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aging population | Nevada Senior Guide

Five Coolest Senior Care Tech Unveiled at CES 2014

January 30, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
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The Innovation Series is Brought to you by Care Innovations, a joint venture between Intel Corporation and GE, committed to creating technology-based solutions that give people confidence to live independently, wherever they are. With GE’s expertise in healthcare and Intel’s expertise in technology – we’re innovating to change the way care and solutions are delivered.

Tech companies from all over the world gathered at the 2014 CES tech convention last week to showcase a plethora of innovative technologies for various industries, with senior living and care having a major presence with a host of rising solutions.

One of the conference tracks—Silvers Summit—was even dedicated to products and services specifically designed to keep older adults engaged, entertained, connected and healthy.

The top technologies catering toward senior care included those that boost social connectivity, track vitals and streamline health data information among physicians and other care providers.

From personal monitoring devices to a “smart” pillbox, here are the top five technologies aimed at the aging population at this year’s CES.

…continue reading here:  http://seniorhousingnews.com/2014/01/13/five-coolest-senior-care-tech-unveiled-ces-2014/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=five-coolest-senior-care-tech-unveiled-ces-2014&utm_reader=feedly

National Report: Oral Health of Older Americans In A ‘State of Decay’

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Oral Health America Launches First-of-its-Kind Website to Connect Older Adults to Affordable Dental Care and Resources

The oral health of older Americans is in a state of decay, according to a new national report released today by Oral Health America (OHA).  A State of Decay, a state-by-state analysis of oral healthcare delivery and public health factors impacting the oral health of older adults, reveals more than half of the country received a “fair” or “poor” assessment when it comes to minimal standards affecting dental care access for older adults. Florida and Arizona, areas with large older adult populations, rank in the bottom five states due to a shortage of oral health coverage, a strained dental health work force, and deficiencies in prevention programs.

“While we are seeing improvements in certain areas of older adult dental care, there is still a lack of progress in advancing the oral health of such a vulnerable population,” said Dr. Ira Lamster, Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, ColumbiaUniversity, Mailman School of Public Health. “Older adults face significant health challenges if their oral health is poor, and there is no coordinated program to help fund necessary services.”

A State of Decay gave a rating of “fair,” “poor,” “good,” or “excellent” based on state level data analyzing five variables impacting older adult oral health: adult Medicaid dental benefits, inclusion of older adult strategies in state oral health plans, edentulism (loss of teeth), dental health professional shortage areas, and community water fluoridation.

The final evaluations in the report for each state are mixed, with several states performing well in some variables, but still in need of improvement in other important areas. The top findings of this report that require scrutiny and action are:

  • Persistent lack of oral health coverage across much of the nation. Forty-two percent of states (21 states) provide either no dental benefits or provide only emergency coverage  through adult Medicaid Dental Benefits.
  • Strained dental health work force. Thirty-one states (62 percent) have high rates of Dental Health Provider Shortage Areas (HPSAs), meeting only 40 percent or less of dental provider needs.
  • Tooth loss remains a signal of suboptimal oral health. Eight states had strikingly high rates of edentulism, with West Virginia notably having an adult population that is 33.8 percent edentate. Photo – PRN Photo Desk, photodesk@prnewswire.com
  • Deficiencies in preventive programs. Thirteen states (26 percent) have upwards of 60 percent of their residents living in communities without water fluoridation (CWF), despite recognition for 68 years that this public health measure markedly reduces dental caries. Hawaii (89.2 percent) and New Jersey (86.5 percent) represent the highest rates of citizens unprotected by fluoridation, an unnecessary public peril.

Daily, 10,000 Americans retire and only 2 percent do so with a dental benefit plan. The State of Decay analysis provides a tool for states to use in addressing shortfalls in oral health status, dental professional access sites, dental benefits for low-income adults, and population-based prevention, all of which affect the oral health of older adults, the fastest growing segment of the American population.

To help older adults and their caregivers address oral health needs and overcome many of the barriers to accessing affordable dental care, OHA launched toothwisdom.org. The website is a first-of-its-kind online tool that connects older adults to dental care and educates on the importance of maintaining oral health with age. The American Dental Hygienists’ Association (ADHA) and Special Care Dentistry Association (SCDA) supported OHA and the launch of the website by encouraging their members to provide meaningful articles for the toothwisdom.org.

“Dental Hygienists have the opportunity to assist older Americans with the oral health challenges they may face as they age,”” said Ann Battrell, Executive Director, American Dental Hygienists’ Association. “We’re all committed to sharing the message that oral health matters and changing the common misperception that with age comes a decline in oral health.”

Few websites focus on oral and systemic health topics, and even fewer provide resources for older adult oral health. Toothwisdom.org offers oral care resources by state – including direct links to dental care, caregiving support, financial tools, social services, and transportation. It also shares the latest news and reliable health information from dental experts across the country on relevant oral health issues, the importance of continuing prevention with age, and the impact of oral health on overall health.

“My dental procedures have been very costly and I had to contact a social worker to help me understand my bills. Dental care should be more available and affordable because we know poor dental care affects overall health, which is particularly important for seniors,” said senior Patricia Cosgrove, a client of The Carter Burden Center for the Aging, Inc.  “Toothwisdom.org can help me find a community health center so I can finally get an affordable check-up and stay up-to-date on oral health information.”

A State of Decay and toothwisdom.org are part of Oral Health America’s Wisdom Tooth Project™, an initiative designed to meet the oral health challenges of a burgeoning population of older adults with special needs, chronic disease complications, and a growing inability to access and pay for dental services.

Links to the 2003 and 2013 editions of A State of Decay can be viewed on toothwisdom.org.

About OHA’s Wisdom Tooth Project
For 55 years, Oral Health America has been the leading national non-profit dedicated to improving the oral health and well-being of Americans throughout the entire spectrum of life. Over the decades, the organization has evolved and adapted to the dynamic nature of our country’s demographics and specific health needs. The Wisdom Tooth Project was born in 2010 due to the current and future implications of an aging population and the need for oral health resources for them mean that we must take meaningful action now.

About Oral Health America
OHA is a national, non-profit association dedicated to changing lives by connecting communities with resources to increase access to oral health care, education, and advocacy for all Americans, especially those most vulnerable. For more information about Oral Health America, please visit www.oralhealthamerica.org.

Study by Harvard Medical School Researchers Examines Senior Living’s Role in Changing Health Care System

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Individuals in senior living communities require an array of health and supportive services to maintain an optimum quality of life. Often, these older adults receive fragmented care through multiple providers and payers, resulting in unnecessary health care expenditures and lower quality-of-care. To address these challenges, Brookdale is partnering with researchers at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and other senior living industry peers to establish the Assisted Living Sector Healthcare Policy Research Fund.

“This support allows us to examine what role senior living providers have in the new models of care that have emerged under health care reform,” says David Grabowski, PhD, professor of health care policy at HMS, who is leading this research study.

Grabowski and his team will examine whether providing more comprehensive, coordinated services in the senior living sector reduces the need for Medicare-paid services and Medicaid-financed nursing home services.

According to Will Clark, Brookdale’s senior vice president of strategy and brand and a member of the HMS Health Care Policy Advisory Council, society’s ability to meet the needs of an aging population is an important political, economic, clinical, and social imperative.

“Harvard’s reputation for tackling some of health care’s biggest challenges and generating meaningful insights that shape our nation’s policy is unparalleled. We are confident Dr. Grabowski and his colleagues’ research will be influential in determining the appropriate role senior living can and should play in our evolving health care system,” Clark said.

Brookdale’s goals for this effort are to create awareness for the potential senior living has to positively impact the health, well-being and overall cost of care for seniors; to identify barriers to creating more integration among senior living and the health care system; influence policy; and identify innovative models that integrate senior living with our health care system.

The initiative is funded through a cumulative contribution of $150,000 from Brookdale and eight other senior living providers — Atria Senior Living, Elmcroft Senior Living, Emeritus Senior Living, Erickson Living, HCP, Inc., Health Care REIT, Inc., Sunrise Senior Living, and Ventas, Inc. Together, these organizations hope to begin a dialogue among health care providers, policy makers, regulators, and consumers on the value of senior living and its role in creating an integrated, outcomes-driven health care system.

The study will occur in two phases. The first phase will consist of analyzing the role of assisted living in new payment-delivery models and presenting a conceptual model of how an integrated model might work, as well as the opportunities and challenges associated with such an approach. Building on the results of the first phase, the second phase of the project will consist of primary data work and potentially the development of a pilot program.

For additional information about the study, contact David Cameron, HarvardMedicalSchool’s director of science communications, at 617-432-0441 or david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu.

For more information about Brookdale, visit www.brookdale.com.

Brookdale Senior Living Inc. is a leading owner and operator of senior living communities throughout the United States.  The Company is committed to providing senior living solutions within properties that are designed, purpose-built and operated with the highest-quality service, care and living accommodations for residents.  Currently, Brookdale operates independent living, assisted living, and dementia-care communities and continuing care retirement centers, with more than 650 communities in 36 states and the ability to serve approximately 67,000 residents.  Through its Innovative Senior Care program, the Company also offers a range of outpatient therapy, home health, personalized living and hospice services. For more information, visit http://www.brookdale.com.

Contact: Andrea Turner, 615-564-6829, aturner2@brookdaleliving.com

Senior Citizens to Benefit From Care – Home Adult Education by Sarah Maple

September 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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A newly announced scheme from the government will improve the quality of life for residents of 21,000 care homes in an effort to bring adult education to senior citizens. According to trainingjournal.com, the project has been commissioned by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills and is in the hands of the National Institute of Adult Continuing Education.

The National Institute of Adult Continuing Education (NIACE) is a non-governmental charity with a number of high profile members, including the BBC, universities, local authorities and the Ministry of Defence. The primary aim of the institute is to ‘encourage all adults to continue in learning of all kinds,’ and set to achieve this by setting up events, support networks, publishing texts, and hosting training courses.

Of course, the idea of adult education for senior citizens is not new. China has been at the forefront of lifelong learning since the establishment of its Agricultural Broadcast and Television School. Before switching over to a primarily ICT-led scheme, the distance learning institution used radio, TV, video, and audio cassette, to ensure those in rural areas had access to learning materials. The scheme is now an integral provider for older learners in an aging society.

The fresh enthusiasm for senior citizen education in the UK is in part due to recent examples of the positive affect it has had when implemented. Tansley House Care Home in Derbyshire has recently won 2009’s NIACE Adult Learners Week after starting an education scheme – resulting with an increase in the levels of health and happiness of the residents.

The next step in the scheme is for NIACE to conduct a report into the best models of learning and the extent by which such schemes improve the lives of care home residents. The scheme also has positive benefits for distance learning and the promotion of continuing education for your whole life – which is a great thing at a time when new learning technologies, open content and proposed broadband for everyone is making education even more accessible.

Sarah Maple is writing for Kaplan distance learning about degree courses online and education in general.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sarah_Maple

ALZHEIMER’S SET TO MOVE FROM THE MOST DAUNTING GLOBAL HEALTH CRISIS TO THE 21ST CENTURY’S FISCAL NIGHTMARE

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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ALZHEIMER’S SET TO MOVE FROM THE MOST DAUNTING GLOBAL HEALTH CRISIS TO THE 21ST CENTURY’S FISCAL NIGHTMARE

OECD and the Global Coalition on Aging Convene at Harris Manchester College, Oxford University to Shape New Approaches for Solutions

Oxford, UK (26 June 2013) – The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Harris Manchester College, Oxford University and Global Coalition on Aging (GCOA) concluded on Friday 21 June, an “Expert Consultation on Unlocking Global Collaboration to Accelerate Innovation for Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia.”  Aimed at providing input to the OECD action agenda for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, the Consultation brought together the highest level of global experts across health, economics, public policy, business, biotechnology and beyond.

Its timing is aligned with UK Prime Minister David Cameron’s recent recognition that dementia is fast becoming the biggest pressure on care systems around the world.  “That’s why we’re using our G8 to bring together health ministers, clinical researchers and healthcare companies,” he said.  “If the brightest minds are working together on this then we’ve got a greater chance of improving treatments and finding scientific breakthroughs.  I’ve said before that we need an all-out fight-back against dementia that cuts across society. Now we need to cut across borders and spearhead an international approach that could really make a difference.”

The objectives of the Consultation included:

  • Providing a space for country experts, policy makers, and scientific, medical and academic experts to share views on the main scientific, technological and policy challenges Alzheimer’s and dementia raise in the context of creating a pathway for aging populations to be sources of economic growth in the 21st century; and
  • Creating an opportunity for multidisciplinary exchange on a collective action plan that maps the way forward.

“The impact of Alzheimer’s and dementia on individuals, families, health systems and national economies as populations age will become truly crippling, and no one nation or research organization can solve this global epidemic alone.” said Michael Hodin, Executive Director of GCOA.  “It requires global understanding, sharing and collaboration, and this Consultation was a critical step in our ongoing fight against Alzheimer’s – a fight we must win if we are truly to unlock our aging populations as new sources of economic growth.”

Alzheimer’s afflicts one in eight over 65 and one-half of all those over 85, and the economic, social and personal costs will only increase with age-related demographic change.  In 2010, the global cost of Alzheimer’s and dementias equalled 1 percent of global gross domestic product (GDP), or $604 billion.  The prevalence and cost, combined with the stigma, which prevents recognition of symptoms and subsequent treatments, signal an urgent call to action.

“Traditional strategies around healthcare services and investments in research are not enough to address the growing worldwide onslaught of Alzheimer’s and dementias,” said Marc Wortmann, Executive Director of Alzheimer’s Disease International.

“The global scale of the pending healthcare-economic crisis mandates a bold forward looking action plan to harmonize a multi-nation attack on the problem,” noted  Zaven Khachaturian, recognized at the meeting as the ‘Chief Architect’ of Alzheimer & Brain Aging research in the United States, now the President of the Campaign to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease by 2020. He indicated the urgent need for a “multinational strategic goal for reducing the prevalence of Alzheimer’s and other chronic brain disorders by 50 percent within a decade” – thus urging the OECD to “identify the framework conditions to accelerate multi-national collaborative R & D.”

George Vradenburg, Chairman of USAgainstAlzheimer’s and convener of the Global CEO Initiative on Alzheimer’s, called for new attention, resources, commitment and collaboration to defeat Alzheimer’s disease. In his keynote speech, coined “The Oxford Accord,” he called for G8 leadership equivalent to the G8 Summit that created the HIV/AIDS Global Fund.

Consultation experts presented their views for proactive public policy and an OECD role in supporting actions to : promote broad-based partnerships; identify incentives, frameworks and infrastructures for enhanced international data sharing; leverage big data as strategies to advance our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease, improve care, promote global exchange of good practice and move toward cure and even prevention.

The Consultation was borne out of the September 2012 OECD workshop, “Anticipating the Special Needs of the 21st Century Silver Economy: From Smart Technologies to Services Innovation,” co-hosted by the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, OECD and Waseda University, with the support of the Japanese government.  The workshop concluded that innovation was needed to meet the challenges and opportunities of global demographic change and mitigate the health, social and economic impacts of aging.

The Consultation was held on 20-21 June, 2013 at The Harris Manchester College (HMC), Oxford University in collaboration with the OECD.

For more information see OECD’s website: oe.cd/innovating-against-alzheimers.

ABOUT THE GLOBAL COALITION ON AGING

The Global Coalition on Aging (GCOA) aims to reshape how global leaders approach and prepare for the 21st century’s profound shift in population aging. GCOA uniquely brings together global corporations across industry sectors with common strategic interests in aging populations, a comprehensive and systemic understanding of aging, and an optimistic view of its impact. Through research, public policy analysis, advocacy and communication, GCOA is advancing innovative solutions and working to ensure global aging is a path for fiscally sustainable economic growth, social value creation and wealth enhancement. For more information, visitwww.globalcoalitiononaging.com.

Fall Prevention Week!

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Fall Prevention Week Is Rapidly Approaching! “Don’t Fall Down! Fall Prevention 101 for Older Adults” Now Available as E-Book

The third week in September has been nationally recognized as “Fall Prevention Week” and we need your help to increase awareness of the growing public health concern of falls among our aging population!

Falls are the leading cause of accidental death and non-fatal injury for people over the age of 65. The greying of America is causing major concern among government agencies due to the financial and emotional costs to individuals, their families and society. In 2000, the average cost of a fall was over $28,000 (CDC, 2006). The good news is that up to 50% of falls can be prevented through increased awareness and behavior change.

“Don’t Fall Down! Fall Prevention 101 for Older Adults” explains situations that increase the risk of a fall and how a person can reduce that risk. Some factors can be changed and others must be accepted. The first step a person can do to prevent falls is become aware of things that contribute to instability and then make the necessary change when possible.

Balance is a complicated messenger system and this 70-page book offers scientifically-researched concepts in an easy to understand manner. The reader will gain a better understanding of what may be causing loss of balance, how to reduce the risk of a fall and where to go for help.

The index includes a “Help, I’ve Fallen and I CAN Get Up” demonstration, Fall Risk Medications List, Home Safety Checklist and a Senior Resource Directory.
Written in large print, this is a must read for older adults, loved ones, family members, caregivers, staff members, program planners, activity directors, nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, and doctors.

Knowledge is empowering. This easy to read book encourages a person to take responsibility his/her well-being in order to remain independent.

To request a review copy of this e-book, or to arrange an interview with the author, please contact:

Name: Kelly Ward, aka, “The Fall Prevention Lady”
E-mail: wardkelly@mac.com
Website: http://www.thefallpreventionlady.com
Tel: 916-821-5715

Cataract Rates are on the Rise in Americans Age 40 and Older

August 21, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Cataract Rates are on the Rise in Americans Age 40 and Older

American Academy of Ophthalmology Offers Tips for Cataract Detection and Treatment

SAN FRANCISCO – August 16, 2012 – The incidence of cataracts in the U.S. has risen 19 percent since 2000, impacting nearly 25 million Americans age 40 and older.[i] In fact, more than half of all Americans will develop cataracts by age 80, according to Prevent Blindness America’s Vision Problems in the U.S. report. In response, the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart program is educating the public about cataract risk factors, detection and treatment options during Cataract Awareness Month.

Cataract is a clouding of the eye’s lens, which can make it more difficult to focus light onto the eye’s retina – the light-sensitive tissue that sends images to the brain. Cataracts, a natural part of aging, are the most common cause of vision loss in the U.S. They typically develop slowly, so symptoms may not be immediately apparent. Over time, cataracts can cause vision to become blurry, cloudy, dull, or dim, and can interfere with daily activities.

The good news is that cataracts are almost always treatable with cataract surgery. During cataract surgery, an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor with the training and certification to provide the full range of eye care and surgery – removes the eye’s cloudy natural lens and replaces it with a clear artificial lens implant called an intraocular lens (IOL). Cataract surgery is often performed as an outpatient procedure and does not require an overnight hospital stay. Cataract surgery is one of the safest types of surgery, and 90 percent of patients who have cataract surgery enjoy better vision afterward.[ii]

“If you notice vision changes, cataracts could be to blame and you might need more than a new pair of glasses,” said David F. Chang, M.D., a clinical correspondent for the American Academy of Ophthalmology and a clinical professor at the University of California, San Francisco. “If you do have a cataract, you should be reassured that it is a normal aging change and not an eye disease. Cataract surgery usually carries an excellent prognosis, and you should talk to your ophthalmologist about whether surgery should be done to restore your eyesight.”

As the aging population grows, it is increasingly important for seniors and their caregivers to understand cataract risks, symptoms, prevention, and treatment options. The American Academy of ophthalmology recommends the following tips to maintain healthy vision:
• Get a baseline exam by age 40. All adults should get a baseline eye exam by age 40 when early signs of eye disease and vision changes may start to occur. During this visit, your ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.) will advise you on how often to have follow-up exams.
• After age 65, schedule regular eye exams. Anyone age 65 and older should visit an ophthalmologist regularly to detect eye diseases and conditions like cataract early, and to monitor any vision loss. Seniors age 65 and older may qualify for an eye exam and up to 1 year of care at no out of pocket cost through EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of American Academy of Ophthalmology. See if you qualify at www.eyecareamerica.org.
• Know your risk factors for cataract. Diabetes, smoking, extensive UV exposure, serious eye injuries, steroid use, and a family history of cataract can increase your risk for developing a cataract.
• Reduce your risks to prevent or delay the onset of cataracts. Use sunglasses and hats to protect your eyes from UV damage. Don’t smoke. If you have diabetes, control your blood sugar carefully through diet, exercise and medications if needed.
• Talk to your ophthalmologist about your treatment options. Vision loss from cataracts can interfere with daily activities. Talk to your ophthalmologist about whether cataract surgery is right for you. When preparing for surgery, give your doctor your complete medical and eye health history, including a list of medications that you have taken. Some medications can cause the iris to move out of its normal position and may require your ophthalmologist to adjust his or her surgical technique.

For more information on cataract symptoms, risk factors, surgery, and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org.

About EyeSmart
The American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

Assisted Living and Retirement Communities: Great Food Equals Happy Residents (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
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Meal times are bar none the most important activity of the day for seniors living in retirement and assisted living communities. Eating is an immensely enjoyable activity when you’re young (as evidenced by our 60% overweight population) and for the elderly, and is often the only enjoyable activity of the day. And while fattening home cooked dishes will always be on menus – just watch the uprising if they took away chicken fried steak from anywhere south of the Mason-Dixon line – communities should still be striving for quality and freshness.

 

  1. Our seniors spent their whole lives deciding when and what they wanted to eat. Isn’t it only fair that they get to do that now? While many communities have limited meal times – and this is not necessarily bad, it’s certainly better to have an all day dining program in place. When is the last time someone told you that lunch was served at 11AM sharp? Our seniors aren’t children and they’re paying a lot of coin to live in these places. Communities should attempt to be as flexible as possible in their scheduling to be respectful of the decision-making ability of these folks, even if they come in at the same time. Every. Single. Day.
  2. It’s just as important to give seniors the choice of where to sit. Senior communities can be like high school with folks moving in and out of social circles. Wouldn’t you get sick of sitting next to the same person every day? What if you didn’t like them? Assigned seating should be reserved only for residents with very high care needs who need extra attention.
  3. Knowledgeable Food & Beverage Director. All the better if the chef is a nutritionist (and in some states it’s the law). Even if no need exists now, he or she should be able to tell you what they can and can not do in the event diets change for health reasons. Diabetes, chewing problems and diverticulitis, among many others – are fairly common ailments among an aging population and something to think about when considering a move.
  4. Quality and Quantity. Look to see how extensive the menu is. Residents should be given at least three options at every meal, one hearty, one healthy, and one light. Even home style dishes should be made with fresh ingredients and a minimum of salt, and served with fruits and vegetables that will be pleasing to any palate.
  5. Cleanliness and Atmosphere. Keeping the kitchen and dining room clean are incredibly important to help prevent the spread of illness within a more frail population prone to picking up every little bug. Check food safety inspections and be sure to walk all the way into the dining room (and in the kitchen if they allow it) to make sure staff looks clean and crisp, salt and pepper shakers free of any visible debris, table surfaces sanitized, and glasses and silverware spotless.
  6. Don’t forget to try the food. While every community claims to have the best around, make sure you ask to try it for yourself. Your taste buds don’t lie and it will give you a much better idea of what the community is really like as a whole.

 

Ms. Harrison has consulted with over 10 different distressed and startup senior living properties across the nation. Seniors Best Interests is a free-to-family service that advocates on behalf of seniors and their families when they begin searching for senior living communities.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ginger_Harrison

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Senior Living Services: Caring for the Elderly and Easing the Pressure Off the Sandwich Generation (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
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Today, this rapidly expanding population is probably the largest it has ever been. Traditionally, women are a disproportionately large percentage of the caregivers. According, to “The Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Takes On Alzheimer’s,” women account for 65% of the Alzheimer’s population and up to three-fifths of Alzheimer patient caregivers.

The term “sandwich generation” was coined by Dorothy Miller in 1981 and refers to the group of adults whose dependents include both their own children and their aging parents.

Frequently adults, especially women, are caring for their elderly parents while simultaneously raising tweens and teenagers. Pulled in two opposite directions, it may often seem overwhelming and as though both parents and children are not getting what they need. Thus, many caregivers eventually seek out either a home health aide or senior care facility as their loved ones’ needs become more than they are equipped to handle.

Home health agencies partner an aide with an elderly patient. Home healthcare is ideal for clients who want to keep either themselves or their loved ones at home with family. Depending on a patient’s needs, the aide may be required to work either during the day or night, or live with the client for 5-6 days at a time. These aides may offer both companionship as well as custodial and medical care, helping with personal hygiene, daily medications, meals, etc. In home healthcare is minimally disruptive to a patient’s routine, allowing him or her to remain in an environment in which she is familiar. This service allows the elderly to either maintain their own residences or continue living with their families, which may actually preserve their mental and emotional health. Dementia patients, for example, benefit from a consistent environment as it helps stave off the disease’s progression. Medicare generally only pays for a small portion of home healthcare; the rest of the cost is covered by private insurance and funds.

Senior assisted living facilities allow residents to maintain some independence within a controlled environment. Seniors may bring their own furniture and other mementos from home. Generally these residences consist of little apartments that are outfitted with kitchenettes, an environment that enables residents to host family and friends in a more private setting. Main meals are generally served at set times in a large dining area and more individual care is available to those who need it. Certain senior assisted living facilities are authorized to dispense medication or reminders to take medication.

Assisted living centers also offer outings and other day trips for seniors who are able to participate. Senior assisted living is a compromise between a nursing home, which has more comprehensive medical care, and living completely autonomously. Although assisted living is normally paid from private funds and assets, certain long term insurance policies will cover licensed assisted living facilities. A few states offer Medicaid funds and waivers to help foot the bill. Assisted living is regulated by the state, so policies and practices vary.

Nursing homes offer the most extensive care, providing full custodial and medical care. For the elderly who require consistent, round the clock medical attention, this choice can be a viable option. Nursing homes provide occupational and physical therapy. Some nursing homes also offer physical rehabilitation programs, which are required after a major procedures, such as hip surgery. For sufferers of advanced dementia, nursing homes provide the round-the-clock care and attention they require.

Although nursing homes cost more due to the level of care they provide, they are also more frequently covered by Medicaid and Medicare. Some nursing home facilities have the air of a hospital and are run like one. Others try to be less austere and more homey and offer many of the same amenities as assisted living facilities.

Choosing the right solution to meet the needs of the elderly is a laborious process that requires individual case-by-case assessment. At home care, assisted living centers, and nursing homes all have their strengths and weaknesses. Each serves a dual purpose: to care for an aging population and ease the burden for familial caretakers. These services provide patients and their families with peace of mind.

www.KennethRozenberg.com operates the Centers for Specialty Care Group, a collection of prominent healthcare organizations offering short- and long-term care, as well as home health services. Learn more at www.KennethRozenberg.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mark_Etinger

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Nevada-Senior-Guide Referral Directory – Northern Nevada

Better Business Bureau of Northern Nevada

4834 Sparks Blvd. Ste. 102, Sparks, NV 89436

(775) 322-0657, www.reno.bbb.org

BBB helps consumers find business & charities                 they can trust. Call for additional help.

 

Nevada Rural Housing

Weatherization Assistance Program,

Section 8 Info. Call for hours and directions.

775-887-1795, Carson City

 

Parkinson’s of Nevada – Veterans Hospital

975 Kirman Ave., Reno, NV 89502

1-775-328-1715 OR

1-888-838-6256 x 1715

Referrals, Support group info, Counselling,                       Education programs

 

Veteran Affairs of NV

1-800-827-1000 – Reno

1-800-273-8255 Opt 1 Hotline

Suicide Prevention, Military. www.Va.gov

Nevada-Senior-Guide Advocacy Directory – Northern Nevada

AARP Nevada State Office / Contact Center

5820 S. Eastern Ave., Ste. 190, LV, NV 89119

Toll Free: (866) 389-5652

www.aarp.org/nv, email: NVAARP@aarp.org

State and national legislative, advocacy,

regulatory and legal advocacy, 1-866-330-0753

 

Advocate for Elders, DAS (Aging & Disability)

445 Apple Street, Ste. 104, Reno, NV 89502

(775) 687-0800

www.nevadacareconnection.org

Special Programs, Referral Service, Suicide                       Prevention, Counseling Health Issues,

Disability Service, Elder Abuse

 

Elder Protective Services (EPS), DAS,

Aging & Disability Services Agency

Reno Regional Office (775) 687-0800

Investigates allegations of abuse, neglect, self

neglect, isolation exploitation for persons

60 & older, CHIP, Grants, Referrals

 

Nevada Attorney General

5420 Kietz Ke Lane, Ste 202, Reno, NV 89703

Reno: (775) 688-1818

Carson City: Bureau of Consumer Protection:                   (775) 684-1100 Main, Constituent – Joyce

Medical alert info: (800) 500-1556 hot line

 

Nevada Disability Advocacy and Law Center

1875 Plumas St. Ste. 1, Reno, NV 89509

(775) 333-7878, www.ndalc.org

Toll Free: (800) 992-5715. Legal advice, referrals

 

Nevada Aging & Disability Services Agency

Advocate for Elders – Reno

445 Apple Street, #104, Reno, NV 89502

(775) 687-0800, www.nvaging.net

Elder protection, COPE Program

Nevada Elder Rights Attorney

445 Apple Street, #104, Reno, NV 89502

(775) 687-0800. Resources, CBC services,
CHIP program, Suicide Prevention

State Health Insurance Assistance Program                        (SHIP) DAS

1820 E. Sahara Ave., Ste 205, LV, NV 89104

(702) 486-3478, 1-877-385-2345 Medicare
Counseling, Reno health care programs

 

 

Washoe County Public Guardian Office

(775) 674-8800, Guardian services for seniors                     that are incapacitated

Nevada-Senior-Guide Referral Service Directory – Southern Nevada

Better Business Bureau

6040 S. Jones Blvd., Las Vegas, NV 89118

(702) 320-4500, www.bbb.org

Referral Service, Complaint processing, 8-4pm

 

Friends of Parkinson’s Inc.

2400 N. Teneya Way, LV, NV 89128

702-381-4141, www.friendsofparkinsons.org

Email: info@ www.friendsofparkinsons.org

Mission to improve quality of life for those                          affected by parkinson’s through services,                     advocacy, and education

 

Nevada Disability Advocacy & Law Center

2820 W. Charleston Blvd., S-11, LV, NV 89102

702-257-8150

Call for information & assistance for
rehabilitation programs and employment,                              Major Complaints

 

Nevada SMP – SR Medicare Patrol

(SR Medical Patrol)

1820 E. Sahara Ave., Ste. 205, LV, NV 89104

702-486-3403 or 1-888-838-7305

http://ag.state.nv.us/senior/protection.htm

Medicare fraud and abuse prevention project

 

United States Senator-Dean Heller

8930 W. Sunset Rd. Ste. 230, LV, NV 89148                           (702) 388-6605, www.heller.senate.gov

 

United States Senator-Harry Reid

333 S. Las Vegas Blvd., #8016, LV, NV 89101

(702) 388-5020

Interpreter Service: Spanish, referral

 

United Way of So. Nevada

5830 W. Flamingo Rd, LV, NV 89103

(702) 734-2273, www.uwsn.org.

Fundraising needs. M-Th 8am-6pm, Closed Fri.

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  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!