hygienists have the opportunity to assist older Americans with the oral health challenges they may face as they age,”” said Ann Battrell, Executive Director, American Dental Hygienists’ Association. “We’re all committed to sharing the message that oral health matters and changing the common misperception that with age comes a decline in oral health.”

Few websites focus on oral and systemic health topics, and even fewer provide resources for older adult oral health. Toothwisdom.org offers oral care resources by state – including direct links to dental care, caregiving support, financial tools, social services, and transportation. It also shares the latest news and reliable health information from dental experts across the country on relevant oral health issues, the importance of continuing prevention with age, and the impact of oral health on overall health.

“My dental procedures have been very costly and I had to contact a social worker to help me understand my bills. Dental care should be more available and affordable because we know poor dental care affects overall health, which is particularly important for seniors,” said senior Patricia Cosgrove, a client of The Carter Burden Center for the Aging, Inc.  “Toothwisdom.org can help me find a community health center so I can finally get an affordable check-up and stay up-to-date on oral health information.”

A State of Decay and toothwisdom.org are part of Oral Health America’s Wisdom Tooth Project™, an initiative designed to meet the oral health challenges of a burgeoning population of older adults with special needs, chronic disease complications, and a growing inability to access and pay for dental services.

Links to the 2003 and 2013 editions of A State of Decay can be viewed on toothwisdom.org.

About OHA’s Wisdom Tooth Project
For 55 years, Oral Health America has been the leading national non-profit dedicated to improving the oral health and well-being of Americans throughout the entire spectrum of life. Over the decades, the organization has evolved and adapted to the dynamic nature of our country’s demographics and specific health needs. The Wisdom Tooth Project was born in 2010 due to the current and future implications of an aging population and the need for oral health resources for them mean that we must take meaningful action now.

About Oral Health America
OHA is a national, non-profit association dedicated to changing lives by connecting communities with resources to increase access to oral health care, education, and advocacy for all Americans, especially those most vulnerable. For more information about Oral Health America, please visit www.oralhealthamerica.org.

The Benefits of Medicare Advantage

October 31, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Dr. Amir Bacchus

The annual election period during which seniors can enroll in Medicare Advantage plans began on Oct. 15 and ends Dec. 7.  During this open enrollment period, many of Nevada’s senior citizens will assess their health care needs and weigh their options carefully to determine whether a Medicare Advantage plan is right for them.

As a physician and the chief medical officer of HealthCare Partners Medical Group, I have a great deal of knowledge and experience related to Medicare Advantage plans, and I urge seniors to make informed decisions this fall.

Medicare Advantage plans can be an excellent choice for seniors without private supplemental insurance, as many offer improved access to coordinated care and protection against high out-of-pocket expenses. Medicare Advantage is an alternative to what is known as Medicare Fee-For-Service or “original Medicare.”  Medicare Advantage plans typically provide prescription drug coverage and eliminate the need to purchase a Medigap policy. The premiums tend to be lower than you would pay by purchasing original Medicare, Part D (prescription drug coverage) and Medigap separately.

When comparing Medicare Advantage plans, it is essential to consider the costs, benefits and health care provider choices within each available plan. You should take time to learn about the “in-network” providers associated with the health insurance plan.  It is important to know whether the providers have a reputation for offering high-quality, coordinate care and if they have a large enough network to meet your health care needs.  Finally, you should also consider access to the primary care physicians, specialists and other providers you use on a regular basis under each plan. Consistency of care has numerous benefits, especially for those who feel comfortable with their current health care providers.

When considering your coverage options this fall, pick the plan that works best for you. It’s a big decision, and I hope seniors explore their options during this year’s enrollment period.

Dr. Amir Bacchus is the chief medical officer and co-founder of HealthCare Partners Medical Group.  Bacchus received his M.D. from Wayne State University School of Medicine in 1993 and is a diplomat of the American Board of Internal Medicine.

 

 

Protect your Winter Landscape from Hungry Wildlife

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Protect your Winter Landscape from Hungry Wildlife
by gardening expert Melinda Myers

There’s no doubt that managing critters in the landscape can be a challenge especially as food supplies start to dwindle. If you are battling with rabbits, deer, groundhogs or other wildlife, don’t let down your guard as the growing season begins to wind down.

Be proactive. Start before they get into the habit of dining on your landscape. It is easier to keep them away than break the dining habit.

Fence them out. Fencing is the best defense against most wildlife.  A four feet tall fence around a small garden will keep out rabbits.  Secure the bottom tight to the ground or bury it several inches to prevent rabbits and voles from crawling underneath.  Or fold the bottom of the fence outward, making sure it’s tight to the ground. Animals tend not to crawl under when the bottom skirt faces away from the garden.

Go deeper, at least 12 to 18 inches, if you are trying to discourage woodchucks. And make sure the gate is secure. Many hungry animals have found their way into the garden through openings around and under the gate.

A five foot fence around small garden areas can help safeguard your plantings against hungry deer. Some gardeners report success surrounding their garden with fishing line mounted on posts at one and three foot heights.

Break out the repellents. Homemade and commercial repellents can be used.  Apply before the animals start feeding and reapply as directed. Consider using a natural product like Messina’s Animal Stopper (www.Messinas.com). It is made of herbs, safe to use and smells good.

Scare ‘em away. Blow up owls, clanging pans, rubber snakes, slivers of deodorant soap, handfuls of human hair and noise makers are scare tactics that have been used by gardeners for years. Consider your environment when selecting a tactic. Urban animals are used to the sound and smell of people.  Alternate scare tactics for more effective control.  The animals won’t be afraid of a snake that hasn’t moved in weeks.

Combine tactics. Use a mix of fencing, scare tactics and repellents.  Keep monitoring for damage. If there are enough animals and they are hungry, they will eat just about anything.

Don’t forget about nature.  Welcome hawks and fox into your landscape. Using less pesticides and tolerating some critters, their food source, will encourage them to visit your yard. These natural pest controllers help keep the garden-munching critters under control.

And most importantly, don’t give up.  A bit of persistence, variety and adaptability is the key to success.  Investing some time now will not only deter existing critters from dining in your landscape, but will also reduce the risk of animals moving in next season.
Gardening expert, TV/radio host, author & columnist Melinda Myers has more than 30 years of horticulture experience and has written over 20 gardening books, including Can’t Miss Small Space Gardening. She hosts The Great Courses “How to Grow Anything” DVD series and the nationally syndicated Melinda’s Garden Moment segments. Myers is also a columnist and contributing editor for Birds & Blooms magazine. Myers’ web site, www.melindamyers.com, offers gardening videos, podcasts, and garden tips. 

Inclined Platform Wheelchair Lift assists with daily life and mobility

July 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

butterfly-chair

Inclined Platform Wheelchair Lift assists with daily life and mobility
The wheelchair lift designed by Butler Mobility Products provide numerous safety features

Butler Mobility’s inclined platform wheelchair lift has helped countless customers better navigate their homes. From installing a lift for customers who have never been able to move from one floor of their home, to installing a lift so a customer can move easily and freely between multiple floors, the inclined platform wheelchair lift helps restore quality of life and mobility.

The wheelchair lift system allows customers to take an entire wheelchair up stairs and down stairs, allowing for it to be used on every floor of the home or building. More than that, the system also ensures that the movement between the floors is safe and accessible.

In addition to providing necessary accessibility, the lift platform is designed to have a standard lifting capacity of 500 pounds, with an optional lifting capacity of 750 pounds.

ADA-compliant, the wheelchair lifts also meet or exceed all National Safety Code requirements. Heavily equipped with many safety features, the inclined platform wheelchair lift has an emergency stop button standard. Key-operated controls, an optional feature, are convenient for households that need parental control of the system. The two-rail design also means installation of the device in the home is simple and requires fairly minimal changes to the stairway.

A battery backup system will also bring the platform up and down stairs as many as 12-15 times, in the event of a power outage, allowing the user to use the wheelchair lift as necessary during such conditions.

As a dependable and reliable product, Butler Mobility’s Inclined Platform Wheelchair Lift is known for providing comfort and convenience for customers all across the country.

For more information, visit www.butlermobility.com

Media Contact
Patricia Small
717-938-4253
psmall@butlermobility.com

NEW Barbershop Chorus Hits the Stage Running

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

NEW Barbershop Chorus Hits the Stage Running

The Silver Statesmen barbershop chorus, only six months old, is already making a name for itself.
With Jim Halvorson at the helm as our new director, the chorus has met competition head-on in Ontario, CA where they were awarded Plateau A Chorus Champion in their division. They will compete in October in Bakersfield, CA, where the Far Western District competition gets stiffer with choruses from Arizona, Nevada, Southern Utah, California, and Hawaii.
With nearly 80 men on the roster, the Silver Statesmen will be performing locally at four different venues to celebrate the 75th anniversary of their parent organization, the Barbershop Harmony Society.

The show, “Celebrate Harmony”, will be at these locations:

■ Friday, August 2, 7pm, Sun City Anthem – Freedom Hall, 1815 Hovenweep St., Henderson
■ Saturday, August 10, 7pm, Sun City Summerlin – Starbright Theater, 2215 Thomas Ryan Blvd., Las Vegas
■ Sunday, August 11, 2pm, Winchester Cultural Center, 3130 McLeod Dr., Las Vegas
■ Saturday, October 5, 2pm, Desert Spring United Methodist Church, 120 N. Pavilion Center Dr., Las Vegas

The Silver Statesmen chorus is Nevada’s largest men’s a cappella group. It is an award-winning, all volunteer chorus known for its thrilling, close harmonies and commitment to musical excellence.

The chorus is chartered as the Las Vegas Chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society. Proud to perform and preserve the unique sound of “barbershop” harmony, the chorus also sings a broad repertoire of other musical styles.
The chorus provides singing, music and performance education opportunities, as well as Youth In Harmony programs in communities within the Las Vegas Valley and throughout Southern Nevada. The chorus, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit educational organization, is self-sustaining through gifts, performance fees, admission to shows, and other fundraising activities.

The Silver Statesmen invites men of all ages to join. The chorus rehearses at 7pm each Thursday, at Christ the King Community Church, 4925 S. Torrey Pines Dr., Las Vegas, NV 89118. For more information, visit www.silverstatesmen.com

SilverStatesmen Ontario CA 5-11-13 (1)

VETERANS VILLAGE LAS VEGAS OFFERS EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Seeks Food Pantry and Water Donations; Open on July 4

 

WHAT:           Due to food and water shortage, Veterans Village, a temporary housing facility for vets that also offers a comprehensive roster of services to help vets heal and succeed – invites the community to donate bottled water and canned food items to provide relief to veterans and individuals in need.

 

Particularly during the extreme heat of the summer, Veterans Village is running low on supplies as they shelter vets and their families seeking respite from the heat.

                       

                        Veterans Village remains open on July 4 to shelter veterans, serve the community and  accept donations.

 

WHERE:         Veterans Village Las Vegas

                        1150 Las Vegas Blvd. South

                        Las Vegas, Nevada 89104

 

                       

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org.

TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

 

Terry Murphy, a longtime local businesswoman and community leader who is president of Strategic Solutions and serves as president of Downtown Las Vegas Alliance, is the SHARE Humanitarian for the month of May for her volunteering efforts with Veterans Village, The Rape Crisis Center and the Variety Early Leaning Center Lorenzi Campus.TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

Murphy also serves as Honorary Consul for the Republic of Ireland and as a board member of The Smith Center for the Performing Arts.

 

Each month, SHARE honors those in the community who give without hesitation to help others in need. Murphy was selected for this honor from the more than 1,500 SHARE volunteers in Southern Nevada.

SHARE is involved with raising funds for various social causes including housing assistance and neighborhood support service programs.

 

About SHARE:

SHARE is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1994 by business executives dedicated to providing affordable housing for individuals in need. During its nearly 20 year history, the organization has served hundreds of families, seniors, veterans and those with physical challenges or terminal illnesses. sharelasvegas.org

 

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org

 

About The Rape Crisis Center:

The Rape Crisis Center (RCC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1974 by Florence McClure and Sandra Petta as the Community Action Against Rape (CAAR) with the goal of helping those in Clark County heal from the trauma of sexual violence. Today, The Rape Crisis Center operates a 24/7 crisis hot line for sexual assault victims and provides counseling, advocacy and support to help victims begin the healing process and navigate the legal system. The RCC is also committed to the prevention of sexual assault through educational programs and community outreach. To assist victims to become survivors, the organization depends on a core base of dedicated volunteers and staff. These individuals are empathetic and enthusiastic people who give their time, energy, and personal sacrifice to continue to serve Clark County’s victims of sexual violence. This service is provided through face-to-face and over-the- phone intervention with newly victimized individuals.The Rape Crisis Center hotline number is 888-366-1640.  For more information, visit www.therapecrisiscenter.org.

 

EarlySense System Implementation Shown to Reduce Falls, Decrease Transfers to Hospitals and Increase the Quality of Care for Elderly in Multi-Center Nursing Home Study

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

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  EarlySense System Implementation Shown to Reduce Falls, Decrease Transfers to Hospitals and Increase the Quality of Care for Elderly in Multi-Center Nursing Home Study

Clinical data presented at the 2013 Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Geriatrics Society

 

Waltham, MA, May 3, 2013 —- EarlySense, the market leader in Proactive Patient Care Solutions™, announced today the results of a multi-center clinical study demonstrating that the EarlySense system helps medical teams at rehabilitation centers to reduce patient falls as well as the number of patients transferred back to the hospital.  The clinical data was collected from The Hebrew Home at Riverdale, NY and Dorot Medical Center in Israel.  The data was presented today at the 2013 Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) by Hebrew Home medical director and study principal investigator Dr. Zachary J. Palace in a poster titled The Effect of a Continuous Patient Monitoring System on Reducing Hospitalization and Falls in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

 

Dr. Palace said, “The implementation of EarlySense on the post-acute care units has demonstrated a significant decrease in the total number of falls and a trend towards reduction in the readmission rate back to hospitals, thus improving the overall quality of care for the elderly. The system also alerted regarding early warning signs of patient deterioration which enabled our medical team to proactively respond and literally save four lives. As clinicians we are always on the lookout for better ways to provide safer, more effective care for our patients.”

 

Dr. Palace continued, “Patient falls and subsequent hospital transfers are an ongoing challenge for most rehabilitation centers. The EarlySense system is the first technology to help us more effectively and proactively respond to early warning signs of deterioration and potential falls to secure better patient outcomes. We’ve experienced success and look forward to continuing this trend.”

 

Dorot Medical Center principal investigator Dr. Gad Mendelson said, “As the population ages, we are seeing a growing need to provide safer, smarter care without increasing our staffing level.  In this clinical trial, we saw that the continuous monitoring nature of the EarlySense system and its low level of false alarms allowed our team to reach deteriorating patients earlier without creating alarm fatigue.”

 

Eight-hundred and thirty-three (833) patient records at The Dorot Geriatric Center, a 374-bed facility in Netanya, Israel and seven-hundred and seventy-three (773) records at the Hebrew Home at Riverdale, an 870-bed skilled nursing facility in Riverdale, N.Y. were collected and reviewed over a six month period.  The transfer rate to the hospital decreased by 21% (p=0.12) at Dorot, and the falls rate decreased by 38.5% (p<0.05) at the Hebrew Home.

 

Mr. David Weinstein, Executive Vice President & Chief Operating Officer of the Hebrew Home at Riverdale said, “The Hebrew Home at Riverdale has always been at the forefront of care and technology.  Early Sense compliments our unique platform by offering our residents innovative advancements that are safe and effective.”

 

EarlySense Vice President of Clinical and Regulatory Affairs Dalia Argaman said, “We are fortunate to be able to work with two outstanding and highly skilled nursing facilities like the Hebrew Home and Dorot.  We look forward to continuing what has been a very productive cooperation at both of these fine locations with the vision that the EarlySense system will continue to benefit medical teams, patients and their families within the entire healthcare spectrum, in the various markets across the world where we are actively promoting the EarlySense Solutions.”

 

About EarlySense

EarlySense has brought to market an innovative technology designed to advance proactive patient care and enable clinicians to achieve better patient outcomes, by assisting in preventing adverse events from occurring through the early identification of potential adverse events, in the form of falls, pressure ulcers and/or patient deterioration.  The company’s flagship product, the EarlySense System, is a continuous, contact-free, patient safety monitoring solution that monitors and documents a patient’s vital signs and movement using a sensor that is placed underneath a bed mattress. There are no leads or cuffs to connect to the patient who has complete freedom of movement and is not burdened by any cumbersome attachments.  The system was initially designed to monitor non-ICU ‘lower risk’ patients on medical surgical floors who are usually monitored by nursing staff approximately once every four hours. The system is currently installed at hospitals and rehabilitation centers in the USA and Europe.  It is also commercially available in Canada. Hospital administrators report that patients, their families and staff feel more comfortable knowing the system is in place.  EarlySense Inc. is headquartered in Waltham, MA.  Investors include: JK&B, Pitango Venture Capital, Etgar Challenge Fund, ProSeed VC Fund (TASE: PRSD), Docor International Management, Noaber, and Bridge Investment Fund, and Peter Soderberg, managing partner of Worthy Ventures Resources, LLC and former president and CEO of Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: HRC).  For additional information, please visit www.earlysense.com.

 

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Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

At a time when thousands of Baby Boomers are reaching the age of 65 every day, the issues of senior rights, elder laws, and anti-ageism have never been more important, more volatile, or more questioned. After all, this is the generation that was ready to take down the establishment fifty years ago, and they haven’t lost any of their desire to change the world for the better. And, they have the numbers to do it. Here are our 100 top blogs for seniors dealing with senior rights, law & policy, and anti-ageism.

Boomers Against The Law

  1. Elder Law Plus: lawyer Evan H. Farr blogs about topics concerning elder law, including probate strategies and parental care.
  2. Michigan Elder Law Blog: the attorneys at Barsch & Joswick provide seniors and their loved ones with sage advice on a variety of Elder law issues.
  3. Everything Elder Law: Evan Farr is back at it again, this time focusing on Elder Law news, concepts, and innovations from around the country.
  4. Massachusetts Estate and Elder Law Blog: lawyer and blogger Stephanie Konarski gives tips on estate planning and other elder law topics.
  5. New York Elder Law Attorney Blog: your source for elder law news and comment in New York, this blog analyzes nursing home legislation and elder care costs.
  6. Elder Law Prof. Blog: Elder Law professor Kim Dayton authors a really nice blog that covers a wide range of Elder law issues, from Supreme Court cases to seminars.
  7. The Pop Tort: can a consumer advocates blog dealing with civil justice be cute? This blog proves it can, complete with an adorable “Pop Tort” logo, even while exploring such issues as Medicare and Medicaid lawsuits, nursing home scams, and medical malpractice against the elderly, among other legal issues.
  8. Supportive Senior Solutions: this blog from a geriatric care management practice in New York covers issues related to geriatric care, caregiving, and healthcare laws for the elderly and infirm.
  9. Aging Beats the Alternative: elder care specialist Lorie Ebers uses her blog to talk about overcoming the challenges of aging, caring for aging parents, and the less talked about side of elder law: Boomer divorce.
  10. Elder Law Blog: lawyer Ronald C. Morton’s elder law blog is full of sage advice for seniors looking how to tap into Veteran’s benefits, how to plan for their golden years, and more.
  11. The Best Elder Law Blog: published by the attorneys at Lamson & Cutner, this blog discusses elder law cases, the Affordable Care Act, and same-sex marriage.
  12. Elder Law Tips and News: the lawyers at Cooper, Adel & Associates bring you posts on living trusts, aging issues, and general estate planning.
  13. The Connecticut Elder Law Blog: lawyer Michael Keenan provides his readers with estate planning tips, elder fraud, and Medicare rules.
  14. The Teddy Bear Lawyers: attorney Rick Law gives readers a great resource for Elder Law in the Chicagoland area. Find articles on protecting vulnerable seniors and financial planning.
  15. Oregon Elder Law: attorney Orrin Onken blogs on elder law, estate planning, and probate proceedings in plain, easy to understand language.
  16. Florida Elder Law and Estate Blog: this informative blog includes great articles on VA benefits, estate planning, and trusts.
  17. Golden Law Center: written by attorney Sasha Golden, the Golden Law Center blog discusses elder law, special needs planning, guardianship, wills and trusts, and estate administration.
  18. Kraft Elder Law: attorney Robert Kraft blogs about Medicaid, Medicare, wills, trusts, probate, veterans benefits, and other elder law topics.
  19. Pennsylvania Law Blog: this elder law blog by the attorneys at the law offices of Shober & Rock discusses Medicaid, taxes, Veterans, banks, and annuities.
  20. Long Beach Elder Law Blog: this blog focuses on elder abuse, estate protection, the Cal MediConnect program, and reform of health law.
  21. Houston Elder Law Blog: the folks at Wright Abshire Attorneys blog about care planning, estate planning, Medicaid Planning, Probate & Estate Administration, and and Veteran’s Benefits.
  22. Hauptman Law Blog: readers of this blog can learn more about elder, estate, and special needs law. Includes articles on the Medicare Settlement and VA Aid.
  23. Fulkerson Elder Law Blog: the function of this elder law blog is for the firm to respond to common questions clients have about elder law and review developments in the law impacting elder law and estate planning.
  24. CMLP Estate Planning and Elder Law Blog: readers can look forward to reviewing articles on simplifying their estate plan and elder law news items of note.
  25. Massachusetts Estate Planning and Probate Blog: attorney Matthew Karr keeps readers up to date on estate planning and probate news and information.
  26. Marshall Elder and Estate Planning Blog: the author of this elder law blog has over 30 years experience in estate planning, special needs planning, and estates.
  27. Hartford, CT Elder Law Blog: the attorney’s at Ruggiero Ziogas & Allaire discuss estate planning, care planning, Medicaid, Veteran’s Benefits, and Probate.
  28. El Paso Elder Law Blog: the law firm of Stephanie Townsend Allala and Associates blogs on estate planning, guardianships, Medicaid Planning, Nursing Home Abuse, and Trust & Probate.
  29. Miami Probate Law Blog: the folks at the Byrant law firm keep readers up-to-date on estate administration, probate court, estate litigation, and the nuisances of will and trust disputes.
  30. Elder Law News: attorney Brian A. Raphan is based in New York City and specializes in Wills, Estates, Trusts, and Elder Care issues. His blog is full of great resources.
  31. Aging & Law in West Virginia: this blog contains news in law and aging in West Virginia, written by the West Virginia Senior Legal Aid organization.
  32. Florida Elder Law and Estate Planning: this Florida Certified Elder Law attorney provides in depth insights and news to help Floridians protect themselves and preserve their assets.
  33. Family Law Blog Maryland: while this blog looks at all matters pertaining to Family Law, elder law sneaks in as a prevalent theme in many of the cases discussed. They look at legal matters like when divorce and retirement coincide, or when grandparents wish to take custody of their grandchildren.
  34. Phoenix AZ Family Law Blog: looking at issues older couples face in Arizona, this family law blog explores the specific challenges elders face in divorces and custody battles, complete with the latest policy changes and laws.
  35. Otherspoon: hospice volunteer and blogger Ann Neumann talks about care-giving and the realities, politics, and senior rights involved in death and dying.

Seniors Talk Policy And Politics

  1. Aging in Place: this blog is concerned with seniors who are dealing with shrinking benefits and increasing costs—seniors find answers on how to protect themselves.
  2. Estate in Denial: providing news, analysis, and commentary on abusive practices occurring in probate courts. Features original perspective and direct communication.
  3. Florida Estate Planning Lawyer Blog: this blog covers estate planning legal issues, cases of interest, and news with a focus on Florida elder law.
  4. McGuire Woods: the people at McGuire Woods author this great blog on long term care legal issues, including timely news, articles, and white papers.
  5. Illinois Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: published by the law office of Wilson & Wilson, this blog covers asset protection, banking, estate planning, and trusts.
  6. Illinois Nursing Home Abuse Blog: covers Illinois nursing home law, including Supreme Court cases and other information relating to residents and family members.
  7. Law Office of Donald D. Vanarelli Blog: provides readers in New Jersey with information on elder law, estate and special needs planning, and mediation services.
  8. Maryland Nursing Home Lawyer Blog: this blog offers insight on nursing home abuse reports, legislation, and legal opinions of elder law in Maryland.
  9. Massachusetts Estate Planning, Probate & Elder Law: elder law attorney Brian Barreira writes on legal issues involving death, taxes, special needs, and long-term elder care.
  10. New Jersey Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: blog posts explore life and death in New Jersey from a perspective of estate planning, elder law, taxation, probate, and estate administration.
  11. Medina Law Group: postings provide readers with advice on estate planning and management, estate taxes, elder law, and VA benefits.
  12. North Carolina Wills and Trusts: this blog provides readers with estate planning and elder law news with a North Carolina focus.
  13. California Nursing Home Abuse Law Blog: covers nursing home abuse, elder law abuse, and features many quality articles relating to California elder law.
  14. Nursing Home Law Blog: this well written blog discusses elder issues, legislation, legal news, protections of elder rights, and helpful health tips.
  15. PA Elder Estate and Fiduciary Law Blog: focuses on elder law, long-term care, end-of-life and health care surrogate decision-making, and estate planning.
  16. Patti’s Blog: find information about this lawyer’s practice, which concentrates on advocacy for seniors. She shares personal interests and her passions.
  17. Pennsylvania Nursing Home Abuse Lawyer Blog: this blog discusses nursing home abuse laws, cases, and news items from Pennsylvania.
  18. Barbara Cashman Blog: Barbara blogs about elder law and policy issues, and often hosts guest bloggers to share their insights on elder law and news.
  19. NJ Elder Law: lawyer Kenneth Vercammen blogs about topics related to estate planning and elder law. He was once awarded the NJ State Bar Municipal Court Practitioner of the Year.
  20. The Senior Sentinel: a blog compiling news and information for Baby Boomers, the Senior Sentinel concentrates on the intersection of ageism and public policy both nationally and world-wide.
  21. Elder Consult: this geriatric medicine blog not only covers Alzheimers, dementia, financial decision making, and medications, it also discusses related legal issues such as elder financial abuse.
  22. Grey Pride: a UK blog by the Anchor Digital Marketing team is dedicated to keeping older people at the top of the political agenda and petitioning the government to create a Minister for Older People to ensure their needs are met.
  23. Over 65 Blog: project organizers from Harvard, Yale, and The Hastings Center host this blog for “seniors seeking solutions for health care and security, mainly looking at health care system reforms, elder law policies and practices, and how seniors can achieve a stronger role in the future of health care.
  24. Reaping Hope Blog: a blog from an NGO in Nepal promoting dignified aging and elder rights, Reaping Hope explores elder abuse and elder oppression while actively helping elderly people claim their rights and challenge discrimination.

Age Against The Machine: Anti-Ageism

  1. Ageist Beauty: the musings, product reviews, and random thoughts of a woman who is fighting against her age.
  2. Everyday Ageism Project: this blog aims to capture people’s everyday experiences dealing with ageism. The author has discovered that ageism is the most commonly experienced form of prejudice.
  3. The Lonely Gerontologist: professor Kelly Yokum blogs about all things aging—including aging stereotypes and other aging topics that come to mind.
  4. My Elder Advocate: this blog provides comprehensive coverage of ageism, the dangers of nursing homes, elder abuse, and elder care.
  5. The Roaming Boomers: David and Carol are great examples of a couple who doesn’t let age get in the way of living life to the fullest.
  6. The Gypsy Nester: Veronica and David show readers how to rock the empty nest and get the most out of life as you age.
  7. Changing Aging: this multi-blog platform challenges conventional views on aging. The authors believe aging is a strength, rich in developmental potential and growth.
  8. The Elders: founded by Nelson Mandela in 2007, the Elders is a group of seniors committed to addressing global challenges, including child marriage and climate change.
  9. Beauty and Wisdom: the blog of photographer Robbie Kaye, who traveled to salons throughout the US to photograph and interview women in their 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s and discovered that beauty is ageless.
  10. Advanced Style: don’t tell these women they are too old to model hip and alluring fashions. This blog teaches women how to dress to impress and that age is only a number.
  11. RL TV: the only cable network and online destination for folks 50+, features a nice blog that provides tips on elder issues and promotes active living.
  12. The 70-Something Blog: blogger Judy informs readers how to live a full and engaging life as she chronicles her journey of aging.
  13. Retirement is Work: newly retired librarian and blogger resolves to post one good thing about retirement every day for a year, but along the way struggles with senior rights and anti-ageism.
  14. Yo Is This Ageist?: a humorous blog by Ashton Applewhite dedicated to determining whether age-related remarks are offensive, “challenging the stereotypes that segregate us by age.”
  15. This Chair Rocks: a smart and sassy blog by Ashton Applewhite that challenges the ideas of ageism with humor and snark. All stereotypes and insensitive remarks are grounds for brilliant blog posts.
  16. Senior Planet: “aging with attitude” is the tagline of this blog community of older adults using technology to connect with each other and take on the issues of ageism and senior rights.
  17. Changing Aging: a blog founded by Dr. Bill Thomas to promote “a radical reinterpretation of longevity” which focuses on anti-ageism and senior rights, as well as getting the most out of a long life.
  18. Time Goes By: Ronni Bennett takes on aging, ageism and related issues with humor, exploring the truth of “what it’s really like to get old.” She starts by rejecting the “cutesy” terms for old people – they’re called “elders” around here!
  19. The Magic of Middle-Aged Women: author Daniel Even Weiss – a man – blogs on the theme of his latest book, The Magic of Middle-Aged Women, where he challenges the prevailing ageist idea that women don’t get better as they age. They do.
  20. Advanced Style: Ari Seth Cohen, a young-ish photographer, roams the New York City streets photographing stylish and creative elders. Here, art challenges the paradigm that age and beauty can’t co-exist.
  21. The New Old Age: the New York Times blog on aging takes advantage of the newspaper’s top writers to explore the unprecedented intergenerational challenge of the Baby Boomers.
  22. The Little Old Lady Stays Put (or doesn’t): explores the “lives, lifestyles and issues of interesting older people,” touching on the issues surrounding ageism, elder rights, living with dementia, and overcoming the struggles of aging with strength and good humor.
  23. Naked at Our Age: advocate of ageless sexuality, Joan Price, talks about sex and aging, taking on Senior Rights subjects like safer sex for seniors while providing helpful tips.
  24. Aging & Work at Boston College: scholars, academics, and researchers share their findings on ageism in the workplace and the challenges aging workers face in this PhD-heavy blog by The Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College.
  25. Ethnic Elders: this newsy blog by New America Media examines the Senior Rights issues and Elder Law of minority groups such as age discrimination, lawsuits related to Social Security, and elder healthcare reform.
  26. The Everyday Ageism Project: blending blogging and research, this site’s goal is to capture the experience of age discrimination. The forum is full of people sharing their experiences in a supportive environment.
  27. Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens Blog: the Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens sub-blog offers wide ranging posts on issues including senior rights and ageism – with its signature left-wing perspective.
  28. Clinical Geriatrics: created as more of a peer-reviewed clinical journal by the American Geriatrics Society, some of the top scholars in geriatrics converge on this blog to discuss geriatric health and wellness issues, which often cross over into legal and anti-ageism issues.
  29. Age Action Alliance: this organization brings together a network of 300 organizations and individuals committed to helping older people. Its blog is dedicated to improving older people’s lives through advocating against ageism, particularly in Britain.
  30. Manitoba Senior Centres: this Canadian blog covers the rampant ageism in Canada and promotes world elder abuse awareness. It also has a list of resources for older adults.
  31. Fierce with Age: defying ageism goes mainstream at this blog, created by veteran journalist Dr. Carol Orsborn. Having written about the Boomer generation for major newspapers and blogged for the Huffington Post and NPR’s Next Avenue, Orsborn is well equipped to take on the spiritual and policy hurdles of aging.
  32. Live Better Boomer!: a Philadelphia-based blog, by social worker Tiffany Matthews, devoted to helping educate and empower Boomers advocate for their own improved healthcare.
  33. Third Age: billed as “health for Boomers and beyond,” Third Age offers relatively fluffy fare, like “Change your Mood with Color,” to the legal issues surrounding Boomer divorce and care-giving.
  34. The Old Gunhand: one facet of senior citizen rights you don’t see every day is elder gun advocates. This website not only tells you the best types of guns for elderly wielders, it also goes into gun policy and senior self-defense.
  35. Age Discrimination Info: a simple name for a one-stop source of statistics and information on age discrimination, including legislation, cases, news, publications, events and training. The perfect resource for the activist.
  36. Age UK: the largest organization in the United Kingdom for working with and for older people, this website has an entire section dedicated to age discrimination and ageism.
  37. National Youth Rights Association: not just for youngsters, the National Youth Rights Association combats ageism in all its forms. In fact, they probably wouldn’t appreciate being called “youngsters.”
  38. Disability and Representation: a blog by writer, photographer and activist Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg that discusses (and tries to change the discourse about) disability rights and ageism, along with autism.
  39. Over 50: Career coaching and workshops for the over-50 crowd, this blog doesn’t stop at finding a job. This site explores Baby Boomer activism in and out of the workplace.
  40. Activist Post: while this blog deals with many topics requiring advocacy, they often include issues that regard Senior Rights, Elder Law and anti-ageism.
  41. California Booming: an informational blog dedicated to California Baby Boomers, this blog covers everything from sex, to diet, to politics of the Boomer generation, including issues concerning senior rights and ageism in the workplace.

Nevada Senior Guide Announces Active Seniors Expo

May 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Las Vegas 

http://myvegasmag.com/las-vegas-senior-expo-sept-22-2013

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Expo Sponsors & Proceeds Benefiting The Alzheimer’s Association

Just a Few Things Our Expo Has to Offer: 
 

  • Ballroom Dancing!
  • Balance & Strength Training!
  • How to Improve Your Sex Life!
  • Senior Community Resources!
  • Live Entertainment!
  • Exercise Demonstrations!
  • Win Free Golf!
  • Win Free Staycation!
  • Free Door Prizes!
  • Play Booth Bingo & Win a Grand Prize Gift Basket!
  • And much more!

Santa Barbara Palms – Nevada Senior Guide

4880 Santa Barbara St, Las Vegas NV 89121

Santa Barbara Palms apartment homes is a brand new affordable Senior Living community offering 2 bedroom 2 bath options in the southeast area of Las Vegas, NV. Amenities include a huge clubhouse complete with kitchen, fitness center, media room, billiards, craft room, class room, computer and business center, health and wellness room and free WiFi. We also provide gated entry, covered parking, pool & spa, picnic areas with BBQs, elevator access to all floors, alarm systems and so much more!

Office Hours

Mon-Fri 8 am to 5 pmSaturday 10 am to 4 pm

Enjoyable Activities for a Senior Citizen Party by Misha Anatolia

May 3, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

Senior citizens are not too old to enjoy themselves, especially if the right  activities are chosen for a party. Great senior party activities keep seniors  engaged, ignite their imaginations, and let them rest. Here’s what to consider  when planning a party for seniors.

Give it a purpose Senior citizens are in their golden years, and they’ve  earned their rest. They’ve also earned the right to strong opinions, and  sometimes have very strong ideas about what they will and will not do. When  planning a party for senior citizens, don’t assume you know what is best for  your guests. Plan the party with a purpose, give them a reason to be interested,  but leave the joining in activities to the participants. Some good activities  that bring a sense of purpose to a party involve charity. You can plan a party  around knitting, sewing, quilting, or crocheting for charity. Lilybug is a  charity that makes blankets and caps for babies in the neonatal intensive care  units of hospitals. Operation Caregiver is a knitting charity that creates warm  handknits for hardworking men and women in service. Having a clear purpose when  at a party allows guests to relax into the experience.

Ignite their imaginations One of the best things about growing older is  being able to lay down the mantel of hard work and eventually return to a sense  of childlike play. Believe it or not, seniors often like to engage in art,  crafts, and imaginative play. Engage this sense of imagination with activities  like calligraphy lessons, watercolor painting, or crochet. Hire a magician,  musician, or storyteller, and then let the guests have the floor while they tell  their own stories. Decorate the party with lots of color or with sweeping themes  to create a wonderland for your guests to lose themselves in.

Let them rest Great party activities, like dancing, get guests moving.  Choose music from every era of their lifetime, and get their memories moving  along with their bodies. At a party for senior citizens, it is important to have  adequate rest, as well. Plan a high tea with finger sandwiches, ladyfingers,  tea, and petit-fours. Arrange furniture in conversation circles near tables  laden with refreshments. Host a film noir movie night where guests can attend as  their favorite old film stars, but can also feel free to put their feet up or  doze when the movie runs too long.

Cater to seniors’ imagination, sense of play, and desire to be a part of the  world. Make the party mean something. Give the party a theme and a purpose. Then  let your guests be your guides. If they want to spend the entire party standing  by the refreshments and reminiscing over the last time they encountered  croissants as fluffy as these, but they don’t have any interest in the ceramics  lesson you’ve got planned, float with it. Let the party go where it will. Being  a good host is about letting the party become a success in spite of you, not  because of you.

Misha Anatolia is a relationship and bridal shower writer. For more bridal shower planning tips and other bridal shower information, go to bridal-showers.org. If you  want more articles, visit our site and click on the Contact Us link.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Misha_Anatolia

 

Senior Citizen Insurance by Jerry Fatjo

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Senior citizen insurance is used by people who are 65 years old or above. The  reason why this is a separate category of insurance is because senior citizens  tend to have more health related troubles, compared to younger people.

Therefore it is important for a senior citizen to find the right type of  insurance. They need to find insurance that is both affordable and offers good  coverage for their specific needs. Seniors do need insurance for the simple  reason that Medicare only provides partial coverage. The thing to do here is to  find out exactly what medicare covers and then have secondary insurance to cover  other expenses.

An example would be, Medicare part A will cover some of their inpatient care,  nursing home care and some health care. Medicare part B covers some types of  their outpatient hospital care, medical equipment and occupational therapy.

However, medicare of any type will usually not cover annual physicals. In  order to get this the patient may have to get the senior health insurance. This  is why it is important to check with your broker and see what exactly is covered  by medicare before getting insurance.

With the use of the internet it is easy nowadays to find an insurance company  that gives affordable rates. Although before getting your senior citizen  insurance coverage, it is always better to talk to an agent before signing  anything. Senior citizens can also qualify for some life insurance plans. There  is a common misconception that seniors do not have anybody directly dependent on  them, therefore they do not need life insurance policies.

This is simply not true in all cases and should be discussed with your  insurance agent or broker. The idea behind life insurance is to give financial  protection for family members. This way they are not left to pay for the funeral  and any unsettled debt that is left behind.

When it comes to the unfortunate situation, such as a loved one’s demise, you  will want to be sure everything or everyone is taken care of. This is especially  true if the person leaves behind a spouse and, or children. The surviving wife  or husband will have many expenses such as rent and health insurance. In this  case a life insurance policy will be of great help for the surviving family  member or members to take care of the daily, weekly, or even monthly living  expenses.

For more information on insurance for seniors check out  [http://www.senior-citizen-insurance-online.com/]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jerry_Fatjo

 

NEON LIT PRESENTS NINE READERS APRIL 26

April 22, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Las Vegas 

NEON LIT PRESENTS NINE READERS APRIL 26

 

Fiction and poetry writers from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas’ Creative Writing Masters of Fine Arts program read monthly at the Arts Factory

(April 18, 2013– Las Vegas ) – Neon Lit, a monthly literary event presented by the UNLV MFA and PhD programs, will present student readers Friday, April 26, at Trifecta Gallery in the Arts Factory, 107 E. Charleston Blvd. Doors open at 6 p.m., reading starts at 7 p.m. Prior to the event, enjoy beer and specialty cocktails at Bar + Bistro in the Arts Factory.

This month, we celebrate writers who are finishing their programs at UNLV. Reading this month will be Justin Irizarry, John Douglas, Mark Lennon, Mary Catherine Martin, Andrew Merecicky, Joe Langdon, Mollie Bergeron, Tim Moungey, and Jackson Wills. All will be reading selections from their thesis or dissertation.

Often attracting more than 80 attendees monthly, the downtown literary event has showcased the work of the university’s creative writing students and guest writers since 2009. The readings reflect the diverse student body, and offer the opportunity to hear a variety of fiction and poetry created in Las Vegas . Neon Lit is hosted monthly in one of the most renowned contemporary art galleries in the arts district.

ABOUT NEON LIT:

Supported by the Black Mountain Institute, UNLV and the Arts Factory Las Vegas, Neon Lit is a monthly downtown literary event showcasing the university’s creative writing MFA and PhD students. For more information visit http://neonlit.org/.

Spring Cooking Workshops by the Springs Cafe Presented by the Culinary Academy of Las Vegas

April 22, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Las Vegas 

Spring Cooking Workshops by the Springs Cafe

Presented by the Culinary Academy of Las Vegas

Las Vegas- April 19, 2013 – The Culinary Academy of Las Vegas announces the spring set of Springs Cafe Cooking Workshops. Learn how to grill, cook vegetables found at the local farmers market to perfection, and the slow and low art of smoked meats from the knowledgeable chefs of the Springs Cafe. Cooking demonstrations include plenty of scrumptious samples, recipes, and discussion with questions from attendees encouraged.

All classes are located at Springs Preserve, 333 S. Valley View Blvd. at US 95. Reservations are required. Space is very limited. For more information and to register please call (702) 822-7700.

WHEN: Every third Saturday of the month, 10 a.m.-Noon
COST: $30 members, $40 non-members per workshop

Member bonus: $75 all 3 three workshops purchased together

CLASS SCHEDULE

April 20: Grilling Favorites

Chefs show how to safely use a gas grill to skillfully prepare the grilling staples of beef, chicken and shrimp. Learn how to perfect steak, marinate and grill chicken satays, and season and grill shrimp like a pro.

May 18: Vegetables Under Fire

Grilling isn’t just for meat! You will learn how to properly grill vegetables and make a picture-perfect grilled vegetable salad, as well as, what seasonings work best for grilled vegetables and how to pickle veggies that are in season.

 

June 15: The Art of Smoked Food: Slow and Low Cookery

Smoked foods are in a flavor league of their own. Learn the method of cooking “low and slow” from the chefs of the Springs Cafe and how to create smoked salmon and beef brisket, as well as a Memphis-style BBQ sauce, in addition to cold smoking vs. hot smoking techniques.

About Culinary Academy of Las Vegas

Founded in 1993, Culinary Academy of Las Vegas (formerly the Culinary Training Academy), the country’s leading nonprofit culinary and hospitality training institute, was developed through a joint labor-management trust representing private sector employers, the Culinary Union Local 226 and the Bartenders Union Local 165. The Academy is licensed by the Nevada Commission on Post-Secondary Education and trains several thousand students per year for participating employers in the hospitality industry. Offerings include a 50-seat bistro-style restaurant, Westside Bistro, and a 400-seat banquet and events center located at the 710 West Lake Mead Blvd. campus. The Academy is the caterer of record for The Smith Center for the Performing Arts and operator of the cafe and catering services at the Springs Preserve. Culinary Academy of Las Vegas is an equal opportunity employer/program. For more information, call 702.924.2100 or visit www.theculinaryacademy.org. Stay up to date on happenings on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterestand YouTube.

Not your ordinary joe – National Wellness Authority, Joe Piscatella, offers SIX-week Wellness and Heart Health Program

April 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

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Not your ordinary joe – National Wellness Authority, Joe Piscatella, offers SIX-week Wellness and Heart Health Program

 

RENO, Nev. (Feb. 15, 2013) –One of the country’s foremost authorities on lifestyle habits and heart health, Joe Piscatella, will offer 6 Weeks to a Healthier Heart – a six-week wellness program designed to improve heart health. The program will focus on lifestyle changes that can have a lasting impact on overall and heart health.

Piscatella underwent coronary bypass surgery at age 32 – and according to his doctors, his prognosis wasn’t good. He found a way to stay faithful to a healthy lifestyle, turned his life around and now is one of the longest-living survivors of bypass surgery – 35 years and counting.

This program is designed specifically for people who could benefit from practical tips that can be applied to daily life to achieve lasting results. Piscatella’s seminars – which TIME magazine calls a “force for positive change” – have inspired millions to achieve a healthier, better-balanced life.

Cost for the six-week program is only $50, which includes all six sessions, as well as pre- and post-fitness profiles to track results. The fitness profiles include a blood draw to calculate total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol), LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol), triglycerides and glucose, as well as weight and Body Mass Index (BMI) measurements.

Program participants across the country have reported proven results upon completion of the program. “On average, participants have lost 10.5 pounds, reduced their LDL cholesterol by 6.2 percent and increased their weekly exercise and activity by 28 minutes,” Piscatella said. “What’s even more impressive is that participants continued to report positive results even five months after the program ends. It is truly inspiring to see people adopt healthy lifestyle habits and improve their health.”

Each weekly 90-minute seminar focuses on a specific topic. All seminars will be held 6-7:30 p.m. at Hyatt Place , 1790 E Plumb Lane in Reno .

  • Monday, April 22: Make Your Health Last As Long As Your Life
  • Wednesday, May 1: Eating Healthy In A Doubleburger.com World
  • Wednesday, May 8: Move It Or Lose It
  • Wednesday, May 15: Take A Load Off Your Heart
  • Wednesday, May 22: Raising Fit Kids In A Fast World
  • Wednesday, May 29: Healthy Cooking At Home

More information about the program, including online registration is available at www.renown.org/HeartEvents. For general inquiries, call 775-982-4892.

Special media opportunity: Does a program like this sound appealing to you or a loved one? Media interested in participating in the program and sharing their story are able to do so at no cost. Interested media should contact Ayse (I-Shay) Caglar at 775-982-4609.

Media Interview / Photo Opportunity: Joe Piscatella is available for in-person media interviews Monday, April 22. He is available for other media interviews before that time via phone. Please contact Ayse (I-Shay) Caglar at 775-982-4609 

 Joe Piscatella - casual

About Joe Piscatella

Joe Piscatella, President of the Institute for Fitness and Health, lectures extensively to a variety of associations, including Fortune 100 companies, professional and medical organizations. He has authored 13 best-selling books including “Don’t Eat Your Heart Out,” “The Road to a Healthy Heart Runs Through the Kitchen,” and “Positive Mind, Healthy Heart!”. Piscatella is a frequent guest on television and radio programs that include CNN, the “Today” show, “Fox News” and “Good Morning America,” and is a guest expert on WebMD. He serves on the Legislative Task Force on Youth Health which focuses on improving nutrition and fitness in elementary schools in Washington state. He is also the only non-medical member of the National Institutes of Health Expert Panel on Cardiac Rehabilitation.

About Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health

Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health has more than 30 years of recognition as the region’s leader in heart and vascular care. The Institute for Heart & Vascular Health has championed innovative heart care with a history of firsts including the region’s first open heart surgery, first angioplasty and first stent replacement. Today, the Institute for Heart & Vascular Health continues to lead the way in state-of-the-art technology like the da Vinci Si HD Robotic Surgical System, 64-slice CT scanner, nuclear medicine, cardiac catheterization and the region’s only D-SPECT cameras that rule out heart attacks faster so patients can be diagnosed and treated quickly. With 17 board-certified heart physicians – more than any other hospital in the region – the heart physicians at the Institute for Heart & Vascular Health offer a variety of specialties and more than 345 years of combined cardiology experience. And with several care centers in Reno , Carson City , rural Nevada and Northern California , patients have convenient access to quality heart care throughout the region. For more information, visit renown.org/heart.

 

 

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Ayse E. Caglar, MBA | Marketing Business Partner II 1155 Mill St. H8  Reno , NV   89502 | P 775-982-4609 | F 775-982-4666

Opportunity Village Hosted “All-Star Celebrity Apprentice” Viewing Party OVIPs enjoyed show featuring Penn Jillette as Project Manager

April 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 


Opportunity Village Hosted “All-Star Celebrity Apprentice” Viewing Party OVIPs enjoyed show featuring Penn Jillette as Project Manager

LAS VEGAS , Nev. – Opportunity Village , Las Vegas ’ favorite charity, hosted a viewing party at its Engelstad Campus for an episode of “All-Star Celebrity Apprentice.” The episode featured longtime Opportunity Village supporter and board member, Penn Jillette acting as Project Manager. Jillette and his team won the week’s task and Jillette was awarded two $20,000 checks for Opportunity Village .   “We are extremely grateful to Penn and The Apprentice. The money raised in this episode for Opportunity Village will help assist the nearly 3,000 OVIPs we serve each year,” stated Linda Smith, Associate Executive Director of Opportunity Village . “We can’t wait to continue watching this season and everyone at our organization, including our OVIPs, are rooting for him, along with the rest of Las Vegas !”

OV_Photo 1

Opportunity Village supporter and board member Penn Jillette presented his “All-Star Celebrity Apprentice” winnings to Associate Executive Director of Opportunity Village , Linda Smith. Jillette is once again competing on “Celebrity Apprentice” on behalf of Opportunity Village and recently won $40,000 for the charity.

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Penn Jillette, longtime supporter of Opportunity Village , visited the organization’s Engelstad Campus to present two checks totaling $40,000 that he won for the charity by participating in “All-Star Celebrity Apprentice.” Jillette’s visit to Opportunity Village aired on the Apr. 14 episode of “All-Star Celebrity Apprentice.”

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OVIPs cheered on longtime Opportunity Village supporter and board member, Penn Jillette at a viewing party for “All-Star Celebrity Apprentice” held on Thursday, Apr. 11.

ABOUT OPPORTUNITY VILLAGE MISSION Opportunity Village is a not-for-profit organization that serves people within our community with significant intellectual disabilities, to improve their lives and the lives of their families. Opportunity Village was founded in 1954 by seven families who were determined to give their disabled children the best lives possible. 59 years later, Opportunity Village is one of the most recognized and respected Community Rehabilitation Programs in the United States . Nevada ’s largest employer of people with disabilities, Opportunity Village serves more than 3,000 individuals annually, providing vocational training, employment, habilitation and social recreation programs and services that make their lives more productive and interesting.   Opportunity Village citizens – individuals who were previously considered unemployable – work at Opportunity Village’s Employment Resource Centers and in jobs throughout the community, collectively earning wages amounting to more than $7.6 million in 2012.  They are hard-working and diligent, proudly paying taxes and happily leading more fulfilling lives.   Primarily a self-funded organization, Opportunity Village generates the majority of its operational funding through its employment contracts and fundraising efforts such as the Magical Forest and Great Santa Run, saving Nevada taxpayers $33.7 million.

How Senior Citizens Can Avoid Back Taxes Headache By Chintamani Abhyankar

April 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Recently, economic times have been tough on us all, but probably no tougher  on any other group than senior citizens.  Senior’s have seen their savings  shrink while their expenses rise and they need to be careful that all of this  does not catch them in a tricky tax situation, to boot.

Seniors need to watch out for the “Make Work Pay” credit.  This credit  proposes to reduce taxes for 95% of families while opening a loophole that can  suck in unaware seniors and leave them owing taxes they had no clue they would  owe.  Non-working senior citizens do not qualify for the credit even though  it may automatically add 6.25% to their withholding.  If such affected  seniors do not change their withholding, they can wind up owing at tax time.

There are specific procedures to determine whether your social security  payments are taxable or not.  Seniors need to know if their social security  income is taxable.  Failure to pay taxes owed on social security income can  result in IRS underpayment fines.  Those fines added on top of any tax owed  plus interest could soon become trouble for a senior on a fixed income at tax  time.

If you should have withholding taken from your pension disbursements depends  on many things, like your number of dependents, what status you file under,  additional sources of income, how many pension payments you receive, and your  personal exemptions.  If you need to withhold and you do not withhold  enough, you could face owing back taxes to the IRS.

Remember to take full advantage of all the exemptions and credits offered you  by the IRS.  Don’t miss any possible deduction of your total tax  liability.

If you are planning to get into your retirement account before age 60,  remember that you will face an additional 10% tax on the money you  withdraw.  The Roth IRA is an exception to this along with some  others.  Learn how you might avoid this tax before deciding to take the  money.

The best and easiest way to avoid the IRS back taxes as a senior citizen is –  have a tax professional prepare your income tax return.  Tax professionals  are trained and accredited and have the knowledge to work with you on your  particular tax obligations.  They will know the best methods of obtaining  every legitimate tax exemption, deduction, and credit you deserve.  They  will know how to help you avoid making any decisions that might lead to owing  the IRS back taxes.

Everybody has to pay tax in the US – senior citizens included. Sometimes due  to some misunderstanding about tax laws, senior citizens make mistakes in  calculating their tax liability. Naturally, IRS will follow them and try to  recover back taxes. In fact is, is easy for senior citizens to pay all their  taxes without any hassle. How they should handle their taxes? Chintamani  Abhyankar provides useful tips.

Chintamani Abhyankar, is a well known expert in the field of finance and  taxation for last 25 years. He has written many books explaining inside secrets  of the magic world of personal finance. His famous eBook Stop donating your  money to IRS [http://www.planningyourtax.com] which is now running in its second  edition, provides intricate knowledge and valuable tips on personal finance and  income tax.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Chintamani_Abhyankar

 

Senior Citizens Health – Choose to Be Healthy the Natural Way by Philip Jubb

April 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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As a Senior Citizen your body looks after you, well most of the time. It  behoves us well to as Senior Citizens to  return the favour and look after our  body.

Natural  is about being proactive. You need to be dedicated to making and  keeping your body healthy.

Natural medicine does not cause drowsiness and works with the body to help  you.

Natural medicine, made from natural ingredients, because of its  anti-bacterial effects, is used by many senior citizens in place of traditional  medicine to assist in the cure their ailments.

Natural is not about being a health freak, but more about being a health  conscious person,  making the natural health lifestyle work for and with you.    It seems unlikely that you as a Senior Citizen will have been living a junk food  and quick meal life,  but, if you have,  you will need to consider incorporating  a series vitamins into your regime.

Natural means incorporating more natural solutions in your life. The best way  to prevent, treat, and in many cases cure illness is to give your body the right  tools and let it go to work reduce  the amount of processed food you eat keep  the salt and alcohol down and take more exercise and get more sleep..

Recent studies seem to  have confirmed that an increased intake of water and  the proper immune enhancing nutrients  offer the best defence against most  infections. Water please note! Not alcoholic drinks. In fact one of the most  common causes of headaches is lack of proper hydration.

Even back pain can be caused by a lack of fluids. Spinal discs which are  filled with fluid act as shock absorbers in our spinal column and when they are  not hydrated  they deflate and provide less absorption placing the load on the  shell of the disk instead of using  fluid . Another effects of the fluid level  in disks can be lack of movement, moving your head around and moving your upper  body around while sitting at a desk can help alleviate this and allow the discs  to become rehydrated.

High blood pressure or hypertension an be caused by a lower blood volume from  dehydration. Its a bit obvious but since our blood is over 80% water it can be,  from a volume point of view, very susceptible to changes in hydration.

As a senior citizen you will be able to enjoy the pleasures of life with a  body that functions at its optimum for a good few years yet, once you start  living a natural life, you start feeling better; and that is crucial in dealing  with the everyday stresses and strains of the senior citizen growing ever  older.

Philip

Philip can usually be found at Senior Citizens Health either writing on senior citizens  issues or health issues.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Philip_Jubb

Depression in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Depression is a medical condition that is characterized by feeling down,  depressed, or hopeless; low self-esteem; and loss of interest in things one used  to enjoy. Senior citizens are prone to life-altering changes that can lead one  to feel depressed. Dealing with the trials life throws at us such as, loss,  change, loneliness, or a chronic medical condition can be quite overwhelming.  Still, depression is not a “normal” part of aging. Like heart disease or  diabetes, depression is a medical condition and it can be treated with  medication and therapy. Treatment is effective at alleviating symptoms within a  few weeks in at least 80 percent of people.

It is important that senior citizens and those providing their elder care  understand the symptoms of depression. If you think you or someone you know may  be suffering from depression, identify your symptoms by using the checklist  provided below. Then, if necessary, seek assistance. For senior citizens, the  most frequently used resource is a family doctor. Bringing a trusted friend or  relative may help ease any anxiety when going to an appointment. Understand that  your doctor may suggest a checkup and begin treatment or refer you to a mental  health specialist.

Before you say, “I’m okay”….

Do you feel:

  • Anxious or “empty”
  • Guilty or useless
  • Agitated or irritable
  • Less interested in things you used to enjoy
  • Like no one loves you
  • Life is not worth living

Or if you are:

  • A change in sleeping habits
  • A change in eating habits
  • Persistent headaches, stomach aches, or pain

Remember that these  may be real symptoms of a real medical condition that can be effectively  treated. Talk to your doctor today. Though many senior citizens suffer from  depression, feeling depressed is not a normal part of aging.

 

Health and Wellness tips

There are many measures senior citizens can take to help relieve the symptoms  of depression. Those involved in the elder care of senior citizens experiencing  depression should encourage the senior to follow these tips and improve their  wellbeing.

Check your medications. Senior citizens often take many  medications. Some medications, including those for sleep, blood pressure, and  nervousness, may affect mood. Talk with your doctor about each of the  medications you are taking. Be sure to include all over-the-counter medicines,  vitamins, and herbal supplements to minimize the chances of having side  effects.

Limit alcohol consumption. Alcohol use can bring about  depression. And, when alcohol and drugs are combined, interactions that lead to  depression can occur.

Stay connected. Sometimes, senior citizens find it more difficult  to get out and stay connected with others. Still, talking with friends and  family members, getting a pet, or even finding a new interest or hobby can help  one through this tough time.  Get involved in activities you take pleasure  in, such as reading a good book, going to a ballgame or a taking a class in a  subject that interests to you.

Be active. Physical activity can improve physical and mental  wellbeing. Though some senior citizens believe they cannot exercise, there are  activities like walking, gardening, or working out (even if one is in a  wheelchair) that can be helpful. Make a goal of 30 minutes of activity 5 days a  week. If you have not taken part in physical activity in a while, be sure to  check with your doctor and get his OK before you begin.

Eat healthy and drink plenty of fluids. Choose healthy snacks  like fruits, vegetables, yogurt, or nuts to increase your nutrition and energy.  Also, try to eat well-balanced meals.  Some senior citizens suffer from  loss of appetite and weight loss; if you have experienced either of these,  consult your doctor.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects  caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for  families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking  employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

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Hearing Loss in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Many senior citizens are affected by some hearing problems. If left  untreated, any extent of hearing loss may worsen over time. It is important that  senior citizens with difficulty hearing consult their doctor. Companions or  caregivers who notice a senior citizen is experiencing trouble hearing should  facilitate and encourage the senior to seek medical attention. Knowing the  symptoms and taking appropriate treatment measures can help stop and, in some  cases, even reverse hearing degradation.

Hearing is very important for daily functioning so problems with hearing are  quite serious and should be addressed as soon as possible. Senior citizens who  experience hearing problems may feel isolated or embarrassed as a result. Still,  if you find that you have trouble hearing, talk to your doctor about the many  treatment options available.

Symptoms

Senior citizens who have hearing loss often complain of:

  • Having trouble hearing on the phone
  • Difficulty with following conversations, especially when multiple people are  talking
  • Needing to have volume levels of electronics so high that others notice and  complain
  • Difficulty hearing things over background noise
  • Sensing that people always seem to mumble
  • Cannot understand when women or children speak to  you

Diagnosis

 

If a doctor finds that you have hearing loss, they may refer you to an  otolaryngologist who specializes in the ear, nose, and throat. After this doctor  conducts diagnostic tests, they may refer you to an audiologist who is trained  to measure hearing function. Audiologists can test your hearing for certain  pitches and loudness levels in order to find if a hearing aid is needed. These  tests are painless.

Hearing loss is caused by degeneration of nerves with age, one of the reasons  it is prevalent among senior citizens. Other common contributions to hearing  loss are earwax build-up, exposure to very loud noises over long periods of  time, viral and bacterial infections, heart conditions, head injuries, tumors,  medications, and heredity.

Types of Hearing Loss

Some different types of hearing loss include:

Presbycusis: This is age-related hearing loss. Senior citizens  affected by this condition can either have a hard time hearing or have low  tolerance for loud noises. It can be caused by damage to the inner ear known as  sensorineural hearing loss.

Tinnitus: This condition is characterized by hearing ringing, roaring,  or some other continuous noise in the ears. It can be caused by exposure to loud  noises, hearing loss, medications, other health problems, allergies, and  conditions of the heart and blood vessels. The source of noise caused by  tinnitus is unclear and varies in how long it affects the sufferer. Senior  citizens can treat the condition by either using a hearing aid to make other  sounds louder or using a masker that makes tinnitus noise less noticeable.  Others use music to drown out the extra noise. Avoiding smoking, alcohol, and  loud noises can decrease the effects of tinnitus.

Conductive hearing loss: This is caused by blockage between eardrum  and the inner ear. This can be caused by ear wax build-up, fluid in the middle  ear, abnormal bone growth, punctured ear drum, or ear infections. For ear wax  blockage specifically, it is suggested that sufferers use mild treatments like  mineral oil, baby oil, glycerin, or commercial ear drops to soften ear wax. If  you think the eardrum may be damaged, you should contact a doctor.

Treatment

Senior citizens who suffer from hearing loss have many options for treatment  and alleviating symptoms of decreased hearing functioning. These include:

Hearing aids: these are small devices placed on the ear that make  certain noises louder. Audiologists can help find the right hearing aid for you  and may allow you to test it in a trial period. Pick a hearing aid manufacturer  who will work with you while you adjust to wearing the product, and be sure that  you are aware of how to maintain a hearing aid, such as replacing batteries and  how to use it properly.

Assistive / Adaptive devices: There are a variety of products that fit  within this category like:

  • Telephone amplifying device: can be a receiver or entire phone that makes  phone conversations louder
  • TV and radio listening systems: avoids having to turn the volume up on  regular devices
  • Assistive listening systems: these are sometimes available in public venues  like theaters, churches, synagogues, and meeting places
  • Alerts: allow for signals that replace doorbells, smoke detectors, and alarm  clocks in order for the hearing impaired to hear them properly. These usually  employ vibrations or flashing lights to replace noise.

Cochlear  implants: If hearing loss is severe, a small electronic device can be placed  under the skin, behind the ear. It allows sound to bypass the malfunctioning  part of the ear and send signals directly to the brain. This process is not  helpful for all cases of hearing loss or deafness.

 

Tips for Senior Citizens

For senior citizens affected by hearing loss, here are some helpful hints for  communication:

  • Let people know you have trouble hearing them
  • Ask people to face you, talk slower, or ask them to speak without  shouting
  • Pay attention to facial expressions and gestures
  • Let people know when you don’t understand them
  • Ask people to reword things for you when you don’t  understand

Tips for Caregivers

 

Elder caregivers taking care of senior citizens who suffer from hearing loss  can use these helpful hints when speaking to their patients:

  • Face the person and talk clearly
  • Speak at a normal speed and do not cover the mouth
  • Stand in good lighting and avoid background noises
  • Use facial expressions and physical gestures
  • Repeat yourself if necessary
  • Keep a hearing impaired person involved in a conversation rather than  talking to others  about the individual while in their presence
  • Be patient,positive and relaxed during the interaction
  • Ask how you can help them understand you

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects  caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for  families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking  employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

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Nevada Ballet Theatre Presents Romeo & Juliet for an unforgettable season finale

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Las Vegas, Press-Media Releases 

SHAKESPEARE’S PLAY AND PROKOFIEV’S ENDURING SCORE BRINGS THE ‘MONTAGUES’ AND ‘CAPULETS’ TO LIFE IN THIS RIVETING BALLET CHOREOGRAPHED BY JAMES CANFIELD 

 “For never was a story of more woe, than this of Juliet and her Romeo.”- William Shakespeare

 

Romeo & Juliet is Co-Sponsored by: Madeleine & Don Andress and Wendy & Richard Plaster

 

LAS VEGAS, NV (Wednesday, April 10, 2013) – Nevada Ballet Theatre (NBT) concludes its inaugural season at The Smith Center for the Performing Arts with the beloved Shakespearean tragedy, Romeo & Juliet. The classic tale of ill-fated love will be presented on Mother’s Day weekend: Saturday, May 11 at 7:30 pm and Sunday, May 12 at 1 pm in Reynolds Hall at The Smith Center for the Performing Arts, 361 Symphony Park Avenue. Ticket prices range from $35-$128 (plus fees) and can be ordered by calling The Smith Center Box Office at (702) 749-2000 or by visiting www.nevadaballet.org.

Based on the play by William Shakespeare, NBT will transport audiences to 15th Century Verona through Sergei Prokofiev’s well-loved score, Romeo & Juliet, Op. 64. Minimalist – yet lush – sets and costumes, reminiscent of the time period, will complement the inventive choreography of Artistic Director James Canfield. Through comedy and tragedy, movement and miming, feuding families tell the tale of innocent love through street fighting, swordmanship and traditional court dancing in this two-act full-length ballet.

One of Shakespeare’s most performed and notable plays, Romeo & Juliet has successfully been adapted for various performance mediums over the centuries, including stage, opera and film. A challenging ballet for any professional dancer, it requires unique preparation in that performers must master a historically stylized look as well as a deep exploration into the art of acting. With an emotionally charged storyline, a concentration on character development is essential, so that the growth and change in each character is evident to audiences.

Romeo & Juliet is a significant ballet because it serves as a unique educational tool; in addition to the historical importance of William Shakespeare’s play, Romeo & Juliet explores cultural, familial and societal issues that are applicable to young people in our society today,” said Artistic Director James Canfield.  “Clark County students who attend our school matinee on Friday, May 10 at The Smith Center for the Performing Arts will gain a unique understanding into the growth and maturation of a character, similar to how we as human beings develop and change throughout our lives.”

As a benefit for Romeo & Juliet ticket holders, NBT will present Insights, a pre-performance perspective designed to engage, enlighten and entertain audiences in preparation for the performance they are about to see. Led by NBT’s Director of Education & Outreach, Terané Comito, Insights will be presented inside The Smith Center’s Troesh Studio Theater and will take place 45 minutes prior to curtain (Saturday, May 11 at 6:45 pm and Sunday, May 12 at 12:15 pm).

MOTHER’S DAY TEA with

Join us for the Mother’s Day Tea and a “Mommy and Me” Fashion Presentation featuring the designs of Paul Smith in The Smith Center Courtyard (adjacent to the box office). Guests will enjoy tea sandwiches, petit fours and specialty tea selections. Add to the beauty of the ballet experience by attending this special event prior to the matinee on Sunday, May 12 from 11 am – 1 pm. Tickets can be purchased for an additional $75 by calling 702-243-2623 ext. 222 or via email at specialevents@nevadaballet.org.

 

JEWELRY BOX” OPPORTUNITY with

Exclusively for Romeo & Juliet, purchase a “Jewelry Box” of 4, 6 or 8 seats. Purchase includes access to the Founders Room, concierge service as well as a $100 gift card for each guest to The Jewelers of Las Vegas. Call 702-243-2623 ext. 224 to make a reservation.

 

ABOUT NEVADA BALLET THEATRE

Under the artistic direction of James Canfield, Nevada Ballet Theatre is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization based in Las Vegas and the largest professional ballet company and dance Academy in the state. Committed to the highest artistic standards, this classically-based company is at home in an eclectic repertory, moving easily from the classics to the high-energy contemporary ballets. The mission of Nevada Ballet Theatre is to educate and inspire statewide, regional and national audiences and vitally impact community life through professional company productions, dance training and education and outreach. Nevada Ballet Theatre is the resident ballet company of The Smith Center for the Performing Arts.

NEVADA BALLET THEATRE SEASON 42:   

 

October 2013

A CHOREOGRAPHERS’ SHOWCASE

Nevada Ballet Theatre and Cirque du Soleil

Sunday, October 6 at 1 pm & Sunday, October 13 at 1 pm  

Mystère Theatre – Treasure Island

This October, we bring back A Choreographers’ Showcase, the collaboration by Cirque du Soleil® and Nevada Ballet Theatre presented at Treasure Island’s Mystère Theatre. This critically acclaimed partnership features new works created and performed by artists from both organizations.

 

November 2013

SWAN LAKE Act II and SLEEPING BEAUTY Act III (Aurora’s Wedding) A Tribute to TchaikovskyFriday, November 1 at 7:30 pm & Saturday, November 2 at 7:30 pm The Smith Center – Reynolds Hall

In November, ballet’s greatest love stories take the stage with Swan Lake Act II and the enchanting Act III of Sleeping Beauty (Aurora’s Wedding). These immortalized characters come alive on stage set to the timeless scores of ballet’s legendary composer Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky.

Swan Lake Act II tells the classic tale of Odette – a beautiful maiden transformed into a swan by an evil sorcerer – and the prince who swears his enduring love for her. Sleeping Beauty Act III celebrates Aurora’s royal wedding with a cast of fanciful characters and luxurious scenery and costumes by Peter Cazalet.

 

December 2013

THE NUTCRACKER The Magic Continues December 14 – 22, 2013 (10 performances) The Smith Center – Reynolds Hall

 

The magic continues this December with The Nutcracker. From the moment the curtain rises, find out just how thrilling a tradition can be as you are transported to a world of magic and wonder. The first production of its kind built for the Reynolds Hall stage features grand sets, costumes and the choreography of Artistic Director James Canfield. This larger than life production returns this winter in its second year with added elements. This is the centerpiece of the holiday season and as a subscriber, you will be first in line for tickets.

March 2014 (FOR SUBSCRIBERS ONLY)

THE STUDIO SERIES: OUTSIDE IN  A Spotlight on Dance in its Purest Form March 27 – 30, 2014 (6 performances) The Smith Center – Troesh Studio Theater

 

March brings The Studio Series, reserved exclusively for subscribers and gives audiences a rare glimpse into the essence of dance, as our dancers perform commissioned works and original pieces within the intimate setting of the Troesh Studio Theater. With production elements at a minimum, you will experience true emotion and enthusiasm.

 

May 2014

SPRING FINALE  A Performance Not To Be Missed Friday, May 9 at 7:30 pm & Saturday, May 10 at 7:30 pm The Smith Center – Reynolds Hall

Don’t miss this emotionally charged program as NBT crescendos to a grand finale including James Canfield’s own tango inspired Cyclical Night and the return of acclaimed choreographer Matthew Neenan’s bold work, At the border, with live musical accompaniment.

2013-2014 SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION  

Subscriptions will be available to the general public in early May. They can be ordered online at: www.nevadaballet.org  or by calling The Smith Center Box Office at 702-749-2847. Subscribers receive many benefits over single ticket purchasers including priority seating, free ticket exchanges, personalized service, invitations to special events and first opportunity to purchase additional Nutcracker tickets. Group Sales also available.

Dewey Street, First of its kind Home for Crafting in Las Vegas Opens Doors

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Family business is only in the area to offer wide variety of  crafting lessons and long arm quilting 

LAS VEGAS, Nev. — Three generations of love for crafting are the foundation for the newly opened Dewey Street, a store that offers lessons and long arm quilting, on South Durango in Las Vegas. Dewey Street prides itself as the only single gathering place for “crafty creatives” in Southern Nevada. Courses and quilting will be led  by the three founders: Cindy Nickerson and her two daughters, Lindsay and Laurie. Dewey Street is also welcoming other craft experts to teach in the professional space. The business additionally offers “open studio” time when the general public may come in to work on crafts with the assistance of Dewey Street staff.

Dewey Street is launching with several types of lessons including: indie, textile and art. Indie covers a wide range of techniques including a “mash-up” of traditional lessons with a modern aesthetic, book binding and paper printing. Textile uses fabrics as a canvas with exploration including bleach printing, pattern design and fabric printing. Art blurs the lines between craft and art, and focuses more on self expression with projects including collage and decoupage.

Additionally, Dewey Street is offering several types of series. Examples include sewing, home and garden, and guest teacher, which brings experts from across the Las Vegas area to teach the skill or craft they know best, broadening the offerings of Dewey Street. This translates into Dewey Street constantly evolving and incorporating new and innovative methods to customers.

Lessons at Dewey Street reach all ages and ability levels. Instruction will appeal to everything from the contemporary crafting movement to traditional techniques. All people aged from child to senior will find a niche and class at Dewey Street, or may take advantage of the “open studio” time.

The name and foundation of Dewey Street find roots with 90-year-old Joan Faust who lived on Dewey Street in West Springfield, MA for nearly all of her life and raised a family as she literally turned trash into treasures. Her influence inspired daughter Cindy, and Cindy’s daughters, to launch the new business in Joan’s memory. The lessons they pass to the Las Vegas community are Joan’s legacy.

Founder Cindy Nickerson has been sewing almost all of her life and can perform nearly all forms of stitchery. The gifted seamstress also ran a successful embroidery business for nearly 25 years in Massachusetts. Cindy operates one of the largest professional grade long arm sewing machines in the area. Her service offers a speedy and professional alternative to work that is commonly done in homes and a level of perfection through state-of-the art computerized technology. The precise stitching creates a high-quality, yet personalized piece that will last for generations.

Cindy’s daughter Lindsay carries on the legacy of quilting and sewing. She is a mother of two (soon to be three) and brings innovation to crafting with small children. Lindsay also  has a green thumb, which morphed into a complementing talent of creating vintage spoon plant markers.

Laurie, Cindy’s other daughter, cannot sew a straight line. However, she offers balance to the women of her family with strong artistic talent. Laurie keeps busy with her day job as Art Director for a leading Las Vegas firm and teaching a course at the Art Institute. Surprisingly, she finds enough spare time to move the artsy side of Dewey Street in the right direction. Her skills include painting, assemblage, book binding and perhaps most fun of all, puppet making.

Dewey Street’s interior reflects Laurie’s artistic vision. Lessons are taught around antique tables and a close look at the chair cushions will reveal a pattern of the Dewey Street logo. The walls are a soft blue and hanging art was designed and framed by Laurie.

The owners also advance Joan’s legacy by helping the community. The last Sunday of every month, Dewey Street offers its space, knowledge and time to a non-profit organization.

Dewey Street, located at 2960 S. Durango Suite 111 in Las Vegas, is open 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday, Thursday and Friday in addition to regularly scheduled class times and appointments. More information is available by going to www.dewey-street.com.

Nevada Senior Guide – Out ‘n’ About Services

Concierge Assistance – YOUR time is valuable!

Call:  (775) 772-5373

Email:  outnaboutservices@hotmail.com

 

Nevada Senior Guide – Senior Safeguards – Easier Independent Living

www.seniorsafeguards.net

Senior Safeguard

Senior SafeGuards specializes in Ramping, Handrailing and Independent Living Aids. We are a family oriented small business in the Reno, Sparks area of Nevada. We sell Modular, Suitcase, Multifold, Threshold, Solid, and Van Ramps. We also carry Independent Living Aids and disability equipment.

We are one of the few companies in the area that will install your ramp for you. We also have RENTAL RAMPS available if you are laid up for just a few months.

Give us a call at (775) 359-3889 for a free quote. We look forward to working with you.

Email:  rick@seniorsafeguards.net

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Boulder Palms

www.boulderpalmscommunity.com

Welcome To Boulder Palms Senior Apartments A 55+ Community

Conveniently located on Boulder Highway in Las Vegas. This central location provides residents easy access to near-by recreational facilities, shopping, casinos, entertainment, and dining. We invite you to come and experience the best in affordable senior living.

 

At Boulder Palms…ONE CHECK PAYS IT ALL!

•Water, Sewer, Trash

•Electricity

•Natural Gas

•Telephone with Voice Mail

•Expanded Cable (65 Channels)

•High Speed Internet

•Community Shuttle

•Public Transportation nearby

•Refreshing Pool

•24-hour emergency maintenance

•Clubhouse

•Soothing Spa

•Minutes from the Las Vegas Strip

•A/C – Window/Wall Unit(s)

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Country Club Meadows

www.countryclubatthemeadows.com

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Excellent 55+ Las Vegas Senior Apartments

Country Club at Valley View Senior Apartments

300 Promenade Boulevard, Las Vegas NV 89107

1400 S Valley View, Las Vegas NV 89102

Call: (877) 900-1482

Go beyond traditional senior apartment living and step into the visionary lifestyle of Country Club at the Meadows in Las Vegas. Here you will discover an elegant, yet fun-filled senior community exclusively designed for the active adult 55 years and older.

Imagine living in a beautiful environment without anything to disturb your perfect day. Whether it is quiet relaxation you seek, or an engaging variety of activities, Country Club at the Meadows offers you both.

Community Highlights

Our unique community is exclusive and private with a 24-hour guard gate and you will love the lush mature and well-manicured lawns. If you enjoy the outdoor setting, our gazebo and barbeque areas are a great place to spend some time relaxing or socializing with friends and family.

Country Club at the Meadows has an on-site activity director planning a variety of events and activities to help you stay healthy, relax, make friends or cultivate new and old hobbies.

The Las Vegas Senior Apartment Amenities You’re Looking For

We offer a wide variety of amenities for you to enjoy, no matter your interests or hobbies. Our beautiful resident clubhouse has billiards, a Wii game area, cards, bingo, resident computer center, and hosted events to include lunch, breakfast, and dinners with live entertainment. From craft room to fitness center, we have something for every Las Vegas senior looking for the right apartment home.

If you are a person on the go, you may choose an outing to shop, dine, or enjoy some entertainment at one of our local casinos via our shuttle van. We also offer free shuttle van assistance for shopping, banks, and many other services.

For the outdoor lovers, you can enjoy an early morning swim in our spacious heated pool and spa or if you prefer, play some shuffleboard or just hang out with some of your friends on the sundeck enjoying complimentary beverages. For the golf lovers we have a well-manicured putting green on the community grounds. If you want to be pampered you may choose to spend some time at our on-site beauty salon.

Apartment Features

Meadows offers three great floor plans and all of our apartment homes are bright and airy, featuring double-wide windows, and private storage for each home. The floor plans are spacious and will accommodate any furniture arrangement. The bedrooms are nicely laid out with a spectacular master bathroom.

Call today to see how our courteous and friendly staff can help you find the right apartment home for you. If you enjoy comfort, convenience and exceptional customer service, then you will want to make the Country Clubs your new home!

Country Club at the Meadows is a pleasure all its own!

Property Owner

Country Club at the Meadows is managed by Gaines Investment Trust, which has been family-owned and operated since 1966. Our priority has always been to provide our residents with the highest quality Las Vegas senior rentals at the most affordable price. Our staff is dedicated to continuing that reputation and we are always looking for new ways to enhance the experience of our residents. Call today and let us help you find your new home.

Amenities

  • Community Clubhouse
  • Full-Time Activities Director
  • Planned Activities
  • On-Site Shuttle Bus
  • Gazebos with BBQs
  • Craft Room
  • Putting Green
  • Shuffleboard
  • Billiards amp&; Cards/
  • Cable & DSL Options
  • Scenic Views
  • Lush, Mature Landscaping
  • 15 Min. to the Vegas Strip
  • 24HR Guarded Gate
  • Heated Pool & Spa
  • Courteous, Friendly Staff
  • 24-Hour Emergency Maintenance
  • 55 & Older Age Restriction
  • Air Conditioning
  • Ceiling Fans
  • Courtyard
  • Covered Parking
  • Handicap Accessible
  • Indoor Heated Spa
  • 365/ 24/7 Heated Pool Access
  • Grassy Courtyard Areas
  • Frost-Free Refrigerator
  • Dishwasher & Disposal
  • Linen Storage
  • Private Storage
  • Laundry Facility & W/D Connections
  • Casino Bus Service
  • Fitness Center
  • On-Site Beauty Salon
  • Business Center
  • Corporate Housing Available
  • Public Transportation Available
  • Guest Suite Available
  • Coffee Bar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!