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Life Extension: The Modern Anti-Aging Movement – Are We Standing at the Threshold of Immortality?

July 17, 2016 by · Comments Off on Life Extension: The Modern Anti-Aging Movement – Are We Standing at the Threshold of Immortality?
Filed under: General 

Why is skincare the focus of longevity research? I guess a cell is a cell, and if you can crack the code for one human cell, it is only a matter of time to solving the puzzle with different types of cell – and skin is without doubt the most visible cells each of us have. And it’s our faces in particular we often judge ourselves and others by, and we are in turn quickly scrutinized, and often opinions reached in a fraction of a second. Our faces often show the most visible signs of aging, and for many in modern society age is by nature “bad” and young or looking young is the ideal. That is why billions and billions of dollars each year are poured by consumers into all sorts of treatments to minimize wrinkles, to push back the effects of gravity, and to turn back the hands of time. And with that much money to be spent by consumers, there are many manufacturers eager to find the next step in arresting Father Time – and at least detaining him until the next stagecoach arrives, where hopefully he can be encouraged to move on before too much damage can be done.

The Entire Issue Explained – In A Pair of Shoelaces

Some time ago a friend gave me a simple analogy that puts this entire issue in perspective. The science may not win a Nobel Prize, but it gave me the necessary ah-ha moment.

The double helix of the DNA strand – our most basic foundation for life – is held together at each end by things that act in the same way as the hard plastic bits on the end of shoelaces do – preventing the DNA from unraveling, and the individual chromosomes scattering across the floor like dropping a string of pearls down a marble staircase. These things are called telomeres.

Somewhere programmed into these tiny telomeres is the entire basis to how long the DNA stays intact – and by inference these are the keys to the length of life of the organism. Somewhere written into the telomere is a great musical score but like all musical scores it has a double bar somewhere to signify the end; but is it to be a minuet or a Wagnerian epic? But sure enough, when the time comes, and the telomeres blow the full time whistle, the DNA strand will unravel and die – and the circle of life begins again. Telomeres govern how often our skin cells are replaced; why a puppy and a child born on the same date may age exactly the same chronologically, but the puppy has become a geriatric before the child reaches puberty.

Telomeres, my friend explained, occasionally go on the fritz (that must have a very specific scientific meaning). One of the ways this occurs is they may forget their programming to release and unravel, and they just hang on, allowing the cells thus affected to multiply again and again without dying. In fact, when this occurs often they become very difficult to kill and to all intents and purposes once the telomeres act in this way, the cell – and those it propagates – are effectively immortal.

This condition has a name which we all know. Cancer.

But, what if we were able in some way to persuade the telomeres within a cancer to behave normally – would that not be the “magic bullet” cure for cancer? And the other side to that equation – if the telomeres in healthy cells could be persuaded to act as they do in a cancer – then is this the recipe for a healthy cell that does not die? Does the cure for cancer and immortality hang on just this one thread?

Whatever your views may be, the reality is that some of the world’s finest research scientists are working on that exact question and some would say it is only a matter of a decade or two before this is neither conjecture nor science fiction, but a reality to face up to. The changes that would take place in society even if life expectancy were to take a leap forward by say 10 or 20 years are enormous, but we should all be thinking that this is a distinct possibility.

From the dab of lanoline a generation ago to what I know hold in my hand as an anti aging skincare treatment is more than just a revolution – and I have no doubt in a few years I will be saying this cream will not just slow the aging process and reduce the visible signs of aging, making your face appear younger – but it will actually be younger.

But before that, let’s look back at how this whole engagement with life extension and anti-aging started. Mankind has always striven for longevity and mused about immortality – but the past 50 years has seen some dramatic steps in reality toward this goal.

Genesis

The thought of extending life has been on the mind of mankind for millennia. References to the search for ways to prolong life can be found as far back as the Epic of Gilgamesh.

Gilgamesh was reputedly the fifth king of the kingdom of Uruk, the modern-day Iraq, around 2500 BC. According to the Sumerian list of kings, he reigned for 126 years. The Torah or Old Testament records Methuselah as living over 900 years, with life spans measured in centuries apparently commonplace before the time of Noah.

Throughout the development of scientific thought from the Reformation onwards, scholars have applied themselves to solving this riddle and these endeavors continue today at the very leading edge of scientific progress.

Unraveling Secrets

As the secrets of our existence are unraveled in ever more minute detail, we are beginning to understand what it is that makes us grow from tiny babies into adults. We now know, for example, that cell functions slow down as the body ages and that production of certain substances required by the body to regenerate decrease or cease completely.

Skin, for instance, needs two substances to retain strength and firmness.
The production of these substances namely collagen (strength, tightness) and elastin (flexibility) decreases with age. The decreases in production together with other factors that include the threat of free radicals make the skin age and become wrinkly. Free radicals are essentially incomplete oxygen molecules causing destructive chain reactions within cells.

The same kind of thing happens in every cell, every tissue and organ around the human body. For example, people develop frown lines, crow’s feet and wrinkles. Nutrients are no longer absorbed easily and vital cell functions, hormones and other substances are produced at decreased rates resulting in the body aging.

A Brief History of the Life Extension Movement

Science has been looking for ways to slow down this process for centuries. The forming of life extension movements, however, did not really begin until around 1970.

➢ In this year, Denham Harman, the originator of the so-called ‘free radical theory of aging’, decided that an organization dedicated to the research and information sharing between scientists working in biogerontology (the field of science concerned with the biological aspects involved in the aging process) was needed. As a result, the American Aging Association was formed.

➢ In 1976, two futurists, Philip Gordon and Joel Kurtzman wrote a book on the research into extending the human lifespan. This popular volume was titled ‘No More Dying. The Conquest Of Aging And The Extension Of Human Life’.

➢ Kurtzman was then invited to speak at Florida’s House Select Committee (HSC) of Aging, which was chaired by Claude Pepper, an American politician and spokesman for the elderly. The aim of this talk was to discuss the impact on Social Security by life extension.

➢ In 1980, Saul Kent, a prominent activist in the field of life extension, published the book ‘The Life Extension Revolution’ and founded the nutraceutical (from ‘nutrition’ and ‘pharmaceutical’, in other words, a nutrition supplement) firm known as ‘The Life Extension Foundation’.

This foundation is a non-profit making organization promoting dietary supplements and publishing the periodical ‘Life Extension Magazine’. Kent was later involved in work relating to cryogenics. He was jailed in the course of this work over a dispute at one point, although charges were dropped at a later stage.

➢ In 1982, American health writer and life extension advocate Sandy Shaw and her co-writer, Durk Pearson, popularized the term ‘life extension’ even further with the bestseller ‘Life Extension: A Practical Scientific Approach’.

➢ Roy Walford, a gerontologist and life-extensionist, published ‘Maximum Lifespan’, another popular book on the subject. He and Richard Weindruch, his student, followed this up in 1988 with their summary on the research they had conducted into the ability to prolong the life of rodents through calorie restriction. The title of this book is ‘The Retardation of Aging and Disease by Dietary Restriction’.

Although this ability to extend life with calorie restriction had been known since the 1930’s, when gerontologist, biochemist and nutritionist Clive McCay did some research into the subject, it was the work of Walford and Weinbruch that gave solid scientific grounding to the McCay’s findings.

Walford’s scientific work was driven by a personal interest in life extension. He practiced calorie restriction as part of his own life and eventually died at the age of 80. The cause of his death was amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a progressive motor neuron disease.

➢ A4M, the ‘American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine’ was founded in 1992 to create a medical specialty for anti aging that was distinctly separate from geriatrics. This allowed scientists and physicians interested in this particular field of science to hold conferences and discuss the latest developments.

➢ The sci.life-extension, a Usenet group, was created by California-born author, philosopher and translator Brian M. Delaney. This represented an important development within the movement of life extension. It made it possible, for example, for the CR (Calorie Restriction) Society to be created.

➢ A more recent development is the proposal of Dr A. de Grey, a biogerontologist at Cambridge University. This proposal suggested that damage to cells, macromolecules, organs and tissues can be repaired with the help of advanced biotechnology. This is evident in hair restoration products, for instance.

More than Books

Although it would appear that most of the work revolving around life extension has been done solely by writing books or founding societies or organizations of some kind or another, the reality is that these books were written in response to or based on very specific, detailed scientific research that have yielded positive results.

They are no longer the works of hopeful minds, but the works of dedicated scientists who have spent their lives working on discovering facts about aging and trying to find ways to slow down, or even reverse the process.

Many breakthroughs have been made, and in many ways, we are already able to extend lives to a certain extent. The average lifespan of a human being is already far greater than it used to be as a result of medical, pharmaceutical and nutritional advances brought about by research and development.

The work continues, and scientists around the world are continually conducting research, comparing results, discussing options and making advances on our behalf.

Driving Forces behind the Development of the Life Extension Movement

What factors are driving this movement into ever greater efforts to find solutions to the extension of Life? The answer to this question actually includes a whole range of factors.

Expectations Have Risen

As the ‘baby boomer’ generation (born between 1946-1964) enters retirement age, expectations of this group are dramatically different from those of the preceding generations. They have greater expectations and desires to enjoy their life as pensioners to the fullest and for as long as is possible. This expectation covers not only length of life, but quality of life as well and this is not a passive request but an active and strident demand in many cases.

Pharmacology

Progress in pharmacology has led to a wide selection of drugs that allow people to live longer and fuller lives being developed over the last two decades or so. The work is still very much in progress and many more drugs are being developed daily.

One of the classic examples of a drug raising the quality of life for older individuals are erectile dysfunction treatments – notably Viagra, Cialis and Levitra. These drugs have dramatically reduced the number of fatalities or serious injury resulting from elderly men rolling out of bed, as well as a number of more qualitative benefits.

Advances in Genetics

Some of the latest scientific research and subsequent advances made in biotechnology and genetics are providing some hope that it may be possible to hold back some of the fundamental causes of aging.

As we outlined previously, chromosomes containing DNA strings are essentially capped with a binding substance known as telomeres. In effect, the telomeres are consumed during cell division and over time, they become shorter and shorter.

This was first observed by a scientist called Leonard Hayflick, and the process of limited cell division was subsequently named the Hayflick Limit. Advocates of life extension work on the thought that lengthening the telomeres through drugs or gene therapy may ultimately extend the Hayflick Limit and thereby fool the cells, and as such the body, into ‘thinking’ it is younger than it actually is.

Developments in Precision Manufacture

Advances made in the fields of nanotechnology, miniaturization, computer chips and robotics also provide hope for potentially life extending solutions.

In the 1970’s, a popular TV series starred Lee Majors as the ‘Six Million Dollar Man’? Science fiction then. Today, it is science fact. Millions of people now walk through life with artificial ankle, knee and hip joints and healthy feet. A generation ago, mass production of this kind of technology was a distant dream.

The same applies to many individuals with artificial limbs. Artificial legs used to be crude wooden contraptions that were just able to keep a person balanced. Today’s artificial limbs are almost fully functional.

The Blessings of Medical Progress

Who would have thought even 50 years ago that it would become possible to bypass a coronary artery, or even replace a heart completely? Yet there are hundreds of thousands, if not millions of individuals enjoying their lives after having this kind of surgery – few of whom would be alive just half a century ago.

Millions of people no longer have to wear glasses, because of the availability of laser surgery. This, too, was science fiction just a few years ago. Today, it is advertised next to shampoo in magazines and on TV.

In other words, science is moving rapidly towards not only extending life, but making the quality of these extra years better as well.

Is it Science, Science Fiction or Lunacy?

What should the average person believe? This question is almost as difficult to answer as finding solutions to extended life. Even among scientists, opinions are divided. Some do believe that extending the quality of life is as possible as extending life in general.

Others brush off the thought as un-scientific nonsense. This is often simply based on the fear of anything ‘new’ disturbing the status quo of established limits. Fortunately, real scientists do keep on looking, because if every single scientist had decided that some of the advancements already in medical, pharmaceutical and technological fields could not be possible, we would all still be dying at 30.

So where does that leave us?

There is no doubt what-so-ever that there are many charlatans out there trying to make a quick buck out of people’s desire to retain their youth. Even today, many products being sold in their millions are essentially non-effective – often given fantastic names and have the most bewildering ingredients to make them look scientific to consumers and justify their cost.

But the facts are while many advancements are being made and research points to the possibility of eventually finding the key to maintaining youth for longer, the scientific community is still warning the public that many of the products being sold today are unreliable to say the least.

➢ Although food supplements may assist in keeping a body healthier – something that can often be achieved by simply adopting a healthier life style and diet – there is as yet no categorical and undeniable proof that they slow down aging as such.

➢ The same goes for many hormone treatments. Although they may have a short term effect of some kind, it is not yet scientifically proven that they will actually work in the long run. The fear that it may not work is based on the fact that taking hormones, a good example is the hormonal acne treatment, will ultimately actually slow down the body’s own production of these hormones.

In addition, many treatments may have potential (and yet unknown) side effects in the long run that could be harmful to the user’s health. This includes the fears that such hormone treatments could increase the risk of cancer, diabetes and other major illnesses.

➢ Other ideas, like the calorie restriction method, are working for rodents. In fact, studies conducted with rats on 30 to 50 per cent restricted diets have shown to almost double the life span of rats.

Similar studies conducted on primates have also shown tendency to extend life to a certain extent and prevent a list of age related illnesses. There are as yet no studies on humans, although some are actually living on calorie restricted diets. Whether this will prolong their lives, however, is a question of having to wait and see.

The theory is that by reducing calorie intake, the metabolism of the body is slowed down, thereby slowing the aging process as well. Nutritionists say there is a certain amount of calories a body of a certain size and weight needs to have to maintain health. Reducing this amount by up to 50 per cent is hardly a good idea in the long term.

Time will tell, as they say, but how will anyone be able to tell the difference? If a person lives to the age of 80, is this because they are on this diet or would they have lived to this age anyway?

Where Will This Lead?

Many believe there is realistic hope and expectation of making significant strides in the area of longevity within the next two decades. This group typically believes the answer will ultimately lie within genetics and biotechnology. It is too early to make definite predictions, but the research so far shows promise and, as mentioned earlier, some of the results of this research are already being used in certain treatments to improve patients’ lives.

At present, overall aging is difficult to slow down, to say the least. Some products indicate they will assist in maintaining overall health/longevity, but the area we are seeing the first commercial products being developed is in the area of skin care and given the size of this market, it is likely that this will continue to be the weather-vane of longevity treatments.

Science or Snake Oil?

It will be difficult to tell these two apart for many years. Charlatans are likely to about, because it is difficult to disprove many theories easily. Equally difficult will be positive proof from those with an ethical perspective on the trail of a real breakthrough, as products based on valid research and using technology or ingredients that will actually have an effect rarely promise overnight results. This is something that anyone looking to find improved youthful looks, etc, will have to bear in mind. None of these products can perform miracles. Even the best of them will take time and regular use in order to achieve the desired effect.

The bottom line is that where we stand now, we can be sure there are some things which are ineffective or even harmful; there are some that show some promise and there are some that are starting to cross the line of being able to demonstrate results – albeit modestly at this point.

In the meantime, it is wise to research products very carefully and to refuse to be baffled by weird and wonderful sounding ingredients or fantastic sounding promises of instant youth. Regeneration will take time – let’s face it, it has taken a lifetime to get to this point, turning back the clock can never be possible over night.

Skin Care and the Life Extension Movement

One may well ask just what all this, and in particular the life extension movement as such, could possibly have to do with skin care, health and beauty products. The fact is, much of the research into life extension is resulting in new approaches to skin care as a kind of by-product.

A greater understanding of how genetics and cellular processes affect the aging and condition of skin allows these research and development teams to investigate different compounds, their compatibility with human cells and genetic make up.

Many compounds found in nature are not just compatible to human skin but in fact the skin cells actually have natural receptors for these compounds. Because life extension research has discovered these receptors, skin care developers can now use this knowledge and create the formulae for their products to provide maximum effect.

Another skin care ‘by-product’ of life extension research is the use of nanotechnology. The use of nanotechnology, or, to be more precise, nanoparticles, has had a huge impact on the way nutrients and other components of skin care products are being delivered to the skin cells. In some ways, nanotechnology has already revolutionized skin care. It is now possible to use active ingredients previously difficult to effectively deliver to the skin, as well as making old, proven ingredients even more effective. Some ingredients used in cosmetics for hundreds, if not thousands of years by certain cultures can now be even more effectively used to improve skin condition and maintain a healthy, youthful look.

Even the moisturizing effect of skin care products can be improved with nantechnology. For this effect, so-called nanosomes are used. Nanosomes are small, pocket-like particles that melt or disintegrate on skin contact. By doing this, the moisturising effect is accelerated, assisting the skin faster and more efficiently.

Nanotechnology plays a key part not only in slowing the aging of skin, but is believed to actively assist in repairing and healing skin cells and tissue.

Another breakthrough in life extension research that is beginning to make itself felt in skin care products is the research into stem cells. Stem cells are elements of all life, plant, animal and human. Stem cells have two properties other cells do not have. These properties are the ability to develop into any kind of cell type and the ability to divide almost indefinitely. The use of plant stem cell extracts in skin care is likely to become one of the next ‘big things’ in the industry. And prepare for the debate when human stem cells are proposed as part of an anti-aging skincare regime, as will inevitably occur!

One thing we can be certain of, is that science will continue to search for answers to the question of life extension, and business will drive the commercialization of discoveries. But whether these lead us to a utopian future or potentially a minefield of strife as we debate who will use and who will benefit from these new godlike powers. In the meantime, at a practical level in the skincare, health and beauty industry we remain hopeful and expectant we will see the emergence of products that not only promise results, but produce them.

David Christensen is a veteran of Asia Pacific business, currently residing in Bangkok, Thailand and heading up the business he was a co-founder of, Royal Siam Natural Health & Beauty – who can be located at [http://www.royalsiam.asia], and the information supporting site at [http://www.royalsiam.info]. Royal Siam was established after careful planning in early 2011, spending 2011 concentrating on building the necessary business infrastructure and concentrating on the domestic Thai market. Early in 2012 Royal Siam launched its international website and online store, and in April 2012 publicly declared the ambition to be among the world’s top 20 premium health and beauty brands by the year 2020. Royal Siam is a unique business, operating in the premium skincare, anti aging, and related fields. At its core, one mission is to commercialize and bring to a global market the immense wealth of knowledge about the healing and beneficial properties of Thai and South East Asian plants – a knowledge base carefully built up over the last thousand years. At the same time, the mission is to bring to market the very latest in scientific advances in the area of anti aging… resulting in the unique position of having a Thai heritage and offering the best of nature, tradition, and science.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/David_D_Christensen/1317312

The Programmed Cellular Death Approach to Anti-Aging Treatment

May 8, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Programmed Cellular Death Approach to Anti-Aging Treatment
Filed under: General 

Modern anti-aging treatment is built on a common base of knowledge that I will quickly review. Biochemistry and molecular biology tell us there are many types of chemical reactions going on in the human body. We know that it is the genetic information programmed inside our cellular DNA that defines what reactions occur. Genetic information, expressed in regulated ways, builds the body’s proteins and enzymes, and controls how enzymes carry out the cell’s biochemical reactions.

This information, contained in the DNA of our genome, consists of many thousands of long, often repetitive, sequences of base pairs that are built up from four basic nucleotides. Human genome mapping has shown there are over 3 billion base pairs in our DNA. It is estimated they contain some 20,000 protein-coding genes. All body functions are controlled by the expression of the genes in our genome. The mechanisms controlling the aging process are believed to be programmed into our DNA but only a fraction of the biochemical reactions related to the aging process have been looked at in any detail. Cellular aging is a very complex process and many of its low level operating details have yet to be discovered.

Anti-aging theory has consolidated itself along two lines of thought: the programmed cellular death theory and the cellular damages theory. The programmed death theory focuses on the root causes of aging. The cellular damages theory looks at the visible aspects of aging; i.e. the symptoms of aging. Both theories are correct and often overlap. Both theories are developing rapidly as anti-aging research uncovers more details. As works in progress these theories may take years to complete. This broad characterization also applies to the currently available types of anti-aging treatments.

The programmed death theory of aging suggests that biological aging is a programmed process controlled by many life span regulatory mechanisms. They manifest themselves through gene expression. Gene expression also controls body processes such as our body maintenance (hormones, homeostatic signaling etc.) and repair mechanisms. With increasing age the efficiency of all such regulation declines. Programmed cellular death researchers want to understand which regulatory mechanisms are directly related to aging, and how to affect or improve them. Many ideas are being pursued but one key area of focus is on slowing or stopping telomere shortening. This is considered to be a major cause of aging.

With the exception of the germ cells that produce ova and spermatozoa, most dividing human cell types can only divide about 50 to 80 times (also called the Hayflick limit or biological death clock). This is a direct consequence of all cell types having fixed length telomere chains at the ends of their chromosomes. This is true for all animal (Eukaryotic) cells. Telomeres play a vital role in cell division. In very young adults telomere chains are about 8,000 base pairs long. Each time a cell divides its telomere chain loses about 50 to 100 base pairs. Eventually this shortening process distorts the telomere chain’s shape and it becomes dysfunctional. Cell division is then no longer possible.

Telomerase, the enzyme that builds the fixed length telomere chains, is normally only active in young undifferentiated embryonic cells. Through the process of differentiation these cells eventually form the specialized cells from which of all our organs and tissues are made of. After a cell is specialized telomerase activity stops. Normal adult human tissues have little or no detectable telomerase activity. Why? A limited length telomere chain maintains chromosomal integrity. This preserves the species more than the individual.

During the first months of development embryonic cells organize into about 100 distinct specialized cell lines. Each cell line (and the organs they make up) has a different Hayflick limit. Some cell lines are more vulnerable to the effects of aging than others. In the heart and parts of the brain cell loss is not replenished. With advancing age such tissues start to fail. In other tissues damaged cells die off and are replaced by new cells that have shorter telomere chains. Cell division itself only causes about 20 telomere base pairs to be lost. The rest of the telomere shortening is believed to be due to free radical damage.

This limit on cell division is the reason why efficient cell repair can’t go on indefinitely. When we are 20 to 35 years of age our cells can renew themselves almost perfectly. One study found that at the age 20 the average length of telomere chains in white blood cells is about 7,500 base pairs. In humans, skeletal muscle telomere chain lengths remain more or less constant from the early twenties to mid seventies. By the age of 80 the average telomere length decreases to about 6,000 base pairs. Different studies have different estimates of how telomere length varies with age but the consensus is that between the age of 20 and 80 the length of the telomere chain decreases by 1000 to 1500 base pairs. Afterwards, as telomere lengths shorten even more, signs of severe aging begin to appear.

There are genetic variations in human telomerase. Long lived Ashkenazi Jews are said to have a more active form of telomerase and longer than normal telomere chains. Many other genetic differences (ex.: efficiency of DNA repair, antioxidant enzymes, and rates of free radical production) affect how quickly one ages. Statistics suggest that having shorter telomeres increases your chance of dying. People whose telomeres are 10% shorter than average, and people whose telomeres are 10% longer than average die at different rates. Those with the shorter telomeres die at a rate that is 1.4 greater than those with the longer telomeres.

Many advances in telomerase based anti-aging treatments have been documented. I only have room to mention a few of them.

– Telomerase has been used successfully to lengthen the life of certain mice by up to 24%.

– In humans, gene therapy using telomerase has been used to treat myocardial infarction and several other conditions.

– Telomerase related, mTERT, treatment has successfully rejuvenated many different cell lines.

In one particularly important example researchers using synthetic telomerase that encoded to a telomere-extending protein, have extended the telomere chain lengths of cultured human skin and muscle cells by up to 1000 base pairs. This is a 10%+ extension of telomere chain length. The treated cells then showed signs of being much younger than the untreated cells. After the treatments these cells behaved normally, losing a part of their telomere chain after each division.

The implications of successfully applying such techniques in humans are staggering. If telomere length is a primary cause of normal aging, then, using the telomere length numbers previously mentioned, it might be possible to double the healthy time period during which telomere chain lengths are constant; i.e. from the range of 23 to 74 years to an extended range of 23 to 120 or more years. Of course this is too optimistic because it is known that in vitro cultured cells are able to divide a larger number of times than cells in the human body but it is reasonable to expect some improvement (not 50 years but say 25 years).

We know that telomerase based treatments are not the final answer to anti-aging but there is no doubt that they can, by increasing the Hayflick limit, extend or even immortalize the lifespan of many cell types. It remains to be seen if this can be done safely done in humans.

Telomerase based treatments are only a partial answer to anti-aging. Please carefully research any anti-aging supplements based on this line of treatment. Through my articles and website I want to help you maintain your good health for the next 10 to 25 years. My hope is that within time period the fruits of anti-aging research will become available to everyone.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9227048

Danger: Contents Under Pressure

April 27, 2015 by · Comments Off on Danger: Contents Under Pressure
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

By: Dr. Danika Bowen, Provost/Vice President of Academic Affairs and Accreditation Liaison Officer

 

Feeling overworked?

 

Try being a heart!

 

When you are working – it’s working.

 

When you are playing – it’s working.

 

When you are sleeping – it’s working.

 

Your heart is under pressure to perform 24 hours a day, seven days a week. And if you are among the one in three adults in the United States living with high blood pressure, you run the risk of your heart “quitting” on you at any time – and you probably don’t even know it.

 

Virtually symptom-free, the American Heart Association (AHA) estimates that while more than 78 million people in the United States have high blood pressure, half don’t even know it. Uncontrolled and untreated high blood pressure can lead to stroke, heart attack, heart failure, erectile dysfunction, aneurysm, kidney failure, atherosclerosis (fatty buildup in the arteries) and even blindness.

 

May is High Blood Pressure Education Month. There is no better time to understand the risk factors that lead to high blood pressure and how to best combat this silent killer.

 

Blood Pressure

Blood pressure is the force of blood on the walls of the blood vessels as blood flows through them. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), this pressure naturally rises and falls during the day, but when it is consistently too high, it is considered high blood pressure. The medical term is hypertension.

 

Blood pressure is usually expressed as a fraction, where the first number – called systolic pressure – measures the force in the arteries when the heart pumps, and the second number – diastolic pressure – measures the heart at rest. Blood pressure measuring 120/80 is considered in the normal range.

 

High Blood Pressure

If your blood pressure is closer to 120-139 systolic or 80-89 diastolic, you are considered to have prehypertension. If your blood pressure is above 140 systolic or above 90 diastolic, you are considered to have high blood pressure, or hypertension.

 

While the exact cause of high blood pressure is unknown, the AHA reports the following potential risk factors to developing the condition:

  • Obesity
  • Inactivity
  • Smoking
  • Heavy alcohol use
  • High-sodium diet
  • Stress
  • Heredity
  • Race – African-Americans develop high blood pressure at a higher rate than any other race
  • Age – Men are more likely to develop high blood pressure after age 35; women are more likely to develop high blood pressure after menopause

 

Combating High Blood Pressure

Among the easiest ways to reduce slightly elevated blood pressure or prehypertension:

  • Lose weight
  • Add foods with potassium, magnesium, calcium, lean proteins and fiber to your diet
  • Limit foods with sodium, trans fats and saturated fats to your diet
  • Limit alcohol consumption
  • Quitting smoking and avoiding second hand smoke

 

If you develop hypertension, depending on the severity, the above tactics are recommended in combination with one or more prescribed medications, all of which should be done under a doctor’s care.

 

Our hearts beat approximately 100,000 times a day, and for someone suffering from high blood pressure, that’s 100,000 beats closer to a number of deadly conditions.

 

In observance of National High Blood Pressure Education Month, Carrington College’s 18 campuses nationwide are attempting to set a Guinness Book World Record for the most blood pressure tested in an eight-hour period on May 21, 2015. To join in this World Record attempt and get your blood pressure checked for free, visit Carrington College located at 5740 S Eastern Ave #140 in Las Vegas on May 21 anytime from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. No appointment necessary.

 

Carrington College offers a variety of programs that lead to a certificate or associate degree. Programs prepare students for careers in the medical, dental and veterinary fields.  For more information, visit carrington.edu.

 

 

Nevada Senior Guide – Visiting Angels Reno

April 26, 2014 by · Comments Off on Nevada Senior Guide – Visiting Angels Reno
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Homecare, Reno, Support Services 

www.visitingangels.com/reno

NSGMayJuneJuly2014_Web15

Visiting Angles, serving Reno, Sparks and the surrounding communities

 

Why Elderly Care by Visiting Angels

At Visiting Angels, we realize it is never easy bringing someone into your home to provide elderly care services.  That’s why we strive to make staying at home a positive experience.  We do this by allowing you to select your caregiver from a group of experienced  elderly care providers, allowing you to maintain your schedule and providing you or your loved one with personalized elderly care services.

 

You Are In Charge – We’re On “Your” Schedule

With Visiting Angels, you’re in charge of everything.  Your Visiting Angels elderly care provider will not dictate to you what your schedule is to be (i.e. what time to get up, when to bathe, meal schedules, etc.).  It is our job to adjust to your schedule and to see to it that you remain comfortable in your home.  Visiting Angels – Senior Home Care at its Best!

 

Bonded, licensed and insured

Your locally owned and operated Visiting Angels office is licensed by the state of Nevada and is insured and bonded.  This can give you the peace of mind that a trustworthy elderly care provider will be in your loved one’s home.

 

Monitoring is essential

At Visiting Angels’ we continually monitor our elderly care providers through our system of continued personalized contacts.  Through telephone check-in’s and home visits, we will be checking regularly with your loved one.  We want to ensure that our elderly care recipients receive the best possible care.

 

Tailor your care to your needs

No two people are the same.  Therefore their elderly care needs are going to be very different.  Whether you need respite care, in home care, part time or full time care, or care at an assisted living facility, Visiting Angels can provide an experienced elderly care provider that is right for you.  Our agency tailors your program of elderly care based on your needs.  Your elderly care program is flexible and you can change the program as different needs arise.  We will also work along with any home health agency or nursing agency that may be assisting your loved ones after a recent hospital stay.

 

Visiting Angels Reno

The Visiting Angels office located in Reno Nevada is locally owned and operated by Monica and Robert Pence.  For additional information on how we can help you or a loved one, please contact our office at 775-852-4663 or visit our website at www.visitingangels.com/reno.  We look forward to assisting you with your care needs.

Stem cell source found in tissue discarded in hip replacements

January 31, 2014 by · Comments Off on Stem cell source found in tissue discarded in hip replacements
Filed under: Articles 

Tissue that is typically discarded in routine hip replacement operations may offer a rich untapped source of stem cells that could be banked for later use in regenerative medicine, where patients’ own cells are used to treat disease or repair failing organs.

This was the implication of a new study led by the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Australia, published online recently in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine.

Study leader Prof. Melissa Knothe Tate and colleagues say, given the tens of thousands of hip replacements performed every year, their findings could have “profound implications” for clinical use.

Currently, to grow new bone or tissue after an infection, injury or the removal of a tumor, if the patient has not preservedstem cells in a cell bank (which is the case for the vast majority of older adults), the stem cells have to come from a donor, or the patient has to undergo surgery to have them harvested from their own bone marrow.

Prof. Knothe Tate explains how their study findings, which now need to be tested clinically, could offer a new source of stem cells for older patients:

“In hip replacement surgery, the…

Continue reading at:  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/271995.php

How to Talk to Aging Parents About Senior Housing

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

One in three adults ages 65 and older will fall each year. Use this podcast to learn how to talk to aging parents about senior living before an accident occurs.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in three adults ages 65 and older fall each year. Of these falls, 20–30 percent result in debilitating injuries limiting seniors’ ability to live on their own. It is more important than ever for seniors and their adult children to plan for senior living accommodations—before an accident occurs.

Of course, the conversation about senior living can be emotional and taxing for aging parents. Seniors may view the change as a loss of independence, and it can be difficult to think about leaving their home and existing lifestyle to join a new community.

In a recent podcast from MySilverAge.com, Lisa Holland—regional director of quality improvement at be.group, a nonprofit provider of California senior living communities—offers expert tips to ease these challenges and strategies to help start the conversation. Holland explains how to approach the subject respectfully and sensitively, and how to offer the right support for each parent’s unique needs.

To hear all of Holland’s tips on talking to aging parents about senior living, including whom to include in the discussion and ways to prepare for potential responses, visit: www.mysilverage.com/thetalk.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

Baby Boomers and Seniors face nutritional triple threat of obesity, weight loss and lack of balanced meals

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Livliga dishware is a new solution to help these two generations eat right and stay healthy 

Americans are living longer than ever, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, but the fight to stay healthy is just as challenging as it has been with past generations. Recent studies show that the Silent Generation, born from 1927 to 1945 and Baby Boomers, born from 1946 to 1964, collectively face three major nutritional challenges.

 

A Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine study shows Baby Boomers have higher rates of hypertension, diabetes, obesity and high cholesterol when compared to their previous generation. The Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations also shows the highest obesity rates are currently found in Baby Boomers.

 

For the Silent Generation, currently ages 68 to 85, the National Institute on Aging says its main challenge is related to lack of balanced nutrition and getting enough calories.

The NIA says this group has:

  • decreased appetite
  • trouble chewing food
  • less socialization around food
  • diminished sense of taste and smell
  • medication interference with food enjoyment
  • fixed incomes

One new solution is Livliga, a tool Baby Boomers and Silent Generation seniors can use to promote right-sized food portions to reach target weights as well as to guide intake of balanced nutritional meals. Created with an Advisory Committee including a cardiologist and certified nutritionist, Livliga offers easy, subtle cues to improve and control the food environment.

 

“Livliga is a solution for every stage of life,” says inventor, Sheila Kemper Dietrich. “It can be used by people who are under eating and need to be reminded to take in more calories or to help those who are struggling to shrink their waistlines. The guide to portion sizes combined with reminders of what comprises a balanced meal are the keys to better health for both groups.”

 

Livliga is Swedish for LIVELY, VIBRANT or VIVID, which is the company’s core philosophy. Kemper Dietrich’s vision was to create an attractive suite of place settings designed for a healthy lifestyle and suitable for entertaining family and friends in both formal and informal settings. The beautiful designs on the dishware offer elegant visual cues to guide appropriate and right-sized servings. The initial product launch was a 4-piece place setting in two patterns, including a dinner plate, salad/luncheon plate, bowl and mug. Livliga also offers a serving bowl, etched water and wine glasses.

 

For Baby Boomers or Silent Generation seniors with grandchildren, Kidliga can also be helpful to promote healthy habits for the entire family. Kidliga is whimsical, fun dishware for kids, accompanied by a health-oriented children’s storybook. Sammie & Sax in the Land of Quinoa: The Search for a Balanced Meal just won a Moonbeam Award in the Health Issues category and is a useful tool and solution to help families in the fight against childhood obesity.

 

Livliga products are specifically designed to help both adults and children address the “psychology of eating”.  The rim sizes, color palette, and designs all combine to encourage slower eating, make portion sizes look larger, as well as make food more visually appealing.

 

A 4-piece Livliga place setting is available on the company website at www.LivligaHome.com at an introductory price of $49.95 (MSRP $59.95). All of the additional products and pricing can be easily found on the website as well. Kemper Dietrich says plans call for further product launches, including additional patterns and a set of LivSpoons that makes for easy, everyday measuring and serving of right-sized portions.

 

To purchase Livliga, visit the online store at www.LivligaHome.com.  “Like” Livliga on Facebook at facebook.com/LivligaHome, follow on Twitter @LivligaHome and visit our blog at LivligaHome.blogspot.com.  Watch our videos on YouTube.com/LivligaHome.

 
Audrey Strong
Agency Zero Public Relations
audrey@agencyzero.com
720.231.6097

Coalition to Protect Retirement Launches Campaign to Safeguard Retirement Savings Incentives

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Nearly 9 in 10 Americans Say Retirement Savings Accounts Should be “Off Limits” As a Source of New Tax Revenue – Part of National Campaign to Raise Awareness About Benefits of Tax Deferral

WASHINGTON, Nov. 7, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Americans overwhelmingly – by a margin of 4 to 1 – oppose changing tax rules for retirement savings accounts, according to a new survey released today by the Coalition to Protect Retirement, a group of America’s leading supporters of retirement savings plans.

The research shows widespread support across political parties for maintaining the current tax treatment for retirement savings vehicles, such as 401(k) plans, 403(b) plans, and traditional IRAs.  According to the survey, which was conducted in mid-October, 87 percent of all Americans and 95 percent of those who have a tax-deferred 401(k)-like retirement plan accounts believe retirement savings should be “off limits” to Congress and not a source of new revenue for the government.

Today’s release of the survey coincides with the Coalition’s launch of a national education and advocacy campaign to preserve the current tax incentives for retirement savings.  The campaign will raise awareness about how current tax deferral rules are helping millions of Americans prepare for their own retirement, and will urge workers and their employers to tell Congress not to change or limit these incentives to save.  Visitors to the Coalition’s website www.HowAmericaSaves.com will be able to send letters to their elected officials and follow developments in Congress.

“Retirement savings incentives play an essential role in encouraging Americans to save and employers to sponsor retirement plans,” said Hank Jackson, President and CEO of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) on behalf of the Coalition.  “This isn’t just smart tax policy – it’s proven good sense.”

Tax Incentives Help Americans Save for Retirement
The current tax incentives have succeeded in helping Americans save for retirement and have increased the number of workers who are covered by retirement plans.  According to the latest available data, more than 67 million people participate in private-sector defined contribution plans alone.  All told, Americans have $20.9 trillion in assets earmarked for retirement.

All Income Levels Benefit from Retirement Plan Tax Incentives
Individuals at all income levels have benefitted from these incentives, particularly middle-income earners.  More than 70 percent of American workers who earn between $30,000 and $50,000 a year contribute to a retirement savings plan when one is offered at work.

“Given the vast numbers of baby boomers who reach retirement age every day, retirement savings incentives are needed more than ever,” said Kenneth E. Bentsen, Jr., President of the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (SIFMA).  “They are doing what they were intended to do – helping people who need them most to take responsibility for their own retirement security.”

The Coalition noted the important role employers play in helping workers prepare for retirement.  Between 2000 and 2009, employers contributed almost $3.5 trillion to public and private retirement plans.  Changes to current incentives could adversely affect employer-sponsored plans, contributions, and the retirement security of millions of Americans.

“Raising new revenue should not come at the expense of Americans’ retirement savings, not now or in the future,” said Brian Graff, CEO and Executive Director of the American Society of Pension Professionals & Actuaries (ASPPA).  “If Congress reduces the benefits of offering and contributing to retirement savings, fewer people will save.  The result: more of tomorrow’s retirees will need to turn to the government for help, and that will mean more federal spending.”

Media Availability
Representatives of the Coalition to Protect Retirement and of Juncture Strategies/ORC International will be available to answer questions and discuss the national survey on Thursday, November 7 from 1:30 – 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time. 
Call-in number:  1-800-745-6370        Passcode:  5356061

About the Coalition to Protect Retirement
The Coalition to Protect Retirement believes that Congress should encourage retirement savings for American workers through the preservation of current tax incentives.  The Coalition is composed of the following associations:  American Benefits Council, American Council of Life Insurers, American Society of Pension Professionals and Actuaries, The ERISA Industry Committee, ESOP Association, Insured Retirement Institute, Investment Company Institute, Plan Sponsor Council of America, Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association, and the Society for Human Resource Management.

The Coalition’s website www.HowAmericaSaves.com was created to raise awareness among workers, employers, policymakers, and the public about the important role that tax deferral plays in helping people plan for their own retirement security.  The site provides tools for individuals and organizations to make their views known to elected officials and to stay informed about proposals being debated in Congress.  To learn more, visit:  www.HowAmericaSaves.com.

About the Survey
Juncture Strategies/ORC International conducted a national on-line survey of 1,011 adults, 18 years of age or older, during October 14–16, 2013.  A summary of the survey results is available at: http://bit.ly/retresearch.

Contact: Bill Maroni BMaroni@howamericasaves.com / 301 802-3375

Staying Safe on the Road: Senior Driving Guide

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Learn the challenges that may keep older adults off the road and find tips for staying safe behind the wheel

According to a recent study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, drivers in their mid- to late-80s have lower overall crash rates than drivers in their early 20s and roughly half as many crashes as teenagers—making them among the safest drivers on the road.

However, fatal crash rates skyrocket for drivers ages 85 and older. In “The Guide to Driving Safety for Older Drivers” from MySilverAge.com, Jake Nelson, AAA director of traffic safety advocacy and research in Washington, D.C., says it’s important to understand what health factors can compromise safe driving. If senior drivers have ongoing limitations that could put them or their passengers at risk, they may want to reconsider their capacity to continue driving.

Older drivers should evaluate how the following factors affect their driving ability:

  • Vision. How well a driver can see accounts for about 90 percent of his or her ability to drive safely. Weak visual aptitude can be measured by an inability to read signs, street markings, or to see other cars and pedestrians in low-light conditions.
  • Mobility. Loss of strength, coordination and flexibility can make it challenging to control a vehicle. Mobility difficulties may also be signaled by pain and discomfort performing daily activities as well as arthritis in the neck and shoulders.
  • Behavior. Trouble remembering familiar routes, anxiety or confusion while driving, or problems distinguishing the gas from the brake pedal are causes for immediate concern.

For a complete list of driving safety tips, including information on driver improvement courses, new driving technologies and alternate modes of transportation, download the driving guide for seniors.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

Downsizing? 4 Easy Ways to Get Rid of Unwanted Stuff

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

Use these methods from MySilverAge.com to declutter and pare down before moving into a new home.

Members of the National Association of Senior Move Managers recently reported that 98 percent of their senior clients downsized before relocating.

Downsizing before a move can be both liberating and overwhelming. But for seniors who have acquired many possessions over the years, it can be an especially daunting task. Seniors planning a move into smaller living spaces should begin the downsizing process about 90 days before moving, says Greg Gunderson, owner and president of Gentle Transitions, a senior relocation services company located in Manhattan Beach, Calif.

“The most time-consuming part is the decision-making process,” Gunderson says. But even after deciding what stays and what goes, Gunderson says one question remains:  “What’s the best way to get rid of the items I don’t want?” From donating a book collection to selling a grand piano, here are four ways to give possessions a new home.

  1. Hold an estate sale. Partner with an estate sales group that can facilitate the auction or sale of belongings at the home.
  2. Contact an auction house. Consider letting an auction house take over the sale of high-end valuables such as antique furniture, artwork or collectibles.
  3. Donate to a charity. Thinking about passing some possessions to those in need? Call the charity (for example Salvation Army, Goodwill) in advance to give them a list of the items that will be donated.
  4. Hire a paper-shredding service. Because financial, bank and private documents can contain confidential information, Gunderson says it’s important to practice caution when removing them from the home.

Downsizing can be an essential part of seniors’ transition to a new home. Another important step is finding the best housing solution to meet current and future needs. A free guide from MySilverAge.com addresses common questions about senior living and offers helpful resources to ease the transition. Find out:

  • When is the right time to move?
  • What are the available housing options?
  • Are there services to help with the moving process?

Download the full guide for all of these answers and additional senior living tips: http://www.mysilverage.com/seniorhousingguide.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

National Report: Oral Health of Older Americans In A ‘State of Decay’

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Oral Health America Launches First-of-its-Kind Website to Connect Older Adults to Affordable Dental Care and Resources

The oral health of older Americans is in a state of decay, according to a new national report released today by Oral Health America (OHA).  A State of Decay, a state-by-state analysis of oral healthcare delivery and public health factors impacting the oral health of older adults, reveals more than half of the country received a “fair” or “poor” assessment when it comes to minimal standards affecting dental care access for older adults. Florida and Arizona, areas with large older adult populations, rank in the bottom five states due to a shortage of oral health coverage, a strained dental health work force, and deficiencies in prevention programs.

“While we are seeing improvements in certain areas of older adult dental care, there is still a lack of progress in advancing the oral health of such a vulnerable population,” said Dr. Ira Lamster, Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, ColumbiaUniversity, Mailman School of Public Health. “Older adults face significant health challenges if their oral health is poor, and there is no coordinated program to help fund necessary services.”

A State of Decay gave a rating of “fair,” “poor,” “good,” or “excellent” based on state level data analyzing five variables impacting older adult oral health: adult Medicaid dental benefits, inclusion of older adult strategies in state oral health plans, edentulism (loss of teeth), dental health professional shortage areas, and community water fluoridation.

The final evaluations in the report for each state are mixed, with several states performing well in some variables, but still in need of improvement in other important areas. The top findings of this report that require scrutiny and action are:

  • Persistent lack of oral health coverage across much of the nation. Forty-two percent of states (21 states) provide either no dental benefits or provide only emergency coverage  through adult Medicaid Dental Benefits.
  • Strained dental health work force. Thirty-one states (62 percent) have high rates of Dental Health Provider Shortage Areas (HPSAs), meeting only 40 percent or less of dental provider needs.
  • Tooth loss remains a signal of suboptimal oral health. Eight states had strikingly high rates of edentulism, with West Virginia notably having an adult population that is 33.8 percent edentate. Photo – PRN Photo Desk, photodesk@prnewswire.com
  • Deficiencies in preventive programs. Thirteen states (26 percent) have upwards of 60 percent of their residents living in communities without water fluoridation (CWF), despite recognition for 68 years that this public health measure markedly reduces dental caries. Hawaii (89.2 percent) and New Jersey (86.5 percent) represent the highest rates of citizens unprotected by fluoridation, an unnecessary public peril.

Daily, 10,000 Americans retire and only 2 percent do so with a dental benefit plan. The State of Decay analysis provides a tool for states to use in addressing shortfalls in oral health status, dental professional access sites, dental benefits for low-income adults, and population-based prevention, all of which affect the oral health of older adults, the fastest growing segment of the American population.

To help older adults and their caregivers address oral health needs and overcome many of the barriers to accessing affordable dental care, OHA launched toothwisdom.org. The website is a first-of-its-kind online tool that connects older adults to dental care and educates on the importance of maintaining oral health with age. The American Dental Hygienists’ Association (ADHA) and Special Care Dentistry Association (SCDA) supported OHA and the launch of the website by encouraging their members to provide meaningful articles for the toothwisdom.org.

“Dental Hygienists have the opportunity to assist older Americans with the oral health challenges they may face as they age,”” said Ann Battrell, Executive Director, American Dental Hygienists’ Association. “We’re all committed to sharing the message that oral health matters and changing the common misperception that with age comes a decline in oral health.”

Few websites focus on oral and systemic health topics, and even fewer provide resources for older adult oral health. Toothwisdom.org offers oral care resources by state – including direct links to dental care, caregiving support, financial tools, social services, and transportation. It also shares the latest news and reliable health information from dental experts across the country on relevant oral health issues, the importance of continuing prevention with age, and the impact of oral health on overall health.

“My dental procedures have been very costly and I had to contact a social worker to help me understand my bills. Dental care should be more available and affordable because we know poor dental care affects overall health, which is particularly important for seniors,” said senior Patricia Cosgrove, a client of The Carter Burden Center for the Aging, Inc.  “Toothwisdom.org can help me find a community health center so I can finally get an affordable check-up and stay up-to-date on oral health information.”

A State of Decay and toothwisdom.org are part of Oral Health America’s Wisdom Tooth Project™, an initiative designed to meet the oral health challenges of a burgeoning population of older adults with special needs, chronic disease complications, and a growing inability to access and pay for dental services.

Links to the 2003 and 2013 editions of A State of Decay can be viewed on toothwisdom.org.

About OHA’s Wisdom Tooth Project
For 55 years, Oral Health America has been the leading national non-profit dedicated to improving the oral health and well-being of Americans throughout the entire spectrum of life. Over the decades, the organization has evolved and adapted to the dynamic nature of our country’s demographics and specific health needs. The Wisdom Tooth Project was born in 2010 due to the current and future implications of an aging population and the need for oral health resources for them mean that we must take meaningful action now.

About Oral Health America
OHA is a national, non-profit association dedicated to changing lives by connecting communities with resources to increase access to oral health care, education, and advocacy for all Americans, especially those most vulnerable. For more information about Oral Health America, please visit www.oralhealthamerica.org.

Study by Harvard Medical School Researchers Examines Senior Living’s Role in Changing Health Care System

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Individuals in senior living communities require an array of health and supportive services to maintain an optimum quality of life. Often, these older adults receive fragmented care through multiple providers and payers, resulting in unnecessary health care expenditures and lower quality-of-care. To address these challenges, Brookdale is partnering with researchers at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and other senior living industry peers to establish the Assisted Living Sector Healthcare Policy Research Fund.

“This support allows us to examine what role senior living providers have in the new models of care that have emerged under health care reform,” says David Grabowski, PhD, professor of health care policy at HMS, who is leading this research study.

Grabowski and his team will examine whether providing more comprehensive, coordinated services in the senior living sector reduces the need for Medicare-paid services and Medicaid-financed nursing home services.

According to Will Clark, Brookdale’s senior vice president of strategy and brand and a member of the HMS Health Care Policy Advisory Council, society’s ability to meet the needs of an aging population is an important political, economic, clinical, and social imperative.

“Harvard’s reputation for tackling some of health care’s biggest challenges and generating meaningful insights that shape our nation’s policy is unparalleled. We are confident Dr. Grabowski and his colleagues’ research will be influential in determining the appropriate role senior living can and should play in our evolving health care system,” Clark said.

Brookdale’s goals for this effort are to create awareness for the potential senior living has to positively impact the health, well-being and overall cost of care for seniors; to identify barriers to creating more integration among senior living and the health care system; influence policy; and identify innovative models that integrate senior living with our health care system.

The initiative is funded through a cumulative contribution of $150,000 from Brookdale and eight other senior living providers — Atria Senior Living, Elmcroft Senior Living, Emeritus Senior Living, Erickson Living, HCP, Inc., Health Care REIT, Inc., Sunrise Senior Living, and Ventas, Inc. Together, these organizations hope to begin a dialogue among health care providers, policy makers, regulators, and consumers on the value of senior living and its role in creating an integrated, outcomes-driven health care system.

The study will occur in two phases. The first phase will consist of analyzing the role of assisted living in new payment-delivery models and presenting a conceptual model of how an integrated model might work, as well as the opportunities and challenges associated with such an approach. Building on the results of the first phase, the second phase of the project will consist of primary data work and potentially the development of a pilot program.

For additional information about the study, contact David Cameron, HarvardMedicalSchool’s director of science communications, at 617-432-0441 or david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu.

For more information about Brookdale, visit www.brookdale.com.

Brookdale Senior Living Inc. is a leading owner and operator of senior living communities throughout the United States.  The Company is committed to providing senior living solutions within properties that are designed, purpose-built and operated with the highest-quality service, care and living accommodations for residents.  Currently, Brookdale operates independent living, assisted living, and dementia-care communities and continuing care retirement centers, with more than 650 communities in 36 states and the ability to serve approximately 67,000 residents.  Through its Innovative Senior Care program, the Company also offers a range of outpatient therapy, home health, personalized living and hospice services. For more information, visit http://www.brookdale.com.

Contact: Andrea Turner, 615-564-6829, aturner2@brookdaleliving.com

Checklist Helps Seniors Through Medicare Open Enrollment

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Older adults can follow a few simple tips to avoid uncovered expenses in the upcoming year.

With Medicare open enrollment beginning Oct. 15, now is the time to start preparing for future health care needs.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130710/CG45364LOGO-b)

Frank Nelson, program manager at the Central Coast Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program, regularly educates Medicare beneficiaries about the importance of open enrollment. He urges seniors to use this period to reevaluate their Medicare Part D coverage and make the most of their policies.

In an interview with MySilverAge.com, Nelson said many beneficiaries feel overwhelmed or have questions about their plans: “It can be a complicated maze. There are a lot of ways you can get tangled up in the nuances.” To avoid the headaches that often come with health insurance, Nelson advises seniors to:

  • Check changes to Medicare Part D. Part D plans should be specific to an individual’s medication needs. Seniors will need to make sure their prescriptions are still covered each year during open enrollment.
  • Request local pharmacy pricing. Open enrollment is a good time to check pricing of prescriptions, as each pharmacy can differ.
  • Purchase a supplemental policy. Older adults might consider Medigap to cover health care costs that aren’t already covered by Medicare.

The steps outlined in this checklist help readers successfully navigate the complexities of Medicare open enrollment and stay on top of their health care plans. Read the full checklist here: http://www.mysilverage.com/medicarechecklist.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

AARP Report Highlights Need for Innovative Long-Term Care for the Aging Baby Boomer Population; Japan’s Technological Secrets May Hold the Answers

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

A newly published AARP report illustrates a profound demographic shift that will have consequences for decades to come, particularly in the senior living and long-term care industry. Baby boomers are entering their retirement years, while the ratio of potential family caregivers to those who require long-term services and support is beginning to drop. Fewer available caregivers will mean the senior living industry must rapidly adapt to a surging market. The AARP’s full report is available here: http://bit.ly/156phYi

Family caregiving is a low-cost but often burdensome approach to elder care. Becoming a primary caregiver often involves leaving behind a career, among other sacrifices. Plus, these well-intentioned caregivers may not have the expertise necessary to provide the level of care needed by an aged parent. Adults in these roles often feel enormous pressure and stress, sometimes even resentment. At any rate, the nation’s changing demographics will make today’s family caregiving situation far different in the near future.

Between 1990 and 2010, there were about 7 potential caregivers for every one person aged 80-plus. That ratio is at the start of a freefall that will force society to change the way it cares for its elderly members. By 2030, the ratio of caregivers to elderly will be 4 to 1. All remaining baby boomers will have reached their years of highest risk (80+) by 2050, when the caregiver ratio will have plummeted still further to 3 to 1.

Kevin Williams, president of SeniorMarketing.com, suggests innovative thinking will be required to bridge this care gap: “Naturally, with fewer family caregivers available, the responsibility will largely shift to senior living communities, care agencies and already overextended government programs. But it will take more than simply building more communities or training more staff—assuming an adequate number of candidates are even available. Technological innovation may be the silver bullet to raise the standard of living for aging boomers, improve efficiency, and reduce costs.”

The nation of Japan, which has the greatest life expectancy and one of the oldest average populations in the world, has recently experienced a demographic transition of its own. Recently, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare put out a call for 2 million new professional caregivers, but only received 1.3 million eligible candidates. With low birth rates being the norm, that shortfall will only increase. A tech-savvy society to begin with, the Japanese have embraced robotics and automation as a solution to the elder care issue. Motorized, assistive devices can help older individuals perform tasks themselves, while automated pill dispensers can prevent dangerous medication mistakes. A recent blog post on The Economist explained Japan’s inventive approach to the elder care dilemma: http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2013/05/automation-elderly

Williams concluded: “This demographic shift is a great challenge but also a great opportunity. Forward-thinking, entrepreneurs will be leading the way in this new environment. Technology to assist with daily tasks, provide medical care, monitor, and connect seniors to loved ones is advancing at a faster pace every year. It’s not unreasonable to predict that the future will witness even better care for our future seniors.”

About SeniorMarketing.com

Baltimore-based SeniorMarketing.com was created with twin goals in mind. First, the company helps connect caregivers and seniors with local, affordable care options. Second, the company increases income for senior living communities and health care agencies.

Contact:

Kevin M. Williams, President
SeniorMarketing.com
5024 Campbell Blvd., Suite D-3
Baltimore, MD 21236
Phone: 1-888-523-3311

Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

National Council on Aging Launches Second Year of Education Program for Older Adults and Those Who Care for Them Aimed at Helping to Protect More Older Adults from the Flu

Actor Lee Majors, best known for his iconic roles on The Big Valley, The Fall Guy, and The Six Million Dollar Man, is joining the National Council on Aging (NCOA) Flu + You program to help protect older adults from influenza (commonly known as “the flu”). Flu + You aims to inform adults 65 and older, their caregivers, and those who care about them, about the dangers of the flu, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options.

As a part of his involvement in the Flu + You campaign, Majors will appear in a public service announcement (PSA) that follows him as he embarks on an important and action-packed mission: learning about his vaccine options and getting vaccinated against the flu. The PSA will educate the public about the increased risk of flu in adults 65 years of age and older and the importance of knowing your vaccine options and getting a flu vaccine, even for tough guys like Majors.

Every year in the United States, roughly nine out of 10 flu-related deaths and more than six out of 10 flu-related hospitalizations occur in people 65 and older. Older adults are at a greater risk for flu due, in part, to the weakening of the immune system that typically occurs with age. This means that no matter how healthy or youthful we feel, as we age we become more vulnerable to the flu and its related complications.

“The CDC recommends an annual flu vaccine as the single best way to protect yourself from the flu, yet a third of people 65 and older still don’t get vaccinated,” said Richard Birkel, PhD, MPA, NCOA Senior Vice President for Healthy Aging and Director of NCOA’s Self-Management Alliance. “As NCOA continues to educate older adults about the flu and the potential severity of the illness, we hope to encourage more people to protect themselves and their loved ones by getting an annual flu shot.”

The flu vaccine offers the best defense to protect against the flu, and adults 65 years of age and older have several vaccine options. In addition to the traditional flu vaccine (which helps protect against three strains of the flu virus), there is also a quadrivalent vaccine (which helps protect against four strains), and a higher dose vaccine that was designed specifically for adults 65 and older. By improving the production of antibodies in older patients, the higher dose vaccine can provide a stronger immune response to the flu than traditional vaccines. All flu vaccines are covered as a Medicare Part B benefit, which means there is no copay for Medicare beneficiaries 65 years of age and older.

“I get the flu shot every year and encourage my peers to do the same – it’s a simple step you can take to protect yourself from the flu,” says actor Lee Majors.  “I urge everyone 65 years of age and older to talk to their health care provider about their vaccine options this flu season.”

The flu can make existing health conditions worse, and it is especially dangerous for people with lung disease, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer—conditions that commonly affect older adults. Nationwide, 86 percent of adults 65 years of age and older have at least one chronic health condition and approximately 66 percent of Medicare beneficiaries have two or more chronic conditions, putting them at increased risk of the flu and flu-related complications, which can be severe and include hospitalization and even death.

For more facts about flu, and to order free educational materials, including a brochure and fact sheet, visit www.ncoa.org/Flu.

About Flu + You
Flu + You is a national public education initiative, from the National Council on Aging with support from Sanofi Pasteur, to educate adults 65 years and older about the dangers of the influenza virus, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options. Older adults and their caregivers can learn more on the Flu + You website, www.ncoa.org/Flu, which features a public service announcement with Lee Majors and facts about the flu. Also available on the website is a calendar of Flu + You events that will be held in 12 cities throughout the United States in September and October. At the events, older adults will have the opportunity to learn more about their risks for flu and available vaccine options, as well as talk to a health care provider and receive a flu vaccination.

About NCOA
The National Council on Aging is a nonprofit service and advocacy organization headquartered in Washington, DC. NCOA is a national voice for millions of older adults—especially those who are vulnerable and disadvantaged—and the community organizations that serve them. It brings together nonprofit organizations, businesses, and government to develop creative solutions that improve the lives of all older adults. NCOA works with thousands of organizations across the country to help seniors find jobs and benefits, improve their health, live independently, and remain active in their communities. For more information, please visit:

www.NCOA.org | www.facebook.com/NCOAging | www.twitter.com/NCOAging

 

CONTACT: Dana Kinker, (212) 301-7181, dkinker@wcgworld.com

In an Aging Society – Are Senior Citizens Driving Safely? by Diane Carbo

August 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Remember when you couldn’t wait until you were old enough to drive. Getting a driver’s license gave us an opportunity to experience a new freedom we did not have before. For those of us with two parents working, driving meant taking ourselves and our siblings to after school activities and work. Driving took us to a level of independence that we had not experienced before. In an aging society of drivers, those very same feelings exist in many today. Driving gives us a sense of independence and freedom, the ability to go out and socialize, go to work or to church. Safety issues are a concern as many move into the golden years. The life expectancy of seniors is increasing. There are more active senior citizens out on the road today than ever before. Since we all age differently, many aging adults, can drive into their seventies and eighties. As we age, the risks for having a serious car accident that requires hospitalization rises. Statistics show that fatal car accidents rise after the age of seventy.

If you know an aging adult driver who is experiencing difficulty with driving, it is important to carefully monitor the situation. This article can help you determine whether you should take steps to encourage the senior to stop driving.

An aging society and risk

Some key risk factors that affect our aging society are:

Vision declines affecting depth perception and ability to judge speed of oncoming traffic. Night vision becomes a problem as our eyes loose the ability to process light. By age 60, you need three times the amount of light that you did at age 20 in order to drive safely after nightfall. We also become more sensitive to bright light and glare. Signs and road markings can be difficult to see.

With age, flexibility may decrease as response time increases. A full range of motion is crucial on the road. Turning your head both ways to see oncoming traffic, moving both hands and feet can be difficult for those with chronic conditions such a rheumatoid arthritis, or Parkinson’s disease, heart disease and diabetes.

Older adults in an aging society will often need to begin to take medications. Certain medications, as well as a combination of medications and alcohol, can increase driving risk. Be aware and careful about medication side-effects and interactions between medications. It is important to talk to your pharmacist to be aware of interactions that could affect your driving safely. Some medications cause drowsiness.

Aging affects our quality of sleep, resulting in daytime sleepiness. Falling asleep at the wheel is a major concern for those that dose off during the day.

The beginning of dementia or mental impairment can make driving more dangerous. A decreased mental capacity or decrease tolerance to stressful driving situations such as complex and confusing intersections may cause delayed reactions to sudden or confusing situations on the road. An aging brain and body does not have the same response time as we did when we were younger.

Look for warning signs

There are multiple warning signs that an aging adult is becoming or is an unsafe driver. Some of them are small, but if there are multiple concerns it may be time to talk about your concerns with the aging driver. Warning signs of an unsafe driver include

 

  • Abrupt lane changes, braking, or acceleration.
  • Increase in the dents and scrapes on the car or on fences, mailboxes, garage doors, curbs, etc
  • Trouble reading signs or navigating directions to get somewhere
  • Range-of-motion issues (looking over the shoulder, moving the hands or feet, etc.)
  • Becoming anxious or fearful while driving or feeling exhausted after driving
  • Experiencing more conflict on the road: other drivers honking; frustration or anger at other drivers. Oblivious to the frustration of other drivers towards them
  • Getting lost more often
  • Trouble paying attention to signals, road signs, pavement markings, or pedestrians
  • Slow reaction to changes in the driving environment
  • Increased traffic tickets or “warnings” by traffic or law enforcement officers
  • Forgetting to put on a safety belt

 

If you are concerned about an aging adult driver, closely monitor their driving before deciding whether they need a refresher coarse on their driving skills or approaching them to give up their driver’s license altogether. Ongoing and open communication is important to addressing the issue of driving. Studies conducted by Harvard and MIT show that while most drivers preferred to discuss the issue with their spouse, doctor or adult children (in that order), this is not the case for everyone. The right person may not necessarily be the most forceful or outspoken one, but rather someone whose judgment and empathy are especially trusted by the driver.

Talk with other family members, your doctor, and close friends to determine the best person for “the conversation.” Remember driving signifies independence, freedom and being self sufficient to active senior citizens. Realize you may meet with resistance and the aging driver may become defensive. Emotion may get in the way of a rational conversation. Express your concerns and give specific reasons for those concerns.

The goal is to get the aging driver be part of the decision making process

You may begin by asking your loved one to make some concessions because of your concerns.

 

  • Taking a driver refresher course
  • Not driving at night
  • Suggest they not drive on busy thoroughfares or during rush hour
  • Taking shorter trips
  • Not driving under adverse weather conditions
  • Encourage a visit to their primary care physician or pharmacist to go over medications that may affect driving skills. Your physician may be able to recommend a Driver Rehabilitation Specialist. This individual can assess driving safety by an office exam and driving test and make recommendations regarding special equipment or techniques that can improve the driver’s safety. Consider ways to decrease the need to drive. Check out alternatives to shopping by car, including:

  • Arrange for home deliveries of groceries and other goods, and try to arrange for home visits by clergy, medical and personal care providers, and government service providers.
  • Use financial services that don’t require bank visits, like automatic bill paying, direct deposit, and bank-by-phone or on-line banking services.

Fears of those living in an aging society 

Fear of isolation and decrease in socializing is a real concern for the aging driver. It is important to keep spirits high as the aging driver makes the adjustments to becoming a non driver. Be in tune to their need for fun, volunteering, work and religious activities. Create a transportation plan that can make it easier for the aging driver to give up driving. You can create a list of friends and family that are willing to drive, contact the church and the local Area Agency on Aging in regards to transportation programs in the area.

Some seniors may adjust better if they can keep their own car, but have others drive them. Their own car may feel more comfortable and familiar, and the sense of loss from not driving may be lessened. Remember, baby boomers have grown up walking out the door and being able to go where they want to go. We need to keep the aging adult driver and those on the road with them safe.

Diane Carbo RN- As a geriatric care manager, that has cared for her father and mother in law in their homes, she learned first hand how overwhelming, stressful, and time consuming caring for a loved one can be. Staying in their homes was very important to them. As a result, Diane started http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com to assist others age in familiar surroundings and avoid the emotional and frustrating task of maneuvering the medical delivery system

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

World’s Leading Ophthalmologist, Dr. Edward Kondrot, Cycling 335 Miles to Raise Awareness for Macular Degeneration

July 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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World’s Leading Ophthalmologist, Dr. Edward Kondrot, Cycling 335 Miles to Raise Awareness for Macular Degeneration

DADE CITY, FLORIDA – (July 18, 2013) – On July 19, 2013, Dr. Edward Kondrot and his wife, Ly, are beginning a 335-mile bike through the beautiful Great Allegheny Passage. Their journey starts in Pittsburg, PA and ends in Washington, DC, an estimated ten-day ride. The couple are biking to raise awareness about alternative treatments for macular degeneration and asking for sponsors to pledge anything from 10 cents to $10 per mile. All the funds raised will go to Restore Vision Foundation, an Arizona non-profit Corporation.

According to the National Eye Institute, Age-Related Macular Degeneration, or AMD, is a common eye condition, usually occurring in adults 50 years and over. It is the leading cause of vision loss in older adults as the macula is destroyed, creating blurry images. Your risk of developing AMD rises with age, as well as if you are a smoker or if you have family members with macular degeneration.

“I think it’s important to highlight the statistics of AMD due to the sheer number of people that are affected,” affirms Dr. Kondrot, the world’s leading ophthalmologist and founder of Healing the Eye & Wellness Center. “Most people with AMD are recommended to get laser surgery or injections, but alternative treatments are much less invasive and have incredible results.”

“If I’m going to bike 335 miles in my sixties, I think the cause is important,” adds Dr. Kondrot, “I want people to realize that harsh surgeries and medication is not the only way to go to prevent or treat macular degeneration. The goal is to raise awareness about alternative therapies, which can be more effective and less invasive. We hope to raise a lot of money for the Restore Vision Foundation.”

Dr. Kondrot is the author of three best-selling books, including “10 Essentials to Save Your Sight” (Advantage Media Group, July 2012), and president of the Arizona Homeopathic and Integrative Medical Association. He has founded the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center, located just north of Tampa, Fla., which offers alternative and homeopathic routes to vision therapies known as the “Kondrot Program.” The program focuses on such conditions as macular degeneration, glaucoma, dry eye, cataracts, and others. His advanced programs have helped people from around the world restore their vision. The center sits on 50 acres of land and features a 14,000-square-foot state-of-the art complex, an organic ranch, jogging trails, swimming pool, hot tub, and more. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

To pledge, please visit: http://ow.ly/n0FFp

To follow Dr. Kondrot and his wife on their journey, visit: http://ow.ly/mZikP

To learn more about the Restore Vision Foundation: http://www.restorevisionfoundation.org/RVF/Welcome.html

About Health The Eye & Wellness Center

The Healing The Eye & Wellness Center is located 30 miles north of Tampa, in Dade City, FL. Founded by Dr. Edward Kondrot, the Center offers world-class alternative therapies for vision conditions, including color and vision therapy, the treatment of glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration, dry eye, and more. The center also offers a variety of seminars, webinars, and training sessions for others in the medical community. Dr. Kondrot is the world’s only board-certified ophthalmologist and board-certified homeopathic physician. He is also author of three best-selling books in the field. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

# # #

Source:

National Eye Institute. Age-Related Macular Degeneration.http://www.nei.nih.gov/health/maculardegen/armd_facts.asp#1

TimeSlips Storytelling Inspires Senior Creativity

July 13, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

By Nancy LaFever / Posted on 12 July 2013 in Seniorsforliving.com (link below)

Timeslips StorytellingA creative program that was originally designed to assist seniors with dementia,TimeSlips uses a storytelling format to spur creativity in older adults and other age groups. Using TimeSlips,trained facilitators have people create stories from prompts, usually pictures. Especially effective with dementia patients, it relieves the often anxiety-producing effort of remembering with imagination. As described, “TimeSlips opens storytelling to everyone by replacing the pressure to remember with the freedom to imagine.”

A recent post on the Leadingage.org website reports that TimeSlips Creative Storytelling has launched a new online training system…  [to continue reading, go to http://www.seniorsforliving.com/blog/2013/07/12/timeslips-storytelling-inspires-senior-creativity/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+seniorsforliving%2FwtAk+%28Seniors+For+Living%29]

WestCare Foundation Announces Expanded Veterans Programs

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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WestCare Foundation Announces Expanded Veterans Programs

(Las Vegas) – WestCare, a community-based nonprofit providing responsive human services and behavioral health care programs for four decades, announced today that it has expanded its Veterans’ services.

WestCare, founded in Las Vegas 40 years ago, serves approximately 5,000 veterans throughout the United States annually.  America’s returning warriors often face health challenges including substance abuse and mental health disorders, identified as this generation’s “invisible wounds of war.”   Among them are post traumatic stress, brain injury, sexual trauma, anxiety and depression.  Episodes of homelessness, unemployment, and criminal justice involvement are not uncommon among our Veterans.

“These challenges present opportunities for community organizations, led by specially trained, qualified and informed staff, to assist with issues such as social isolation, domestic violence, reintegration and transition, and other problems a Veteran, as well as Veteran family members, may be experiencing,” said veteran and Director of Veteran Services, Dan Bernal. “WestCare is committed to helping Veterans and military family members live positive, productive and healthy lives.”

WestCare’s expanded programs are aimed at addressing a broad range of issues for Veterans and their families through services that  include: treatment for substance abuse and mental health disorders with gender or youth-specific services as appropriate, HIV/AIDS-specific programs, assistance to homelessness  including transitional shelters and permanent housing projects, family counseling, community reintegration, assistance to those who are justice involved, educational and vocational programs for both youth and adults, and case management.

From the top down, starting with WestCare’s President and Vietnam Veteran, Richard Steinberg, more than 10 percent of WestCare’s leadership and staff are Veterans and members of military families. The organization has a deep understanding of military culture at every level and in every program.  “Serving those who have served” is more than a slogan at WestCare.

Since the organization’s inception, Veterans have been welcomed into WestCare programs.  Today, the expanding reach of Veteran-specific programs is aimed at extending services to the men and women who deserve respect for their service, understanding of where they have been and opportunities for their future.

WestCare

WestCare, whose mission “uplifting of the human spirit,” was founded 40 years ago in Las Vegas.  Since its inception, it has grown to more than 100 locations in 16 U.S. States, the US Virgin Islands and the Pacific Islands headquartered in Guam.  The non-profit organization has a variety of programs available in each of the communities it serves.   For more information on the WestCare Foundation and its mission, visit www.WestCare.com.

Ophthalmologists Warn that Fireworks-Related Injuries Can Cause Permanent Vision Loss

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Ophthalmologists Warn that Fireworks-Related Injuries Can Cause Permanent Vision Loss
American Academy of Ophthalmology and Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology urge parents to closely supervise children when around fireworks

LAS VEGAS – June 26, 2013 – As the Fourth of July holiday approaches and Americans make plans to celebrate the stars and stripes with a little red glare from celebratory rockets, the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology urge the public to take important steps to prevent fireworks-related eye injuries. The academies ask parents and other adults to be especially cautious when children are in the presence of fireworks.

Of the more than 9,000 fireworks injuries that occur in the United States each year, [I]approximately 45 percent are sustained by children age 15 and under.[II] Eyes are among the most injured body parts,[III] and one in six fireworks-related eye injuries results in permanent vision loss or blindness.[IV]

All fireworks are dangerous if not properly handled; however, sparklers cause the most injury and are particularly dangerous since many children handle them on their own. Sparklers typically burn at 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit. That temperature is nearly 1,000 degrees hotter than the boiling point of water, double the heat required to burn wood, hot enough to melt glass and cause third-degree burns to the skin.[V] Out-of-control bottle rockets also cause some of the most serious eye injuries, including corneal abrasions, traumatic cataract, retinal detachment, optic nerve damage and rupture of the eyeball – all of which can lead to potential blindness.

Both Academies advise the public that the best way to avoid potentially blinding injuries is to attend a professional public fireworks display instead of using consumer fireworks. For those who still decide to use legal consumer fireworks, the Academy recommends they follow these safety tips to prevent eye injuries:

  • Never handle fireworks without protective eyewear and ensure that all bystanders are also wearing eye protection.
  • Never let young children play with fireworks of any type. If older children are permitted to handle fireworks, ensure they are closely supervised by an adult and wear protective eyewear.
  • Clear the area of flammable materials and view fireworks from at least 500 feet away.
  • Leave the lighting of professional-grade fireworks to trained pyrotechnicians.

For those who attend professional fireworks displays and/or live in communities surrounding the shows:

  • Respect safety barriers at fireworks shows.
  • Do not touch unexploded display (show) fireworks; instead, immediately contact local fire or police departments to help.

“It’s vital that the public take seriously the dangers of using consumer fireworks. If mishandled, devastating injuries can occur – particularly to the eyes,” said Adam J. Rovit, M.D., president of the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology. “We urge parents and adults to be on high alert about these risks, especially if children are in the presence of fireworks, and take these safety measures to reduce the risk of eye injury.”

The Academy and the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology believe these tips can help to ensure safe Independence Day observances for everyone. If, however, a fireworks-related eye injury occurs, call 911 and seek medical help immediately. These injuries typically need advanced care by an ophthalmologist, a medical doctor who specializes in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

For more fireworks safety tips and additional information on how to maintain healthy vision, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology
The mission of the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology is to promote and advance the science and art of medical eye care. The Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology’s members are dedicated to treating and preventing eye diseases for all patients.  Learn more at Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide.  Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org.

About EyeSmart
The American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.orgto learn more.

###


[I] Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2011 Fireworks Annual Report, accessed at http://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/113888/2011fwreport.pdf

[II] Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Fireworks-Related Injuries to Children, accessed at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/108/1/190.full

Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2011 Fireworks Annual Report, accessed at http://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/113888/2011fwreport.pdf

[IV]  British Journal of Ophthalmology, Ocular firework trauma: a systematic review on incidence, severity, outcome and prevention, accessed athttp://bjo.bmj.com.proxy1.library.jhu.edu/content/94/12/1586.full#ref-11

[V] National Fireworks Protection Agency fireworks tips, accessed at http://www.nfpa.org/assets/files/pdf/public%20education/fireworkssafetytips.pdf

Bodybuilding Health – Exercises For Senior Citizens by Machahi John Joel

June 27, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Crafting the ideal bodybuilding program

With the special concerns highlighted above, the training program, the bodybuilding exercises, the intensity and frequency of training must be precisely considered before setting up the ideal program. Remember that at this age, most senior citizens have assorted health complications ranging from hypertension, diabetes to kidney failures. The body is particularly susceptible to accumulating fats and the metabolism is usually skewed.

The contemporary health and fitness approach, that is the approach of initiating bodybuilding training as a means to optimal health and physical fitness, requires that everyone remains active in the gym, regardless of age. The idea therefore, is to design a bodybuilding training regimen that counters these age-borne adversities and thus maintains the body at a prime state.

The special features of their training program

The programs for older adults must feature:

 

  • Aggressive weight loss strategies
  • Increased cardiovascular exercises for a healthy cardiovascular system and weight loss
  • Moderate intensity in weight exercises to stimulate muscle growth
  • Endurance training to strengthen the bones
  • Proper diet rich in minerals like iron and calcium
  • Reduced training frequency (Ideally at two days a week)
  • Reduced training duration (Ideally at 35-45 minutes)

Ideal Kinds of Exercises 

There are particular bodybuilding exercises that must be incorporated in the training regimen for senior citizens. Remember that the exercises must be construed as intent on assisting the older adults regain or maintain their health and physical fitness. They should incorporate four distinct types of exercises namely:

 

  • Weight lifting exercises for strength (Maintain an intensity level between low and medium)
  • Balance exercises that stimulate physical fitness (Ideally done using free weights i.e. side leg raises)
  • Stretching exercises for flexibility
  • Endurance exercises that last longer but with a minimal intensity i.e. jogging, walking, swimming or riding a bicycle.

 

For these exercises, two workout sessions of 40 minutes each will be ideal. In most cases, a senior citizen is advised to contract a fitness trainer or at least to consult one regularly. This will ensure that his or her bodybuilding program is comprehensive, safe and beneficial. That means that they can craft a workout schedule like the following:

Monday

· Pre-workout warm up – 5 minutes

· Endurance exercises – 15 Minutes

· balance exercises for – 15 minutes

· Post workout warm up – 5 minutes

Thursday

· Pre-workout warm up – 5 minutes

· Stretching exercises – 15 Minutes

· Weight exercises for – 15 minutes

· Post workout warm up – 5 minutes

Two individuals cannot craft a similar bodybuilding regimen. Older adults must design their own program based on:

· Age

· Body strength

· History in the gym

· Medical status of health

· Body fat ratio

· Daily activity levels

· Diet program

· Diet supplementation

Conclusion

There are some particular issues that need to be considered even as the program takes off. Lets us regard these as safety tips that will assist senior citizens in deriving maximal benefits from bodybuilding training despite advance in age. Here they are:

· Consult the physician before initiating any bodybuilding training and severally while on the program

· The light activities should always begin a training session and the intensity should then increase gradually

· Warm ups are a must before and after a training session

· Keep the body well hydrated before, during and after workouts

· Rest durations must be at least 72 hours long

· Proper dressing and protective gear must always be worn while in the gym or on the track

There is a link between a bodybuilding lifestyle and optimal health. Once an individual strikes that link, he or she attains optimal physical fitness as a by-product. With the right information, you can easily set up a training regimen that is centered on bodybuilding health. From this program, muscle mass and strength will accrue and with it physical fitness.

Machahi John Joel is a successful body builder who has spent the last four years pumping iron. It is from this background that he now writes expert articles trying to expound on the link between bodybuilding, health and physical fitness. Learn more about that critical link at [http://digitalhealthandfitness.com/]. In this information age, you need a digital connection to a happy life.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Machahi_John_Joel

 

Choosing the Right Pet For a Senior Citizen? by Kelly Marshall

June 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

When you are in a place where you are holding a purring cat or playing with a dog in the yard, have you ever noticed that you are often in a good mood? Many people have noticed that pets can give us warm feelings of love and importance, and while these are important no matter what age you are, more people are beginning to notice that the elderly can really benefit from them. There are many studies that show that the owning and handling of animals will significantly benefit the health of the individual, and that owning pets that make them feel loved and important can help the elderly to lead to longer, healthier lives.

Is there an elderly person in your life who could benefit from the love that an animal has to give? While many people are interested in getting a pet for the senior citizen in their life, they often do not know where to start. If this is something that you are thinking about doing, you will find that it is very important to prepare and to make sure that you are going to be able to get them the pet that is right for them. Take some time and consider the matter. Are they in a situation where they are going to be able to take care of the animal and do they like animals? Many people find that they can ease their family into the idea if they introduce them to a pet through a service first.

When you are looking for a pet for a senior citizen, you should start by looking for an older animal, especially if the person in question has some limited mobility. For instance, there are cats and dogs that are adults and ready to be adopted from the animal shelter. There are many advantages to adopting adult animals. For instance, you already know how large the animal is going to get and you also know what their temperament is like. You will not be bringing a bouncy youngster into the home that will need to be trained and you will find that older animals tend to be very laid back. Not only are you going to be giving an older animal a home, you will find that they can be just the perfect fit for the person you have in mind.

If the senior citizen in question has never owned an animal before, you will find that this is something that requires a lot of discussion. Ask them if they have ever considered it, and make sure that they do get to meet the animals in question. Getting a good match in terms of personality and lifestyle is essential, as is making sure that the levels of care that are necessary are going to suit. Take some time and make sure that you consider what your options are when you are thinking about finding the right pet for the senior citizen in your life.

Pets can enhance our lives in so many ways, so make sure that you consider what they can do for the older person in your life!

This article was written by Kelly Marshall of http://www.ohmydogsupplies.com – the only place to go for dog feeders metal, stainless steel, and wrought iron.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kelly_Marshall

 

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

At a time when thousands of Baby Boomers are reaching the age of 65 every day, the issues of senior rights, elder laws, and anti-ageism have never been more important, more volatile, or more questioned. After all, this is the generation that was ready to take down the establishment fifty years ago, and they haven’t lost any of their desire to change the world for the better. And, they have the numbers to do it. Here are our 100 top blogs for seniors dealing with senior rights, law & policy, and anti-ageism.

Boomers Against The Law

  1. Elder Law Plus: lawyer Evan H. Farr blogs about topics concerning elder law, including probate strategies and parental care.
  2. Michigan Elder Law Blog: the attorneys at Barsch & Joswick provide seniors and their loved ones with sage advice on a variety of Elder law issues.
  3. Everything Elder Law: Evan Farr is back at it again, this time focusing on Elder Law news, concepts, and innovations from around the country.
  4. Massachusetts Estate and Elder Law Blog: lawyer and blogger Stephanie Konarski gives tips on estate planning and other elder law topics.
  5. New York Elder Law Attorney Blog: your source for elder law news and comment in New York, this blog analyzes nursing home legislation and elder care costs.
  6. Elder Law Prof. Blog: Elder Law professor Kim Dayton authors a really nice blog that covers a wide range of Elder law issues, from Supreme Court cases to seminars.
  7. The Pop Tort: can a consumer advocates blog dealing with civil justice be cute? This blog proves it can, complete with an adorable “Pop Tort” logo, even while exploring such issues as Medicare and Medicaid lawsuits, nursing home scams, and medical malpractice against the elderly, among other legal issues.
  8. Supportive Senior Solutions: this blog from a geriatric care management practice in New York covers issues related to geriatric care, caregiving, and healthcare laws for the elderly and infirm.
  9. Aging Beats the Alternative: elder care specialist Lorie Ebers uses her blog to talk about overcoming the challenges of aging, caring for aging parents, and the less talked about side of elder law: Boomer divorce.
  10. Elder Law Blog: lawyer Ronald C. Morton’s elder law blog is full of sage advice for seniors looking how to tap into Veteran’s benefits, how to plan for their golden years, and more.
  11. The Best Elder Law Blog: published by the attorneys at Lamson & Cutner, this blog discusses elder law cases, the Affordable Care Act, and same-sex marriage.
  12. Elder Law Tips and News: the lawyers at Cooper, Adel & Associates bring you posts on living trusts, aging issues, and general estate planning.
  13. The Connecticut Elder Law Blog: lawyer Michael Keenan provides his readers with estate planning tips, elder fraud, and Medicare rules.
  14. The Teddy Bear Lawyers: attorney Rick Law gives readers a great resource for Elder Law in the Chicagoland area. Find articles on protecting vulnerable seniors and financial planning.
  15. Oregon Elder Law: attorney Orrin Onken blogs on elder law, estate planning, and probate proceedings in plain, easy to understand language.
  16. Florida Elder Law and Estate Blog: this informative blog includes great articles on VA benefits, estate planning, and trusts.
  17. Golden Law Center: written by attorney Sasha Golden, the Golden Law Center blog discusses elder law, special needs planning, guardianship, wills and trusts, and estate administration.
  18. Kraft Elder Law: attorney Robert Kraft blogs about Medicaid, Medicare, wills, trusts, probate, veterans benefits, and other elder law topics.
  19. Pennsylvania Law Blog: this elder law blog by the attorneys at the law offices of Shober & Rock discusses Medicaid, taxes, Veterans, banks, and annuities.
  20. Long Beach Elder Law Blog: this blog focuses on elder abuse, estate protection, the Cal MediConnect program, and reform of health law.
  21. Houston Elder Law Blog: the folks at Wright Abshire Attorneys blog about care planning, estate planning, Medicaid Planning, Probate & Estate Administration, and and Veteran’s Benefits.
  22. Hauptman Law Blog: readers of this blog can learn more about elder, estate, and special needs law. Includes articles on the Medicare Settlement and VA Aid.
  23. Fulkerson Elder Law Blog: the function of this elder law blog is for the firm to respond to common questions clients have about elder law and review developments in the law impacting elder law and estate planning.
  24. CMLP Estate Planning and Elder Law Blog: readers can look forward to reviewing articles on simplifying their estate plan and elder law news items of note.
  25. Massachusetts Estate Planning and Probate Blog: attorney Matthew Karr keeps readers up to date on estate planning and probate news and information.
  26. Marshall Elder and Estate Planning Blog: the author of this elder law blog has over 30 years experience in estate planning, special needs planning, and estates.
  27. Hartford, CT Elder Law Blog: the attorney’s at Ruggiero Ziogas & Allaire discuss estate planning, care planning, Medicaid, Veteran’s Benefits, and Probate.
  28. El Paso Elder Law Blog: the law firm of Stephanie Townsend Allala and Associates blogs on estate planning, guardianships, Medicaid Planning, Nursing Home Abuse, and Trust & Probate.
  29. Miami Probate Law Blog: the folks at the Byrant law firm keep readers up-to-date on estate administration, probate court, estate litigation, and the nuisances of will and trust disputes.
  30. Elder Law News: attorney Brian A. Raphan is based in New York City and specializes in Wills, Estates, Trusts, and Elder Care issues. His blog is full of great resources.
  31. Aging & Law in West Virginia: this blog contains news in law and aging in West Virginia, written by the West Virginia Senior Legal Aid organization.
  32. Florida Elder Law and Estate Planning: this Florida Certified Elder Law attorney provides in depth insights and news to help Floridians protect themselves and preserve their assets.
  33. Family Law Blog Maryland: while this blog looks at all matters pertaining to Family Law, elder law sneaks in as a prevalent theme in many of the cases discussed. They look at legal matters like when divorce and retirement coincide, or when grandparents wish to take custody of their grandchildren.
  34. Phoenix AZ Family Law Blog: looking at issues older couples face in Arizona, this family law blog explores the specific challenges elders face in divorces and custody battles, complete with the latest policy changes and laws.
  35. Otherspoon: hospice volunteer and blogger Ann Neumann talks about care-giving and the realities, politics, and senior rights involved in death and dying.

Seniors Talk Policy And Politics

  1. Aging in Place: this blog is concerned with seniors who are dealing with shrinking benefits and increasing costs—seniors find answers on how to protect themselves.
  2. Estate in Denial: providing news, analysis, and commentary on abusive practices occurring in probate courts. Features original perspective and direct communication.
  3. Florida Estate Planning Lawyer Blog: this blog covers estate planning legal issues, cases of interest, and news with a focus on Florida elder law.
  4. McGuire Woods: the people at McGuire Woods author this great blog on long term care legal issues, including timely news, articles, and white papers.
  5. Illinois Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: published by the law office of Wilson & Wilson, this blog covers asset protection, banking, estate planning, and trusts.
  6. Illinois Nursing Home Abuse Blog: covers Illinois nursing home law, including Supreme Court cases and other information relating to residents and family members.
  7. Law Office of Donald D. Vanarelli Blog: provides readers in New Jersey with information on elder law, estate and special needs planning, and mediation services.
  8. Maryland Nursing Home Lawyer Blog: this blog offers insight on nursing home abuse reports, legislation, and legal opinions of elder law in Maryland.
  9. Massachusetts Estate Planning, Probate & Elder Law: elder law attorney Brian Barreira writes on legal issues involving death, taxes, special needs, and long-term elder care.
  10. New Jersey Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: blog posts explore life and death in New Jersey from a perspective of estate planning, elder law, taxation, probate, and estate administration.
  11. Medina Law Group: postings provide readers with advice on estate planning and management, estate taxes, elder law, and VA benefits.
  12. North Carolina Wills and Trusts: this blog provides readers with estate planning and elder law news with a North Carolina focus.
  13. California Nursing Home Abuse Law Blog: covers nursing home abuse, elder law abuse, and features many quality articles relating to California elder law.
  14. Nursing Home Law Blog: this well written blog discusses elder issues, legislation, legal news, protections of elder rights, and helpful health tips.
  15. PA Elder Estate and Fiduciary Law Blog: focuses on elder law, long-term care, end-of-life and health care surrogate decision-making, and estate planning.
  16. Patti’s Blog: find information about this lawyer’s practice, which concentrates on advocacy for seniors. She shares personal interests and her passions.
  17. Pennsylvania Nursing Home Abuse Lawyer Blog: this blog discusses nursing home abuse laws, cases, and news items from Pennsylvania.
  18. Barbara Cashman Blog: Barbara blogs about elder law and policy issues, and often hosts guest bloggers to share their insights on elder law and news.
  19. NJ Elder Law: lawyer Kenneth Vercammen blogs about topics related to estate planning and elder law. He was once awarded the NJ State Bar Municipal Court Practitioner of the Year.
  20. The Senior Sentinel: a blog compiling news and information for Baby Boomers, the Senior Sentinel concentrates on the intersection of ageism and public policy both nationally and world-wide.
  21. Elder Consult: this geriatric medicine blog not only covers Alzheimers, dementia, financial decision making, and medications, it also discusses related legal issues such as elder financial abuse.
  22. Grey Pride: a UK blog by the Anchor Digital Marketing team is dedicated to keeping older people at the top of the political agenda and petitioning the government to create a Minister for Older People to ensure their needs are met.
  23. Over 65 Blog: project organizers from Harvard, Yale, and The Hastings Center host this blog for “seniors seeking solutions for health care and security, mainly looking at health care system reforms, elder law policies and practices, and how seniors can achieve a stronger role in the future of health care.
  24. Reaping Hope Blog: a blog from an NGO in Nepal promoting dignified aging and elder rights, Reaping Hope explores elder abuse and elder oppression while actively helping elderly people claim their rights and challenge discrimination.

Age Against The Machine: Anti-Ageism

  1. Ageist Beauty: the musings, product reviews, and random thoughts of a woman who is fighting against her age.
  2. Everyday Ageism Project: this blog aims to capture people’s everyday experiences dealing with ageism. The author has discovered that ageism is the most commonly experienced form of prejudice.
  3. The Lonely Gerontologist: professor Kelly Yokum blogs about all things aging—including aging stereotypes and other aging topics that come to mind.
  4. My Elder Advocate: this blog provides comprehensive coverage of ageism, the dangers of nursing homes, elder abuse, and elder care.
  5. The Roaming Boomers: David and Carol are great examples of a couple who doesn’t let age get in the way of living life to the fullest.
  6. The Gypsy Nester: Veronica and David show readers how to rock the empty nest and get the most out of life as you age.
  7. Changing Aging: this multi-blog platform challenges conventional views on aging. The authors believe aging is a strength, rich in developmental potential and growth.
  8. The Elders: founded by Nelson Mandela in 2007, the Elders is a group of seniors committed to addressing global challenges, including child marriage and climate change.
  9. Beauty and Wisdom: the blog of photographer Robbie Kaye, who traveled to salons throughout the US to photograph and interview women in their 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s and discovered that beauty is ageless.
  10. Advanced Style: don’t tell these women they are too old to model hip and alluring fashions. This blog teaches women how to dress to impress and that age is only a number.
  11. RL TV: the only cable network and online destination for folks 50+, features a nice blog that provides tips on elder issues and promotes active living.
  12. The 70-Something Blog: blogger Judy informs readers how to live a full and engaging life as she chronicles her journey of aging.
  13. Retirement is Work: newly retired librarian and blogger resolves to post one good thing about retirement every day for a year, but along the way struggles with senior rights and anti-ageism.
  14. Yo Is This Ageist?: a humorous blog by Ashton Applewhite dedicated to determining whether age-related remarks are offensive, “challenging the stereotypes that segregate us by age.”
  15. This Chair Rocks: a smart and sassy blog by Ashton Applewhite that challenges the ideas of ageism with humor and snark. All stereotypes and insensitive remarks are grounds for brilliant blog posts.
  16. Senior Planet: “aging with attitude” is the tagline of this blog community of older adults using technology to connect with each other and take on the issues of ageism and senior rights.
  17. Changing Aging: a blog founded by Dr. Bill Thomas to promote “a radical reinterpretation of longevity” which focuses on anti-ageism and senior rights, as well as getting the most out of a long life.
  18. Time Goes By: Ronni Bennett takes on aging, ageism and related issues with humor, exploring the truth of “what it’s really like to get old.” She starts by rejecting the “cutesy” terms for old people – they’re called “elders” around here!
  19. The Magic of Middle-Aged Women: author Daniel Even Weiss – a man – blogs on the theme of his latest book, The Magic of Middle-Aged Women, where he challenges the prevailing ageist idea that women don’t get better as they age. They do.
  20. Advanced Style: Ari Seth Cohen, a young-ish photographer, roams the New York City streets photographing stylish and creative elders. Here, art challenges the paradigm that age and beauty can’t co-exist.
  21. The New Old Age: the New York Times blog on aging takes advantage of the newspaper’s top writers to explore the unprecedented intergenerational challenge of the Baby Boomers.
  22. The Little Old Lady Stays Put (or doesn’t): explores the “lives, lifestyles and issues of interesting older people,” touching on the issues surrounding ageism, elder rights, living with dementia, and overcoming the struggles of aging with strength and good humor.
  23. Naked at Our Age: advocate of ageless sexuality, Joan Price, talks about sex and aging, taking on Senior Rights subjects like safer sex for seniors while providing helpful tips.
  24. Aging & Work at Boston College: scholars, academics, and researchers share their findings on ageism in the workplace and the challenges aging workers face in this PhD-heavy blog by The Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College.
  25. Ethnic Elders: this newsy blog by New America Media examines the Senior Rights issues and Elder Law of minority groups such as age discrimination, lawsuits related to Social Security, and elder healthcare reform.
  26. The Everyday Ageism Project: blending blogging and research, this site’s goal is to capture the experience of age discrimination. The forum is full of people sharing their experiences in a supportive environment.
  27. Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens Blog: the Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens sub-blog offers wide ranging posts on issues including senior rights and ageism – with its signature left-wing perspective.
  28. Clinical Geriatrics: created as more of a peer-reviewed clinical journal by the American Geriatrics Society, some of the top scholars in geriatrics converge on this blog to discuss geriatric health and wellness issues, which often cross over into legal and anti-ageism issues.
  29. Age Action Alliance: this organization brings together a network of 300 organizations and individuals committed to helping older people. Its blog is dedicated to improving older people’s lives through advocating against ageism, particularly in Britain.
  30. Manitoba Senior Centres: this Canadian blog covers the rampant ageism in Canada and promotes world elder abuse awareness. It also has a list of resources for older adults.
  31. Fierce with Age: defying ageism goes mainstream at this blog, created by veteran journalist Dr. Carol Orsborn. Having written about the Boomer generation for major newspapers and blogged for the Huffington Post and NPR’s Next Avenue, Orsborn is well equipped to take on the spiritual and policy hurdles of aging.
  32. Live Better Boomer!: a Philadelphia-based blog, by social worker Tiffany Matthews, devoted to helping educate and empower Boomers advocate for their own improved healthcare.
  33. Third Age: billed as “health for Boomers and beyond,” Third Age offers relatively fluffy fare, like “Change your Mood with Color,” to the legal issues surrounding Boomer divorce and care-giving.
  34. The Old Gunhand: one facet of senior citizen rights you don’t see every day is elder gun advocates. This website not only tells you the best types of guns for elderly wielders, it also goes into gun policy and senior self-defense.
  35. Age Discrimination Info: a simple name for a one-stop source of statistics and information on age discrimination, including legislation, cases, news, publications, events and training. The perfect resource for the activist.
  36. Age UK: the largest organization in the United Kingdom for working with and for older people, this website has an entire section dedicated to age discrimination and ageism.
  37. National Youth Rights Association: not just for youngsters, the National Youth Rights Association combats ageism in all its forms. In fact, they probably wouldn’t appreciate being called “youngsters.”
  38. Disability and Representation: a blog by writer, photographer and activist Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg that discusses (and tries to change the discourse about) disability rights and ageism, along with autism.
  39. Over 50: Career coaching and workshops for the over-50 crowd, this blog doesn’t stop at finding a job. This site explores Baby Boomer activism in and out of the workplace.
  40. Activist Post: while this blog deals with many topics requiring advocacy, they often include issues that regard Senior Rights, Elder Law and anti-ageism.
  41. California Booming: an informational blog dedicated to California Baby Boomers, this blog covers everything from sex, to diet, to politics of the Boomer generation, including issues concerning senior rights and ageism in the workplace.

Senior Citizens and the Job Search by Mort Ferguson

June 4, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Although many employers are looking for new graduates or someone younger with a bit of experience, there are still plenty of jobs that you can secure as a senior citizen. Opportunities in the work force abound for older Americans. On the surface it may seem harder to find such roles; however they are available – you just need to know where and how to approach the search.

There is a great potential among older employees. They have more experience, are (generally) easier to work with, and typically more flexible than the person fresh from college who is more likely to have an implanted ideal of what their job should be like. In other countries such as the Netherlands and Australia, younger employees are losing jobs to the more experienced and mature adults; in North America, this is a growing trend as well.

It is illegal, of course, to have someone ask your age when applying for a job, but hiring personnel can tell from application and resume information whether you may have been in the work force for some time. That is why instead of talking strictly about your age, you need to highlight your experience. When putting together your resume, clearly list your accomplishments over the years and all your previous jobs. In your cover letter, focus on why you would be better suited for the job than a young applicant – even if you committed decades at home to raise children – thus helping employers understand the benefits in hiring you over a recent graduate with no real life experience.

If you have been out of work for a while or entering a field in which you have not had that much experience, consider enrolling in a class that can refresh your memory about that market or a class that can update you on new policies. Businesses are constantly changing, and part of entering the work force again means learning contemporary methods of working rather than continuing the way work was done when you were younger.

The Internet has web sites offering opportunities for senior citizens, and shows relevant vacancies in the city in which you work. There are even specific agencies that work solely with senior citizens to make sure you can find a job in which you would be welcome. Some of the fields that value the knowledge of a senior citizen include healthcare, public speakers, and writers. You simply need to determine what you may be interested in doing and then make the move to apply for jobs in your chosen field.

It is not so difficult to land a job when you are 60; you just need to become a bit savvy at learning where to look.

For practical job hunting & career [http://www.job-hunting-careers.com/medical_billing_and_coding_career.shtml] information, please visit [http://www.job-hunting-careers.com], a popular site providing great insights on your search for just the right job or career, ranging from US Post Office to a travel nurse [http://www.job-hunting-careers.com/travel_nurse_employment.shtml] position and many more!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mort_Ferguson

Health Insurance For Senior Citizens – Why Are They So Hard To Insure? by Zandra Jones

May 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Private health insurance for senior citizens is very hard to come by. As you get older, it becomes more prevalent that commercial insurance companies don’t want to cover older Americans. Since the creation of Medicare, there is no incentive to cover senior citizens because most buy into the Medicare system any way. Even though this may be true, there are still some older Americans who need to buy private health insurance. So let’s take a look at some of the main reasons why getting insurance for them can be difficult.

Your Age Is a Dominant Factor.

There are a number of reasons why senior citizens can’t get health coverage. For starters, a lot of health insurance companies look at your age. When people start getting over the age of 50, they are prone to have more illnesses, they see the doctor more often, and they might have more hospital stays. So the risks of insuring an older person far outweigh the benefits. We all age so why is this such an important factor?

The Cost Of Insuring An Older Person Is High.

Due to the fact that the elderly are prone to so many conditions and will need so much care, there are many companies who consider them to be a big risk. The average hospital stay of a person over the age of 50 is longer than some one in their 20’s and 30’s. Younger people heal and recover a lot quicker then older adults so their cost per treatment is less. Insurance companies know approximately how much they have to pay out for each age group and take all these things into consideration when pricing policies.

Pre-Existing Conditions are Not Insurable.

If you have a pre-existing condition like diabetes or high blood pressure, it is most of the time not insurable. May be with the new health care reform this will change. However, what does a pre-existing condition tell an insurance company? It tells them that you may not do a good job in taking care of yourself or you have bad eating habits. So why insure someone who could have possibly prevented such conditions by not drinking, not smoking, and not overeating. This may not be fair but insurance companies are in the business of making money for their investors.

Affordability May Be A Problem.

The last thing that you will find is that many times, senior citizens can’t afford the insurance. Even if they find a company willing to insure them, many are retired and are on a limited income. The cost of premiums alone can eat up any retirement check or pension income. Many have to choose between insurance or keeping a roof over their heads.

Getting health insurance for senior citizens is still a big problem for many. Many have never paid into the social security system and are not eligible for medicare and private insurance is way too expensive. Hopefully, the new health care reform will address many of these issues otherwise what options do these seniors have.

Getting good Health Insurance Information to stay update with the ever changing laws can be difficult. Visit www.healthbenefitstoday.com to get all the fact before you make a decision to purchase health insurance.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Zandra_Jones

Memory Strategies For Senior Citizens – What Technology Today Tells Us! by Carson Hill

May 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Memory loss, lack of brain clarity, or fear of memory loss is something  experienced by just about every aging adult or senior citizen today!

Facing these obstacle personally can cause a lot of panic, anxiety and  frustration.

Most aging adults think they are losing their ability to focus and remember  because their brain is just simply getting old but this is not totally the case!  In fact, contrary to popular belief, most of the beginning stages of brain fuzz  symptoms and memory loss issues have more to do with a lack of use than a lack  of youth!

As adults and seniors age, the demand to rely on their brain occurs less  frequently. When their brain is not challenged it does not expand and grow;  therefore their memory and ability to focus is not sharp! Their memories and  focus becomes dull.

The good news is that technology today strongly indicates that we can have a  dramatic effect on the capability of our brain as a result of how we treat  it!

Brain exercise and utilization of proper brain techniques can sharpen the  brain and even make it strong again! Regardless of age, proper brain function  techniques can literally re-grow the brain. Most people don’t realize that with  use, the brain does grow!

The brain is malleable. It’s almost like a piece of plastic that can be  shaped!

With proper stimulation and healthy activity, the brain creates neuron  connections. These connections can be compared to a tree that is growing more  branches.

With this knowledge, we can treat our brains like we would a muscle. As we  age, we can learn to keep our minds properly stimulated using specific  techniques. With proper brain stimulation, senior citizens can are in far more  control than has been thought possible. They can notice drastic effects and  exciting changes in their memory, focus and clarity both long term and short  term!

Now you have an understanding that you are directly impacting your mind  through the way you treat it. I’ve told you that your brain is malleable. I’ve  told you that it grows with use! I’ve also told you that your short term memory  and long term memory can be greatly affected by proper brain stimulation.

I’ve been studying the brain for the last five years. I am fascinated by the  brain and grateful to know that we have so many excellent options and resources  to benefit us in this day and age.

If you or someone you know personally has interest in improving their brain  function in their aging years, I would recommend they visit http://www.regrowmybrain.info. There you’ll find excellent  information with a fantastic program tailored specifically for senior citizens  and aging adults. This is the only brain fitness program I’ve found that tailors  to the older generations exclusively!  The material includes some bonus  information that has to do with Alzheimer’s understanding and coping. These are  great resources to have whether your are faced with that condition or not.

Also visit http://www.squidoo.com/memory-strategies-for-senior-citizens for a better summary of what I just discussed with visuals.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Carson_Hill

Government Grants For Senior Citizens – Specific Grants Set Up For the Elderly by Matthew Salvinger

May 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The government has grants set up to help every group of people in the  country, including senior citizens. In some cases these grants may be approved  to the senior citizens themselves, but the grants can also be awarded to people  who assist the citizens on a regular basis. Whether it’s medical research for  the elderly or increasing the safety of old folks homes there are grants that  will provide funding to those who need it.

Government grants for senior citizens will often go to organizations that  work with the elderly and charities that support senior citizen groups. These  organizations can be businesses or volunteer groups, as long as they work with  the elderly in some capacity. The grants can be used for special classes for  people over 65, providing cheaper medical services for the elderly, keeping  volunteer groups that run errands for disabled older adults funded, and just  about anything else an organization can think of to help the elderly  community.

Various websites have provided lists of where to find these government  grants. They have information on what government organization is funding the  grant, when the deadline for the grant application is, what the grant is  intended for, and how to apply for those specific grants. Anyone can apply for  government grants for senior citizens as long as they qualify for the grant. It  tends to be easier for individuals to go through organizations if they are  seeking grant money although individuals are permitted to apply also. Certain  grants for the elderly such as education grants and housing grants are simple to  get without the assistance of an agency. More information on who can apply for  these grants is available through government websites and some local government  agencies.

The US Government and private foundations award MILLIONS IN GRANTS to people just like you who are in need of  financial help. The best part is, most grants come with absolutely NO INTEREST!  Get More  Details

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Matthew_Salvinger

Strength Training Tips for Senior Citizens by Aaron Dorksen

May 7, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Many senior citizens wouldn’t even consider lifting weights or performing  strength training exercises, thinking that’s something for much younger, fitter  people to do.

A person is never too old to perform strength training exercises, though. In  fact, frequent exercise is the best prescription for independent, active and  healthy aging, according to the A.A.R.P., the National Institute on Aging and  the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Studies show that all adults, even seniors, can benefit from as little as 15  minutes a day of moderate cardio exercise. Thirty minutes a day of light to  moderate cardio exercise is the optimum level, and the good news is the cardio  exercises can be broken up into segments (ie: brisk walk in morning, afternoon  swim).

Adults, including seniors, are also recommended to perform strength training  exercises two-three times per week.

Although exercise programs for seniors (generally considered people age 50-60  and older) are modified considerably from what younger generations are doing in  the gym, senior strength training can help people of any age increase muscle  strength, strengthen bones, fight off and-or delay the effects of arthritis, and  improve balance and mobility. Regular exercise is also important to help  maintain strong heart function and a healthy weight.

Jim Androsik, a physical therapist for Wooster Commuinty Hospital’s  HealthPoint Health and Wellness Center in Ohio, has witnessed great benefits  from the seniors he’s worked with who have followed a strength and conditioning  program.

“Generally, the senior citizens we work with are people 60 years-old and up  who are referred to us by a physician,” Androsik said. “Doctors give us some  guidelines, such as the frequency and duration a person should exercise for and  comments on their health in general.

“We then develop a program for them.”

Exercise programs for seniors can obviously vary greatly depending on age and  health, but typically there are basic guidelines Androsik has his seniors  follow.

“We generally recommend that a senior perform strength training exercises two  to three times a week,” he said. “We look at their needs to determine exactly  what exercises they’ll do, such as if they’re experiencing back pain, shoulder  pain, arthritis, etc.”

Here’s a basic exercise program for seniors based on Androsik’s advice and  other research I’ve conducted. Again, these are general recommendations and  seniors should consult with a physician before beginning an exercise program. It  would also be highly beneficial for seniors to exercise as part of a group or  class, to help with motivation, to make sure they’re using the right techniques  and, of course, to enjoy the social aspect of exercising):

Cardio exercise (3-4 times per week)

Tip: Perform low-impact exercises that are easy on your joints. Start very  slowly before increasing duration and resistance. Start with 5 minute cardio  workouts and slowly progress to 15 minutes or more if you can.

Pick from the following: Treadmill, walk on track, exercise bike, pool  workout, yard work, etc.

Weight lifting/strength training (2-3 times per week) Tip: Androsik says it’s  important to do high repetitions on exercises with low resistance or weights. Do  light stretches before performing strength training exercises. Here’s a sample  strength training program a senior might perform:

* Good mornings 1 x 15 (one set of 15 reps) tip: stand straight, slowly bend  down to touch toes or reach down as far as comfortable, rise back up and  repeat.

* Shoulder rotations 1 x 15 tip: stand straight with arms out parallel to  side, rotate shoulders 15 times in each direction. Good warmup exercise.

* Sit Ups – 1 x 15

* Side Bends – 1 x 15

* Squats – 1 x 12-15 tip: Use barbell, machine or without weights. Keep back  straight by looking straight ahead at spot on wall, go down as tolerated but no  lower than parallel with knees.

* Lunge – 1 x 12-15 tip: hold dumbbells to make harder

* Calf Raise – 1 x 12-15 tip: hold dumbbells to make harder or use  machine.

* One Arm Rows – 1 x 12 – 15 tip: balance one knee on bench, other leg on  floor. Pull dumbbell up and down with arm on side of body planted on floor.  Builds shoulder strength.

* Rotator cuff with band or machine – 1 x 12-15 internal rotation, 1 x 12-15  external rotation. tip: have a doctor or trainer show you how to do these, great  for preventing shoulder pain.

* Dumbbell curl – 1 x 12 – 15 tip: do them seated or standing

* Dumbbell bench press – 1 x 12 – 15 tip: do them lying on a bench

* Dumbbell flyes – 1 x 12 – 15 tip: do them lying on a bench

* Triceps extension – 1 x 12 – 15 tip: use machine or dumbbell. This is just  a general plan to give seniors some ideas, but it’s best to work with a trainer.  Tweak as needed. Remember to use light weights and do high reps.

“Exercise can provide lifelong benefits,” Androsik said. “It can minimize or  slow down arthritic changes.”

Basically, exercise can delay the aging process to a large degree in many  people and if seniors find a program they enjoy it can actually be fun. What are  you waiting for seniors – get back into the gym!

Find exercise equipment  stores Arizona and more with our fitness experts. At Home Fitness consultant  Aaron Dorksen’s blog deals with a variety of fitness topics, ranging from  workout tips, motivational ideas and feature stories on how exercise impacts  people’s lives. Consult a doctor before making any significant changes in your  exercise routine or diet. E-mail him with comments, questions or ideas for  future blogs at aaron@athomefitness.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Aaron_Dorksen

 

Know More About Short Term Health Insurance Plans For Senior Citizens by John D. Edwards

May 2, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Short term insurance has become very popular over the recent years as it is a  cheaper and affordable insurance option for many people. When it comes to  insurance polices there are many to choose from. There are companies that  provide a host of insurance policies and at times it is difficult to choose the  ideal one for you. For people over 65 years of age it becomes even more  difficult because they are not aware of the right plans for themselves and they  fear the amount of premium that they need to pay as the amount for insurance  policy increases with age. If you are over 65 years this may sound depressing  for you however the good news is that there are many short term health insurance  plans that are offered by insurance companies for their benefit and welfare.

The above insurance companies offer the best policies that are less expensive  for them. These companies have two sets of health insurance policies that are  available for people under 65 and the next set for people over 65. The insurance  policies that have been framed for senior citizens by Medicare are short term  insurance policies that have been targeted for the welfare of these citizens.  There are certain cholesterol levels, blood pressure, family history, height,  weight and other considerations that are taken into account for these citizens.  In fact, the above policy considerations are more liberal than the ones that are  made for younger adults. These citizens can reap the benefits of short term  health insurance polices that have been made keeping their needs in mind.

The term insurance policy intended for senior citizens offer the best rates  and helps them save significant money. The short term insurance is also called a  temporary insurance that provides health insurance for a limited period only.  The time period can be as short as a month and can also go up to 6 to 12 months  as well. The term health insurance works in the same way as the long term health  insurance. The coverage between the two is different and in the case of the  former the person gets a health card that will possess limits and the  deductibles on the services of the policy. Such a short term insurance policy  provides you with the advantages of an insurance against accidents and illnesses  only for a limited period.

The short term health insurance plan for senior citizens do not contain  pre-existing conditions and preventive care. The pre-existing condition is a  medical problem that a person suffers from before he or she goes into insurance.  These short term health insurance plans are specially designed to provide  protection against major health problems that a senior citizen faces.

Thus, from the above it is evident that the above short term health insurance  have been specially designed for the purpose of senior citizens and they can  avail all the benefits and the advantages of the polices that have been offered  to them with ease.

Are you looking for low cost short term health insurance? Visit http://www.short-termhealthinsurance.com today  for more information!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=John_D._Edwards

 

Tips for Staying Safe As a Senior Citizen by Mark Mahaffey

April 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

When it comes to staying safe, senior citizens have special  concerns.

Although research has shown that the risk of being a victim of a physical  assault crime decreases as you age, the risk of other kinds of crime continues  and even intensifies.

Senior citizens are just as likely as the rest of the population to have  their homes broken into, but they are at higher risk for financial crimes. To  criminals, they appear more vulnerable and defenseless. And since the elderly  are often well-off financially, they are a target for crimes involving money  scams.

Further, the elderly grew up during decades when it was proper to be polite  and trusting. This makes them less likely to be rude during a phone conversation  or face-to-face meeting with a con artist. The con artist will keep pushing, and  the elderly victim may just ‘give in.’

Financial crimes are devastating for anyone, but especially so for senior  citizens. They not only feel afraid, but may begin to question their own ability  to handle their own affairs. For an aging person already trying to hold on to  independence as long as possible, this can be emotionally terrifying.

If you are a senior citizen, or have a loved one who is elderly, there are  some steps you can take to keep yourself or your loved one protected. You don’t  have to wait for crime to happen to you: be proactive and make sure you stay  safe.

Secure your home.

A home alarm system is a great deterrent to would-be burglars. Motion  detectors, automatic lights, and a security system with 24-hour monitoring will  significantly decrease the likelihood of a home invasion.

For even more peace of mind, your monitoring service can respond to medical  emergencies as well. And you may even qualify for a senior citizen discount.

Here is a check list of home safety tips for senior citizens:

• Check the locks on all doors and windows to make sure they are secure.

• Trim tall bushes that are up close to the house to eliminate hiding  places.

• Be sure your house number is painted brightly so emergency help can find  you quickly, should you need them.

• Don’t hide keys under mats or pots. Instead, ask a trusted neighbor to keep  your extra key.

• Don’t keep extra cash in your house. It is better to keep it in the bank or  in a safe deposit box.

• Post security signs around your house to let the burglars know you are  protected.

Be smart about financial scams

Senior citizens are susceptible to con artists at the door or over the phone.  These con artists know that the elderly are interested in products promising  anti-cancer benefits or improved memory. Older adults are also less likely to  report fraud, because they don’t know who to call to report.

Here are some tips to stay safe:

• Never allow any unexpected visitor into your home.

• Install peepholes in your doors.

• Do not give out identifying information over the phone such as social  security numbers and account numbers.

• Do not do business with door-to-door salespeople of any kind.

• Know who your neighbors are and try to join a neighborhood watch for added  security.

• Never click on a link to a financial institution in an email. Instead,  manually type the URL into the address bar.

Stay safe away from home

To reduce the risk of being robbed while away from home, follow these safety  precautions:

• Never carry more cash than you need.

• Don’t carry all your credit cards with you.

• Keep your bag close to your body.

• Avoid walking in deserted or dark areas.

• Lock your car doors while traveling in areas where you will be stopping  frequently.

• Also lock your car doors while you are away from your car.

• Consider installing an alarm system in your car. This may qualify you for a  discount on your auto insurance.

You don’t have to wait for crime to come to you. By being pro-active and  educating yourself, you can outsmart the criminals and keep yourself and those  you love safe.

http://www.bestsecurityproducts.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mark_Mahaffey

 

Safety Tips for Traveling With Senior Citizens by David Stillwagon

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Feeling safe and secure is vital when you are traveling whether you are  traveling by yourself or with a group or family. It is always a big concern when  you have children especially when you are in an area that isn’t familiar to you.  Children have a habit of wandering away so keeping an eye on them is extremely  important. But it isn’t just children that need to be careful when traveling;  senior citizens also have to extra cautious.

Before you head out the door it is always a good idea whether you are a  senior citizen or not to check to make sure that your medications are with you.  Forgotten things like medication can be a major disruption to your trip.

A good detailed itinerary is the best place to start when planning a trip  with senior citizens. Knowing the times of travel, how long it is going to be  before getting there and what you will be doing helps to lessen the confusion  and questions that might arise. If you are traveling by car you should make an  estimate on how long the trip will take. If you are traveling with senior  citizens they may need more breaks should include that with your estimate.  Taking your time when traveling and enjoying the ride makes it more pleasant for  everyone.

If you are travelling on a plane then you need to take a few things into  account such as giving yourself plenty of time at the airport to check in and go  to the rest room if necessary. If the airport is large then you might want to  request a wheelchair if your senior citizen traveling partner gets tired on  their feet. Remember also that security is a lot tighter now so the time that  you are standing in line has increased greatly.

Seating arrangements on a plane or a bus should be considered with the older  adult in mind. If they have to take more restroom breaks that it is a good idea  to get them an aisle seat close to the restroom that way they won’t be have to  be climbing over folks.

After the plane ride is over and you leave the plane it might be a good time  to take a rest and a bathroom break. While the plane ride might not be tiring to  you it might be to others. A little rest now will definitely help out later.

Planning ahead and taking all the right precautions can make for enjoyable  trips with senior citizens.

David Stillwagon blogs about age and health issues

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Stillwagon

 

The Critical Importance of Recreation For Senior Citizens by Robert McCluskey

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As our population ages, there is increasing emphasis on teaching and learning  lifelong recreational skills. Research has shown that recreation is an important  part of an individual’s social behavior. Recreation plays a critical role in the  lives of older adults by contributing to an improved quality of life. People who  participate in recreational activities as senior citizens report significantly  more life satisfaction than those who do not.

Physical recreation is especially important. Engaging in physical activity  reduces almost every risk of disease, including heart disease, high blood  pressure, colon cancer and diabetes. Participation in recreational activities  improves mental health, as well. Again, research shows that older individuals  who participate in recreational activities have better coping behaviors in  response to stressful life events and daily frustrations. They learn that social  support is important, and available, through these activities.

Unfortunately, we have come to view our older years as a time of diminishing  activity and social interaction. As a result of these expectations, aging folks  often assume they are incapable of recreational activity or that it will not be  available to them. They often cite scarce financial resources, lack of  transportation or declining health as reasons for avoiding these important  activities. Although there is some validity to these concerns, we often overlook  the increasing resources that are being dedicated to wellness among senior  citizens. Some of these resources are:

  • Travel programs. Fees are usually required, but deep discounts for seniors  are often available.
  • Volunteering. Seniors bring valuable experience, wisdom and compassion to  others
  • Elderhostel. A world-wide travel program bringing affordable adventure and  learning to seniors
  • Theme parks. Senior days! Special entry fees!
  • Entertainment and arts. Museum and theatre tours often provide discounts and  transportation to seniors
  • Local parks and recreation programs. Great outdoor activities
  • Community Gardening. Check with your local parks and recreation office
  • Senior citizen centers. Free or reduced price meals and more!
  • Book clubs. Reading and socialization are a potent therapeutic combination  for the brain

 

It is important for senior citizens and those who care for them to seek out  recreational activities even at this time when they may be reluctant to do so.  Research indicates that seniors who participate in these kinds of activities  tend to remain active once they begin.

Western cultures sometimes view their aging populations as economic and  social liabilities. In fact, when they are nurtured, they become assets.  Recreational activities can provide help and motivation that seniors require to  enable them to contribute their valuable time and wisdom in return for that  nurturance.

Robert A. McCluskey Bob McCluskey is a semi retired teacher and school  administrator. He has recently been teaching college-level psychology classes  and has developed a course in the psychology of aging. Bob teaches courses  specifically designed for senior citizens and is especially interested in the  mental health of aging, With an emphasis on the preservation and enhancement of  memory.

If you would like to learn more about this topic visit our web site: Senior Technology News! Going Strong Seniors is your premier source for Internet  resources!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Robert_McCluskey

 

ConnectMyFolks iPad App Offers New Way For Tech-Resistant Seniors To Connect With Family, Friends

April 22, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events 

ConnectMyFolks iPad App Offers New Way For Tech-Resistant Seniors To Connect With Family, Friends

EUGENE, Ore., April 18, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — A new iPad app that’s free to download and use will keep technologically challenged seniors in safe, simple and easy electronic touch with their friends, children and grandchildren. ConnectMyFolks delivers email, texts, photos and videos instantly to technophobes of all ages, although it’s designed to be used by people 65 and older. It is now available in the App Store.

Email and texting have replaced letter writing and phone calls for most people, and that leaves seniors out of the loop, says ConnectMyFolks co-founder Steve Lee. “If someone’s not able to get email or texts, they can end up isolated from their own family,” Lee says. “These days if you’re not receiving emails or texts, you’re left behind.”

Although the nation’s tech-savvy population is aging and bringing its expertise with it, the 85-year-old and up age category is the fastest growing demographic in the United States . Many of these seniors never acquired tech skills and are often intimidated by computers and smart phones.

ConnectMyFolks is simple and secure. Only people on the senior’s approved list can communicate through the app. That eliminates spam, scammers and other threats. “Whether it’s a nephew who’s always asking for money, or it’s a random phishing attempt, those emails won’t get through,” Lee says.

Housed on the intuitive iPad, ConnectMyFolks is designed for people easily overwhelmed by traditional tech devices. It launches with three big buttons – one for mail, one for pictures and one for videos. Forward, back and home buttons make navigation simple. “You absolutely cannot get lost in this app,” Lee says. “You can’t break it. When it doubt, just ‘go home.'”

A key feature is the simple web-based admin panel, where a designated friend or relative can set up the senior’s approved ConnectMyFolks sender list, select reply options based on the senior’s needs (pre-set replies, typed emails or voice recordings) and make adjustments to font sizes and other interface settings.

The app is expected to be popular in part because families are so geographically scattered. Even grown children who take care of their folks are often helping from afar, according to the US Census Bureau, which reports 7 million to 10 million adults care for their aging parents long distance.

ConnectMyFolks was developed by In the Loop, a Eugene , Oregon , company devoted to the use of technology to solve everyday challenges faced by modern families. Learn more at www.connectmyfolks.com.

Gift Ideas For Senior Citizens Perplexing You? 5 Tips to Finding the Perfect Gift For Baby Boomers by Diane Carbo

April 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Gift ideas for senior citizens can be perplexing. Not to worry, I have  5 tips to help you find the perfect gift for seniors citizens in your life. Many  gift givers have the perception that as we age, we have accumulated everything  we need in life. In some case that may be so, but, just because we are getting  older, does not mean we don’t enjoy or appreciate a meaningful and well thought  out gift.

Tip #1 As we age, our needs change. Our thoughts focus on our past, what we  accomplished, what we wanted to do, but postponed due to life’s responsibilities  that came our way. Many fondly recall the dreams, plans and hopes of their  youth. There are many that have things in their life that they miss or wish they  had a chance to do. Now, because of their age, they think that this is no longer  a possibility. Trust me, there is a gift giving idea in those postponed dreams  and plans. And all you have to do is discover what they are.

Tip # 2 Every aging senior has different personalities, lifestyles,  interests, financial and health situations. This should be considered when  exploring gift giving options.

Take time to consider the senior adult for whom you want to choose the  perfect gift.

Are they an active senior, with lots of ability to get around independently?  Are they involved in church, community or group activities? Do they live  alone? Do they have limited access to social functions or activities due to  illness or inability to drive? What keeps them from getting out an about?   Do they have hobbies or outside interests? Have they had a change in  their physical or mental abilities that has affected their lifestyle?  Are  they able to take care of their home environment, yard or pets?  Is their  financial situation a problem or is money never a concern?  Are they an  individual that is open to trying new things? Or are they an individual set in  their ways?

More Gift Ideas for Senior Citizens Perplexing You? 5 Tips to  Finding the Perfect Gift for Baby Boomers…

Tip #3 To accomplish the goal of finding the perfect gift for the aging  senior in your life will take a little thought and exploration on your part.  Take time in your everyday conversations to ask questions about the past and the  present interests. Make this a part of your regular conversation. Gift ideas  will present themselves. Don’t hesitate to ask “Is there any thing that you  wished you had done?”  “Is there any thing that you miss doing or would like  to do some day?”  “Have you ever considered ________(this may be dancing  lessons, painting, doing wood working, trying a computer etc) ?”

Tip # 4 If you have done your exploration, you should have come up with some  great gift ideas. Or maybe you still feel stuck on finding the perfect gift. Now  it is time to be creative. If you have assessed the aging senior’s situation,  you can determine what is important to them. Would they benefit from some  special one on one time with you? Spending uninterrupted and unrushed time,  to do something that your aging senior will enjoy, not only will be appreciated,  but will have the benefit of creating a memory for you and your aging senior.   If they are an active senior, they may be open to trying something new and  different. You may want to plan a trip or activity that would be fun. Don’t  forget that learning is a lifelong activity. Check out the local colleges,  YMCA’s and online courses that may be of interest to your aging senior. You may  be able to introduce a new hobby or activity that will improve or maintain mind  and physical fitness.

Tip #5 Do not discount home made gifts or projects. Plan a family project  where the entire family can get involved. You may want to create a family tree,  organize family pictures. Create a slide show with old family pictures and have  your senior incorporate family stories behind those pictures. Or create a video  of your aging senior talk about the family history. This could be an on going  project with a planned family debut. Plan a party and ‘red carpet’ event for the  entire family to view.

Finding gift ideas for seniors can give you an opportunity to learn  and create a stronger bond between you. Finding a gift for baby boomers is  giving something needed, something wanted or something they have longed for, but  never expressed. Given with lots of love, will make it the “perfect”  gift.

Diane Carbo Registered Nurse has more than thirty five years in the nursing  field. Her experience as a geriatric care manager, makes her uniquely qualified  to help those who want to live out their lives in their own homes. Diane has  developed a web site to make people aware of issues and options. You will find  the answers to many of your questions as well as helpful information that will  be continually updated. Please visit http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com/gift-ideas-for-senior-citizens.html for more information on gifting baby boomers and senior adults. Sign up for The  Caring Advocate Ezine her free newlsetter and receive a complimentary  copy of the Home Health Care Planning Guide.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2267649

Riding to Death: How Healthy Eating Can Improve the Health of Senior Citizens by Stan Onodu

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Are you a senior citizen? Medical science told us that there are ailments  associated with age. You’ll agree with me that it is virtually unheard of for  youngsters to complain of illnesses like osteoporosis, high blood pressure,  diabetes, heart disease, arthritis and certain cancers. But these are mostly the  health challenges of older adults. As a senior citizen, you need to know that  you can effectively manage these diseases through healthy eating. Let me show  you how.

Fluids. Naturally, you’ll observe, in most cases, that the skin and the  entire body frame of older adults shrink as they get older and older. This is as  a result of the fact that they tend to dehydrate so easily, which may not be  unconnected with their inability to feel thirsty most of the time. As a senior  citizen therefore, you should form the habit of constantly ingesting water and  fruit juices into your system.

Proteins. Proteins are body-building foods. They are also in the business of  repair and or replenishment of worn-out body cells and tissues. The healthy  proteins for senior citizens include eggs, lean meats, turkey or poultry and  fish. From these, minerals such as calcium, zinc and iron, greatly needed by the  elderly can be sourced.

Carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are energy-giving foods. It is a known secret  that senior citizens need a lot of energy derivable from this kind of foods in  order to sustain their ability to perform basic daily activities like dressing,  bathing, etc. Whole grains, cereals and their derivatives form excellent diets  for them. And more so, with some fibre content in the foods, these older folks  will be less exposed to constipation.

Fats. Only unsaturated fat foods, as in lean meats, fish, low-fat diary  products, avocados, nuts and seeds, should be taken by senior citizens. The  reason being that other fats contain HDL kind of cholesterol that can aggravate  blood pressures, thereby putting their heart conditions at very high risk.

Moderate Exercise. Man shall not leave by bread alone. Our senior citizens  need some bit of exercises – taking a walk, light gardening, riding bicycles,  etc – which can help them burn off calories thereby reducing weight; improving  heart and lung functions, and ultimately engender overall feeling of well-being.  It is important to note, however, that before they embark on any form of  exercises, their doctors must be aware.

If our senior citizens can strive to adopt the above healthy lifestyles or  habits, I guarantee their good health even though, for sure, their health cannot  be as it used to be when they were younger. Healthy eating is a gateway to a  healthy, long life and the case of our senior citizens cannot be  different.

What is that health condition that constitutes a burden in your life? Do you  know that through healthy eating you can overcome it? You can learn a lot more  here: http://www.healthyeatingpalace.blogspot.com/.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Stan_Onodu

 

Charleston Heights Arts Center Hosts Rainbow Company Musical And Summer Conservatory

April 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Las Vegas, Press-Media Releases 

Musical “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale” Presented April 26-May 5  

Join the fun as Rainbow Company Youth Theatre presents the hilarious musical “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale,” created by the musical team of Janet Yates Vogt and Mark Friedman of “How I Became a Pirate” fame.  Everyone knows Rapunzel has the longest hair, but “Lady Za Za” has the biggest hair in Rainbow Company’s wacky version of the favorite fairy tale. Off-beat and up-beat characters abound as the plot unfolds, and surprise after surprise will entertain audiences of all ages.

The play will be performed April 26-27 and May 3-4 at 7 p.m., and April 28 and May 4-5 at 2 p.m., at the Charleston Heights Arts Center, located at 800 S. Brush St. Tickets are available now at $7 for adults, $5 for teens/seniors/military; and $3 for children age 12 and younger. To purchase tickets, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-6383 or 229-6553.

The Rainbow Company also will be offering a two-week actor training conservatory June 17-29 for youth ages 8-16 of all theater experience levels. Guest artists and award-winning staff will conduct classes and rehearsals leading up to a performance on the main stage of Charleston Heights Arts Center June 29. The cost is $225 per youth. Space is limited. Registration is open now and will remain open until full. Youth ages 8-11 will attend morning sessions from 8 a.m. to noon; ages 12-16 will participate from 1 to 5 p.m. For more information about the Rainbow Company or to register for the conservatory, call (702) 229-6553 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

The Rainbow Company is a nonprofit, community theatre operated by the city of Las Vegas. The theater group holds auditions open to both adults and young people throughout the year. The staff offer classes in all aspects of theatre for ages 4 through high school at Charleston Heights Arts Center, and presents four productions annually that bring the magic of live theatre to family audiences. In its 35-year tenure, Rainbow Company has received numerous accolades, including the Governor’s Arts Award, Nickelodeon’s Parents’ Picks Award, the National Recreation and Park Association First-Place Dorothy Mullen Arts & Humanities Award, and many more.

Mark Your Calendar For The Children’s Arts Festival June 1

Mark Your Calendar For The Children’s Arts Festival June 1

Free Family Festival At Centennial Hills Park Will Abound With Entertainment & Activities 

Mark your calendar now for the first annual Centennial Hills Children’s Arts Festival, scheduled for Saturday, June 1, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Centennial Hills Park. The city of Las Vegas invites the community to this family festival that will abound in music, entertainment and fun arts activities for children and adults. Admission is free. The park is located at 7101 N. Buffalo Drive, at Deer Springs Way.

Participants will enjoy award-winning musicians, including Aaron Nigel Smith, Justin Roberts & the Not Ready for Naptime Players, and Alex & The Kaleidoscope Band. Other performers include the Nevada School of the Arts, Broadway in the Hood, the West Las Vegas Arts Center Drum Ensemble, Las Vegas Contemporary Dance Theatre, DJ Tony, and more. Children will participate in make-and-take art activities, interactive storytelling, drama, music and dance as they experience “The Zone.”  Youth will enjoy jump houses, face painting, balloon artists, two petting zoos, chalk on the walk, a recycling demonstration and workshop, photography contest and more.

The festival also will include a marketplace with an eclectic mix of local family-oriented businesses, organizations and food vendors.

Call (702) 229-3515 or 229-6383, or visit www.artslasvegas.org for more information.

Sometimes Little Things Can Be Huge!

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

By Thair Phillips, President, RetireSafe

A small and relatively new product is making life easier for older Americans. It’s a simple thing, but unit dose laundry detergent packs (or pods) are helping seniors perform necessary laundry chores that they might not otherwise be able to do without help. The laundry packs’ small size and pre-measured, consistent content is perfect for aging hands and eyes. With ten thousand of our fellow Americans reaching the age of 65 each day, it’s a really big deal!

While younger Americans can choose from many options, the pods are a huge help to the frail and the disabled.  Consider those who suffer from arthritis, for example. According to 2007-2009 data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), an estimated 50 million adults have self-reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis. That number is expected to grow to 67 million by the year 2030, per NHIS data. Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States, negatively impacting function and mobility for millions of senior citizens. The laundry pods meet the need created by those who can no longer heft a jug of detergent and pour it into a measuring cup. The small (but not too small to handle) size detergent pod fits the bill for aging-in-place seniors who wish to remain self-reliant.

And then there are those who must struggle each and every day with impaired vision.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), individuals over the age of 65 accounts for roughly 30 percent of the U.S. population considered to be visually impaired. Dimming eyesight can reduce physical, functional, emotional, and social well-being.  Doing the laundry can be a chore for all of us, but trying to measure the exact amount of liquid or powder for the person who is vision impaired can be a laundry room disaster resulting in ruined clothes and dangerous messes. For age-in-place seniors with cataracts, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and/or diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes that causes visual impairment, anything that can help simplify the laundry measuring process is truly a godsend.

Keep in mind that many older Americans in single family homes and apartments may well have to take their laundry and laundry supplies to a communal laundry room or a Laundromat.  Having the convenience of smaller, self-contained detergent pods to carry instead jugs of liquids and large boxes of powder is a big advantage for the elderly.  This is especially true for those navigating with canes or walkers, or those needing to keep one hand free for stability.

In short, pre-measured laundry detergent packs or pods are critical innovations for seniors. This is one small-sized product with a huge functional impact for seniors. In an aging America, we need every one of these impactful products, and many, many more.

RetireSafe is a nationwide organization of 4000,000 supporters that advocates on behalf of seniors on issues regarding Social Security, Medicare, health and financial well-being.

Contact Thair Phillips, (202) 628-5095

Connect Nevada annual survey reveals 75% of residents now subscribing to broadband service, up from 67% in 2011

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Carson City – Connect Nevada today released new data showing that broadband adoption in Nevada is increasing, with 75% of residents now subscribing to broadband service, up from 67% in 2011. Mobile broadband usage also increased from 46% in 2011 to 54%.  Despite this progress, not everyone in Nevada is benefitting from these advances in technology.

“We’re excited to see healthy growth in Nevada toward embracing the amazing educational, professional, and quality-of-life benefits that high-speed Internet provides,” said Connect Nevada Program Manager Lindsey Niedzielski. “However, this new study makes it clear that the expense of the service is now creating a digital divide. Connect Nevada is working hard to address broadband access, adoption, and use across the state so that every Nevada resident is offered the same opportunities for a bright and prosperous future, regardless of factors like age, race, income, or where they live in the state.”

The data are available via an interactive widget on the Connect Nevada website.

Among the key findings of the residential survey are:

  • Three out of four Nevada households subscribe to home broadband service, which is an increase of 8 percentage points from 2011. Despite this upward trend, more than half a million Nevada adults still don’t subscribe to broadband service at home.
  • Mobile broadband is also growing in popularity across Nevada. Statewide, more than one-half of Nevada adults (54%) use mobile broadband, up from 46% in 2011. This includes 55% of rural Nevadans.
  • Nearly half of Nevada’s low-income households do not have home broadband service, and approximately 48,000 low-income Nevadans rely exclusively on mobile broadband service.
  • Expense plays a role in whether Nevadans adopt both home and mobile broadband. Approximately 105,000 Nevadan adults who do not subscribe to home broadband service say that the monthly cost of service is too expensive, while 104,000 Nevadan cell phone owners do not subscribe to mobile broadband on their cell phones due to the monthly cost.
  • Nevada cell phone owners report that the main reason they subscribe to mobile data plans is for the freedom of being able to access the Internet while away from home.

Connect Nevada conducted this survey in support of statewide efforts to close the state’s digital gap. It explores the barriers to broadband adoption, rates of broadband adoption among various demographics, and the types of activities broadband subscribers conduct online, among other findings.

While the results show broadband adoption increasing, approximately 513,000 adults (25%) in Nevada still do not subscribe to the empowering technology of high-speed Internet. To address this digital divide, Connect Nevada offers the Every Community Online program, which offers free digital literacy training and low-cost computers and Internet access.

For the 2012 Residential Technology Assessment, Connect Nevada surveyed 1,201 adults across the state in late 2012. Connect Nevada conducted this survey as part of the State Broadband Initiative (SBI) grant program, funded by the U.S. Department of Commerce, National Telecommunications and Information Administration, and by the American Recovery and Reinvestment of 2009.

# # #

About Connect Nevada: The Governor’s Office and the Nevada Broadband Task Force are leading the initiative to increase broadband Internet access, adoption, and use across the state. Connect Nevada is a nonprofit organization that was commissioned by the state to work with all Nevada broadband providers, create detailed maps of current broadband coverage, and coordinate efforts with other Federal grant award recipients in the state. Connect Nevada is now supporting the development of a statewide plan for the deployment and adoption of broadband. The goal is to spread high-speed Internet across the state and make sure all Nevada residents have access to its life-changing benefits. For more information visit: www.connectnv.org.

Veterans Village Collaborates with Heaven Can Wait Animal Society

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Veterans to pilot dog adoption program 

 

WHAT:                 VeteransVillageLas Vegas, a comprehensive housing and resource facility for U.S. veterans and their families, is collaborating with Heaven Can Wait Animal Society (HCWAS) Las Vegas.  Two veterans will pilot a dog adoption program by volunteering to assume responsibility for the care of a dog while staying at the facility.  When they leave, veterans can opt to adopt the dog permanently at no charge.  The plan is to expand the program so that more veterans will enjoy the opportunity to have a loving companion, while helping to save dogs’ lives by giving them a safe home at VeteransVillage.

 

WHEN:                 Two veterans will officially adopt their dogs on Thursday, March 14 at 10 a.m.

Other dogs will be onsite to meet potential veteran owners to be considered for future adoption.

 

WHERE:               Veterans Village Las Vegas, 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard South

 

DETAILS:              Veterans are responsible for keeping their dog active, grooming, ensuring the dog is fed and, crated when left alone. HCWAS will properly train the dogs, provide food, treats and toys as well as assume financial responsibility for all veterinarian visits.  HCWAS will also train veteran residents how to properly care for their animal.

 

HCWAS offers many other services for animals in the Las Vegas area. In addition to finding safe homes for animals, HCWAS focuses its attention on eliminating companion animal suffering and pet overpopulation through spay/neuter, adoptions, community outreach programs and education. By pairing with Veteran’s Village, HCWAS hopes to reach its projected goals of better educating adults on the importance of spay/neuter for their pet and eliminating the killing of more than 30,000 cats and dogs annually in Las Vegas.

 

In addition to providing temporary housing for vets and their families, Veterans Village provides a comprehensive roster of services to vets through partnerships with other community organizations and government agencies, including employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events.

 

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org

 

About Heaven Can Wait Animal Society

Heaven Can Wait Animal Society, a non-profit 501 (c)(3) animal humane organization, was formed in 2000 by a group of 5 concerned citizens with the idea of building a beautiful 20 acre sanctuary to house all of the unwanted animals in our community.  In the meantime, though, animals were and still are dying at rate of around 30,000 per year in our local shelters with even more just dying in the streets.  Therefore, we decided to refocus our efforts slightly away from rescue and more toward promoting spay/neuter as the solution to the tragic pet overpopulation problem here in Las Vegas.www.hcws.org

Seasons at Prince Creek West Celebrates 15,000 Square Feet Expansion– Grand Clubhouse Welcomes First Visitors

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Murrells Inlet, SC–Seasons at Prince Creek West, the active adult lifestyle community that has made its mark as one of the country’s most luxurious locales for active adults 55+, has announced the opening of its grand clubhouse.

Featuring 15,000 square feet, the new facility greets visitors with a breathtaking view of its resort-style outdoor pool.  A spacious foyer extends a warm welcome and houses a library and card room. Easily subdivided to host multiple events simultaneously, the grand hall/ballroom features a catering kitchen and dance floor and is outfitted with the latest in audio-visual equipment and lighting.  A well-appointed billiards room rounds out the facility and includes large-screen TV’s, pool tables, game tables and a wet bar. Opening onto a covered lanai with an expansive outdoor entertainment area, the clubhouse allows residents to take full advantage of this coastal community’s temperate climate year-round.

Amid much fanfare, the clubhouse recently welcomed its first guests: residents of Seasons at Prince Creek West. Long-time resident, Marge Mugno, praised the developer, Dock Street Communities, for delivering a product that according to Mugno, “is a perfect addition to an already perfect community.”

“The clubhouse was designed to meet the needs of our residents who enjoy a fun and active lifestyle. That’s exactly what Marge and her fellow residents did last week as they kicked up their heels at our inaugural dinner/dance. Our motto, ‘don’t just change your address; change your life’ paints an accurate description of our residents,” said Activities Director, Gail Lewis. “People love the fact that something is always going on.”

Seasons’ latest amenity complements an existing sports park which encompasses more than 30,000 square feet of tennis courts, bocce and shuffle board courts, indoor and outdoor pools, a state-of-the art fitness center, an outdoor kitchen/fireplace with a seated dining area, and a wilderness trail and dock.

Located within the pristine Prince Creek development in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, Seasons is in close proximity to the well-known Tournament Players Club, a five-star golf club operated by the PGA, and within minutes of world class shopping, dining, entertainment venues and medical facilities.

Developed by Dock Street Communities, Seasons at Prince Creek West has an estimated 450 single-story homes that today are enjoyed by approximately 700 residents. Luxury features include large covered and screened porches, natural gas, granite countertops, GE appliance packages, large master suites and spa-inspired baths.

Visitors are always welcome at Seasons. The sales center, located at 125 Sugar Loaf Lane in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, is open Monday through Friday from 10:00 am to 5:30 pm, Saturday 10:00 am to 5:00 pm, and Sunday from 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm.  Tours may be scheduled by calling 843-650-6627.

For more information on the community and its exclusive lifestyle, visit Seasons at Prince Creek West online at: www.seasonsmi.com

About Seasons at Prince Creek West:

Seasons at Prince Creek West is an active adult lifestyle community for individuals 55+. Situated in Murrells Inlet, SC, this gated community twenty miles south of Myrtle Beach, SC features over 30,000 SF of amenities that include a sports park, fitness center, and grand clubhouse. Hiking and bike trails, the Atlantic Ocean and championship golf courses nearby really appeal to the outdoor enthusiast Seasons is served by the nearby Myrtle Beach International Airport.

About the Dock Street Communities:

Dock Street Communities, Inc., founded in 2005 by Sam Burns, is a privately held company specializing in acquisition, finance, development, construction, selling and management of communities including live/work townhomes, single family residential, and 55+ active adult lifestyle communities. Their developments span North and South Carolina, Florida, and Tennessee.

Photos on the new clubhouse and grand opening, as well as fact sheets on both Seasons at Prince Creek West and Dock Street Communities, are available by clicking on the following link:

http://www.marketingstrategiesinc.com/clients/seasonsatprincecreek.html

Link Includes:

Images:

•Clubhouse, Foyer

•Ribbon Cutting/Grand Opening (l-r) Dennis Ouellette, Project Manager Dock Street Communities; Scott Trembley, Vice President of Sales Dock Street Communities; George Kieft, Resident and HOA Board Member; and Gail Lewis, Activities Director, Seasons at Prince Creek West

•Clubhouse, Covered Lanai

•Residents & Guests Welcome the New Clubhouse

Word Documents:

•Fact Sheets: Dock Street Communities and Seasons at Prince Creek West

City Of Las Vegas April 2013 Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle!

 

Spring Celebration and Foster Connect (all ages)
Saturday, April 6, noon to 4 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road, (702) 229-8100.
Families will enjoy a spring celebration with amusement rides, jump houses, crafts, games, farmers’ market, community vendors, music and much more. Interested families will be able to receive information on becoming a foster family.

 

Summer Themed Specialty Camp Registration (ages 6-15)

Thursday, April 11, 8 a.m. registration packets are available for pick up.

Thursday, April 11, 5 p.m., registration opens for Summer 2012 alumni at Mirabelli.

Saturday, April 13, 8 a.m., open registration at both sites in person. No online registration.

Cost: $115 per week for the first child; $110 each additional child from the same family.

MirabelliCommunity Center, 6200 Hargrove Ave., (702) 229-6359.

VeteransMemorialLeisureServicesCenter, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.

Two community centers will offer themed specialty camps with additional activities, cooking, and/or field trips from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday, beginning June 10. A few specialty camps have higher prices. Mirabelli special camp list is available online.

For more information on summer camps, call 229-6175.

 

Summer Camp Registration (ages 6-15)

Registration opens Saturday, April 13, 8 a.m. in person at the following sites.

Cost: $75 per week for the first child; $70 for each additional child from the same family.

Lorenzi Adaptive Summer Camp, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-6358.

CimarronRoseCommunity Center, 5591 N. Cimarron Road, (702) 229-1607; ages 6-11 only.

DoolittleCommunity Center, 1950 N. J St., (702) 229-6374.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

StupakCommunity Center, 251 W. Boston Ave., (702) 229-2488.

Camps will be offered from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays, beginning June 10; Lorenzi Adaptive camp will begin at 7:30 a.m. For more information on summer camps, call 229-6175. No online registration.

 

Ward 6 Free Shredding Event
Saturday, April 13, 10 a.m. to noon.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive.
Bring your documents that need to be shredded. Complimentary shredding takes place in the Centennial Hills Community Center Active Adult Center parking lot. Limit of five boxes per vehicle.

Dula Gymnasium Indoor Pickleball Tournament (ages 18+)

Friday, April 19, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Cost: $15 if registered by April 5; $20 if registered after April 5.

Dula Gym, 441 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6307.

Enter the Inaugural Promotional Pickleball Tournament. Four indoor courts will host Men’s Doubles, Women’s Doubles, Mixed Doubles and 50+ groups with A and B divisions. This is a double-elimination tournament. Minimum registration of four teams per division with a guarantee of three matches. First-place winners will receive awards. Please call 229-6307 for more information and registration flyer.

 

Ward 6 Free Movie in the Park – “Odd Life of Timothy Green”
Friday, April 19, 6:30 p.m.

Free admission.
Centennial Hills Park Amphitheatre, 7101 N. Buffalo Drive, Buffalo and Deer Springs.
Enjoy the PG-rated family film, the “Odd Life of Timothy Green” in the park. Bring a blanket or folding chair to be more comfortable. For more information, call (702) 229-5463.

 

Ward 1/Ward 2 Free Shredding Event

Saturday, April 20, 10 a.m. to noon.

All AmericanSportsPark, 1551 S. Buffalo Drive

Bring your documents that need to be shredded. For more information, call (702) 229-4645.

 

Mayor’s Health Walk (all ages)

Saturday, April 27, 8 to 9:30 a.m.

Free admission and open to the public

Kellogg Zaher Sports Complex, 7901 W. Washington Ave. at Buffalo Drive.
For more information, call (702) 229-6720.

Adaptive Recreation

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)

Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m.  Closed school district staff development days and holidays.

Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

Participants will enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

 

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)

Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

 

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)

Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed school district staff development days and holidays.

Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.

CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Call 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts April 2013 Calendar Of Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts

April 2013 Calendar Of Events

495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101

Contact:  Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993                              Feb. 28, 2013

Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org

City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

 

 

 

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

 

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)

Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m.
Admission: $4 dollars per person per week at the door.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of fun learning international dance styles, including Arabic, Armenian, Bulgarian, Chinese, Greek, Israeli, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian and Turkish folk dances. No need to bring a partner. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.

 

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)

Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.

Admission: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

 

Contra Dance (ages 8+)
Saturday, April 13. Group lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7 to 10 p.m.
Admission: $10 adults; $5 members, students & military; $3 children under 16 & non-dancers; pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance to a live acoustic band playing joyful fiddle tunes, driving reels and a waltz or two. All dances are taught and called; newcomers and families welcome. No need to bring a partner. Wear comfortable flat-soled shoes and casual clothing. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

 

Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’Ole Concert (all ages)
Saturday, April 13, 7 p.m.
Cost: $10 in advance, $15 event day.
Historic Fifth Street School Auditorium, 401 S. 4th St., (702) 229-3515.
Five-time Na Hoku Hanohano Award-winner Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’ole was honored at the 2009 awards as Male Vocalist of the Year.  An accomplished hula dancer and singer in the Hawaiian language, he brings a love of the Hawaiian culture to his performance. For more information on the artist, go to www.kaumakaiwakanakaole.com/. For tickets and information, call (702) 229-3515 or (702) 229-6469, or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Downtown Cultural Series – Rocky and Ruthie Lombardo Songs from the “American Songbook” (all ages)
Friday, April 19, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.

Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
Bring your lunch to enjoy a concert by Rocky and Ruthie Lombardo. The jazz duo will offer selections from the American Songbook featuring American composers from 1920 to the present. For more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org, or call (702) 229-3515.

Poets’ Corner

Friday, April 19, 7:30 p.m.

Admission is free.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.

Hosted by Keith Brantley, this monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants features the best local poetry talent.

 

USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, April 20, 7 to 11 p.m. Dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Admission: $5 members, military and students ages 13-25; $10 for non-members. Pay at door.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St. (702) 229-6383.
Presented by USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. For more information, call (702) 813-6694 or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org.

 

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Presents “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale”

April 26 and 27, May 3 and 4 at 7 p.m.; April 28, May 4 and 5 at 2 p.m.

Cost: $7 adults; $5 teen/senior/military; $3 children age 12 and younger.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The classic fairy tale of Rapunzel comes to life in this lively musical appropriate for the whole family. Enjoy the new twist on the old tale, from the writing team that created “How I Became a Pirate.” This production is ideal for anyone of any age who loves to laugh! For tickets and information, call 229-6383 or 229-6553, or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

 

African-American Midwives Film Series — “Bringin’ In Da Spirit” (ages 14+)

Saturday, April 27, 3 p.m.

Admission is free.  Call (702) 229-4800 to reserve a space.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.

“Bringin’ In Da Spirit” is a film about the history of African-American midwives from slavery to current times. This film was able to capture the interviews of “grand” midwives that worked in the segregated South. Most African-Americans born in the segregated South prior to the mid-1960s were born into the hands of a midwife. The sparse number of black physicians and the poverty of many blacks meant that not only did midwives “catch” babies, but they did most of the “doctoring” in the community. With the development of Medicaid and other social and political changes, midwives were no longer relied upon for healthcare. Martha-Marie Drohobyczer will moderate a discussion after the film to examine some of the reasons African-American women have the highest infant mortality rate in the United States, three times the rate of white Americans, and what we can do to reduce this rate.

Exhibitions

 

“African-American Heritage”

Artist Lolita Develay

Through April 18, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.

Free admission and open to the public.

Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.

Lolita Develay is a 2014 Master of Fine Arts candidate at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She lived in Hollywood, Calif., prior to moving to Las Vegas in 2008. Her works are well painted surfaces which reflect her interest in traditions of realism, often focusing on the intrigue of light acting on an object. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Sculptures in Glass”
Artists Larry Domsky and Barbara Domsky

Through May 30, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.

Free admission and open to the public.

Las Vegas City Hall Grand Gallery, 495 S. Main St., First floor, (702) 229-1012.

Glassworks designed and created by this husband-and-wife team will be displayed. The work will include newer pieces that fit the format and space of City Hall as well as pieces from their collection of glassworks. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Spirit Journeys”

Artist Rainer Bertrams

March 21-May 4, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Artist’s reception March 21, 6 to 8 p.m.

Free admission and open to the public.

CharlestonHeightsArtCenter, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.

The images will focus on meditative subjects and themes that explore human kind’s existential struggles for a universal understanding of human nature. For questions about this exhibit or the gallery program, call 229-1012 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Equinox”

March 28-June 8, during reception and by appointment only.

Artists’ reception March 28, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

Admission is free.

HistoricFifthStreetSchool, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.

For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Celebrating Life! 2013” (ages 50+)

Tuesday-Wednesday, April 23-24 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. entry submission drop off.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.

This is the 13th annual juried exhibit for ClarkCounty resident artists age 50 and better. It is free to enter and each artist may submit only one entry. There are six media categories, each awarded first, second, third and honorable mention awards: Drawing/Pastel, Painting, Mixed Media, Photography, Sculpture and Ceramics, Watercolor and Gouache. There is also a best of show award. This program is sponsored by the city of Las Vegas Arts Commission. For more details, or to receive a prospectus, call (702) 229-1012.

# # #

Editor’s Note: Photos are available for download at

ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/Exhibitions/.

ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/April_2013/

No password is required.

Social Services and Education Programs

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

March calendar of social services and education programs for individuals, caregivers, and family members impacted by the diseases we treat.  All of these programs are open to the community and are offered free of charge.

 

Lending Library (4th Floor)

Featuring hundreds of books, videos and brochures for patients, families and the community-at-large.  Open to the public Monday – Thursday, 10 am – 2 pm.  Receive a free tote bag when you check out a book.

 

Healthy Living: Up2Me

New 6 week session begins Mar 29, 12:30 pm – 3:00 pm

Join us for this proven six-week program designed to help caregivers and individuals with chronic diseases set goals and develop skills for success.  Free and open to the public, advance registration is required.  Contact Susan, 483-6055, solorzs@ccf.org.

 

Lunch & Learn

 

Wednesdays, 12 noon – 1 pm

888 W. Bonneville Avenue, Las Vegas

Bring your lunch, drink & dessert are provided; open to the public.

 

Mar 6: Brain Stimulation to Improve Movement, Brach Poston, PhD, Project Scientist, Cleveland Clinic

 

Gain an understanding of non-invasive brain stimulation techniques shown to improve the motor skills of individuals with Parkinson’s Disease as well as in older adults.  Learn about current Cleveland Clinic projects using these techniques along with their future therapeutic potential.

 

Mar 13: In Case of Emergency, Rodney Anderson, MHA, Department Supervisor, Cleveland Clinic

 

Learn tips and strategies to prepare for emergency situations and to keep you and your loved ones safe.

 

Mar 20: Healthy Meal Ideas, Master Chef Gustav Mauler, Spiedini

 

Answer the age-old question, “what’s for dinner” with quick, simple, and nutritious meal ideas.  Recipes and samples will be provided.

 

Mar 27: Interior Design – Supporting Daily Activities, Attila Lawrence, Professor, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

 

Discover inspiring ideas for the design of interior spaces to improve the quality of independent living for individuals and caregivers.

 

Cleveland Museum of Art Series

 

Dynamic conversations about art through videoconferencing.

 

All art education programs are held at the LouRuvoCenter for Brain Health Library, 888 W. Bonneville Avenue, Las Vegas; open to the public.

 

America’s Story through Art: America Emerging; 1700s

Mar 5, 11:00 am – 12:00 noon

America Emerging is a discussion of the 1700s.  This program includes the developing American identity, folk art, the influence of the Age of Reason, the effect of the mercantilist economy, and underlying causes of the Revolution.

 

America’s Story through Art: America Expanding; 1801 – 1861

Mar 19, 11:00 am – 12:00 noon

Art in the first half of the 19th century was a reflection of American values, identity, and political culture.  America Expanding explores frontier life, the results and impact of westward expansion, landscape painting, Jacksonian democracy, and genre art.

 

Contact Susan Solorzano, 483-6055 or solorzs@ccf.org for additional information.

 

Support Groups

 

MEMORY LOSS SUPPORT GROUP

Wednesdays, 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Meetings are held weekly for adult members who provide care for loved ones with memory loss.  Contact Donna, 483-6035, municd@ccf.org.

 

PARKINSON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP

Mar 12, 12:00 noon – 1:00 pm

(Held the 2nd Tuesday of every month)

 

Separate groups for early stage individuals and adult family members.

 

Contact Jennifer, 483-6036, gayanj@ccf.org.

 

HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP

Mar 26, 12:00 noon – 1:00 pm

(Held the 4th Tuesday of every month)

 

Separate groups for gene-positive individuals (asymptomatic and early stage) and adult family members.

 

Contact Jenna, 483-6054, cliffoj@ccf.org.

 

 

 

 

 

Social Services

LouRuvoCenter for Brain Health

Cleveland Clinic |  888 W Bonneville Ave  |  Las Vegas, NV89106

Desk: (702) 331-7042  |  Fax: (702) 260-9797 |  E-mail: louruvosocialserv@ccf.org

Connect:  www.keepmemoryalive.org

City Of Las Vegas March 2013 Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

City Of Las Vegas March 2013

Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

 

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle!

 

Ward 1 Puppy Love Event (all ages)

Saturday, March 2, 10 a.m. to noon.

WoofterPark (DogPark), 1600 Rock Springs Drive (Corner of Rock Springs Drive & Vegas Drive).

Prepare to enjoy the Dog Costume Parade (with prizes), food trucks, vendors, raffles and information booths. Pet adoptions will be available. Spay and neuter clinic information will be available. Hosted by Ward 1 Councilwoman Lois Tarkanian. For more information, please contact Kimberly Reid at (702) 229-2299 or kreid@lasvegasnevada.gov.

 

Corporate Challenge Opening (all ages)

Saturday, March 2, 8 a.m. Torch Relay; 3:30 p.m. Family Fun; 5:30 p.m. Executive Relay; 7 p.m. Opening Ceremonies

Free admission.

Fremont Street East between Las Vegas Boulevard and Seventh Street.

Opening ceremonies will include a parade of flags and banners, a Corporate Challenge Light Show and musical entertainment.

 

Ward 5 Coffee With The Councilman

Thursday, March 7, 9 to 10 a.m.

Free admission and open to the public.

Starbucks, 751 N. Rancho Drive, at Bonanza Road.

Join Ward 5 Councilman Ricki Y. Barlow for coffee and conversation about your ideas to improve Ward 5 and Las Vegas.

 

The Fast and the Furriest Dog Walk & Health Fair (all ages)
Saturday, March 9, 10 a.m. to noon. Walk begins at 10:30 a.m.
Free and open to the public.
Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road, (702) 229-8100.
Bring your four-legged friends and family out for a walk in the park. Community vendors will be participating in this event to provide information to help you, your family and your four-legged friends stay healthy this year. The animal foundation will share information about low-cost spay and neuter, microchip and vaccination clinic.

Coffee With The Mayor

Thursday, March 14, 8 to 9:30 a.m.

Free admission and open to the public.

Starbucks, 751 N. Rancho Drive, at Bonanza Road.

Residents looking to meet and converse with Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman and Ward 5 Councilman Ricki Y. Barlow will have the opportunity from 8 to 9:30 a.m. Coffee with the Mayor is an opportunity for residents who have issues to discuss, or would simply like to meet the mayor.

 

Spring Youth Flag Football Leagues (ages 6-14)

Games on Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., March 16-May 11. Advance registration required.

Fee: $75, includes NFL jersey, black shorts, flags, and trophies or medals.

CimarronRoseCommunity Center, 5591 N. Cimarron Road, (702) 229-1607.

VeteransMemorialLeisureServicesCenter, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.

For boys and girls ages 6-14. Birth certificate is required at registration. Practices will be held once or twice each week for 1-1½ hours in locations to be determined. There will be 6-8 games, based on size of league. Divisions: Pee Wee (ages 6-8), Juniors (9-11), and Seniors (12-14). Participants must purchase their own mouth pieces and rubber cleats. Coaches are always needed. There will be a city championship for the top four teams in each division for an additional $10 fee.

 

Ward 3 Free Shredding Event

Saturday, March 16, 10 a.m. to noon.

Kmart, 5051 E. Nellis Blvd. on east side near Nellis.

Ward 3 Councilman Bob Coffin sponsors this complimentary shredding event. Bring your documents that need to be shredded. Limit five boxes per vehicle. For more information, call 229- 4623.

 

Spring Break Splash Camp (ages 6-11)

Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Cost: $110 per child

Municipal Pool, 431 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6309.

Camp activities include daily swim lessons and more. Excursions will be included for an additional fee. Campers should bring a sack lunch, beverages, swim suit, towel and a change of clothes each day. Limited to 25 youth. Advance registration is required. Call 229-6309 to register.

 

Spring Break Kids Camp (ages 6-11)

Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Cost: $75 first child, $70 each additional child.

CimarronRoseCommunity Center, 5591 N. Cimarron Road, (702) 229-1607.

VeteransMemorialLeisureServicesCenter, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.

Youth need to bring a sack lunch and snacks each day. Enjoy sports, games, arts, crafts and more fun.

 

Free Souper Spring Egg Hunt (ages walking-13)

Saturday, March 30, 10 a.m. to noon.

Dula Gym, 441 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6307.

Bring a canned good or non-perishable food item and receive an extra ticket to win a prize egg.  Donations will be delivered to Three Square Food Bank. Children will be released at listed times in designated areas of Dula Gym to search for eggs filled with treats and discoveries. Tots ages walking-4, gym floor 9:30 a.m.; ages 5-6, dance room 9:50 a.m.; ages 7-8, fitness room 10 a.m.; ages 8-9, computer lab 10:10 a.m.; and ages 10-13, gymnasium floor 10:20 a.m.

Ward 2 Spring Egg Hunt Eggstravaganza (all ages)

Saturday, March 30, 10 a.m. to noon.

Free and open to the public.

VeteransMemorialLeisureServicesCenter, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.

Bring the family to enjoy DJ music, photos with Easter Bunny, egg hunts, craft projects, games, face painting, jump houses and raffle drawings.

 

Adaptive Recreation

8th Annual Vision Forum (all ages)

Thursday, March 7, 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Free admission. Those who pre-register by Feb. 27 are guaranteed a free lunch, raffle ticket and expedited Paratransit service, if requested.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Registration and vendors exhibit hall in the adjacent Dula Gym will be open 8-10 a.m. Workshops scheduled 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. include fitness, nutrition, technology tips, goal setting, ADA guidelines, blindness training, transportation, education, health advocacy, low-vision information and a family session. The day is sponsored by the city of Las Vegas, Blindconnect, Nevada Council of the Blind and the Veterans Administration Vision Program. For more information and a registration form, call 229-6454.

 

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)

Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m.  Closed March 25-29, school district staff development days and holidays.

Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

Participants will enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

 

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)

Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

 

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)

Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed school district staff development days and holidays.

Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.

CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Call 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence.

SLCC Joins National Program to Train Baby Boomers for Jobs

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Salt Lake Community College was recently chosen to join the Plus 50 Encore Completion Program, a national effort to train 10,000 baby boomers for new jobs in healthcare, education and social services. The program is sponsored by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC).

The College will assist adults age 50 and over in completing degrees or certificates in high-demand occupations that give back to the community. With many adults age 50 and over out of work or seeking to transition to a new career, the program offers skill updates and career makeovers. Salt Lake Community College will prepare older adults for careers such as pharmacy or ultrasound technicians and medical terminology specialists. In addition, the College’s Transition to Teaching program is offered in partnership with the State Office of Education to prepare students as elementary and secondary educators.

“The Plus 50 Encore Completion Program represents a meaningful, national validation of the work the College’s Division of Continuing Education has undertaken. The program will support individuals who want to design a second career—either out of practical necessity or personal interest,” said Jennifer Saunders, Associate Dean of Continuing Education. “People returning for education and training at this stage of their lives are building on rich employment histories, valuable interpersonal skills, and knowledge achieved through experiential learning. These resources are then being coupled with the most current workforce education.”

The program will be implemented utilizing a variety of strategies, including accelerated classes, flexible scheduling and cohort models, which provide groups of students with similar goals an opportunity to move through a program together.

Since 2008, AACC and its network of Plus 50 Initiative colleges have worked with baby boomers to help them prepare for new careers. An independent evaluation of AACC’s Plus 50 Initiative found that 89 percent of students agreed that college work force training helped them acquire new job skills, and 72 percent attributed landing a job to such training.
“Many adults age 50 and over want to train for new jobs that help others and are hiring, but they need to update their skills. Community colleges offer a supportive environment where baby boomers can train for new jobs quickly and affordably,” said Mary Sue Vickers, director for the Plus 50 Initiative at AACC.

In addition to grant funds to augment training programs, participating colleges gain access to toolkits and extensive marketing resources tailored to reach baby boomers. They’ll also benefit from the advice and support of staff at other community colleges that have successfully implemented programs for older learners and understand the unique needs of the plus 50 student population.

The Plus 50 Encore Completion Program is funded with a $3.2 million grant to AACC provided by Deerbrook Charitable Trust—supporting AACC’s work to increase the number of students who finish degrees, certificates, and other credentials. In April 2010, AACC committed alongside other higher education organizations, to promote the development and implementation of policies, practices and institutional cultures that will produce 50 percent more students with high quality degrees and certificates by 2020.

While the AACC Encore Completion Program focuses on serving the Plus 50 population, Salt Lake Community College welcomes anyone interested in making a career transition to learn more about the broad range of training opportunities available at: www.slcccontinuinged.com.

For more information about the Plus 50 Initiative at AACC, see: http://plus50.aacc.nche.edu.

The Encore Institute at Salt Lake Community College is an innovative program designed for adult learners who want to expand their knowledge through career and personal enrichment courses. The Institute offers flexible class scheduling, non-degree and degree learning experiences and affordable training to deepen or expand the personal and professional skills of students.

The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) is a national organization representing close to 1,200 community, junior and technical colleges nationwide. Community colleges are the largest and fastest growing sector of higher education, enrolling more than 13 million credit and non-credit students annually. More information is available at: http://aacc.nche.edu.

About the College: Salt Lake Community College is an accredited, student-focused, urban college meeting the diverse needs of the Salt Lake community. Home to more than 62,000 students each year, the College is the largest supplier of workforce development programs in the State of Utah. The College is the sole provider of applied technology courses in the Salt Lake area, with 13 sites, an eCampus, and nearly 1,000 continuing education sites located throughout the Salt Lake valley. Personal attention from an excellent faculty is paramount at the College, which maintains a student-to-teacher ratio of less than 20 to 1.

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts March 2013 Calendar Of Events

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts March 2013 Calendar Of Events

495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101
Contact: Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993 Feb. 11, 2013
Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org
City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Spring Class Registration at Charleston Heights Arts Center (ages 2-adult)
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
March 1-April 3 registration for 7- to 8-week session of classes April 3-May 24.
Offered courses include ballet, jazz, hip hop, ballroom dancing, visual arts and private lessons in music and dance by appointment. For more information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org. Register for classes at www.artslasvegas.org/classes/register.htm beginning March 1.

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Spring Drama Class Registration (ages 4-17)
Registration Opens March 1 for 7-week class sessions that begin the week of April 3.
Cost: Fees range from $49 to $70.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
To register or for more information, call (702) 229-6553 or 229-6383, or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m.
Admission: $4 dollars per person per week at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of fun learning international dance styles, including Arabic, Armenian, Bulgarian, Chinese, Greek, Israeli, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian and Turkish folk dances. No need to bring a partner. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Contra Dances (ages 8+)
Saturdays, March 2 and 23. Group lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7 to 10 p.m.
Admission: $10 adults; $5 members, students & military; $3 children under 16 & non-dancers; pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance to a live acoustic band playing joyful fiddle tunes, driving reels and a waltz or two. All dances are taught and called; newcomers and families welcome. No need to bring a partner. Wear comfortable flat-soled shoes and casual clothing. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.
Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Auditions for “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale”
Saturday, March 2, 2013, 1 p.m.
No fee to audition.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Auditions for the Rainbow Company musical production of “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale” will start promptly at 1 p.m. Roles are available for ages 12 through adult. Comfortable clothes that allow for movement should be worn and a prepared song is strongly recommended. The show will be performed April 26-May 5. For more information, call 229-6553.

“The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle” presented by Target and ArtsPower (all ages)
Saturday, March 9, 10:30 a.m.
Cost: $3 general admission.
Historic Fifth Street School Auditorium, 401 S. 4th Street, 229-3515.
ArtsPower’s “The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle” tells the uplifting story of an ordinary train that performs an extraordinary feat of strength and courage. The story follows the adventures of The Little Blue Engine, who dreams of someday pulling the Piney Vale Ex¬press just like her best friend Rusty. For tickets and information, call 229-3515 or 229-6469 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, March 9, 7 to 11 p.m. Dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Admission: $5 members, military and students ages 13-25; $10 for non-members. Pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St. (702) 229-6383.
Presented by USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. For more information, call (702) 813-6694 or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org.

Downtown Cultural Series – Bill & Kate Isles Concert (all ages)
Friday, March 15, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
Bring your lunch to enjoy a concert by Bill and Kate Isles, an acoustic singer/songwriter duo based in Duluth, Minn. They tour nationally, entertaining audiences with a wide variety of musical styles, catchy melodies and memorable songs. For more information, visit www.billandkateisles.com or www.artslasvegas.org, or call (702) 229-3515.

Poets’ Corner
Friday, March 15, 7 p.m.
Admission is free.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Hosted by Keith Brantley, this monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants features the best local poetry talent.

St. Patrick’s Day Dance (adults)
Saturday, March 16, 7 p.m.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Admission: $10 in advance; $15 event day.
It’s easy to be green! Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day early by dancing to songs from the 1940s- 70s, from swing and foxtrots to Latin and jazz, performed by the Carl Grove Combo.
For tickets or information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.
Women and Young Women’s Conference 2013 (ages 14+)
“The Spirit Of A Woman…Body & Soul”
Saturday, March 23, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Admission is free, but advance registration is required. Call (702) 229-4800 to register.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
This dynamic event will promote personal empowerment and mentorship, with a focus on sisterhood. The purpose of the event is to strengthen communication between women and young women, creating and enhancing opportunities for understanding. A series of specialized workshops will be offered throughout the day to benefit and assist women as they share, teach, and learn from each other. Participants are asked to wear comfortable active wear for the workshops. Each adult participant is encouraged to bring a young lady or mentee of high school age, friend, mom, sister, or aunt to the event. The event is cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District.

Spring II Class Registration at the West Las Vegas Arts Center (all ages)
March 23-April 6 registration for 6-week session of classes April 10-May 18.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Cultural arts classes include African Drum; African Dance for Children and African Dance for Teens/Adults; Keep it Moving…Ballet & Tap; Ballet–Beginner/Intermediate; Modern Dance; Hip Hop; Zumba; Tae Kwon Do; Video & Documentary Creation; Music Production; Arts & Crafts – Kids Create and Craft It Up; and Private Piano/Voice lessons. To register, or for more information, call (702) 229-4800 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Folk Celebration and Stage Performance (all ages)
Saturday, March 23, 12:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Admission: $10.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Admission includes a 2 p.m. theatre concert performance in the Jeanne Roberts Theatre, featuring international dance artist “Zarnia,” who specializes in Middle Eastern dances with elaborate costuming, musician RJ Fox playing Flamenco-style guitar accompanied by flamenco dancers, and talented Las Vegas Kaminari Taiko Drummers, a performance group affiliated with the Japanese American Citizens League. View demonstrations and information 12:30-1:45 p.m., take dance lessons 3:30-6:30 p.m. A concert ticket stub will provide half off admission to the Contra Dance at 6:30 p.m. A food vendor will be on site from 12:30 to 6 p.m. This event coincides with the 2013 National Folk Organization’s Las Vegas conference. For tickets or information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Rainbow Company Spring Break Drama Workshop (grades 2-6)
Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Cost: $135. Advance registration is required.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Students will enjoy five full days of drama, with a performance on the main stage Saturday, March 30. For information and registration, call 229-6553 or 229-6383 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Spring Break Dance Camp (ages 12-18)
Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 3:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Cost: $75. Advance registration is required. Registration opened Feb. 1.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dedicated young dancers will flourish within this weeklong intensive and disciplined atmosphere available to intermediate- and advanced-level students (or students with a minimum of one year of dance instruction). Instruction led by Jackie Koenig and Jennifer Kidder. Dance attire required; please bring snacks. A student demonstration for family and friends at 6:30 p.m. Friday will conclude the camp. To register or more information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.
Spring Break Arts Workshop (ages 10-18)
Wednesday-Friday, March 27-29, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Admission is free, but advanced registration is required.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
This will be a heritage development workshop, exploring traditions and discovering individualities. Call (702) 229-4800 for information and registration.

Life Skills & Job Readiness Workshop (ages 14-19)
Saturday, March 30, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Admission is free, but registration is required.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Life Skills Training is a dynamic, skills-based program that promotes health and personal development. It is designed for those facing the new roles and responsibilities of becoming young adults transitioning into the workplace. The workshop focuses on goal setting, communication, decision making, risk, and maintaining relationships. The program is cosponsored by Nevada Partners. For more information and registration, call (702) 924-2134.
Exhibitions

“Narratives of Progress”
Artist Armin Mühsam
Through March 16, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
About his work, Mühsam says, “My work focuses on the relationship between the natural and the human-built. I imagine the land after technology has rendered it nearly uninhabitable, despite its promises to create a better world. I paint the absence of humans but not of humanity — man-made, sterile landscapes after the disappearance of the natural.” For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

“African-American Heritage”
Artist Lolita Develay
Through April 18, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
Lolita Develay is a 2014 Master of Fine Arts candidate at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She lived in Hollywood, Calif., prior to moving to Las Vegas in 2008. Her works are well painted surfaces which reflect her interest in traditions of realism, often focusing on the intrigue of light acting on an object. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

“Sculptures in Glass”
Artists Larry Domsky and Barbara Domsky
Feb. 26-May 30, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Grand Gallery, 495 S. Main St., First floor, (702) 229-1012.
Glassworks designed and created by this husband-and-wife team will be displayed. The work will include newer pieces that fit the format and space of City Hall as well as pieces from their collection of glassworks. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.
Nevada Watercolor Society’s 2013 Signature Members’ Exhibit
Feb. 28-March 23, during the reception and by appointment.
Artists’ reception Feb. 28, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information about the city gallery programs, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org. More information about the Nevada Watercolor Society can be found at www.nvws.org/.

“Spirit Journeys”
Artist Rainer Bertrams
March 21-May 4, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Artist’s reception March 21, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The images will focus on meditative subjects and themes that explore human kind’s existential struggles for a universal understanding of human nature. For questions about this exhibit or the gallery program, call 229-1012 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

“Equinox”
March 28-June 8, during reception and by appointment only.
Artists’ reception March 28, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

City Of Las Vegas Presents Musical Theatre And Concerts Feb. 15-17

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Enjoy Rainbow Company’s “Across The Truckee” At The Historic Fifth Street School

The city of Las Vegas offers family entertainment options Feb. 15-17. The Rainbow Company Youth Theatre’s upcoming production of “Across The Truckee” combines musical theatre, Nevada history and audience participation in a “one-of-a-kind” experience that is bound to please audiences of all ages. “Across the Truckee” is the latest original chapter in the company’s on-going “Nevada Series.” Each year a play with music is developed that highlights Nevada’s exciting history and colorful characters. This season, four of Nevada’s most unusual historic figures are included: Eilley Oram, known as “The Washoe Seeress”; Henry T. Comstock, of Comstock Lode fame; Timothy H. O’Sullivan, ground-breaking photographer of the Civil War; and Adolph Sutro, known as the “the king of the Comstock.” The ending of the play may vary from performance to performance, since the audience will participate with choices! The show will be performed Feb. 15-17 at the Historic Fifth Street School, located at 401 S. Fourth St. Showtimes are 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, with additional 2 p.m. shows Saturday and Sunday. Ticket prices are $7 for adults, $5 for teens/seniors/military and $3 for children ages 12 and younger. For tickets and information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-6553 or 229-6383.

Bring your lunch at noon Friday, Feb. 15, to enjoy the latest installment of the city of Las Vegas’ Downtown Cultural Series of free concerts at the Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse Jury Assembly Room at 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South. Open to the public, the hour-long concert will feature the Emanuel Schmidt Quartet, led by guitarist Emanuel Schmidt. Swiss-born Schmidt earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Music Performance at the Wesley Institute in Sydney, Australia, as well as a doctorate in Communication Processes in Jazz Performance from the Sydney Conservatorium of Music. A versatile musician, he plays drums, keyboards, bass and guitar, and composes/arranges music for a full orchestra. For more information on the artist, go online to http://emanuelschmidt.com/ or call (702) 229-3515 for more details.

Tickets are on sale now for the 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, Guy Davis concert at the Charleston Heights Arts Center, located at 800 S. Brush St. Davis is a musician, composer, actor, director and writer. But most importantly, Davis is a bluesman. The blues permeates every corner of Davis’ creativity. Throughout his career, he has dedicated himself to reviving the traditions of acoustic blues and bringing them to as many ears as possible through the material of the great blues masters, along with African-American stories and his own original songs, stories and performance pieces. For more information on Davis, visit www.guydavis.com/. Priced at $10 in advance and $15 on event day, tickets are available online at www.artslasvegas.org or by calling (702) 229-6383.

No more “empty nest”: middle-aged adults face family pressure on both sides

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

The “empty nest” of past generations, in which the kids are grown up and middle-aged adults have more time to themselves, has been replaced in the United States by a nest that’s full – kids who can’t leave, can’t find a job and aging parents who need more help than ever before.

According to a new study by researchers at Oregon State University, what was once a life stage of new freedoms, options and opportunities has largely disappeared.

An economic recession and tough job market has made it hard on young adults to start their careers and families. At the same time, many older people are living longer, which adds new and unanticipated needs that their children often must step up to assist with.
The end result, researchers suggest, are “empty nest” plans that often have to be put on hold, and a mixed bag of emotions, ranging from joy and “happy-to-help” to uncertainty, frustration and exhaustion.

“We mostly found very positive feelings about adults helping their children in the emerging adulthood stage of life, from around ages 18 to 30,” said Karen Hooker, director of the OSU Center for Healthy Aging Research.

“Feelings about helping parents weren’t so much negative as just filled with more angst and uncertainty,” Hooker said. “As a society we still don’t socialize people to expect to be taking on a parent-caring role, even though most of us will at some point in our lives. The average middle-aged couple has more parents than children.”

The findings of this research were just published in the Journal of Aging Studies, and were based on data from six focus groups during 2009-10. It was one of the first studies of its type to look at how middle-aged adults actually feel about these changing trends.
Various social, economic, and cultural forces have combined to radically challenge the traditional concept of an empty nest, the scientists said. The recession that began in 2008 yielded record unemployment, substantial stock market losses, lower home values and increased demand for higher levels of education.

Around the same time, advances in health care and life expectancy have made it possible for many adults to live far longer than they used to – although not always in good health, and often needing extensive care or assistance.

This study concluded that most middle-aged parents with young adult children are fairly happy to help them out, and they understand that getting started in life is simply more difficult now. Some research has suggested that age 25 is the new 22; that substantially more parents now don’t even expect their kids to be financially independent in their early 20s, and don’t mind helping them through some difficult times.

But the response to helping adult parents who, at the same time, need increasing amounts of assistance is not as uniformly positive, the study found – it can be seen as both a joy and a burden, and in any case was not something most middle-aged adults anticipated.

“With the kids, it’s easy,” is a general purpose reaction. With aging parents, it isn’t.

“My grandparents died younger, so my parents didn’t cope with another generation,” one study participant said.

Many middle-aged people said it was difficult to make any plans, due to disruptions and uncertainty about a parent’s health at any point in time. And most said they we’re willing to help their aging parents, but a sense of being time-starved was a frequent theme.
“It brings my heart joy to be able to provide for my mom this way,” one study participant said. “There are times when it’s a burden and I feel resentful.”

The dual demands of children still transitioning to independence, and aging parents who need increasing amounts of care is causing many of the study participants to re-evaluate their own lives. Some say they want to make better plans for their future so they don’t pose such a burden to their children, and begin researching long-term care insurance. Soul-searching is apparent.

“I don’t care if I get old,” a participant said. “I just don’t want to become debilitated. So I would rather have a shorter life and a healthy life than a long life like my mom, where she doesn’t have a life. She doesn’t have memories. Our memories are what make us who we are.”

An increasing awareness of the challenges produced by these new life stages may cause more individuals to anticipate their own needs, make more concrete plans for the future, reduce ambivalent approaches and have more conversations with families about their own late-life care, the researchers said in their study.
About the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences: The College creates connections in teaching, research and community outreach while advancing knowledge, policies and practices that improve population health in communities across Oregon and beyond.

North Hill, Boston-Area Senior Living Community, Wins Innovation Award and Award for Best Repositioned 50+ Housing “On the Boards” Project in the U.S.

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

At an awards ceremony in Las Vegas last night, North Hill, the leading Boston-area senior living community, was honored with three Gold and two Silver awards in the National Association of Home Builders Best of 50+ Housing competition. This included being named the Best Repositioned 50+ Housing project “on the boards” in the nation. And then North Hill was s ingled out by judges for a special award — an Innovation Award for its industry-leading PurposeFULL Living wellness philosophy.

“Stunned and proud,” is how Kevin Burke, CEO of North Hill Communities Inc. [www.NorthHill.org] described his reaction. “Our entire community has been so committed and creative in its efforts to transform senior living. We felt honored to even be named a finalist in this, the industry’s most prestigious awards program. To be further recognized for Innovation — it’s very exciting.”

The awards reflect North Hill’s progress with the Project True North Initiative — the community’s largest and most comprehensive investment in its 28-year history. Project True North enhancements to the community include new residences, transformed indoor and outdoor spaces, and innovative services and amenities. At the heart of all the changes is PurposeFULL Living, North Hill’s multidimensional wellness philosophy [www.NorthHill.org/PurposeFULL-Living]. The judges felt the concept and execution of PurposeFULL Living was so notable it deserved a special Innovation Award.

The 50+ Housing Awards were winners were announced on January 23 at the International Builders Show in Las Vegas. North Hill received the following awards:
• GOLD — Best Repositioned/Remodeled Community on the Boards
o See renderings at http://www.northhill.org/senior-living-ma-photo-gallery
o Learn more about PurposeFULL Living at http://www.northhill.org/pursuing-your-passions
• GOLD — Best Online Marketing Strategy
o Visit the new main website, http://www.NorthHill.org, as well as a sister site focused on the initiative, http://www.TrueNorthEvolution.org
o See a recent email at http://bit.ly/UL3uU4
• GOLD — Best Sales/Marketing Event
o See photos from the event at http://bit.ly/RrqwRY
• SILVER — Best Brochure
o See a sample of the brochure at http://bit.ly/12aZCQc
• SILVER — Best Integrated Marketing Strategy
o “Discover True North,” the campaign launching the True North initiative, included direct mail, online and offline advertising, email, public relations and special events (the first of which attracted more than 400 attendees and caused a traffic jam on the Needham/Wellesley town line)
o See a sample TV ad at http://bit.ly/U4cfXo
ABOUT NORTH HILL: North Hill provides opportunities for vibrant living from its campus on the Needham/Wellesley line. Founded in 1984, a combination of location, the innovative Lifecare financial model and exceptional quality in healthcare and hospitality service have made North Hill one of the most sought-after retirement communities in Massachusetts. The North Hill vision is to be the leading provider of the most progressive, personalized healthcare and hospitality services to older adults in the Northeast. To learn more, visit www.NorthHill.org.

Research Suggests Massage Therapy Is Effective For Health Conditions In People Of All Ages

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Massage Therapy Shown to be Beneficial for Enhancing Immune Function in Preterm Infants, Decreasing Blood Pressure and Improving Stability in Older Persons and Reducing Stress in Cancer Patients.

People of all ages are beginning to understand the many benefits of massage therapy, including the role it can play in overall health and well-being. Recent research compiled by the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) suggests that massage can enhance the immune function in preterm infants, decrease blood pressure and improve stability in older persons, as well as reduce stress and anxiety in cancer patients.
Massage Therapy for Improved Immune Function and Weight Gain in Preterm Infants
Research[1] published in Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), showed that for stable, preterm infants, daily massage therapy is positively associated with higher natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity and weight gain. American Massage Therapy Association President, Cynthia Ribeiro, says of the study, “This research demonstrates that massage therapy can benefit preterm infants by enhancing immunity and stimulating growth. Parents of preterm infants are encouraged to speak with a certified massage therapist to learn more about certain techniques designed to aid in their child’s development.”
Massage Therapy for Improvements in Balance, Neurological, and Cardiovascular Measures in Older Adults
Research[2]published in the International Journal of Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (IJTMB ) found that older adults who receive massage therapy for up to six weeks could benefit from decreased blood pressure and improved stability. “This study suggests that regular massage therapy can produce several advantages for the older generation, including a relaxation affect for the entire body, lowering blood pressure, decreasing stress and improving balance, amongst other things,” says American Massage Therapy Association President, Cynthia Ribeiro.
Massage Therapy for Decreasing Stress in Cancer Patients
Research[3] published in BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care indicates that massage therapy can have a positive influence on the quality of life of people suffering serious illnesses such as brain cancer. The American Massage Therapy Association acknowledges these study results, which suggest that massage therapy can improve physical as well as emotional well-being in patients with late stage disease and when used in combination with standard care, massage can help reduce stress, anxiety, pain and fatigue.
View AMTA’s Research Roundup Volume 2 online
Visit AMTA’s Find a Massage Therapist® to find a qualified massage therapist in your area.
Research Roundup, Volume 1
AMTA issued its first research roundup in 2012 which also highlighted the growing body of evidence showing that massage therapy can be effective for a variety of health conditions, including:
• Osteoarthritis of the knee
• Inflammation after exercise
• Chronic low-back pain
• Fibromyalgia
View this research in further detail.
Massage Therapy Facts
• Between July 2010 and July 2011 roughly 38 million adult Americans (18 percent) had a massage at least once
• 75 percent of American’s surveyed claim that their primary reason for receiving a massage was medical (43 percent) and stress (32 percent) related
• 89 percent of individuals believe that massage can be effective in reducing pain; with 29 percent of respondents admitting they have used massage therapy for pain relief
• 50 percent of people claim their doctor has either strongly recommended or encouraged them to get a massage
Visit AMTA’s research section for more information from our consumer and industry fact sheets.
About AMTA
The American Massage Therapy Association® (AMTA®) is a professional association of more than 56,000 members. AMTA professional members have demonstrated a level of skill and knowledge through education and/or testing and must meet continuing education requirements to retain membership. AMTA provides information about massage therapy to the public and works to improve the professional climate for massage therapists. The association also helps consumers and healthcare professionals locate qualified massage therapists nationwide, through AMTA’s Find a Massage Therapist® free national locator service available at www.findamassagetherapist.org.
[1] Ang J, Lua J, Mathur A, et al. A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial of Massage Therapy on the Immune System of Preterm Infants. Pediatrics. 2012; 130(6):e1549-58.
[2] Sefton JM , Yarar C, Berry JW, et al. Six weeks of massage therapy produces changes in balance, neurological and cardiovascular measures in older persons. International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork.2012; 5(3):28-40.
[3] Keir SM and Saling JR. Pilot study of the impact of massage therapy on sources and levels of distress in brain tumour patients. BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. 2012; 2:363-36.
For more information, contact:
Bob Szafranski
Edelman, 312.240.2687
Bob.Szafranski@edelman.com
or
Caroline Dowdy
Edelman, 312.240.2801
Caroline.Dowdy@edelman.com

City Of Las Vegas February 2013 – Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle! Most facilities will be closed Feb. 18 for holiday observance.

Co-ed Fall Flag Football Registration Opens (ages 6-14)
Register Jan. 7-March 1 at city community centers listed below for league play March 16-May 11.
Cost: $75 per person, includes NFL team jersey and shorts.
Cimarron Rose Community Center, 5591 N. Cimarron Road, (702) 229-1607.
Veterans Memorial Leisure Services Center, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.
A birth certificate is required to register. Volunteer coaches are needed. Cost includes post-season tournament. No games will be scheduled for Saturday, March 30.

Ward 5 Coffee With The Councilman
Thursday, Feb. 7, 9 to 10 a.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Starbucks, 751 N. Rancho Drive, at Bonanza Road.
Join Ward 5 Councilman Ricki Y. Barlow for coffee and conversation about your ideas to improve Ward 5 and Las Vegas.

Ward 1 Fit Family Health Festival & Trail Walk (all ages)
Saturday, Feb. 9, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Free admission. T-shirts available for the first 100 attendees. Raffle tickets for sale.
Pioneer Park, 7449 Braswell Drive.
Join the Outside Las Vegas Foundation, Weight Watchers and the city of Las Vegas for a fun health festival for the whole family. Enjoy a community expo with health and outdoor vendors in the park as well as trail walks to nearby parks. Learn about many fun ways to get active and healthy in our community. Contact Robin at (702) 229-6405 for more information.

Raptor Play Park Grand Opening (all ages)
Saturday, Feb. 16, 10 a.m. to noon.
Thunderbird Family Sports Complex, 6105 N. Durango Drive at Tropical Parkway.
Bring the family out to experience the free red, white and blue opening of the Raptor Play Park. This new phase to the park will add landscaping and turf areas, lighted sidewalk extensions, a picnic shade shelter, site furnishings, off-site improvements and a scaled F-22 Raptor Stealth Fighter Jet exhibit. Light refreshments will be offered while supplies last.
Las Vegas Mayor’s Cup International Showcase (U14-U19)
Saturday-Monday, Feb.16-18. (Team check-in Feb. 15.)
Free admission for spectators. $1,000 team entry. Team registration closed Dec. 28, 2012.
Bettye Wilson Soccer Complex, 7353 Eugene Ave., and other Las Vegas fields to be announced.
The largest international youth soccer tournament in the country will take place in Las Vegas Presidents’ Day weekend, Feb. 16-18. More than 6,000 soccer players ages 14 to 19, from at least 11 foreign countries and 28 U.S. states, will square off in soccer fields around the valley. The event is co-hosted by the city of Las Vegas and the Downtown Las Vegas Soccer Club, and is expected to attract college soccer coaches and recruiters from across the country to scout for both male and female athletes. Spectator admission and parking are free at all games.

Matches will be played from 8:45 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. See the website for specific field locations, times and match-ups. Medals and trophies will be presented to winning teams following each championship game, beginning about 11 a.m. Monday and continuing to approximately 4 p.m. Accepted teams, player profiles, college coaches expected to attend, tournament schedule and program, participating hotels, and more information is available on the event website at www.LVMayorsCup.com.

Free Community Garden Class at Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs
Saturday, Feb. 23, 9 to 11 a.m.
Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road, (702) 229-8100.
Join Ward 6 City Councilman Steve Ross and Dr. Angela O’Callaghan of the Nevada Cooperative Extension for a free class, “Growing in Small Places.” Learn how to plant herbs, vegetables and fruits in small areas or containers.

Adaptive Recreation

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 6 p.m. Closed school district staff development days and holidays.
Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.
East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Participants will enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed school district staff development days and holidays.
Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Call (702) 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence.
# # #
Media Contact:
Margaret Kurtz
Public Information Officer
City of Las Vegas
495 S. Main St., 7th Floor
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702) 229-6993
Cell (702) 249-1828
E-mail: mkurtz@lasvegasnevada.gov

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts – February 2013 Calendar Of Events

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
Centers will be closed Feb. 18 for holiday observance.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $5 dollars per person per week at door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $4 dollars per person per week at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of international fun learning Armenian, Bulgarian, Israeli, Arabic, Macedonian, Russian, Greek, Turkish, Chinese, Serbian folk dances, and more. No need to bring a partner. Cosponsored by the Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing Club of Las Vegas, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 562-9889 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Spring Class Registration Opens Feb. 2 (all ages)
Registration for the six-week spring 2013 classes Feb. 20-March 30 is open Feb. 2-16.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Cultural arts classes include African Drum; African Dance for Children and African Dance for Teens/Adults; Keep it Moving…Ballet & Tap; Ballet–Beginner/Intermediate; Modern Dance; Hip Hop, Yoga–Health & Wellness; Tae Kwon Do; Video & Documentary Creation; Music Production; and Private Piano/Voice lessons. The West Las Vegas Arts Center also will offer two new exciting classes exploring the creativity and sheer fun of arts and crafts. They are: Kids Create and Craft It Up. To register, or for more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-4800.
Sweethearts Square Dance (ages 8+)
Saturday, Feb. 2; introductory lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7:30 to 10 p.m.
Admission: $12 per person at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Enjoy square dancing to callers such as Andy Finch, Joe Valvo, Vern Vernazarro and Ron Sowash of Las Vegas and with guest cuer Ron Hartzell. No need to bring a partner. Class-level dances, Plus and Round dances will be included, as well as a chance to win door prizes. Refreshments will be available. Cosponsored by the Stardusters, Las Vegas Square & Round Dance Club, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 348-4906 or (702) 229-6383, or visit www.lasvegassquarenrounddancers.org

Valentine Dance with Boyd Coulter & the Good Times Band
Saturday, Feb. 9, at 7 p.m.
Tickets: $10 advance purchase; $15 per person at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance the evening away with Big Band music. Step back to a sweeter time when Big Band swing was the thing and romance was the theme. Enjoy an evening of dancing to great tunes made famous by the bands of Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey and Benny Goodman; romantic standards from the ‘50s and ‘60s; cha-chas, tangos, and more. For more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call 229-6383.

Downtown Cultural Series – Emanuel Schmidt Quartet “The Music of Miles” (all ages)
Friday, Feb. 15, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
An excellent and experienced musician, Emanuel Schmidt has performed at schools, clubs, cafés and festivals – for intimate crowds as well as for thousands – in Australia, Switzerland and in the U.S.A. According to Schmidt’s peers and educators, he is “an outstanding and versatile guitarist of exceptional ability, and an extraordinarily thoughtful and hardworking musician.” Described by The Australian Music Centre’s Ian Shanahan as an “accomplished and imaginative composer,” Schmidt has written for a full orchestra and performs reflective, emotive and adventurous original compositions with his groups. This group will perform selections from albums such as “Kind Of Blue,” “My Funny Valentine,” “ESP,” and more. Call (702) 229-3515 for more details.

The Poets’ Corner
Hosted by Keith Brantley
Friday, Feb. 15, 7 p.m.
Admission is free.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
A monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants, featuring the best local poetry talent.

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Presents “Across The Truckee” (all ages)
Friday-Sunday, Feb. 15-17; 2 p.m. shows Saturday and Sunday; 7 p.m. shows Friday and Saturday.
Tickets: $7 for adults, $5 for teens/seniors/military; and $3 for children under age 12.
Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St., (702) 229-3515.
Who knew Nevada’s history could be so rich in entertainment? Don’t miss the chance to see the main stage version of “Across The Truckee,” the newly created and lively production about Nevada history, before it goes on tour. Meet colorful characters galore and tap your toes to music that sets you to humming—whatever your age! For tickets and information, call (702) 229-6383 or 229-6553, or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.
Guy Davis in Concert
Saturday, Feb. 16, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $10 advance purchase; $15 per person at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, Jeanne Roberts Theatre, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Guy Davis is a musician, composer, actor, director, and writer. But most importantly, Guy Davis is a bluesman. The blues permeates every corner of Davis’ creativity. Throughout his career, he has dedicated himself to reviving the traditions of acoustic blues and bringing them to as many ears as possible through the material of the great blues masters, along with African-American stories and his own original songs, stories and performance pieces. For more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call 229-6383.

An Evening with Peter Yarrow (all ages)
Friday, Feb. 22, 8 p.m.
Tickets: $10 in advance/$15 event day
Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St., (702) 229-3515.
Share an intimate evening with legendary singer/songwriter and activist Peter Yarrow (Peter, Paul & Mary, Puff the Magic Dragon, Operation Respect). Inspirational as well as humorous, Peter will look back over the career of Peter, Paul & Mary, telling stories and singing some of the many hits that won them acclaim worldwide. Call 229-3515 for more information.

The Jester Hairston Music Association, Inc. Presents “Why Do We Sing – The Evolution of African-American Music” (all ages)
Cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District.
Saturday, Feb. 23, 3 p.m.
Admission is free, but tickets are required and may be picked up in advance at the West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd.
West Las Vegas Library Theatre, 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 507-3989.
The Jester Hairston Music Association (JHMA) chorus, along with youth from the community, share reasons and circumstances of why we sing. The historical music genres of jazz, spirituals, and gospel will be explored and performed in this festive occasion. Please call (702) 229-4800 for more information.

USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, Feb. 23, 7 to 11 p.m.; dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Cost: $10 per person at the door; $5 for USA Dance members, military, and students ages 13-25.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Cosponsored by the USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national organization USA Dance. USA Dance Las Vegas is a volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. Call (702) 813-6694 or (702) 229-6383 for more information, or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org.
Exhibitions
“Second Wind” Exhibition
Artist Robin Stark
Nov. 26, 2012-Feb. 14, 2013; Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Grand Gallery, 495 S. Main St., First floor, (702) 229-1012.
Inspiration for this work was influenced by the work of American sculptor David Smith. The artist’s ceramic sculptural forms have a reference to the traditional ceramic vessel, yet deviate from functionality and focus on expressive formal elements (surface shapes defined by sharp edges and bold color) to suggest visual movement and momentum. The pieces treat the surface as a two-dimensional format to imply motion already established in the three-dimensional form through repetition and layering of various shapes and colors. The purity and intensity of the hues generate an emotional quality, which is critical to the overall nature of the pieces.

“Narratives of Progress” Exhibit
Artist Armin Mühsam
Jan. 18-March 16, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Snake Exhibit
Jan. 31-Feb. 23, by appointment only. Artists’ reception Jan. 31, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
Chinese Year of the Snake begins Feb. 10. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

African-American Heritage Exhibit
2013 Featured Artist: Lolita Develay
Feb. 7-April 18, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Nevada Watercolor Society’s 2013 Signature Members’ Exhibit
Feb. 28-March 23, during the reception and by appointment.
Artists’ reception Feb. 28, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

# # #
High-resolution photos are available for download at ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/Feb_2013_Events/ and ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/Exhibitions/.
No password is required.
Media Contact:
Margaret Kurtz
Public Information Officer
City of Las Vegas
495 S. Main St., 7th Floor
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702) 229-6993
Cell (702) 249-1828
E-mail: mkurtz@lasvegasnevada.gov

Caring for Problem Skin

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Caring for Problem Skin

(Family Features) According to the National Institutes of Health, skin is the largest organ of your body. Skin can be a very delicate thing, and as the outermost layer, it needs to be cared for in order to look and feel its best. Unfortunately, for those who suffer from highly prevalent skin conditions, such as eczema, caring for and maintaining skin can be a daily challenge.

What is eczema?
Eczema is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition characterized by dry, itchy skin and visible skin rash. Over 35 million Americans, both children and adults, suffer from eczema. The prevalence of eczema has increased nearly 400 percent over the past 30 years and is projected to continue to increase due to environmental and other factors such as stress, according to the National Eczema Association.

In a healthy state, the external layer of your skin acts as a protective barrier. For eczema sufferers, the skin has a deficiency in the external layer that allows the moisture to escape and causes chronic dryness. When skin is dry and unprotected, irritants can reach the sensitive layers below and cause uncomfortable itch flare-ups.

Common triggers
There are a number of things that can trigger an eczema flare-up:
• Irritants such as synthetic fibers, detergents, perfumes, rough or poor fitting clothing, dust or sand.
• Environmental factors such as hot or cold temperatures, humidity, or dry air.
• Emotional factors such as anxiety or stress.

Tips for managing eczema
The National Eczema Association says that daily skin care is essential to help manage eczema.
• When bathing, wash in warm water for 5 to 10 minutes.
• Use a non-irritating and fragrance-free wash. Do not scrub skin harshly.
• Moisturize within 3 minutes after every shower. It helps lock in your skin’s natural moisture to help prevent eczema-related dryness.
• In addition to your daily skincare routine, try applying a cold compress to soothe your skin.

When choosing skincare products, look for gentle, fragrance-free washes and moisturizers, such as Neosporin Essentials products, a line of skincare products which includes a daily body wash, daily moisturizing cream and anti-itch cream specifically designed for people with eczema. Each product has a unique Relipid formula, which contains a lipid, humectant, emollient and botanical blend to help retain the moisture essential for healthy-looking skin. Plus, the daily moisturizing cream contains colloidal oatmeal and was clinically shown to restore visibly healthier skin in three days. Use all products as directed.

Eczema can be stressful and make daily living challenging and uncomfortable. With diligent skin care and good habits, you can help maintain healthy skin and effectively manage symptoms when they do flare up.

To get more information on living with eczema, daily management tips and money-saving coupons, go to www.neosporinessentials.com.
Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Ophthalmologists Offer Sight-Saving Eye Care to Prevent Blindness

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

EyeCare America promotes vision loss prevention in U.S. through no out of pocket-cost eye exams and care

According to the World Health Organization, nearly 180 million people suffer from blindness or visual impairment globally, yet 75 percent of blindness could be prevented or treated with sight-saving eye care. In observance of World Blindness Awareness Month, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, urges the public to make eye exams and care a top priority to maintain their healthy vision.

A variety of problems are responsible for blindness around the world, and the leading causes of blindness and vision loss in the United States are age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataracts, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. More than two-thirds of visually impaired adults in the U.S. are age 65 or older. The number of Americans with age-related eye disease is expected to double within the next three decades unless something is done to reverse the trend.

To better prevent blindness in the U.S., EyeCare America encourages seniors to visit www.eyecareamerica.org to find out if they qualify for an eye exam and up to one year of care at no out-of-pocket cost. EyeCare America matches eligible patients age 65 and older with an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor – who will provide a comprehensive medical eye examination.

“Regular eye exams are imperative to detect and treat eye diseases and prevent serious vision loss,” said Richard P. Mills, M.D., chairman of EyeCare America. “This is especially true for people age 65 and older who are at increased risk for eye diseases. That’s why EyeCare America is so focused on providing access to eye care, and we hope that fewer people will suffer from preventable causes of blindness as a result.”

EyeCare America is made possible through the generous support of the Knights Templar Foundation, Genentech and Alcon. To see if you or a loved one is eligible, visit the online referral center at www.eyecareamerica.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

Cultural Arts – December 2012 Calendar Of Events

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Cultural Arts
December 2012 Calendar Of Events
495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101
Contact: Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993 Oct. 2, 2012
Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org
City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

 

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
Centers will be closed Dec. 25 for holiday observance.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Winter Class Registration Opens (all ages)
Saturday, Dec. 1, 8 a.m.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Registration is open through Dec. 29, for six-week class sessions to be held Jan. 2-Feb. 9, 2013. Offered cultural arts instruction includes African Drum – Beginner / Intermediate / Advanced; African Dance for Children; African Dance Teens/Adults; Baby Ballet & Tap; Ballet – Beginner / Intermediate; Modern Dance; Hip Hop – Beginner / Intermediate; Yoga – Health & Wellness; Tae Kwon Do – Beginner / Intermediate / Advanced; Video & Documentary Creation; Music Production; and Private Piano / Voice lessons. To register or for more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call 229-4800.

Winter Class Registration Opens (ages 2-adult)
Saturday, Dec. 1, 10 a.m.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Registration is open through Jan. 9, 2013, for 10-week sessions of classes to be held Jan. 12-March 23. Offered courses include Ballet, Jazz, Hip Hop, Zumba, Salsa Rueda, Drawing, Art for Youth & Teens, private music lessons, private or semi-private dance lessons and Saturday tots classes in dance for ages 2 years and up. Registration is open the same dates for Rainbow Company youth theatre classes for ages 4-17. To register or for more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-6383.

Toys for Tots Square Dance (ages 8+)
Saturday, Dec. 1; introductory lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7:30 to 10 p.m.
Cost: $6 with new unwrapped toy; $8 without toy. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Square dance to help the U.S. Marines make children’s Christmas wishes come true. Enjoy callers Andy Finch, Joe Valvo, Vern Vernazarro and Ron Sowash of Las Vegas and caller Arlen Miller of Northridge, Calif., with guest cuer Ron Hartzell. Newcomers and families are welcomed. No need to bring a partner. Class-level dances, Plus and Round dances will be included, as well as a chance to win door prizes. Refreshments will be available. Cosponsored by the Stardusters, Las Vegas Square & Round Dance Club, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 348-4906 or 229-6383, or visit www.lasvegassquarenrounddancers.org.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m., Dec. 5 and 12.
Cost: $4 dollars per person per week. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of international fun learning Armenian, Bulgarian, Israeli, Arabic, Macedonian, Russian, Greek, Turkish, Chinese and Serbian folk dances, and more. No need to bring a partner. Cosponsored by the Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing Club of Las Vegas, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 562-9889 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.
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Afternoon Delight Tea Dances (adults)
Thursdays, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., Dec. 6 and 13.
Cost: $5 general admission per person. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Great music and a friendly atmosphere welcome dancers of all levels to the center’s beautiful ballroom dance floor. Loy Au will lead the dance instruction and demonstrations for new dances each week. A themed dance will be featured each month. Invite your friends and bring snacks to share. No dance will be held Dec. 20 or 27. For more information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m., Dec. 7 and 14.
Cost: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Presents “Honk!” (all ages)
Dec. 7, 8, 14 and 15 at 7 p.m.; Dec. 9, 15 and 16 at 2 p.m.
Cost: $7 adults; $5 teen/senior/military; $3 children age 12 and younger.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
And for the holidays, join the Rainbow Company Youth Theatre for “Honk!,” the musical story of Ugly, whose odd looks incite prejudice among his family and neighbors, until he discovers his true and glorious destiny. Tickets are available by calling 229-6383 or 229-6553, or online at www.artslasvegas.org.

Downtown Cultural Series – Danny Wright “An Intimate Christmas” (all ages) – canceled
Friday, Dec. 21, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
Call (702) 229-3515 for more details. A replacement performer may be scheduled.

The Poets’ Corner
Hosted by Keith Brantley
Friday, Dec. 21, 7 p.m.
Admission is free.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
A monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants, featuring the best local poetry talent.

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Kwanzaa 2012 (all ages)
A Celebration of Culture and the Rites of Passage Graduation ‘Crossing Over’ Ceremony
Cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District
Saturday, Dec. 22, 3 p.m.
Admission is free, but tickets are required and may be picked up in advance at the West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd.
West Las Vegas Library Theatre, 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 591-3989.
Join the community celebration to share the meaning of Kwanzaa and embrace and celebrate the accomplishments of our youth graduate participants in the annual Rites of Passage mentoring workshops. Please call (702) 229-4800 for more information.

Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks Present “Holidaze in Hicksville” (all ages)
Saturday, Dec. 22, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $10 in advance, $15 at the door.
Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St., (702) 229-3515.
Hicksville show will feature a live performance of songs from the acclaimed album Crazy for Christmas, as well as several Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks classics. Free limited parking available at the Historic Fifth Street School; metered parking available in metered lots across the street both west and south of school. For tickets and information, call 229-3515 or 229-6383, or go online to www.artslasvegas.org. For more information on the performers, visit www.danhicks.net/.

Exhibitions

Public Employee Art Exhibit
Oct. 18-Dec. 6, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
The Public Employee Art Exhibit was open to any artist who resided in Southern Nevada and is employed by the state, county or city government. Only original artwork was accepted. If you have any questions, contact gallery coordinator, Jeanne Voltura, at 229-1012 or e-mail to jvoltura@lasvegasnevada.gov. For more information, go to www.artslasvegas.org.

“Mountains and Valleys Without End”
Artist Daniel Gottsegen
Through Dec. 8; Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The artist’s experience working in and studying the environment from both a scientific (naturalist) and personal orientation has shaped the way he considers (and constructs) his world and his work. He is interested in the tension and duality between our romantic conceptions of nature and the reality of the potential environmental calamities we are facing. He seeks to embody this tension in his work by the use of technology (video that he shoots) to derive image sources, or in recent work (the Wanderungen series) by juxtaposing images. For more information on the gallery program call (702) 229-1012 or go to www.artslasvegas.org.

“Gnot The Proper Gnomenclature” (all ages)
Through Jan. 17, 2013, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall, 495 S. Main St., second-floor outside patio, (702) 229-4631.
The public is invited to enjoy two whimsical garden gnome sculptures by Las Vegas artist Jesse Smigel. On display for viewing, photos and videos, the gnomes are carved from dense foam. One standing gnome is 9 feet tall; the second reclining gnome is approximately 9 feet long. No sitting or standing on the sculptures, please.
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City of Las Vegas Halloween & Harvest Happenings

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City Offers Many Special Events And Activities For Children And Adults

The city of Las Vegas offers special events and activities for children and adults for Halloween and harvest fun. These activities are just a sampling of the many programs available throughout the year. For a full list of classes and activities available, go online to download the Fall/Winter 2012-2013 Recreation Guide at www.lasvegasparksandrec.com or call any of the facilities below. All activities are subject to change. Please call to confirm before attending. Most centers are closed Oct. 26. Most activities require advance registration. Most programs at senior centers and active adult centers require a $2 annual membership in the city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all city of Las Vegas senior and active adult centers.

Oktoberfest Luncheon (ages 50+)
Thursday, Oct. 18, 11:30 p.m.
Cost: $5.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Celebrate the rich heritage of the German people with bratwurst, sauerkraut and a great party!

Halloween Luncheon (ages 50+)
Friday, Oct. 19, 11 a.m. seating; 11:30 a.m. luncheon. Advance reservations required.
Cost: $5.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.
Dress in costume for this annual luncheon that includes salad, dessert, beverages, and dinner served in a pumpkin!

Free Ward 6 Movie In The Park
Friday, Oct. 19, 7 p.m.
Centennial Hills Amphitheatre, 7101 N. Buffalo Drive, at Deer Springs Way.
Enjoy the PG-rated family film, “Scooby-Doo,” in the park, sponsored by Lexus of Las Vegas. Bring your picnic, blankets or folding chairs to be more comfortable. Food will be available for purchase from Curbside Café. For more information, call 229-6154 or visit www.lasvegasnevada.gov/ward6.

Cooking Club: What Can You Make from a Pumpkin? (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 23, 11 a.m.
Cost: $5.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Ghost & Ghouls Breakfast (ages 50+)
Thursday, Oct. 25, 8:30 to 10 a.m.
Cost: $3.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Enjoy a ghoulish serving of pancakes with bloody scrambled eggs and slices of bacon.

Howling Halloween Carnival (all ages)
Thursday, Oct. 25, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
Doolittle Community Center, 1950 N. J St., (702) 229-6374.
There will be a costume contest, games, drawings and candy for the kids. There will also be a Haunted Hallway designed to frighten all who enter.

Halloween Costume Dance with the Jerry Tiffe Band (adults)
Saturday Oct. 27, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $10 in advance, $15 event day.
Charleston Heights Arts Center Ballroom, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Get in the spirit of the season and “monster mash” at the annual Halloween-themed dance. Dress in your favorite costume and dance the night away to the music of Jerry Tiffe and his combo band. Band members are Jerry Tiffe (leader/singer/trumpet), Dale Sweetland (drums/vocals), Thomas San Filippo (keyboards/bass) and Brian Bissell (guitar). Call 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org for tickets and information. For more information on the band, go online to www.jerrytiffe.com.
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Halloween Costume Luncheon & Celebration (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Oct. 31, 11:30 a.m. Advance registration required.
Cost: $5.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Dress in costume to enjoy a spooky meal and carnival-style games. Prizes will be awarded to the best costume, creepiest costume, funniest and more. Space is limited, so sign up early.

Halloween Fun! (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Oct. 31, 1 to 3 p.m. Advance registration required by Oct. 26.
Cost: $2.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.
Come dressed in costume to celebrate Halloween and two lesser-known holidays, Carve a Pumpkin Day and National Candy Corn Day! “Carve” a pumpkin and enjoy treats made with candy corn!

Scarecrow Making (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Nov. 7, 10:30 a.m. Registration begins Oct. 22.
Cost: $5 with a current annual $2 senior membership. Advanced registration is required.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
The PVC “skeleton” and base will be provided; the rest is up to you! Bring an old pair of jeans and shirt, or dress and shoes — it’s up to you to create a scarecrow that will be used to decorate the center. You’ll also enjoy a fall snack. Call 229-1702 for more information.

Harvest Festival Potluck (ages 50+)
Thursday, Nov. 8, 11:30 a.m.
Free with a dish to share.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.

City Of Las Vegas November 2012 Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City Of Las Vegas November 2012
Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle! Most facilities are closed Nov. 12, 22 and 23 for holiday observance.

“Souper” Family Swim Day (all ages)
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Cost: One can of soup or other canned goods If you bring more than one item, you will receive an additional one-day pass to use any day during open swim.
Municipal Pool, 431 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6309.
No school — come to the pool! Canned goods will be donated to a local food bank. Regular fees apply without donation.

E! Club (ages 6-13)
Friday, Nov. 16, 6 to 9 p.m.
Cost: $25 per child.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Parents can enjoy a night on the town while children enjoy a fun evening of activities.

Ward 4 Free Holiday Movie in the Park (all ages)
Friday, Nov. 30, 6:30 p.m.
Police Memorial Park, 3250 Metro Academy Way.
Enjoy the family movie, “The Grinch,” featuring Jim Carrey, as well as free holiday crafts, hot chocolate, candy canes, popcorn and cookies, while supplies last. Get your picture taken with the Grinch for free.
Please dress warmly and bring a blanket or chair to sit on; movie will be outside on the grass.

Adaptive Recreation
Adaptive Cycle Club (all ages)
Saturday, Nov. 3, 9 to 11 a.m. or 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Cost: $2 per person.
Wayne Bunker Family Park, 7351 W. Alexander Road, at Tenaya Way.
Call (702) 229-4796 to reserve your spot in the early or late session. Adaptive cycles provided.

Project D.I.R.T. Tent Camping (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Saturday-Sunday, Nov. 10-11, 11 a.m. Saturday to 11 a.m. Sunday. Advance registration required.
Cost: $30 per person.
Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road, (702) 229-8100.
Meet at Floyd Lamb Park to enjoy tent camping, hiking and fishing. Call (702) 229-4796 for registration and information. Cost includes meals and tent. Bring your own sleeping bag.
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Paralympic Sport Free Activity Nights (kindergarten-grade 12)
Wednesday, Nov. 14, 5 to 8 p.m.
Rancho High School, 1900 Searles Ave.
Register at main school entrance. Call (702) 229-4796 or e-mail jfoster@lasvegasnevada.gov for additional information and locations.

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed staff development days and holidays.
Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Call (702) 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence.

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m. Closed Nov. 6, 12, 22-23.
Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Participants will enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

Wheelchair Athletes Open Gym (high school-adult)
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., excluding Nov. 22.
Fee: $2 per practice.
Fremont Middle School Gymnasium, 1100 E. Saint Louis Ave.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Wheelchair Basketball Practice (high school-adult)
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. No practice Nov. 22.
Fee: $20 per person.
Fremont Middle School Gymnasium, 1100 E. Saint Louis Ave.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Quad Rugby Team Practice (high school-adult)
Fridays, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. No practice Nov. 23.
Fee: $20 monthly
Chuck Minker Sports Complex, 275 N. Mojave Rd.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

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Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging Launches InvestigAge for Aging Services & Seniors Housing Industry

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Mather LifeWays announces the launch of a new online experts forum for the seniors housing/aging services industry, called InvestigAge.

Developed by Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging, InvestigAge is anticipated to be a key resource for senior living/aging services providers, professionals, developers, and investors, as well as for researchers and other stakeholders with interests in the field of aging. InvestigAge will highlight current findings and trends impacting housing and services for older adults.

The InvestigAge Editorial Board, consisting of 12 recognized industry leaders and researchers, will provide brief summaries of original research papers and reports.

Different than an abstract, which merely describes overall findings of a study, the annotated summaries will include a synopsis of the research, as well as a critical evaluation or analysis to help the reader interpret and apply the results.

“We see InvestigAge as a synergistic means to bridge scholarly research and industry practice,” said Linda Hollinger-Smith, PhD, RN, FAAN, vice president, Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging, who led the development and implementation of the launch.
“InvestigAge is just what the field needs around evidence-based research,” said Larry Minnix, president and CEO, LeadingAge. “We value this new tool for disseminating valuable research to senior living providers who are looking for a comprehensive resource to help inform their strategies and move our industry forward.”

Users will have access to InvestigAge online at any time with a login and password; in addition, they will receive a monthly e-newsletter highlighting new articles.

“InvestigAge will bring together key research, reports, and other original resources in a way that will be accessible in one place — rather than requiring extensive online or library searches,” said Mary Leary, CEO and president, Mather LifeWays.

Given Mather LifeWays’ strong reputation as a source of information about aging well through its successful 10-year history of the consumer-oriented Aging in Action online website and e-newsletter, with more than 13,000 subscribers, this highly-anticipated resource will benefit the aging services professional field as well. For more information, or to register for InvestigAge, visit online at www.investigage.com.

Based in Evanston, Illinois, Mather LifeWays www.matherlifeways.com is a unique, non-denominational not-for-profit organization founded 70 years ago to serve the needs of older adults. Dedicated to developing and implementing Ways to Age WellSM, Mather LifeWays creates programs, places, and residences for today’s young-at-heart older adults. Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging is the research and education arm of Mather LifeWays, and serves as a thought leader in the field of aging by designing and conducting national applied research, pilot demonstration projects, and education initiatives.

CONTACT: Lori Keenan, +1-847-902-2905, Lori@SmarthinkingPR.com

Fall Prevention Week!

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Fall Prevention Week Is Rapidly Approaching! “Don’t Fall Down! Fall Prevention 101 for Older Adults” Now Available as E-Book

The third week in September has been nationally recognized as “Fall Prevention Week” and we need your help to increase awareness of the growing public health concern of falls among our aging population!

Falls are the leading cause of accidental death and non-fatal injury for people over the age of 65. The greying of America is causing major concern among government agencies due to the financial and emotional costs to individuals, their families and society. In 2000, the average cost of a fall was over $28,000 (CDC, 2006). The good news is that up to 50% of falls can be prevented through increased awareness and behavior change.

“Don’t Fall Down! Fall Prevention 101 for Older Adults” explains situations that increase the risk of a fall and how a person can reduce that risk. Some factors can be changed and others must be accepted. The first step a person can do to prevent falls is become aware of things that contribute to instability and then make the necessary change when possible.

Balance is a complicated messenger system and this 70-page book offers scientifically-researched concepts in an easy to understand manner. The reader will gain a better understanding of what may be causing loss of balance, how to reduce the risk of a fall and where to go for help.

The index includes a “Help, I’ve Fallen and I CAN Get Up” demonstration, Fall Risk Medications List, Home Safety Checklist and a Senior Resource Directory.
Written in large print, this is a must read for older adults, loved ones, family members, caregivers, staff members, program planners, activity directors, nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, and doctors.

Knowledge is empowering. This easy to read book encourages a person to take responsibility his/her well-being in order to remain independent.

To request a review copy of this e-book, or to arrange an interview with the author, please contact:

Name: Kelly Ward, aka, “The Fall Prevention Lady”
E-mail: wardkelly@mac.com
Website: http://www.thefallpreventionlady.com
Tel: 916-821-5715

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 – Recreation, Adaptive Recreation, Sports & Community Special Events

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 – Recreation, Adaptive Recreation, Sports & Community Special Events

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle! Most facilities are closed Oct. 26 for holiday observance.

Ward 5 Coffee With The Councilman
Thursday, Oct. 4, 9 to 10 a.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Starbucks, 751 N. Rancho Drive, at Bonanza Road.
Join Ward 5 Councilman Ricki Y. Barlow for coffee and conversation about your ideas to improve Ward 5 and Las Vegas.

Ward 4 Walk & Roll For ALS (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 13, 6 a.m. registration. 5K begins 8 a.m., Walk begins 8:15 a.m.
Cost: $25 minimum donation to participate in walk; $35 for runners ages 18+; $25 runners ages 5-17; free for under age 5.
Police Memorial Park, 3250 Metro Academy Way, at Cheyenne Avenue.
Sign up your team at http://als.kintera.org/WalknRoll. Call (702) 777-0500 for more information.

Ward 2 Trunk or Treat Car Show and Free Kid’s Halloween Festival (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public. There is a fee for vendors and car show participants.
Veterans Memorial Leisure Services Center, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.
Please join Councilman Bob Beers for a fun day filled with music provided by DJ Brando, along with Halloween activities for the kids, including craft projects, costume contest, games, face painting and jump houses. Kids have the opportunity to “trunk or treat” at the cars decorated for Halloween in the car show. Help pick the spookiest! All makes, models and years welcome in the car show. Vendors are welcome. The event is sponsored by Ward 2 Councilman Bob Beers.

Contact John Bear at 229-2420 or e-mail to jbear@lasvegasnevada.gov, if you want to register your car in the show, become a vendor at the event, or volunteer to help. Early registration for the car show is $25 and is due by Thursday, Oct. 4. You also can register a car in the car show on the event date for $35. The vendor fee is $25, which includes a table.
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Free Ward 6 Shredding Event
Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to noon.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive.
Bring your documents that need to be shredded. Complimentary shredding takes place in the Centennial Hills Community Center Active Adult Center parking lot. Limit of five boxes per vehicle. This is a safe and convenient way to get rid of old documents.

Movie at the E! (all ages)
Friday, Oct. 19, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
East Las Vegas Community Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Enjoy a family movie in the plaza. This will be a perfect chance for the family to relax and enjoy a safe and special night under the stars. Bring low folding chairs for your comfort.

E! Club (ages 6-13)
Friday, Oct. 19, 6 to 9 p.m.
Cost: $25 per child.
East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Avenue, (702) 229-1515.
Parents can enjoy a night on the town while children enjoy a fun evening of activities.

Ward 1 Trunk or Treat (all ages)
Wednesday, Oct. 24, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
Anthem Institute Parking Lot, 2320 S. Rancho Drive, at Sahara Avenue.
Enjoy a community celebration with trick-or-treating, jump house and more, hosted by Anthem Institute and co-sponsored by the city of Las Vegas.

Howling Halloween Carnival (all ages)
Thursday, Oct. 25, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
Doolittle Community Center, 1950 N. J St., (702) 229-6374.
There will be a costume contest, games, drawings and candy for the kids. There will also be a Haunted Hallway designed to frighten all who enter.

Las Vegas Mayor’s Cup International Tournament
Friday-Sunday, Oct. 26-28.
Free for spectators. Advance registration required for teams.
Bettye Wilson Soccer Complex, 7353 Eugene Ave., and other parks.
For teams ages 8-15. This soccer tournament is co-hosted by the city of Las Vegas and the Downtown Las Vegas Soccer Club. This top-ranked event drew teams from 11 different states, as well as Canada and Mexico last year. Teams are guaranteed three games. Individual awards are offered for 1st and 2nd place. The entry fee is only $515 for U8-U10 and $735 for U11-U15. Entry deadline is Sept. 6. For more information, go online to www.lvmayorscup.com.
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Adaptive Recreation

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed staff development days and holidays.
Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Call (702) 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence.

Wheelchair Athletes Open Gym (high school-adult)
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., through December.
Fee: $2 per practice.
Fremont Middle School Gymnasium, 1100 E. Saint Louis Ave.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m. Closed Oct. 12, 26.
Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.
East Las Vegas Community Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Participants enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

Adaptive Cycle Club (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 6, 9 to 11 a.m. or 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Cost: $2 per person.
Wayne Bunker Family Park, 7351 W. Alexander Road, at Tenaya Way.
Call (702) 229-4796 to reserve your spot in the early or late session. Adaptive cycles provided.

Helter Skelter Quad Rugby Tournament
Oct. 12-14, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday.
Free for spectators.
Dula Gymnasium, 441 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6307.
Six teams from across North America will compete for medals for first through third place. Teams will include: Las Vegas Sin City Skulls; Northern California Quake; Sierra Strom from Reno/Sacramento; University of Arizona Wildcats; Boise Idaho Bombers; and the Ottawa Stingers from Canada. Spectators are welcome. Call (702) 229-4796 or e-mail jfoster@lasvegasnevada.gov for more information.
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20th Annual Disability Awareness Day (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Free admission and lunch.
Pioneer Park, 7449 Braswell Drive.
Attend a free “Work Incentives Seminar on Ticket to Work & Employment for SSI/SSDI Beneficiaries Age 14 to 64.” This seminar will be held from 10 to 11:30 a.m. in conjunction with Disability Awareness Day. Also enjoy live entertainment, a free wheelchair safety check and a free lunch. Call (702) 889-4216 to reserve your space.

Free Paralympic Sport Activity Nights (kindergarten-grade 12)
Wednesday, Oct. 17, 5 to 8 p.m.
Rancho High School, 1900 Searles Ave.
Register at main school entrance. Call (702) 229-4796 or e-mail jfoster@lasvegasnevada.gov for additional information and locations.

Quad Rugby Team Practice (high school-adult)
Friday, Oct. 19, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Minker Sports Complex, 275 N. Mojave Road, (702) 229-6563.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Registration for Henderson 7th Annual Senior Warm-up Open Table Tennis Tournament

Quick reflexes will be front and center as the City of Henderson Parks and Recreation Department hosts its 7th Annual Senior Warm-up Open Table Tennis Tournament 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday, Oct. 3-4 at Valley View Recreation Center, 500 Harris St. Participation is open to players ages 45+.

Entry is $15 per player, per event: singles, doubles and mixed doubles. Entry packets and online registration are available at cityofhenderson.com/parks (activity code 624106-48 for singles, 624106-49 for doubles, and 624106-50 for mixed doubles) or in person at Valley View Recreation Center by Oct. 1. Entries may be accepted after Oct. 1 pending space availability. Registration is not accepted at the event.

The tournament format is round robin, with two players from each round advancing to the single elimination stage. Medals will be awarded based on the number of entries. All USTA Table Tennis rules apply, and proper dress code is expected.

“Table tennis is a sport of intense concentration, quick reflexes, and outstanding hand/eye coordination,” said JoAnn Nesti, Recreation program coordinator, City of Henderson Parks and Recreation Department. “This tournament typically attracts some of the finest players in the Las Vegas Valley who appreciate a great match and strong competition.”

For additional information, call 267-4060.

The nationally accredited City of Henderson Parks and Recreation Department provides premium services through diverse and innovative parks, recreation and natural resource opportunities. It serves the community with seven recreation centers (including a facility for adults 50+), one senior center, 11 pools, 54 parks, five skate parks, two sports complexes, more than 66 linear miles of trails, Acacia Demonstration Gardens, the Henderson Bird Viewing Preserve, and thousands of programs for people of all ages and abilities.

Cataract Rates are on the Rise in Americans Age 40 and Older

August 21, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Cataract Rates are on the Rise in Americans Age 40 and Older

American Academy of Ophthalmology Offers Tips for Cataract Detection and Treatment

SAN FRANCISCO – August 16, 2012 – The incidence of cataracts in the U.S. has risen 19 percent since 2000, impacting nearly 25 million Americans age 40 and older.[i] In fact, more than half of all Americans will develop cataracts by age 80, according to Prevent Blindness America’s Vision Problems in the U.S. report. In response, the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart program is educating the public about cataract risk factors, detection and treatment options during Cataract Awareness Month.

Cataract is a clouding of the eye’s lens, which can make it more difficult to focus light onto the eye’s retina – the light-sensitive tissue that sends images to the brain. Cataracts, a natural part of aging, are the most common cause of vision loss in the U.S. They typically develop slowly, so symptoms may not be immediately apparent. Over time, cataracts can cause vision to become blurry, cloudy, dull, or dim, and can interfere with daily activities.

The good news is that cataracts are almost always treatable with cataract surgery. During cataract surgery, an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor with the training and certification to provide the full range of eye care and surgery – removes the eye’s cloudy natural lens and replaces it with a clear artificial lens implant called an intraocular lens (IOL). Cataract surgery is often performed as an outpatient procedure and does not require an overnight hospital stay. Cataract surgery is one of the safest types of surgery, and 90 percent of patients who have cataract surgery enjoy better vision afterward.[ii]

“If you notice vision changes, cataracts could be to blame and you might need more than a new pair of glasses,” said David F. Chang, M.D., a clinical correspondent for the American Academy of Ophthalmology and a clinical professor at the University of California, San Francisco. “If you do have a cataract, you should be reassured that it is a normal aging change and not an eye disease. Cataract surgery usually carries an excellent prognosis, and you should talk to your ophthalmologist about whether surgery should be done to restore your eyesight.”

As the aging population grows, it is increasingly important for seniors and their caregivers to understand cataract risks, symptoms, prevention, and treatment options. The American Academy of ophthalmology recommends the following tips to maintain healthy vision:
• Get a baseline exam by age 40. All adults should get a baseline eye exam by age 40 when early signs of eye disease and vision changes may start to occur. During this visit, your ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.) will advise you on how often to have follow-up exams.
• After age 65, schedule regular eye exams. Anyone age 65 and older should visit an ophthalmologist regularly to detect eye diseases and conditions like cataract early, and to monitor any vision loss. Seniors age 65 and older may qualify for an eye exam and up to 1 year of care at no out of pocket cost through EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of American Academy of Ophthalmology. See if you qualify at www.eyecareamerica.org.
• Know your risk factors for cataract. Diabetes, smoking, extensive UV exposure, serious eye injuries, steroid use, and a family history of cataract can increase your risk for developing a cataract.
• Reduce your risks to prevent or delay the onset of cataracts. Use sunglasses and hats to protect your eyes from UV damage. Don’t smoke. If you have diabetes, control your blood sugar carefully through diet, exercise and medications if needed.
• Talk to your ophthalmologist about your treatment options. Vision loss from cataracts can interfere with daily activities. Talk to your ophthalmologist about whether cataract surgery is right for you. When preparing for surgery, give your doctor your complete medical and eye health history, including a list of medications that you have taken. Some medications can cause the iris to move out of its normal position and may require your ophthalmologist to adjust his or her surgical technique.

For more information on cataract symptoms, risk factors, surgery, and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org.

About EyeSmart
The American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

Tips for caring for elderly parents – new book release

August 21, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Statistics show that nearly 10 million adults over the age of 50 are caring for aging parents, according to a study by the MetLife Mature Market Institute.

In her new book Mixed Nuts, professional counselor and therapist Dr. Mary Speed highlights actual patient experiences and offers advice on a variety of topic areas, including caring for an aging parent. Her tips include:

• When communicating, turn off any background distractions, such as the television or radio.
• Schedule appointments for the mornings. Before you go, work together to write down questions to ask.
• For arrivals and departures, plan for an extra 30 minutes each way.
• Try to connect new information and concepts to something familiar.
• Inform ahead of time about anticipated changes.

If you would like a copy or set up an interview with Dr. Speed, please contact Stephanie Lowe- slowe@bohlsengroup.com

Vi Marks 25 Years As a National Leader in Senior Living

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Vi Marks 25 Years As a National Leader in Senior Living

Vi – the developer, owner and operator of older adult living communities – is celebrating its 25th anniversary in August. Vi operates 10 continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) nationwide.

“We are extremely proud of the accomplishments we have achieved during the past 25 years,” said Randy Richardson, President of Vi. “In an era of uncertainty, our employees and residents can take pride in the fact we are a stable, national presence within the senior living industry, free from third-party debt in our CCRC communities and managed by a strong, long-tenured team.”

Vi was established in 1987 as Classic Residence by Hyatt. The company changed its name to Vi in 2010. The company was created by Penny Pritzker, whose family founded Hyatt Hotels, to leverage Hyatt’s hospitality expertise in the growing retirement living industry to better cater to the needs and lifestyle of discerning older adults.

Vi (pronounced vee) is the Latin root for the word “life.” It was chosen as the name for the company because it captures the positive opportunities to live a more engaging and fulfilling life as an older adult.

Vi’s ability to merge its hospitality heritage with quality senior living is what differentiates the brand from others. Visitors and residents can sense this commitment to quality and service from the moment they walk into one of Vi’s communities, according to Richardson. “Hospitality is in our DNA; and every detail is meant to convey quality service, from the decor to our lifestyle and fitness programs and to our employees who’ve been specially trained in the art of making residents feel at home.”

In addition, Vi communities feature stylish dining venues that enable residents to eat well and dine in style. Menus offer a wide variety of options to suit residents’ nutritional needs and taste preferences. Meals are prepared by chefs who receive specialized training at The Culinary Institute of America.

As testament to Vi’s approach, a recent survey of independent living residents at Vi’s 10 CCRC communities finds them happy with their decision to live at Vi. The survey finds that 94 percent of Vi’s independent living residents who completed the survey are very satisfied or satisfied with the community. Almost 95 percent say they would recommend their Vi community to family or friends.

Late last year, Vi commissioned a report by Ken Dychtwald Ph.D., renowned gerontologist, psychologist, best-selling author, and CEO of Age Wave that challenges the “prevailing myths and misperceptions” about CCRC living. The report, “The Five Myths and Realities of Continuing Care Retirement Communities,” is available here.

About Vi
Vi, formerly Classic Residence by Hyatt, is celebrating its 25th anniversary as a developer, owner and operator of older adult living communities. The company was founded in August 1987. The company is dedicated to enriching the lives of older adults by providing quality environments, services and care. Vi currently operates ten continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) nationwide. For more information about Vi communities, visit

http://www.ViLiving.com.

Contact: Tim Hermeling, 312-803-8480

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 Senior Special Events

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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City Of Las Vegas October 2012 Senior Special Events

Las Vegas Residents Invited To Celebrations, Luncheons & Activities At City Centers

The city of Las Vegas active adult and senior centers offer exercise, fitness, craft, arts, dance, music and computer classes; cards; games; discussion and social groups; luncheons; sports; and special events Monday through Friday to residents age 50 and better. Many of these activities contribute to wellness and a healthy lifestyle. A listing of classes and activities is published in the Beyond the Neon Leisure Guide, available in the centers and online at www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. All activities are subject to change. Most activities require $2 annual membership to city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all senior and active adult centers.

Golf Lessons (ages 50+)
Mondays at 9 a.m. or 10:15 a.m. Registration for October sessions begins Sept. 17.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Bring in a couple of clubs that you need to work on.

Oktoberfest Brunch (ages 50+)
Thursday, Oct. 4, 10 a.m. Registration open Sept. 3-28.
Cost: $3.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.
Celebrate Oktoberfest with some Bavarian brunch delicacies!

Breakfast Nook (ages 50+)
Friday, Oct. 5, 8:30 a.m.
Cost: $3, includes French toast casserole, sausage, fruit, coffee and juice.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Flu & Pneumonia Shots (all ages)
Tuesday, Oct. 9, 9 a.m. to noon.
Cost: Call for information. Various insurances accepted.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Southern Nevada Health District staff will administer flu and pneumonia vaccinations. Call 759-0850 for more information on pricing and which insurances will be accepted.

Chili Cook-off
Wednesday, Oct. 10, noon.
Cost: Free to enter; $2 to taste.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Make your best chili to enter in the annual chili cook-off. Prizes will be awarded to the winner. Salad and cornbread provided for those who taste and help judge the best chili!
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Helping You Understand Your Medicare Benefits and Options (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct., 16, 10 a.m. Registration opens Sept. 17.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Receive information to help you make your best Medicare choices.

Flu Shots (all ages)
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 10 a.m. to noon.
Cost: Call for information.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Southern Nevada Health District will provide annual flu shots. A list of accepted insurances will be available closer to the date of the clinic. Please call to be put on the reservation list.

Annual Texas Hold’em Poker Tournament (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 12:30 p.m.
Cost: $4.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Prepare for this fun tournament by joining the Thursday class at 1 p.m. or playing in the weekly games on Tuesdays and Fridays at 12:30 p.m. Enjoy hot and cold refreshments. Top three winners will receive a prize basket!

Getting Paid to Talk (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 1 to 3:30 p.m. Must be registered by Oct. 5.
Cost: $15.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.
This exciting workshop will teach you how to get paid to talk – by reading for audio books, animated shows and more. The field is wide open. Learn how to market yourself, where to go to find voice-over jobs, how to do voice-overs, etc.

World Food Day Luncheon (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Oct. 17, 11:30 a.m. Registration open Sept. 3-Oct. 12.
Cost: $5.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.
Give back to our community in honor of World Food Day. Bring a non-perishable food item with you and enjoy a delicious lunch. Feel good, doing good!

Oktoberfest Luncheon (ages 50+)
Thursday, Oct. 18, 11:30 p.m.
Cost: $5.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Celebrate the rich heritage of the German people with bratwurst, sauerkraut and a great party!

Flu and Pneumonia Shots (all ages)
Tuesday, Oct. 23, 9 to 11 a.m.
Call the beginning of October for pricing.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Southern Nevada Health District staff will administer flu and pneumonia vaccinations for a fee. Pneumonia vaccination is recommended for adults age 65 and older. For more information on flu vaccines, go online to www.southernnevadahealthdistrict.org/immunizations/flu-shots.php.
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Cooking Club: What Can You Make from a Pumpkin? (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 23, 11 a.m.
Cost: $5.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Lillian’s Fashion Divas (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Oct. 24, 11:00 a.m. for fashion show; brunch immediately following.
Fashion show is free and open to the public. Brunch cost: $3. R.S.V.P. by Oct. 17 for brunch.
West Las Vegas Library Theatre for fashion show, 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd.
Doolittle Senior Center for brunch, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Active adults from Doolittle Senior Center present fashions created in the master seamstress classes. They will showcase fall fashions, including casual wear, evening wear and Sunday’s best. The event is presented by the Doolittle Senior Center and hosted by the city of Las Vegas and Las Vegas-Clark County Library District. Call 229-6125 for more information.

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Cultural Arts – September 2012 Calendar Of Events

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Cultural Arts – September 2012 Calendar Of Events

495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101
Contact: Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993 July 26, 2012
Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org
City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Centers will be closed Monday, Sept. 3, for holiday observance.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m.
Cost: $4 dollars per person per week. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of international fun learning Armenian, Bulgarian, Israeli, Arabic, Macedonian, Russian, Greek, Turkish, Chinese and Serbian folk dances, and more. No need to bring a partner. For more information, call 229-6383.

Afternoon Delight Tea Dances (adults)
Thursdays, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Cost: $5 general admission per person. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Great music and a friendly atmosphere welcome dancers of all levels to the center’s beautiful ballroom dance floor. Loy Au will lead the dance instruction and demonstrations for new dances each week. A themed dance will be featured each month. Invite your friends and bring snacks to share. For more information, call 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Cost: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – Crystal Bookmark Award Nominations
Aug. 13-Sept. 21.
The Vegas Valley Book Festival launches its annual awards project to honor a local individual and an organization for advancing the cause of literature in the Las Vegas Valley. Nominations from the public are requested Aug. 13-Sept. 21. Nominations can be submitted online at www.vegasvalleybookfestival.org, or call (702) 229-5431 for a nomination form. The deadline for submittal is 5 p.m. Sept. 21. Nominees must reside in Southern Nevada. The two awards will be presented at the festival at 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, p.m. in the auditorium of the Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St.
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Contra Dances (ages 8+)
Saturday, Sept. 1, 15. Group lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7 to 10 p.m.
Cost: $10 adults; $5 members, students and military; $3 children under 16 and non-dancing adults. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance to the live music of an acoustic band playing joyful fiddle tunes, driving reels and a waltz or two. All dances are taught and called; newcomers and families are welcomed. No need to bring a partner. Wear comfortable flat-soled shoes and casual clothing. For more information, call 656-9513 or 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – “Create an Artist’s Sketchbook” (ages 3-12)
Sept. 1-2; Saturday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m.
Programs are free with paid admission. $10 for adults; $8 for seniors, military and children 12 and over; $5 for ages 3-11; free for children 2 and under.
Las Vegas Natural History Museum, 900 Las Vegas Blvd. N., 384-3466.
In this workshop inspired by the famed book series, “Dinotopia,” written and illustrated by James Gurney, kids ages 3-12 can create an imagined dinosaur utopia using watercolors and sketchbooks. Paleontology experts will answer questions on Saturday.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – “Smart Chicks Kick It Tour” (ages 13+)
Tuesday, Sept. 11, 7 to 9 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Shakespeare Las Vegas, Reed Whipple Cultural Center, 821 Las Vegas Blvd. North.
Seven best-selling young adult authors stop in Las Vegas as part of their six-city tour of North America. Authors Kelley Armstrong, Melissa Marr, Rachel Caine, Kim Derting, Kami Garcia, Richelle Mead and Veronica Roth will read excerpts from their own works, followed by a spirited question-and-answer session, book signings and reception. Call 229-5431 for more information.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – “The First Lady of Las Vegas” (all ages)
Saturday, Sept. 15, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Cost: $1 for ages 13+; free for ages 12 and younger.
Old Las Vegas Mormon Fort State Historic Park, 500 E. Washington Ave., (702) 486-3511.
Nevada author Carrie Townley Porter talks about the life of the pioneer heroine who helped found our city — and signs her book, “Helen J. Stewart: The First Lady of Las Vegas.”

Downtown Cultural Series – The Sweet Potatoes (all ages)
Friday, Sept. 21, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd South.
Bring your lunch to enjoy this noontime concert. The Sweet Potatoes play original, acoustic Americana- style music with a fresh twist. This trio will bring a smile to your face with their sweet harmonies and finely crafted songwriting. Call (702) 229-3515 or visit www.artslasvegas.org. For more information on the band, visit http://thesweetpotatoes.com/.

The Poets’ Corner
Hosted by Keith Brantley
Friday, Sept. 21, 7:30 p.m.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
A monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants, featuring the best local poetry talent.
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USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, Sept 22, 7 to 11 p.m.; dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Cost: $5 for USA Dance members, military, and students ages 13-25; $10 for non-members. Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Cosponsored by the USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national organization USA Dance. USA Dance Las Vegas is a volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. Call (702) 813-6694 or (702) 229-6383 for more information, or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org. Pay at the door.

Community Artist Series: Mohummed-Rafee Shakir “Shamanic Syntax”
Saturday, Sept. 29, 3 p.m.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Mohummed-Rafee Shakir provides an unusual opportunity for audience members to connect with the mysteries of the ancient world through a variety of artistic mediums within an environment of “sacred sound.” The concept of “sacred sound” is a reference to the concept that vibration is the underlying connective force of the universe.

Pride & Prejudice and Zombies English Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, Sept 29, 7 to 10 p.m.
Cost: $10 adults; $5 members, students and military; $3 children under 16 and non-dancing adults. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Featuring a combination of English and Scottish dances and more. Costumes are encouraged, but not required. Caller Marsden Macrae leads a program that is enlivened by her vast knowledge of the history, historical setting and social customs of each dance. Only a brief reminder of choreography will be available, prior to the start of each dance. Attendees can gain a familiarity of the dances by attending dance sessions that are available before Sept 29. For more information, call 656-9513 or 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization.

Exhibitions

“You are Here” Exhibition (all ages)
Artist David Lindsay
June 29-Sept. 1; Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Arts Center Gallery, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
David Lindsay grew up in the San Francisco bay area. After high school, he lived in northern Italy for two years. Although his purpose was not to study art, he could not help but be influenced by the art and architecture of that country. The influence of Italian painting and architecture can be seen in his work, but in a combination that is unique and creative. His work has been exhibited all over the United States, as well as in Italy and Romania. He currently is working on projects for venues in Las Vegas, Texas, Germany and Italy.

“Celebrating Life! 2012 Winners Circle” (all ages)
July 26-Sept. 6, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
Enjoy this collection of award-winning pieces from the annual juried exhibit for adults 50 and better that takes place each spring.
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“Νeothta” (Youth)
Aug. 23-Oct. 27, by appointment only and during artists’ reception.
Meet-the-Artists reception Aug. 23, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. 4th St.
A selection of artists explore idealistic images of children. Call (702) 229-1012 for more information.

“Object Illusion”
Artist Joanne Vuillemot.
Aug. 30-Nov. 15, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Terrace Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
This local artist and educator will exhibit her silver and mixed-media metalwork.

“Mountains and Valleys Without End”
Artist Daniel Gottsegen
Sept. 7-Nov. 21; Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The artist’s experience working in and studying the environment from both a scientific (naturalist) and personal orientation has shaped the way he considers (and constructs) his world and his work. He is interested in the tension and duality between our romantic conceptions of nature and the reality of the potential environmental calamities we are facing. He seeks to embody this tension in his work by the use of technology (video that he shoots) to derive image sources, or in recent work (the Wanderungen series) by juxtaposing images. For more information on the gallery program call (702) 229-1012.

Hispanic-American Heritage Exhibit
Sept. 13-Oct. 11, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Meet-the-Artists reception Sept. 13.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.

“Absolutly Abstract”* *Editor’s Note: Spelling of exhibit name is correct as listed.
Artist Thurman Hackett
Sept. 15-Nov. 17, Wednesday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Meet-the-Artist Reception: Saturday, Sept. 22, 3 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
After spending 25 years as an interior designer, Thurman Hackett came to realize his artistic talent. He began to find new freedoms of expression through painting. As years passed, Hackett developed his own style of abstract painting. Although his subjects relate to American and African history, American jazz artists and automobiles of the 1940s, this show focuses on Africa.

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Nevada-Senior-Guide Health Care Partners Medical Group

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Las Vegas 

facebook.com/healthcarepartnersnevada

About Us

HealthCare Partners Nevada is a network of more than 200 primary care physicians and more than 1,300 specialists. With medical clinics and specialty care affiliates throughout Las Vegas, North Las Vegas, Henderson, Boulder City and Pahrump, HealthCare Partners Nevada (HCPNV) is committed to delivering the highest quality of care to all our patients.
Through our total care model, HealthCare Partners provides patient centered comprehensive primary care, specialty, and urgent care services. Founded in 1996, HealthCare Partners Nevada is an affiliate of HealthCare Partners LLC with offices in California, Florida and Nevada.

For Patients

At HealthCare Partners we approach your health with Total Care. Our mission is to deliver the highest quality care to all our patients. We do this by offering you complete access to our services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We also accommodate same-day appointments.
Our health care providers are ready and able to offer expert care when you need it most. While our mission is to deliver the best possible care for our patients, our promise is to provide the personal attention you deserve. It is our pleasure to ensure your individual healthcare needs are met.

Specialty Services

When you choose HealthCare Partners, you are choosing to manage your health through what we call our Total Care Model.  Total care means that you are actively involved with a team of healthcare professionals lead by your primary care physician who is responsible for coordinating your care and ensuring the best outcome possible for your medical needs.
HealthCare Partners is continually adding medical specialties to our team of healthcare professionals, including cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, internal medicine, pediatrics, and podiatry.

Cardiology

Cardiologists are doctors with special training and skill in finding, treating and preventing diseases of the heart and blood vessels.
Click here to find a HealthCare Partners Medical Group cardiologists.

  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Repair
  • Angioplasty
  • Atrial Fibrillation Management
  • Cardiac Catheterization /Angiography
  • Cardiovascular Disease Management
  • Carotid Ultrasonography
  • Catheter Ablation (CA)
  • Cholesterol Management And Testing
  • Coagulation Monitoring
  • Coronary Angioplasty/Stenting
  • Doppler Ultrasound
  • Echocardiography (Echo)
  • Electrophysiological Studies (EPS)
  • Gated Blood Pooling Imaging
  • Heart Rhythm Management
  • Holter/Event Monitoring
  • Implantable Cardioverter /Defribrillator (ICD)
  • Laser Lead Extractions
  • Nuclear Cardiac Imaging
  • Patent Foramen Ovale Repair (PFO)
  • Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Rotational Atherectomy (PCTRA)
  • Peripheral Vascular Disease Management And Testing
  • Peripheral Vascular Interventions
  • Permanent Pacemaker Implantation
  • Stress Testing
  • Structural Heart Disease
  • T-Wave Alternans
  • Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)
  • Transesophageal Echocardiography
  • Ventricular Septal Defect Repair (VSD)
  • Women And Heart Disease
Endocrinology

Endocrinologists are doctors that focus on the medical aspects of hormones and their associated diseases and conditions.  Endocrine disorders may include: cholesterol disorders, coronary artery disease, diabetes, hormone replacement therapy, hypertension, hypoglycemia, obesity, osteoporosis, reproductive medicine and thyroid disorders.

Dermatology

Dermatologists are doctors that specialize in the diagnosis, treatment and management of disorders of the skin, hair and nails.

Internal Medicine

Internal medicine specialists are doctors that focus on adult medicine and have had special study and training focusing on the prevention and treatment of adult diseases. Internists are sometimes referred to as the “doctor’s doctor”, because they are often called upon to act as consultants to other physicians to help solve puzzling diagnostic problems.

Pediatrics

Pediatricians are doctors that focus on babies, children, adolescents, and young adults from birth to age 21.  Pediatricians manage the physical, mental, and emotional well-being of their patients in every stage of development.

Podiatry

Podiatrists are doctors that diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and related structures of the leg.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Education Directory – Southern Nevada

AARP – Nevada State Office / Contact Center

5820 S. Eastern Ave. #190, LV, NV 89119

Toll Free 1-866-389-5652

www.aarp.org/nv

Advocacy, Employment Assistance, Safe

Driving Instruction, Tax Services,

Legal Services, 1-866-330-0753

Clark County Library District

(702) 734-7323, www.lvccld.org

Free computer training classes for adults  and seniors. Call for times and events.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Nevada Aging and Disability Services Division

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

http://www.nvaging.net/

The Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD) in the State of Nevada, Department of Health and Human Services, represents Nevadans aged 60 years and older and those with disabilities.

Mission Statement The Aging and Disability Services Division provides leadership and advocacy in the planning, development and delivery of a high quality, comprehensive support service system across the lifespan. This allows all of Nevada’s elders, adults and children with disabilities or special health care needs to live independent, meaningful, and dignified lives in the most integrated setting appropriate to their needs. Developmental Services

State of Nevada Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD)

Programs/Services

 

Advocate for Elders

Advocacy, assistance, information and referral to frail seniors, who are 60 years of age or older, primarily homebound and living in the community, and their caregivers.

Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs)

Provides citizen-centered “one-stop” entry points into the long-term support system. Serves individuals in need of long-term support, caregivers, and those planning for future long-term support needs.

Assisted Living (AL) Waiver

Assisted living supportive services to eligible individuals in a residential facility as an alternative to nursing home placement.

 

Community Options Program for the Elderly (COPE)

Non-medical services to older persons to help them maintain independence in their own homes as an alternative to nursing home placement. Similar to the HCBW Program.

 

Disability Rx (External link) Assistance with the cost of prescription medicines to qualified individuals with disabilities.

 

Disability Services (External link)The Office of Disability Services provides resources at the community level which promote equal opportunity and life choices for people with disabilities through which they may positively contribute to Nevada.

Elder Protective Services (EPS)

For persons 60 years old and older who may experience abuse, neglect, exploitation, or isolation.

 

Grants

Information for current and/or prospective grantees.

 

Home and Community Based Waiver (HCBW formerly CHIP)

Non-medical services to older persons to help them maintain independence in their own homes as an alternative to nursing home placement.

 

Homemaker Program

General housekeeping, limited meal preparation, shopping, laundering, errands, standby assistance with bathing, and home management services.

 

IDEA Part C Office

Provides oversight of Part C (early intervention services) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Addresses issues and problems faced by residents in long term care facilities, which includes residential facilities for groups.

 

Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)

The goal of the SMP program is to empower seniors to prevent Medicare/health care fraud through outreach and education.

 

Senior Rx

Nevada’s plan to provide Nevada seniors relief from the high cost of prescription medicine.

 

Senior Tax Assistance/Rent Rebate Program

This program is no longer available.

 

State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP)

Medicare Counseling Information

Counseling and assistance to Medicare Beneficiaries in Nevada, utilizing a statewide network of volunteers.

 

Taxi Assistance Program (TAP)

Discounted taxicab fares to seniors and persons with disabilities in Clark County. (Washoe County also has a program of this type.

 

 

Waiver for the Elderly in Adult Residential Care (WEARC)

Non-medical services in a group care setting to offer individuals a less expensive alternative of supervised care in a residential setting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Visiting Angels – Summerlin and Henderson

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care 

www.visitingangels.com/vegas

Las Vegas Home Care, Las Vegas Senior Care and Elder Care

Visiting Angels is the nation’s leading nationally respected network of non-medical, private duty home care agencies providing senior care, elder care, personal care, respite care and companion care to help the elderly and adults continue to live in their homes. We are family owned by Michael and Jackie DiAsio.

With offices in Las Vegas and Henderson, we provide senior home care to these areas and the surrounding communities.

We are one of Las Vegas’ largest and most established home care agencies. In 2012, we completed our 12th year serving Las Vegas and Henderson. During 2012, we again performed over 200,000 care giving hours to our clients and their families. We currently have over 225 screened and trained employees (caregivers.) who have been with us an average of 4 years. We assist of about 450 people each day with our flexible program. In our 12 years, we have provided over 1,750,000 care giving hours of service to our clients and their families.

We are licensed thru the State of Nevada and during our 2012 unannounced Focused State Re-licensure Survey conducted by the State of Nevada’s Bureau of Health Care Quality and Compliance, we had no deficiencies. In addition to our private pay service, we are also a State of Nevada Medicaid Provider and during our 2012 unannounced Program Compliance Review by the State of Nevada’s Division of Health Care Financing and Policy, we obtained an overall score of 98%.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Silver Sky – Las Vegas

www.silverskylasvegas.com 

Silver Sky Assisted Living

Come See Why Everyone’s Talking About Silver Sky!

Las Vegas’ newest assisted living community at the edge of Summerlin – where modern apartments, state-of-the-art amenities and quality care are surprisingly affordable.

For a personal tour call 702-835-9040

License #4251AGC. Silver Sky is committed to providing housing and support services for older adults.

8220 Silver Sky Drive, Las Vegas 89145


An Exceptional Retirement and Assisted Living Community for Nevada Seniors

Silver Sky at Deer Springs Assisted Living pulled out the stops to create a family-style Retirement and Assisted Living setting while providing services that reflect both quality and caring. We feel it’s so exceptional that it places us in a class of our own.

The Deer Springs staff takes pride in their jobs and provide quality services tailored made to meet your every need. They’ll take time to get to know you personally and to put a smile on your face too. It isn’t their intention to become part of your family but when they spend as much time with you as they do, it just happens.

The Deer Springs staff takes pride in their jobs and provide quality services tailored made to meet your every need. They’ll take time to get to know you personally and to put a smile on your face too. It isn’t their intention to become part of your family but when they spend as much time with you as they do, it just happens.

State of the Art Kitchen

Silver Sky at Deer Springs Assisted Living is bright, clean, and spacious. When friends and family visit they will enjoy your apartment home because of the attractiveness, details, freshness and personality built into the design. Each apartment comes equipped with a refrigerator/freezer and microwave oven. Our classic design and colors are suitable for all tastes and create a lot of compliments.

Outside your personal apartment at Silver Sky at Deer Springs Assisted Living you’ll find plenty of space to share and enjoy with family and friends. A brightly decorated reception area and lobby, library, living room, activity room and a delightful Bistro for beverages, snacks, ice cream and plenty of visiting await you.

Recreation Room

Knowing the importance of quality of life, Silver Sky at Deer Springs Assisted Living supports dignity, independence, choices, flexibility, and style for seniors who thrive on quality of life.

Silver Sky at Deer Springs Assisted Living serves the needs of all seniors in compliance with Fair Housing Laws and the general public seeking affordable housing. (Income restrictions apply).

Our Neighborhood

Our Apartments Are Centrally Located

A shopping center is only a block away and is home to many stores and shops including Wal-Mart, Costco, Stein Mart, Wells Fargo Bank, Bed Bath and Beyond as well as many great restaurants, and other shopping is close at hand.

Centennial Hills Hospital Med Center is just five and half miles away and Mountain View Medical Center is a short 7 miles away.

Services

Assisted Living Services

If and when you need a little extra help, we can assist you with the activities of daily living. These services are provided in the comfort of your apartment home without necessitating a need to move. Some of our services include: Personal laundry, daily housekeeping, medications, bathing, and dressing, transportation, hygiene, and nutrition.

Emergency Communication System

All apartments are connected to an emergency communication system that allows residents to reach our staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week, in case of emergency.

Transportation

We provide scheduled transportation for shopping trips, organized social and recreational activities, and medical and dental appointments.

Dining

The dining room is open, airy, and intimate yet comfortable and provides you with three nutritious meals daily.  Our Executive Chef’s at Silver Sky and at Deer Springs love to create fresh and flavorful meals with variety and nutrition and always with your health in mind. In fact, our menus are seasonal and reviewed by a Registered Dietician. Invited Guests and Family are always welcome to dine with you.

Our culinary team prepares over 200,000 meals annually and savors the opportunity to create your favorites! Theme dinners are offered throughout the year to celebrate special events such as Cinco De Mayo, St. Patrick’s Day, Thanksgiving, and the entire holiday season plus special luaus and so much more.

Veteran Information

Any wartime veteran with 90 days of active duty, one day beginning or ending during a period of war, is eligible to apply for the Aid & Attendance Improved Pension. A surviving spouse may also apply. The individual applying must qualify both medically and financially.

To qualify medically, a wartime veteran or surviving spouse must need the assistance of another person to perform daily tasks, such as eating, dressing or undressing, taking care of the needs of nature, etc. being blind or in a nursing home for mental or physical incapacity, or residing in an assisted living facility also qualifies.

Eligibility must be proven by filing the proper Veterans Application for Pension or Compensation. This application will require a copy of DD-214 or separation papers, medical evaluation from a physician, current medical issues, net worth limitations, and net income, along with out-of-pocket medical expenses.

To qualify financially, an applicant must have on average less than $80,000 in assets, excluding their home and vehicles.

You must still be income qualified as well as pass the other qualifiers to become a resident at Deer Springs Assisted Living.

FAQ’s

What’s Included in my Monthly Fees?

Monthly fees include all utilities (with the exception of phone and internet), breakfast, lunch and dinner. Also included are weekly housekeeping, bus transportation, and fun activity and wellness programs, concierge service, educational and cultural events and 24-hour staffing.

Do You Accept Veterans?

Yes we do.

How is behind Silver Sky? Are the communities stable places to live?               Yes, they are stable communities.

How is the food?

The food is great. If you’d like, stop by some time and try it out.

Is living at a Silver Sky Community fun?

Our residents think so. We have a slate of fun things to do and keep you active.

What’s the staff like at your communities?

We invite you to schedule an appointment to meet everyone.

Do you have two bedroom apartments?

Yes we do.

Nevada-Senior-Guide McKnight Senior Village – Las Vegas

http://www.pinnacleams.com/McKnightII/

McKnight Senior Village

Single Story 1 Bedroom Cottages From $508 Per Month!651 McKnight Street(702) 380-0666Directions:
From US 95, exit Eastern north to Bonanza. Go east on Bonanza to McKnight Street, turn left. We will be on your left.571 North 30th Street(702) 383-8114Directions: From US 95, exit Eastern north to Bonanza. Go east on Bonanza to North 30 Street, turn right on 30th. Sunrise will be on your right.Features:
  • Fully gated community
  • Gas grills/gazebo
  • Laundry facilities
  • Refrigerator/dishwasher
  • Ceiling fans/large pantry
  • Spacious walk -in closet
  • Washer/Dryer hook-ups
  • Berber carpet
  • Planned activities
  • Transportation to casino and grocer

McKnight Senior is an affordable luxurious apartment community designed specifically for independent adults! Located in Las Vegas, Nevada, McKnight Senior goes the extra mile offering a wide range of services and programs to help you stay involved and active. Our Resident Activity Coordinator reassures that you will be welcomed into the community and connected to the services you need. McKnight offers everything from exercise and water aerobics programs to continuing education, social activities and free scheduled transportation. Residents can also enjoy large patios, bingo and poker night, European cabinetry and walk-in closets. Our ideal location in Las Vegas puts you minutes from fine dining and multiple shopping centers. You’ll also have easy access to the strip and the Las Vegas Expressway.

Lease today at McKnight Senior apartments!

Advertise

August 10, 2011 by · Comments Off on Advertise
Filed under:  

Advertise in the Print Publication:

Click here to download the Media Kit:  NVSG Media Kit

media-kit-1

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!