Part Four: Current and Future Anti-Aging Treatments

May 1, 2016 by · Comments Off on Part Four: Current and Future Anti-Aging Treatments
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As previously noted, many anti-oxidants are essential nutrients. Natural anti-oxidants, like vitamin C and E, work synergistically. Anti-oxidants may be more effective if obtained from a diet rich in fruits and vegetables. Nutritionists recommend eating 6 or more daily servings of anti-oxidant rich fruits and vegetables. Everyone agrees the use of antioxidant supplements for anti-aging may be helpful, but there is no agreement on what the most effective supplement dosages should be.

Anti-aging medicine acknowledges that stress of all kinds causes aging but has not yet developed individualized treatment for this. There are countless sources of internal and external stress and individual stress levels vary greatly. One overlooked cause of internal stress is improper hydration. Water is essential in for the correct operation of many internal functions. Too little or too much water causes age producing stress. When one is old (80+) thirst perception declines and dehydration can easily set in. Other overlooked sources of stress are antioxidants themselves. High doses (or doses above certain yet unspecified amounts) of supplemental anti-oxidants are a known cause of stress.

To be helpful, antioxidant supplements must prevent other types of stress more than the stress they themselves create. Knowing the correct supplement dosages that can do this is an essential part of anti-aging treatment. A healthy young person in his twenties, who is properly nourished, will have less internal stress that an older individual in his sixties. For a young individual, lower amounts of antioxidants may be safer than higher amounts. A older person, whose many internal homeostatic mechanisms are less able to deal with internal stress, may benefit more from higher amounts of antioxidants. Theoretically an anti-oxidant based course of anti-ageing treatment will slow the rate at which cellular damage occurs. Cells will become “sick” more slowly. Over time, as fewer sick cells are replaced at a slower rate, the number of cells retaining longer telomere chains will be higher. You can then reasonably expect this to result in an increase in life expectancy. For now the recommended but imprecise approach to decrease the rate at which cellular damage occurs is to increase your per day intake of anti-oxidant rich fruits and vegetables, to slightly increase your intake of antioxidants, and to take various vitamins and small amounts of anti-aging supplements on a daily basis. One study has shown taking a good multivitamin supplement is associated with longer telomere length.

Ideally anti-aging treatment should to be fine tuned for each individual. The key here would be to measure and minimize the cumulative effects of different kinds of stress on an individual basis. Easily measurable practical bio-markers for various types of stress do not yet exist or are not being used. When they are used it will be easy to customize individual antioxidant dosages so that everyone have “optimum” levels throughout their life. “Optimum” levels would maintain a safe reserve of protective antioxidants in the body.

Next I will briefly discuss the most popular nutrients associated with anti-aging. The most popular of the anti-oxidants, vitamins, and nutrients often associated with good health and anti-aging include: beta-carotene (vitamin A), vitamin C, vitamin E, various Flavonoids,Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, Co-enzyme Q10, Lycopene, Selenium.

There are dozens of supplements that are known to effectively treat specific symptoms of old age. A few of the better known supplements include: DMAE, Acetyl-l-carnitine, L-carnosine, Alpha Lipoic Acid, DHEA, L-arginine, and melatonin

Good food contains some of the anti-oxidants previously mentioned. A few other popular foods associated with anti-aging include: Green Tea, turmeric, and red wine.

All of the above have unique biological properties and, in my opinion, are “good” for you if taken in small or moderate amounts. Some (ex. vitamin C) may also be “good” for you in larger amounts. Various studies on each of these may conflict with each other. You need to carefully research each substance on your own but researchers have already found several nutrients to be associated with longer than average telomere lengths. These include: Green Tea, Omega-3, Vitamins A, C, D, and E.

Vitamin E has been associated with telomere lengthening anti-aging properties.

Green tea contains many antioxidants, including vitamin C, E and flavenoids.Flavenoids form a large antioxidant class (including catechins and quercetin) that has many anticarcinogenic, antihypercholesterolemic, antibacterial, (helps prevent dental caries), and anti-inflammatory properties. The leaves of the tea plant are rich in polyphenols. The consumption of 3 cups or more of green tea daily has been associated with longer than average telomere length.

The Omega-3s are essential long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids that are anti-inflammatory and help prevent heart disease, stroke, memory loss, depression, arthritis, cataract, cancer. Omega-3s slow down the shortening of telomeres; i.e. they may protect against aging on a cellular level.

Vitamin C is an abundant internal water soluble antioxidant that protects cellular components against free-radical formation caused by pollution and cigarette smoke. Many studies have associated high vitamin C intakes with lower rates of cancer of the mouth, larynx and esophagus. Vitamin C has shown promise in treating premature aging and possibly aging itself.

Due to limitations on the number of links I can incorporate into this article I could not provide more reference links supporting the preceding paragraphs. If interested please email me at the email address shown at the end of this article and I will forward them to you.

The sooner you start some sort of anti-aging treatment the better but it is never too late to start. All real treatments will help you maintain a longer than average average telomere chain length.

The goal of the programmed death theory of aging is to address the root causes of aging. This goal includes attempts to slow or reverse the telomere shortening process. Two such treatments are: TA 65 and human genetic engineering.

TA 65 is a telomerase activating product produced and marketed by Sierra Sciences. The key ingredient in TA 65 is Astragalus, a plant extract known to have telomerase activation properties. The product may work but I do not recommend it for several reasons. TA 65 is too expensive for the average person. A number of expensive health spas incorporate TA 65 in their programs. Again these are financially beyond the reach of the average person. The marketing tactics of Sierra Sciences have been questioned by many and there are law suits pending against TA 65.

The big issue I have with TA 65 is one of scientific honesty. The company genetically engineered mice that allowed telomerase to be switched off and on at an early age. TA 65 was able to switch telomerase back on in these mice and allowed them to live normal lives. http://www.nature.com/news/2010/101128/full/news.2010.635.html

Using this to show how effective TA65 treatment is, is dishonest. This is not how telomerase normally works and there was no real extension of the lifespan beyond what it would have been without the genetic modification. In normal mice the effects of TA65 were temporary and little or no life extension was seen. http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2011/04/11/anti-aging-pill-new-study-on-ta-65-sparks-controversy.html

Human genetic engineering is the real answer to fighting and defeating aging. It can directly address the root causes of aging. Advances in this area (ex. CRISPR) allow DNA base pairs to be inserted or deleted at specific place in our DNA. This means the human genome can now be precisely edited as needed. The lifespan of old mice has been modestly increased using telomerase gene therapy. In humans gene modification therapy has frequently been used for various medical problems. On September 15, 2015, Elizabeth Parrish was the first human to undergo anti-aging gene therapy. Anti-aging treatments will rapidly advance as our knowledge of the specifics of the human genome grows.

Current general social-political attitudes seem to be favoring the further development of anti-aging research. There are no international recognized political programs to stop aging or extend life but since 2012 a few pro-immortality political parties have sprung up. Their aim is to support anti-aging and life extension research, and to help provide access to advances in these areas to everyone. Among the numerous organizations supporting anti-aging research, the SENS (Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence) organization has come up with an anti-aging research plan. They want to develop anti-aging therapies to repair most forms of cellular damage. SENS, is a charitable organization. Any anti-aging advances resulting from funding it provides will become readily available public knowledge. In addition to the normal scientific research there is the $1,000,00 Palo Alto Longevity Prize that is being offered to anyone who can come up with an effective anti-aging treatment.

As of 2015, all known anti-aging treatments are only partially effective. Depending on when one starts a comprehensive anti-aging program, one can probably extend one’s life by 10 to 25 years. Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health estimated that an anti-aging lifestyle can add 24.6 more productive years to one’s lifespan. Anti-aging knowledge increases at a rate of about 10 times every 10 years. This probably means that for many of us there is more than enough time to reap the anticipated benefits in anti-aging research. One day soon, aging, like many other diseases, will be cured. While we wait for those anti-aging technological singularities to occur the name of the game is to ensure we stay healthy long enough repeat their benefits.

As a former engineer I have a strong affinity to all sciences including biology.

My interests include following advances in the fields of anti-aging, health and nutrition. Rapid advances in these areas will vanquish the disease we call aging.
Through my articles and website I want to help you maintain your good health for the next 10 to 25 years. I believe this can be done by a daily program that includes moderate exercise, a healthy diet that includes vitamins and related supplements, and taking advantage of any advances in related research. My hope is that within the next 25 years or less, the fruits of anti-aging research will become available to everyone.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9239681

2 Easy Travel Tips for Long Trips With Elderly Seniors

January 20, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
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Are you planning on any traveling with your elderly parents this year – for holiday visits with long distance family members or perhaps just to have a fun trip out to see sights and enjoy lovely scenery? My senior mom and I just returned from a 7 hour drive to visit some of her great-grandkids. It was a lovely visit but we did come back with a few tips to share with fellow journey-ers.

I routinely keep 4-5 lap blankets of different weights in my car – for her and for my grandkids. That way, if the car is too cool for anyone, they can balance it out easily with a snuggly warm blanket. Then, if they get too hot, it’s easy to toss it off. And the different weights are especially helpful for my senior mom, as she can go from very cold to very warm much faster than normal. This allows her to easily swap blankets as her body temperature changes without having the heater or the cooler blast her in the face to try to accomplish the same thing.

She has always enjoyed car trips in the past, but the past couple of years they’ve been less pleasant. She has found that sitting too long bothers her back and her arthritis. On the trip out, we stopped every couple of hours to walk around, get a drink, use the restroom, etc. and that worked well. By the time we headed home, she was happy over the visit, exclaiming, “This was SUCH a nice time together,” yet aching more than her normal amount. She took some medicine before we left that helped a bit and also encouraged sleeping on the way. She didn’t feel up to…  (keep reading… http://eldercareabcblog.com/2-easy-travel-tips-for-long-trips-with-elderly-seniors/)

Staying Safe on the Road: Senior Driving Guide

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Learn the challenges that may keep older adults off the road and find tips for staying safe behind the wheel

According to a recent study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, drivers in their mid- to late-80s have lower overall crash rates than drivers in their early 20s and roughly half as many crashes as teenagers—making them among the safest drivers on the road.

However, fatal crash rates skyrocket for drivers ages 85 and older. In “The Guide to Driving Safety for Older Drivers” from MySilverAge.com, Jake Nelson, AAA director of traffic safety advocacy and research in Washington, D.C., says it’s important to understand what health factors can compromise safe driving. If senior drivers have ongoing limitations that could put them or their passengers at risk, they may want to reconsider their capacity to continue driving.

Older drivers should evaluate how the following factors affect their driving ability:

  • Vision. How well a driver can see accounts for about 90 percent of his or her ability to drive safely. Weak visual aptitude can be measured by an inability to read signs, street markings, or to see other cars and pedestrians in low-light conditions.
  • Mobility. Loss of strength, coordination and flexibility can make it challenging to control a vehicle. Mobility difficulties may also be signaled by pain and discomfort performing daily activities as well as arthritis in the neck and shoulders.
  • Behavior. Trouble remembering familiar routes, anxiety or confusion while driving, or problems distinguishing the gas from the brake pedal are causes for immediate concern.

For a complete list of driving safety tips, including information on driver improvement courses, new driving technologies and alternate modes of transportation, download the driving guide for seniors.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

Ways You Can Get a Senior Citizen Up and Active Again by Kristie Brown

August 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Expert Author Kristie Brown

Ask almost any senior citizen if they prefer to just sit around and take things easy, and they’re going to tell you “no way”. Mistakenly many of us equate an advanced age with lack of vitality and interest in the world around them, but as people are living longer, they’re retaining these characteristics well into their golden years. It’s possible you may know a senior who is somewhat limited in mobility or crippled up with arthritis, but you’ll find that if you suggest an activity, they’ll be more than willing to go with you. Here are some ideas for getting them up and active again:

1. If the person is lonely and enjoys company, you might be able to interest them in going to a local senior center or joining some type of club. Here they can find the companionship they seek, meet new friends, and enjoy activities with peers. In the beginning it may be difficult to get the person to go, because something new can be a challenge to anyone. Talk to the director of the center or club and find out when a good time to visit might be. Maybe there’s a time when the center isn’t very busy so that your senior wouldn’t be intimidated by a whole room full of strangers. You could invite them to go to dinner with you at a center potluck, or entice them with some of the activities you know they’d particularly enjoy. Once you get them involved, it’s a sure bet they’ll want to go back again and again.

2. Volunteering offers unique experiences for willing seniors. The different types of jobs abound, and your loved one will be sure to find something out there that he or she enjoys doing. Not only do these activities involve working as productive members of the community, but they can also come with perks, such as free dinners, small gifts, and service recognition awards. A senior who has been busy their entire lifetime doesn’t like to feel that they aren’t able to be an active part of the work community any longer. They can begin feeling depressed and worthless. Volunteering will demonstrate to them that they still have plenty to give and that their efforts are appreciated.

3. With the help of your senior, plan a get-together for others in the age group who live nearby in order to establish friendships. This is especially important when the person reaches an age where they are losing friends and need to find other people to share their world. Make sure to allow the senior to help with everything from planning to clean up. You may have to modify tasks to their abilities, but you also might find them working rings around you, because older folks have strong work ethics. Plan a simple menu and a few “get to know you” games to break the ice. They will have a lot to talk about, because they have shared similar experiences, such as the Great Depression, health problems, parenting,and other events from their lifetimes.

Need additional information on home care Maple Grove? Get high quality, customized home care that fits your needs here: home care.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kristie_Brown

Massage For Senior Citizens – Benefits and Precautions by Eva Gnech

August 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Probably the most important benefit of massage is the pleasure of human touch, and the companionship provided during massage therapy sessions. This provides a relaxation which alone may relieve some of the loneliness, depression and fears that many seniors suffer from. A recent study found that all senior citizens who were receiving regular massages showed a dramatic improvement in their moods and their attitudes toward life in general. Nearly 50% of the same group tested also showed additional health benefits;a reduction in their rates of breathing, an increase in their range of motion, an improvement of their postures, development of more body awareness, their skin took on healthier colors and their muscle tones were enhanced.

In addition to these general life improvements, some health conditions that may respond positively to regular massage include:

– inflammations in the joints;

– arthritis;

– skin discoloration and other dermatological conditions;

– deteriorating muscles and bones;

– reduced appetite and therefore weight loss;

– poor blood circulation;

– sleep disorders;

– weakened mental capacity,

– tendonitis;

– bursitis;

– asthma;

– emphysema;

– high blood pressures;

– diminished functions of the internal vital organs such as the heart, the liver, the brain, the thyroid, the stomach and the intestines.

Before you make your appointment, make sure you take care of safety first:

– Find a massage therapist that is properly trained;

– Limit your appointments to 30-45 minutes at a time;the elderly appear to respond better to shorter, more frequent sessions.

– Be careful when positioning yourself on the massage table: ask for help or request a chair massage.

– Tell your massage therapist if it is your first massage: request a gentle relaxation massage. Your bones may be thinner and your joints stiffer than other patients; ease into it. Over time you may request a deeper tissue massage if it feels comfortable for you.

– Tell your massage therapist if you are not comfortable being touched in some areas: Many elderly prefer head, hands and feet massages. Even massaging these body parts alone will greatly benefit you.

– Request use of lotions or oils, or bring in your own favorite lotions: senior citizens’ skin tends to be thinner and less pliable, and using oils will help avoid cracking or damaging of your skin. Lotions will also soften and moisturize your skin, making it healthier and more pliable.

Relax and enjoy your massage! With the above precautions massages are perfectly safe regardless of your age. Most importantly, massages help you relax and improve your outlook on life. That alone may alleviate other aches and pains and make this worth your while.

So contact a qualified massage therapist today, and make the appointment that will help you relax and enjoy some TLC, you deserve it!

For a more detailed description of the benefits and precautions of Seniors Massage, see http://massagetherapystartup.com/massage_therapy_for_senior_citizens.html.

For more information regarding massage therapy, setting up your own massage therapy business, or how to make a lucrative living in the massage industry, see http://massagetherapystartup.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eva_Gnech

In an Aging Society – Are Senior Citizens Driving Safely? by Diane Carbo

August 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Remember when you couldn’t wait until you were old enough to drive. Getting a driver’s license gave us an opportunity to experience a new freedom we did not have before. For those of us with two parents working, driving meant taking ourselves and our siblings to after school activities and work. Driving took us to a level of independence that we had not experienced before. In an aging society of drivers, those very same feelings exist in many today. Driving gives us a sense of independence and freedom, the ability to go out and socialize, go to work or to church. Safety issues are a concern as many move into the golden years. The life expectancy of seniors is increasing. There are more active senior citizens out on the road today than ever before. Since we all age differently, many aging adults, can drive into their seventies and eighties. As we age, the risks for having a serious car accident that requires hospitalization rises. Statistics show that fatal car accidents rise after the age of seventy.

If you know an aging adult driver who is experiencing difficulty with driving, it is important to carefully monitor the situation. This article can help you determine whether you should take steps to encourage the senior to stop driving.

An aging society and risk

Some key risk factors that affect our aging society are:

Vision declines affecting depth perception and ability to judge speed of oncoming traffic. Night vision becomes a problem as our eyes loose the ability to process light. By age 60, you need three times the amount of light that you did at age 20 in order to drive safely after nightfall. We also become more sensitive to bright light and glare. Signs and road markings can be difficult to see.

With age, flexibility may decrease as response time increases. A full range of motion is crucial on the road. Turning your head both ways to see oncoming traffic, moving both hands and feet can be difficult for those with chronic conditions such a rheumatoid arthritis, or Parkinson’s disease, heart disease and diabetes.

Older adults in an aging society will often need to begin to take medications. Certain medications, as well as a combination of medications and alcohol, can increase driving risk. Be aware and careful about medication side-effects and interactions between medications. It is important to talk to your pharmacist to be aware of interactions that could affect your driving safely. Some medications cause drowsiness.

Aging affects our quality of sleep, resulting in daytime sleepiness. Falling asleep at the wheel is a major concern for those that dose off during the day.

The beginning of dementia or mental impairment can make driving more dangerous. A decreased mental capacity or decrease tolerance to stressful driving situations such as complex and confusing intersections may cause delayed reactions to sudden or confusing situations on the road. An aging brain and body does not have the same response time as we did when we were younger.

Look for warning signs

There are multiple warning signs that an aging adult is becoming or is an unsafe driver. Some of them are small, but if there are multiple concerns it may be time to talk about your concerns with the aging driver. Warning signs of an unsafe driver include

 

  • Abrupt lane changes, braking, or acceleration.
  • Increase in the dents and scrapes on the car or on fences, mailboxes, garage doors, curbs, etc
  • Trouble reading signs or navigating directions to get somewhere
  • Range-of-motion issues (looking over the shoulder, moving the hands or feet, etc.)
  • Becoming anxious or fearful while driving or feeling exhausted after driving
  • Experiencing more conflict on the road: other drivers honking; frustration or anger at other drivers. Oblivious to the frustration of other drivers towards them
  • Getting lost more often
  • Trouble paying attention to signals, road signs, pavement markings, or pedestrians
  • Slow reaction to changes in the driving environment
  • Increased traffic tickets or “warnings” by traffic or law enforcement officers
  • Forgetting to put on a safety belt

 

If you are concerned about an aging adult driver, closely monitor their driving before deciding whether they need a refresher coarse on their driving skills or approaching them to give up their driver’s license altogether. Ongoing and open communication is important to addressing the issue of driving. Studies conducted by Harvard and MIT show that while most drivers preferred to discuss the issue with their spouse, doctor or adult children (in that order), this is not the case for everyone. The right person may not necessarily be the most forceful or outspoken one, but rather someone whose judgment and empathy are especially trusted by the driver.

Talk with other family members, your doctor, and close friends to determine the best person for “the conversation.” Remember driving signifies independence, freedom and being self sufficient to active senior citizens. Realize you may meet with resistance and the aging driver may become defensive. Emotion may get in the way of a rational conversation. Express your concerns and give specific reasons for those concerns.

The goal is to get the aging driver be part of the decision making process

You may begin by asking your loved one to make some concessions because of your concerns.

 

  • Taking a driver refresher course
  • Not driving at night
  • Suggest they not drive on busy thoroughfares or during rush hour
  • Taking shorter trips
  • Not driving under adverse weather conditions
  • Encourage a visit to their primary care physician or pharmacist to go over medications that may affect driving skills. Your physician may be able to recommend a Driver Rehabilitation Specialist. This individual can assess driving safety by an office exam and driving test and make recommendations regarding special equipment or techniques that can improve the driver’s safety. Consider ways to decrease the need to drive. Check out alternatives to shopping by car, including:

  • Arrange for home deliveries of groceries and other goods, and try to arrange for home visits by clergy, medical and personal care providers, and government service providers.
  • Use financial services that don’t require bank visits, like automatic bill paying, direct deposit, and bank-by-phone or on-line banking services.

Fears of those living in an aging society 

Fear of isolation and decrease in socializing is a real concern for the aging driver. It is important to keep spirits high as the aging driver makes the adjustments to becoming a non driver. Be in tune to their need for fun, volunteering, work and religious activities. Create a transportation plan that can make it easier for the aging driver to give up driving. You can create a list of friends and family that are willing to drive, contact the church and the local Area Agency on Aging in regards to transportation programs in the area.

Some seniors may adjust better if they can keep their own car, but have others drive them. Their own car may feel more comfortable and familiar, and the sense of loss from not driving may be lessened. Remember, baby boomers have grown up walking out the door and being able to go where they want to go. We need to keep the aging adult driver and those on the road with them safe.

Diane Carbo RN- As a geriatric care manager, that has cared for her father and mother in law in their homes, she learned first hand how overwhelming, stressful, and time consuming caring for a loved one can be. Staying in their homes was very important to them. As a result, Diane started http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com to assist others age in familiar surroundings and avoid the emotional and frustrating task of maneuvering the medical delivery system

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

Strength Training Tips for Senior Citizens by Aaron Dorksen

May 7, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Many senior citizens wouldn’t even consider lifting weights or performing  strength training exercises, thinking that’s something for much younger, fitter  people to do.

A person is never too old to perform strength training exercises, though. In  fact, frequent exercise is the best prescription for independent, active and  healthy aging, according to the A.A.R.P., the National Institute on Aging and  the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Studies show that all adults, even seniors, can benefit from as little as 15  minutes a day of moderate cardio exercise. Thirty minutes a day of light to  moderate cardio exercise is the optimum level, and the good news is the cardio  exercises can be broken up into segments (ie: brisk walk in morning, afternoon  swim).

Adults, including seniors, are also recommended to perform strength training  exercises two-three times per week.

Although exercise programs for seniors (generally considered people age 50-60  and older) are modified considerably from what younger generations are doing in  the gym, senior strength training can help people of any age increase muscle  strength, strengthen bones, fight off and-or delay the effects of arthritis, and  improve balance and mobility. Regular exercise is also important to help  maintain strong heart function and a healthy weight.

Jim Androsik, a physical therapist for Wooster Commuinty Hospital’s  HealthPoint Health and Wellness Center in Ohio, has witnessed great benefits  from the seniors he’s worked with who have followed a strength and conditioning  program.

“Generally, the senior citizens we work with are people 60 years-old and up  who are referred to us by a physician,” Androsik said. “Doctors give us some  guidelines, such as the frequency and duration a person should exercise for and  comments on their health in general.

“We then develop a program for them.”

Exercise programs for seniors can obviously vary greatly depending on age and  health, but typically there are basic guidelines Androsik has his seniors  follow.

“We generally recommend that a senior perform strength training exercises two  to three times a week,” he said. “We look at their needs to determine exactly  what exercises they’ll do, such as if they’re experiencing back pain, shoulder  pain, arthritis, etc.”

Here’s a basic exercise program for seniors based on Androsik’s advice and  other research I’ve conducted. Again, these are general recommendations and  seniors should consult with a physician before beginning an exercise program. It  would also be highly beneficial for seniors to exercise as part of a group or  class, to help with motivation, to make sure they’re using the right techniques  and, of course, to enjoy the social aspect of exercising):

Cardio exercise (3-4 times per week)

Tip: Perform low-impact exercises that are easy on your joints. Start very  slowly before increasing duration and resistance. Start with 5 minute cardio  workouts and slowly progress to 15 minutes or more if you can.

Pick from the following: Treadmill, walk on track, exercise bike, pool  workout, yard work, etc.

Weight lifting/strength training (2-3 times per week) Tip: Androsik says it’s  important to do high repetitions on exercises with low resistance or weights. Do  light stretches before performing strength training exercises. Here’s a sample  strength training program a senior might perform:

* Good mornings 1 x 15 (one set of 15 reps) tip: stand straight, slowly bend  down to touch toes or reach down as far as comfortable, rise back up and  repeat.

* Shoulder rotations 1 x 15 tip: stand straight with arms out parallel to  side, rotate shoulders 15 times in each direction. Good warmup exercise.

* Sit Ups – 1 x 15

* Side Bends – 1 x 15

* Squats – 1 x 12-15 tip: Use barbell, machine or without weights. Keep back  straight by looking straight ahead at spot on wall, go down as tolerated but no  lower than parallel with knees.

* Lunge – 1 x 12-15 tip: hold dumbbells to make harder

* Calf Raise – 1 x 12-15 tip: hold dumbbells to make harder or use  machine.

* One Arm Rows – 1 x 12 – 15 tip: balance one knee on bench, other leg on  floor. Pull dumbbell up and down with arm on side of body planted on floor.  Builds shoulder strength.

* Rotator cuff with band or machine – 1 x 12-15 internal rotation, 1 x 12-15  external rotation. tip: have a doctor or trainer show you how to do these, great  for preventing shoulder pain.

* Dumbbell curl – 1 x 12 – 15 tip: do them seated or standing

* Dumbbell bench press – 1 x 12 – 15 tip: do them lying on a bench

* Dumbbell flyes – 1 x 12 – 15 tip: do them lying on a bench

* Triceps extension – 1 x 12 – 15 tip: use machine or dumbbell. This is just  a general plan to give seniors some ideas, but it’s best to work with a trainer.  Tweak as needed. Remember to use light weights and do high reps.

“Exercise can provide lifelong benefits,” Androsik said. “It can minimize or  slow down arthritic changes.”

Basically, exercise can delay the aging process to a large degree in many  people and if seniors find a program they enjoy it can actually be fun. What are  you waiting for seniors – get back into the gym!

Find exercise equipment  stores Arizona and more with our fitness experts. At Home Fitness consultant  Aaron Dorksen’s blog deals with a variety of fitness topics, ranging from  workout tips, motivational ideas and feature stories on how exercise impacts  people’s lives. Consult a doctor before making any significant changes in your  exercise routine or diet. E-mail him with comments, questions or ideas for  future blogs at aaron@athomefitness.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Aaron_Dorksen

 

Healthy Eating For Senior Citizens by Ian Pennington

May 2, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

All too often we resort to medication to help with our medical problems when  a change in our diet could be all that was needed. As we grow older our diet  becomes more and more important and healthy eating for senior citizens can  improve their quality of life considerably.

In an ideal world, we would be following a healthy diet throughout our lives  and our medical problems later in life would be negligible. This, however, is  unlikely to be the case and there will not doubt be a range of conditions  appearing as we get older. One of these is likely to be osteoporosis. This is a  condition which will weaken the bones and can lead to an increased risk of  fractures. A plan for healthy eating for senior citizens who have, or are at  risk of getting osteoporosis would include a possible reduction in protein. We  are not saying that you should discard it from your diet, just do not eat too  much. Your body uses acid in the digestion of protein and if there is too much  you may need to counterbalance this by taking calcium from your bones.

Other conditions that the elderly are prone to include rheumatoid arthritis.  There are many debates regarding the affect of certain foods on rheumatoid  arthritis and healthy eating for senior citizens who suffer with the condition.  Some claims have been subject to research and others are still just a case of  hearsay. It is very difficult to say if there is any link between diet and the  condition and many studies are underway.

The best advice that can be given regarding healthy eating for senior  citizens is to eat a good, balanced diet with plenty of fresh foods. Do not eat  too much protein and try and reduce red meats a little. Calcium is great for the  strengthening of bones but do consider the fact that this is protein and bear in  mind what we said earlier.

Often, as you get older, you find that your appetite is not as great as it  was when you were younger. You may find it easier to digest more, smaller meals  rather than one or two larger ones. Sometimes you may feel lethargic about  preparing a meal. If this is the case try to eat something which does not  require much time and effort. This does not mean that it has to be lacking in  nutritional value. Even a bowl of cereals can be very healthy and satisfying and  will make you feel better in the short term. In the long term, however, you  would be wise to make the effort to produce a good hot, nutritious meal for  yourself and your family. Healthy eating for senior citizens is by far the best  way to ensure you keep your energy levels high. This way you will be able to  enjoy your leisure time and fight infections and ill health.

Ian Pennington is an accomplished niche website developer and author.

To learn more about healthy eating  [http://www.seniorhealthtoday.info/healthy-eating-for-senior-citizens], please  visit Senior Health Today [http://www.seniorhealthtoday.info] for current  articles and discussions.

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Niche Marketing Strategies For Tutoring Businesses Looking To Attract Senior Citizens by SK Tilton

April 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

For years, we’ve heard about the graying of our population from the baby boom  years. Our current class of senior citizens inductees (the population born  during the Baby Boom after World War II from 1946 to 1964) is going to make up  close to 20% percent of the total US population by 2029 according to the US  Census Bureau. What often goes unmentioned is that this mature population also  controls one of the largest percentages of disposable income. As a group, senior  citizens are and will be for some time the most affluent Americans. They hold  about three quarters of the nation’s financial assets worth approximately $1  trillion in disposable income annually.

Again, that is $1 trillion dollars in disposable income annually.

Many product and/or service oriented businesses have taken the long view and  begun marketing various products and services geared specifically to the older  consumer. Despite this recognition on the part of a few marketers, this  financially secure, mature group of consumers remains largely untapped by  educational companies and services. Take for instance the onslaught of new  technologies that seem to pop up like daisies in the spring, out of all consumer  groups, our seniors, are usually the last to be courted. While it may be true  that certain technologies are better suited for younger tech savvy consumers (I  am reminded of my elderly grandmother who purchased an unlimited text messaging  package on a small phone without text messaging capability and did I mention she  had arthritis), it doesn’t mean that this market is entirely unsuited for those  educational businesses and services that use technology to deliver their product  or service.

For a supplemental education service tutoring provider, this mature consumer  group is wide open with far less competition and minimal requirements in the way  of overhead expenditures. Two of the much-needed services that senior citizens  in particular lack are computer training and technology acclimation. Many of the  services supplemental education companies can provide, are the ones that are  most often overlooked or taken for granted, i.e. using the internet, opening up  an email account, social networking account registration, etc. If you are  reading this article, you can definitely offer those services and more. Suppose  for a moment you feel uncomfortable with your level of competence in offering a  few of these services, let me repeat what I said in my previous article, Niche  Marketing Strategies for Tutoring Businesses Looking To Attract Parents of  Students Taking State Standardized Tests, you do not have to be an expert in the  subject matter in order to provide supplemental services in the subject matter,  you just need to hire people with thorough experience related to the field.

The reason for the lack of competition in this age group is precisely because  this mature audience is a bit more discerning with their spending habits and a  more sophisticated approach is required to gain their attention, loyalty, and  dollars. However, it is for this very reason that supplemental education service  providers should dive into this market with fervor and enthusiasm. Education is,  and has always been a cornerstone for any age group. The value that the 50 and  over age group places on education should not go unnoticed. Along with  education, communication plays an important role in everyone’s lives and its  role only expands as one gets older. In the past, many grandparents would send  letters to their grandchildren and eagerly await their response. Grandparents  yearn to be a part of their grandchildren’s lives. Why not offer the ability to  stay in touch while simultaneously helping an older population learn and acquire  new skills? Imagine grandma’s joy every time she logs on to her e-mail account  and sees a message from her grandchild or when she receives a tweet. It’s truly  a win-win proposition!

Of course that’s just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the type of  services supplemental education providers can offer up in addition to computer  training. Curriculum and/or activities marketed to senior citizens can range  from learning a new language to scrap booking to ballroom dancing. If you’re  looking for ideas on what senior citizens are interested in learning, you can  find a compiled starter list below. Since most of your organized activities and  programs will consist of a variety of group sizes, you will have the ability to  market age specific specials and discounted tuition fees accordingly. Remember,  you run a supplemental education service business that should be able to teach  and tutor in multiple disciplines. You do not need to have any expert knowledge  in any of these areas, just hire someone who does. It is highly unlikely that  Sam Walton knew how to repair the diesel engines of every tractor-trailer that  brought in a load of merchandise to his stores, but his business (Walmart) hired  people who did have that expertise.

The best part about marketing to this age group is that they are fairly  accessible if you know where to look. Putting up postings/flyers at local  community church bulletins, visiting the adult education departments of local  community colleges, and contacting the Facility Director or Onsite Coordinator  at various assisted living facilities to propose your computer training or other  services to their residents, is a good way to start. If interested, there are  plenty of online directories that list full contact information for assisted  living facilities narrowed by zip code or state.

How about the Bingo nights? They are usually held at lodges, halls, churches,  and schools/community colleges.

Hold the presses! Yet another great source that has been largely abandoned by  the younger generation is the newspaper. Here’s a little known fact about the  newspaper industry – 65% of its readers are over the age of 55. By advertising  in this medium you are reaching over half of the newspapers readers – Now that’s  worth another read!

When it comes to reaching senior citizens, let your creativity lead the way,  your opportunities are limitless. For the astute, forward thinking individual,  this is a unique opportunity to service an undeserved demographic and separate  your business from the competition. Remember, thinking outside the box never  gets old!

Activity Ideas for Senior Citizens: · Computer Training  · Dance   · Yoga  · Painting  · Sewing · Journal Writing · Knitting or  crocheting  · Photography · Discussion Groups  · Exercise  ·  Knitting  · Foreign Language Conversation · Needlepoint  · Pinochle   · Quilting  · Tai Chi  · Writing workshops  · Crafts  ·  Bowling  · Bridge

S.K. Tilton has served as a program director, site coordinator, area  director, and as a SES business consultant to various SES (Supplemental  Education Services) tutoring companies across the United States. S.K. Tilton has  written numerous business plans for SES start ups and filed many approved  applications on behalf of SES tutoring companies. As a consultant, S.K. Tilton  has been responsible for presenting and implementing successful marketing plans  and helping first year start ups achieve success normally enjoyed by seasoned  SES veterans. S.K. Tilton’s latest work combines practical experience of the  best and worst SES practices to bring you the only SES success guide book  available. For further information on the SES Made Easy book and the author,  please visit http://www.sestutoringbiz.com.

Stay informed on the latest information regarding supplemental education  service tutoring at http://sestutoringbiz.com/category/Blog/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=SK_Tilton

 

Seniors Citizens Joining a Gym – The Questions You Should Be Asking by Bob Alexander Smith

April 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

There aren’t too many seniors-only gyms around at the moment, however finding  a local one that caters to your needs isn’t impossible.

At your local gym try asking the following questions to see whether you might  join:

Does any of your staff have senior-fitness certifications? 

Several of the governing bodies that certify personal trainers offer training  in senior fitness, and you want to have access to a trainer who has taken  advantage of these educational opportunities.

In many countries the governing bodies which certify personal trainers are  beginning to offer specialist training certificates for those trainers which  undertake the appropriate courses and examinations. Finding a gym with one of  these certified trainers is a plus!

Also these specialist trainers will be able to tailor an exercise program  that suits your needs and what the gym’s is currently offering.

Does the gym offer any senior citizen fitness classes?

There can be a variety of classes offered by your local gym which can cater  to your needs. Having classes in the late morning and afternoons when it’s  quieter maybe what you’re looking for? The gym could even offer Yoga, Pilates of  even Marathon training group classes.

Do check to see if the gym offers classes and equipment suited to those with  arthritis, cardiovascular diseases or any other ailments you may have. There  could even be classes that offer low impact workouts or even chair aerobics  modified for seniors that you might be interested in.

Do you offer senior citizen discounts?

Senior Citizens get nice discounts on public transport, at the cinema, even  at the grocery store, so why not at the gym? Don’t be too shy about asking for  discounts – as in life, if you don’t ask you’ll never know!

Is there a fitness assessment before starting to use the machines? 

Sure the gym is a great habit to get into but before starting do ensure you  have a complete medical assessment by you own physician. You wouldn’t try to  drive a car before knowing what all the pedals and levers were for – it’s the  same thing with the equipment in the gym. Check to see if the gym you are  thinking of joining has a trainer on hand that is familiar with how to teach you  to use the machines and activities that are safe for seniors.

After deciding which of the gyms to join remember the following safety tips  when getting started on your brand new routine:

  1. Start slowly and gently if you’ve not done much exercise in a while.
  2. Breathe as you’ve been instructed for the specific machine – holding your  breath isn’t good.
  3. Wear good fitting shoes and use all of the recommended safety  equipment.
  4. Drink plenty of water.
  5. Warm up and cool down to protect your muscles from strain as taught by the  trainer.

 

If you experience any unusual pain or a shortness of breath whilst you  exercise, stop and get checked by your physician so that you can continue to  enjoy the benefits of exercising.

As well as providing advice to seniors I’ve also launched my first website at  http://www.loftconversionsscotland.com to help those  interested in expanding their living space.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Bob_Alexander_Smith

 

Injury-Free Physical Fitness For Senior Citizens Made Easy by Jeremy Reeves

April 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Physical fitness for senior citizens is more important than ever in today’s  society. Decades ago, everything was done manually.

Although technology has brought us many incredible things, it has also made  us a much more lazy society. No longer do we have to use our bodies to do yard  work, clean around the house, or even work on our own car.

There are now gadgets for virtually everything that lets us do it while using  minimal body strength.

But negative consequences come with the luxury we’ve been given. When manual  labor is no longer needed and our muscles aren’t getting used on a daily basis –  they start to weaken. Combine that with the fact that as every year goes by your  muscles get weaker and you’ll understand why physical fitness for senior  citizens is so important.

By strength training you will dramatically reduce your risk of osteoporosis,  sore joints and broken bones. Many doctors and health companies try to make you  buy Vitamin C and “drink a lot of milk” to overcome these problems, but in  reality they simply don’t work. Supplements can help in a small way, but  strength training has been proven time and time again to have a much more  positive effect with muscle, bone and joint problems that most senior citizens  face – even arthritis!

Isn’t It Dangerous To Exercise As I Get Older?

Unfortunately, many senior citizens are afraid to exercise due to fears of  injuring themselves. However, there are a few simple precautions you can take  such as:

  • Perform low-impact exercises such as pushups, bodyweight squats and other  bodyweight exercises.
  • If lifting weights, do it for 10 or more reps and keep it at a manageable  weight.
  • Don’t over-exert yourself. Stop or briefly rest if you get uncomfortably  tired.

 

Be smart and think about the injury-potential of each exercise before you  perform it.

For example, instead of jogging, consider using stationary exercise bikes.  Pro form exercise bikes are a great piece of equipment to try out. The Schwinn  231 recumbent exercise bike is also a great choice to have if you want to keep  one in your own home.

Besides the simple precautions you should take, there are a few other things  to consider. Physical fitness for senior citizens is a much more delicate  situation than physical fitness for younger individuals.

  • Take Things Slowly At First – Because of the weakening of bones,  joints and muscles you need to take things slowly at first. Don’t simply start a  program and push yourself to exhaustion. It’s also important to go to a doctor  who knows your medical history beforehand. They may even be able to help you  decide what type of exercise you should be doing.
  • Exercise Slowly – You should also perform the actual exercises  slowly. Don’t make jerky or bouncing movements or you’ll risk injuring yourself.  The slower you perform the exercise, the less risk you have of getting  hurt.
  • Warm Up Properly – Warming up is very important to anybody,  especially senior citizens. Lack of blood flow as well as tight joints and  muscles performing less efficiently are all factors contributing to injuries. By  properly warming up before your actual workout, you significantly reduce your  risk of getting injured.

 

Although physical fitness for senior citizens is a bit more complicated due  to more things that can possibly go wrong, it’s also just as or more important  than exercising at a young age. By taking the right precautions and making sure  you’re exercising correctly, you can enjoy injury-free and pain-relieving  exercise for a long time to come.

Jeremy Reeves is a certified personal trainer devoted to helping you get in  the best shape of your life. His website –  [http://www.fitness-product-reviews.com] – reviews the 4 most effective weight  loss products on the market today.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jeremy_Reeves

 

Senior Citizens – Burdened With Grief and Anger by Jessie Penn

April 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Grief and anger often becomes a heavy burden for people as they age. Throughout life, people experience grief over many things. They grieve if there home burns down, lose a job or a pet. However, an area of loss that is not usually considered with grief is the physical decline during the aging process.

Grief can be detected, in seniors, by the comments they make about losing their youth. Many times, they speak with remorse at lost youth, decreased functionality, and body strength. When a senior citizen notices they are losing muscle strength, or begin experiencing arthritis, stiffness, and joint pain, it’s not unusual to notice anger. They become upset and wish to escape the betrayals of their bodies, and become very angry in the process.

No one asks to get old or feeble. Most likely, if we had a choice, most of us would vote to discontinue and ban getting old. A person might grieve when they are bestowed the title of “Senior Citizen.” At first, a senior citizen, might not notice the changes that are taking place in the physical aspects of the body or the mind. And, perhaps, as much as they hate the thought of getting old, family members also grieve about losing the ‘young’ mom or dad they once knew.

Unfortunately, getting angry about growing old has no escape; there’s no one to blame it on. So, sometimes the result is that seniors lash out at the ones closest to them. Anger and frustration with the aging body can cause tempers to rage or flare up unexpectedly. Many times, a senior lashes out at a loved one or caregiver because they are nearby and easily accessible. The aging person knows it isn’t fair, but may have a hard time explaining their actions.

Learning how to cope with anger about aging is necessary so you don’t hurt the innocent ones around you. But, it is also unhealthy to keep your grief bottled up inside you. If seniors are not allowed to vent and get rid of their anger, the body can decline at a faster rate.

It’s been suggested that people become angry because they feel a false sense of entitlement. This crops up when expectations do not line up with reality. A feeling of undo entitlement happens when we believe we do not deserve to get old.

There is just one way to confront getting older, and that is to recognize that we are not alone, everyone will get old, and we are not entitled to be exempt from the aging process. Recognizing this fact can help to eliminate anger from the arena as we cope with the affects of aging.

Attempting to deny the advance of life’s end, is probably the sole cause of midlife crisis’s. Trying to behave as if they are not getting older and hiding emotional responses to aging can cause devastating results. Avoiding the feelings about aging has caused many to act irresponsibility or make bad decisions.

By recognizing the problems that naturally happen through aging, some of the anger can be avoided. Instead of dwelling on declining abilities, senior citizens can minimize the impacts by living with a healthier attitude toward aging.

Focusing on your diet, exercise, keeping busy, and doing everything you can to stay rested and emotionally sound. Thinking about or getting involved with other people can help to create a healthier attitude toward aging and minimize its effects.

Try to keep your spirits up, be happy through achievements and seemingly small enjoyments. Keep a young at heart attitude and get in touch with the child inside you. You’ve come too far, traveled many winding paths, and you deserve to feel content and happy. Emotions about how you feel about yourself can play a major role in the person you choose to be as a senior citizen.

Get free information to protect your loved ones when a medical emergency or security treat happens. Go to http://personalsecuritydevices.walkinsarewelcome.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jessie_Penn

Senior Citizens Health Conditions by Ian Pennington

April 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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As we reach our later years we are at risk of a great many health concerns.  The list of senior citizens health conditions is a long and complex one. It  includes both mental and physical issues and some people will be plagued with both.

It can only be expected that, as time takes it toll on our bodies, we will  experience some deterioration in our physical and mental wellbeing. That is not  to say that once we have retired we are on the scrap heap and just waiting until  our lives are over. Far from it. There has been a huge amount of medical  research taking place over the last century, and indeed much longer, and this  has paved the way for a greater understanding of the aging process. We are now  much more educated regarding nutrition and health matters and are able to  control and sometimes eliminate many of the senior citizens health  conditions.

One of the main fears that the elderly face is that of dementia of one form  or another. The most commonly known is Alzheimer’s Disease but there are others.  This affects the patients mind and can be the cause of heartache for a caring  partner who will feel unable to help. They will find that they spend much of  their time caring for the patient whilst at the same time having to accept the  fact that they are becoming more distant as the disease progresses. This can be  aggravated if the carer is also suffering from any one of the other senior  citizens health conditions, either physically or mentally.

Other serious conditions can often include strokes. Post stroke problems can  vary hugely depending on the severity of the attack and the level of recovery of  the patient. Sometimes a stroke can result in partial paralysis. This obviously  has a far reaching affect on the elderly and may jeopardise their ability to get  out and visit family and friends. Even the most simple tasks, which were taken  for granted previously, may now cause a problem; shopping, housework etc.  Strokes are high on the list of senior citizens health conditions, but, they are  also the subject of a lot of research and our understanding of the subject is  increasing all the time. Post stroke care has improved a great deal and in some  cases patients now recover fully.

Heart disease has been an increasing problem in all age groups, but continues  to be a main factor in contributing to senior citizens health conditions. Once  again, however, research is good on the subject and our knowledge increasing all  the time. Surgical options are becoming more common and our expertise in the  field has contributed to many lives being extended.

There are a number of senior citizens health conditions which can be helped  by a careful diet being followed during our earlier years. Osteoporosis,  rheumatism and arthritis have all been the subject of studies and tests. Some  foods have been found to be a great help in reducing the chances of becoming a  sufferer.

Don’t wait until it is too late. There has been so much research undertaken  on the subject of senior citizens health conditions that you would be wise to  take action early and follow the advice that is available so that you can  increase your chances of enjoying your later years in the best possible  health.

Ian Pennington is an accomplished niche website developer and author.

To learn more about senior health  [http://seniorhealthblog.info/senior-citizens-health-conditions], please visit  Senior Health Blog [http://seniorhealthblog.info] for current articles and  discussions.

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Exercise for Senior Citizens At 50 And Beyond by Renie M Rutten

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Even a small amount of increased physical activity can benefit your  functional health. This means getting in and out of your home to attend church,  going for a walk, and getting your own mail without the assistance of someone  else.

Benefits Of Regular Exercise For Senior Citizens

—–Improved Overall Health

—–Smaller Waistline

—–Lowered Risk of Bone Fracture Including Hips

—–Lower Risk of Lung, Breast and Color Cancers

—–Stabilized Blood Sugar Reducing Type II Diabetes

—–Better Balance and Bone Strength

Levels of Senior Citizen Exercise Workouts

There are three basic levels of activity to discuss when thinking about  exercise for Senior Citizens, the first is sedentary. This is where many  senior citizens fall unfortunately. This means you are getting little or no  regular physical exercise. Sedentary individuals take less the 10,000 steps a  day and their risk of falls, illness and disease are much greater than seniors  in the next group.

The second group of seniors we want to discuss are those who get  moderate physical activity each day. Moderate activity should be the goal  of most seniors to keep them healthy and independent. Brisk walking, dancing,  bicycling, swimming, dance and exercise DVD’s are excellent examples of exercise  that will raise the heart rate, but allow you to breath and talk normally.

The final level of activity for the more active seniors is vigorous  activity. This level means you heart rate has increased to the level that  you are not able to talk and exercise at the same time. Some examples might  include running, tennis, Zumba dance or other high intensity exercise.

Senior Exercise the Answer to Anti Aging

Aging and lack of physical activity are often associated with health issues  like: loss of balance causing falls, forms of arthritis causing stiffness and  pain, breathing problems and sleep apnea, stroke, heart disease and even some  cancers. These conditions are attributed to the limited activity and excess  weight from a decrease in your muscle tone and RMR from not getting enough  movement as we age.

How To Increase Your Physical Activity Level

Increasing your activity especially if you fall into the sedentary level of  seniors may seem like a daunting task. The good news is that is not necessarily  true. Starting an exercise program can be fun and easier to start than you might  think.

The most important issue is to find some activity you enjoy. Remember you  don’t need to spend a fortune on a home gym to reach your peak fitness level.  Some ideas that cost little or nothing are walking, dancing or water aerobics.  Start slowly and increase your time and intensity each week or so. As always  it’s a good idea to visit with your doctor, especially if you have health issues  already.

Incorporate friends and make it fun. You can help others reach their peak  fitness and improve their health as well.

Learn more about exercise for senior citizens and how it can improve your  health and save your life. More fitness information is available on my website  at http://www.yourweightlossanswers.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Renie_M_Rutten

 

Riding to Death: How Healthy Eating Can Improve the Health of Senior Citizens by Stan Onodu

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Are you a senior citizen? Medical science told us that there are ailments  associated with age. You’ll agree with me that it is virtually unheard of for  youngsters to complain of illnesses like osteoporosis, high blood pressure,  diabetes, heart disease, arthritis and certain cancers. But these are mostly the  health challenges of older adults. As a senior citizen, you need to know that  you can effectively manage these diseases through healthy eating. Let me show  you how.

Fluids. Naturally, you’ll observe, in most cases, that the skin and the  entire body frame of older adults shrink as they get older and older. This is as  a result of the fact that they tend to dehydrate so easily, which may not be  unconnected with their inability to feel thirsty most of the time. As a senior  citizen therefore, you should form the habit of constantly ingesting water and  fruit juices into your system.

Proteins. Proteins are body-building foods. They are also in the business of  repair and or replenishment of worn-out body cells and tissues. The healthy  proteins for senior citizens include eggs, lean meats, turkey or poultry and  fish. From these, minerals such as calcium, zinc and iron, greatly needed by the  elderly can be sourced.

Carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are energy-giving foods. It is a known secret  that senior citizens need a lot of energy derivable from this kind of foods in  order to sustain their ability to perform basic daily activities like dressing,  bathing, etc. Whole grains, cereals and their derivatives form excellent diets  for them. And more so, with some fibre content in the foods, these older folks  will be less exposed to constipation.

Fats. Only unsaturated fat foods, as in lean meats, fish, low-fat diary  products, avocados, nuts and seeds, should be taken by senior citizens. The  reason being that other fats contain HDL kind of cholesterol that can aggravate  blood pressures, thereby putting their heart conditions at very high risk.

Moderate Exercise. Man shall not leave by bread alone. Our senior citizens  need some bit of exercises – taking a walk, light gardening, riding bicycles,  etc – which can help them burn off calories thereby reducing weight; improving  heart and lung functions, and ultimately engender overall feeling of well-being.  It is important to note, however, that before they embark on any form of  exercises, their doctors must be aware.

If our senior citizens can strive to adopt the above healthy lifestyles or  habits, I guarantee their good health even though, for sure, their health cannot  be as it used to be when they were younger. Healthy eating is a gateway to a  healthy, long life and the case of our senior citizens cannot be  different.

What is that health condition that constitutes a burden in your life? Do you  know that through healthy eating you can overcome it? You can learn a lot more  here: http://www.healthyeatingpalace.blogspot.com/.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Stan_Onodu

 

Activities For Senior Citizens – How Hobbies and the Mind Body Connection Work By Diane Carbo

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Hobbies have a mind body connection, they are important activities for  senior citizens and are an important part of healthy aging. Active seniors  are proof that you can enjoy better health and have fun doing it.

Research studies have shown that leisure time and physical activity promote a  healthier lifestyle. Our bodies are meant to be active and move. Many, as they  age, tend to become increasingly inactive, preferring to watch TV to help pass  the time away. Finding fun activities for senior citizens can change that.

Some good activities for senior citizens

Active seniors are involved and participate in what life has to offer.  Hobbies give an individual a reason to get out and share with others. Whether it  is painting, building model airplanes or playing cards the benefits of a hobby  can be an increase your chances for improved physical, social and emotional well  being.

It is important to have regular leisure time physical activity. Anything that  promotes moving and being active will benefit you as you age. The health  benefits of staying active are a delay or prevention of a chronic disease such  as: heart disease, diabetes, some cancers and arthritis. Physical activity also  promotes brain fitness. This can help delay or prevent dementia or  Alzheimer’s.

Participating in a variety of hobbies helps many cope with the stressors of  life. How you react and respond to different situations in life affects your  health. Stress and anxiety can lead to poor health. Active seniors are involved  and lead a more balanced life.

Hobbies allow active seniors to socialize, find companionship and  camaraderie. Making connections with others that have the same interests can  often open an individual to new found friendships.

Many individuals that participate in similar hobbies find themselves with  other individuals that have similar situations and experiences in life. As we  age, we experience losses that affect our emotional health. Active seniors that  are involved in hobbies have a pool of other individuals that they can draw  emotional support and comfort. There are times when they can also learn from  shared experiences. Sharing our feelings with others is a way to connect with  others as well as relieve the stress and anxiety we may be feeling.

More Hobbies and the Mind Body Connection: How Active Seniors are Having  Fun and Enjoying Better  Health …

Hobbies as activities for senior citizens are a way to calm their  minds and relax. It is a way to belong, have something to look forward to  doing.

For many, their hobbies are a tool that releases stress and helps bring their  emotions back into balance again. It is a time when we get an attitude  adjustment and feel right with the world again.

Leisure time physical activity is important to healthy aging. Moving our  bodies and using our minds affect how we age. The mind body connection benefits  of participating in hobbies are improved mental clarity, enhanced immune system,  improved self esteem and self confidence.

Hobbies are a way to have fun, enjoy and stay regularly involved in leisure  time physical activity. Consistency and regular involvement is the key to  maintaining healthy aging.

Having a variety of hobbies during the week can keep an individual busy,  interested and involved. Participating in a hobby with a group can be  motivating. Knowing that the expectations of others are anticipating your  participation in the day’s activity may give one the boost to go when they feel  down. Even to know that you have others that depend on you to be there, may give  you an extra boost to participate when you don’t feel like it. Feeling a sense  of commitment to others, a sense of belonging is important to healthy aging.

Hobbies give many a sense of connection to others, when there are no other  connections in an individual’s life. Connections to others, a sense of  belonging, a sense of community gives many active seniors the reason to  participate in life to their fullest ability.

Hobbies are a way for many to stay physically and mentally stimulated. Trying  new things, meeting new people and sharing your knowledge, experience and  sometimes your creative side with others can keep an active senior challenged  mentally, as well as, physically.

Hobbies are a safe way to get out and meet people with like minded interests.  It is a great ice breaker to meeting new people and a way to stay active, no  matter how old you get to be.

Any activity that gets an aging senior moving and involved with others is a  step towards healthy aging. It is important to get busy and stay active. Take up  dancing, gardening; join a walking club or travel.

Hobbies have a mind body connection. Active seniors are having fun and  enjoying better health as they regularly participate in things they enjoy. It is  never too late to start enjoying yourself now. Take time to find your own  activities for senior citizens to help your loved ones and  yourselves.

Diane Carbo Registered Nurse has more than thirty five years in the nursing  field. Her experience as a geriatric care manager, makes her uniquely qualified  to help those who want to live out their lives in their own homes. Diane has  developed a web site to make people aware of issues and options. You will find a  mountain of helpful information that will be continually updated. Please visit:  http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com/activities-for-senior-citizens.html for more information on hobbies and senior activities Sign up for The Caring  Advocate Ezine her free newlsetter and receive a complimentary copy of  the Home Health Care Planning Guide.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2183928

City Of Las Vegas May 2013 Senior Special Events

Las Vegas Residents Invited To Celebrations, Luncheons & Activities At City Centers

The city of Las Vegas active adult and senior centers offer exercise, fitness, craft, arts, dance, music and computer classes; cards; games; discussion and social groups; luncheons; sports; and special events Monday through Friday to residents age 50 and better. Many of these activities contribute to wellness and a healthy lifestyle. A listing of classes and activities is published in the Beyond the Neon Leisure Guide, available in the centers and online at www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. All activities are subject to change. Most activities require $2 annual membership to city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all senior and active adult centers.  Centers are closed May 27 for the Memorial Day holiday.

 

New Walk with Ease Program (ages 50+)

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:30 p.m.

Cost: $5 drop in, or free with fitness pass purchase.

Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Join this new walking group that is part of the Arthritis Foundation program.


Lieburn Matinee Movies
(ages 50+)

Wednesdays, 1:30 p.m.

Free admission.

Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Popcorn and water will be provided. Call 229-1600 to learn which movies will be shown.

 

East Las Vegas Matinee Movies (ages 50+)

Fridays, 1 p.m.

Free admission.

East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

Free popcorn for movie goers. Call 229-1515 to learn which movies will be shown.

 

Bunco (ages 50+)
Wednesday, May 1, 10 a.m. Registration opens April 22.
Cost: $5 with a current annual $2 senior programs membership.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Enjoy playing Bunco and having a light snack afterward. Advanced registration required.
Call 229-1702 to register and for more information.

 

Centennial Hills Active Adult Book Club (ages 50+)
First Wednesday of each month at 12:30 p.m.; May 1.

Cost: Free with a current annual $2 senior programs membership.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Come prepared to discuss this month’s book: “Defending Jacob” by William Landay.

 

May Day Brunch (ages 50+)
Thursday, May 2, 10 a.m. Advance registration is required by April 26.
Cost: $3.
East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

Celebrate spring and the coming of summer!  Call 229-1515 to register.

 

Cinco de Mayo Luncheon (ages 50+)

Thursday, May 2, 11:30 a.m.  Advance registration required by April 29.

Cost: $5; $2 annual Senior Programs membership also required.

Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Enjoy a fabulous Mexican meal! Call 229-6454 for additional information and registration.

 

Cinco de Mayo Luncheon (ages 50+)

Tuesday, May 7, at 11 a.m. Advance registration is required.

Cost: $ 5 per person.

Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Enjoy enchiladas, chips, salsa, Spanish rice and refried beans. Please call 229-6125 to register by May 3. Space is limited.

 

Mother’s Day Potluck Celebration and Glamour Shots (ages 50+)

Thursday, May 9, noon.

Cost: Bring a dish large enough to share. Includes one free glamour shot; extra shots may be purchased.

Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Enjoy the afternoon with a variety of foods and activities. Make appointments early for your free pose. Please register by May 6 by calling 229-6125. Space is limited.

 

Scrapbooking and Card Making (ages 50+)
Monday, May 13, 1 p.m.
Free with current annual $2 senior programs membership.

Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Share crafting ideas with others. Registration opens April 22. Bring your family, pet or vacation pictures and make a scrapbook page! Call 229-1702 for information and registration.

National Salad Month Luncheon (ages 50+)
Wednesday, May 15, 11:30 a.m. Advance registration is required by May 10.
Cost: $5.
East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

Celebrate National Salad Month with surprising combinations and new tastes! No rabbit food –you are sure to get your fill! Call 229-1515 to register.

AARP Safe Driving Class (ages 50+)
Thursday, May 16, 11 a.m. Advance registration required; space is limited.
Cost: $12 AARP member, $14 non-member; plus $2 annual Senior Programs membership.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Bring snacks/lunch and drinks. Expect to be in the class until approximately 3 p.m.

Sometimes Little Things Can Be Huge!

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

By Thair Phillips, President, RetireSafe

A small and relatively new product is making life easier for older Americans. It’s a simple thing, but unit dose laundry detergent packs (or pods) are helping seniors perform necessary laundry chores that they might not otherwise be able to do without help. The laundry packs’ small size and pre-measured, consistent content is perfect for aging hands and eyes. With ten thousand of our fellow Americans reaching the age of 65 each day, it’s a really big deal!

While younger Americans can choose from many options, the pods are a huge help to the frail and the disabled.  Consider those who suffer from arthritis, for example. According to 2007-2009 data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), an estimated 50 million adults have self-reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis. That number is expected to grow to 67 million by the year 2030, per NHIS data. Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States, negatively impacting function and mobility for millions of senior citizens. The laundry pods meet the need created by those who can no longer heft a jug of detergent and pour it into a measuring cup. The small (but not too small to handle) size detergent pod fits the bill for aging-in-place seniors who wish to remain self-reliant.

And then there are those who must struggle each and every day with impaired vision.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), individuals over the age of 65 accounts for roughly 30 percent of the U.S. population considered to be visually impaired. Dimming eyesight can reduce physical, functional, emotional, and social well-being.  Doing the laundry can be a chore for all of us, but trying to measure the exact amount of liquid or powder for the person who is vision impaired can be a laundry room disaster resulting in ruined clothes and dangerous messes. For age-in-place seniors with cataracts, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and/or diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes that causes visual impairment, anything that can help simplify the laundry measuring process is truly a godsend.

Keep in mind that many older Americans in single family homes and apartments may well have to take their laundry and laundry supplies to a communal laundry room or a Laundromat.  Having the convenience of smaller, self-contained detergent pods to carry instead jugs of liquids and large boxes of powder is a big advantage for the elderly.  This is especially true for those navigating with canes or walkers, or those needing to keep one hand free for stability.

In short, pre-measured laundry detergent packs or pods are critical innovations for seniors. This is one small-sized product with a huge functional impact for seniors. In an aging America, we need every one of these impactful products, and many, many more.

RetireSafe is a nationwide organization of 4000,000 supporters that advocates on behalf of seniors on issues regarding Social Security, Medicare, health and financial well-being.

Contact Thair Phillips, (202) 628-5095

Lisfranc Injury: Easy to Miss, Hard to Get Over

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care 

Left untreated, this little-known foot injury can lead to serious long-term problems

 

Elite athletes like NFL quarterback Matt Schaub and wide receiver Santonio Holmes had productive seasons ended by the little-known and often overlooked Lisfranc injury, a serious foot injury that few have heard of and no one wants.  But foot and ankle surgeons at the Annual Scientific Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) this week are evaluating how to effectively diagnose and treat this injury, which can result in severe long-term complications like chronic pain, osteoarthritis and even foot deformities.

Relatively uncommon, found in only 1 of every 55,000-60,000 people annually, Lisfranc injuries occur in the midfoot – where the long bones leading up to the toes (metatarsals) connect to the bones in the arch (tarsals).  “The Lisfranc complex is a critical joint in propulsion during walking and running.  Unfortunately, injuries there are easily overlooked.  As many as thirty percent of Lisfranc injuries are missed at initial diagnosis by providers who are not foot and ankle specialists.  The long-term effects can be debilitating,” observes Cleveland, Ohio foot and ankle surgeon Mark Hardy, DPM, FACFAS, and a conference presenter.

 

Diagnosis can be difficult because the signs, even during examination and imaging, can be extremely subtle. Injuries most often occur to car accident victims where the foot is jammed into the floorboard or to athletes when the foot is planted and twisted.  Direct trauma injuries can result when a heavy object is dropped on the foot.  “Most people don’t have an appreciation of the amount of force required to disrupt the Lisfranc complex.  Whether you’re an athlete or a laborer, early and appropriate treatment is mandated,” says Hardy.

 

Lisfranc injuries can also result simply from missing the last step on the stairs; even a minor slip and fall can cause serious injury. Symptoms of a Lisfranc injury may include swelling of the foot, pain throughout the midfoot upon standing or during examination, inability to bear weight, bruising on the bottom of the foot in the arch area, and an abnormal widening of the foot, possibly signaling dislocation.

 

Lisfranc injuries fall into three categories; sprains, fractures and dislocations. Sprains typically do not require more than rest and recuperation time, as they are comparable to ankle sprains.  In a fracture, a break in a bone in the Lisfranc joint occurs. In a dislocation, the bones are forced from their normal positions. In severe cases, both fractures and dislocations occur. In fractures and dislocations, surgery is often the best option. Patients hope for a non-surgical response, but foot and ankle surgeons are well aware of the dangers associated with putting off necessary surgery.

 

“A number of factors impact the surgeon’s decision on treatment options; the patient’s age, overall health and activity level,” says Hardy. “Because of the possible long-term impact of this injury, our chief objective is ensuring a positive outlook for the future.”

 

Wires, pins and even surgical buttons can be used to stabilize the joint, both permanently and in some cases temporarily. Some promising studies have focused on the effectiveness of a minimally invasive technique that can help reduce the recuperation period.

 

“Lisfranc injuries can be successfully treated when properly diagnosed and treated in a timely manner.  If you have experienced any sort of foot trauma and symptoms appear, it’s time to see a foot and ankle surgeon,” urges Hardy. “Especially in the case of Lisfranc injuries, the earlier someone visits a foot and ankle surgeon, the greater the likelihood of a positive outcome.”

 

For more information on foot and ankle injuries and conditions, visit the ACFAS patient education website, FootHealthFacts.org.

###

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of over 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons.  Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research and provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its consumer website, FootHealthFacts.org.

Nine simple ways you can improve your heart health

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Ten minutes a day is all you need to be heart healthy. Walking the dog, knowing your numbers, eating your greens – those are a few heart-healthy things that only Take 10.

Since 1963, to urge Americans to join the battle against heart and vascular diseases, Congress has advised the president to proclaim February “American Heart Month.” To celebrate American Heart Month this year, Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health is offering a variety of educational and screening events and opportunities for disease prevention and to support the fight against heart disease and stroke.

1. Beginning Feb. 1 though Feb. 28, Renown is helping people commit to improve their heart health in just 10 minutes a day. Every day in February, visit the Take 10 tab on the Renown Health Facebook page. From heart-savvy information and healthy recipes to useful apps, Renown will reveal a simple health tip that takes 10 minutes or less. Also enter to win an Ultimate Health Screening Package ($219 value).

2. Friday, Feb. 1, people are encouraged to promote awareness of heart disease by dressing in red on National Wear Red Day.

3. Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 5 and 6, Renown South Meadows Medical Center will host the life-saving services of Life Line Screening, the nation’s largest provider of preventive screenings. The screening event is designed to help local residents identify their risk of stroke, vascular disease and osteoporosis before the life-changing effects of these conditions can occur. The event is from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Northview Conference Room. Call 1-800-690-0295 to schedule an appointment.

4. Throughout February: Low-cost health screenings. These events include a variety of health screenings for cholesterol, diabetes, arthritis, heart disease and more. No appointment required. The schedule includes:

Feb 6, 8 – 10 a.m.: Renown Medical Group, 202 Los Altos Parkway.
Feb 13, 8 – 10 a.m.: 850 Mill St.
Feb 20, 8 – 10 a.m.: Renown Medical Group, 1343 W. Newlands Drive, Fernley
Feb 27, 8 – 10 a.m.: Renown South Meadows Medical Center, Northview Conference Room

5. Saturday, Feb. 9, Renown will participate in the Save a Heart – Simple 7 Health Expo featuring the American Heart Association’s Simple 7, steps to heart healthy living: Get Active, Control Cholesterol, Eat Better, Manage Blood Pressure, Lose Weight, Reduce Blood Sugar and Stop Smoking. The expo takes place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Scheels, Legends at Sparks Marina. The event is open to the public. No RSVP needed.

6. Friday, Feb. 15, at 12 noon, Renown will host a free Online Health Series webinar on the link between gout and heart disease. Renown Health Rheumatologist Malin Prupas, MD, FACP, will be the featured presenter. Register for this webinar at renown.org/onlinehealthseries.

7. Wednesday, Feb. 27, at 12 noon, Renown will host a free Online Health Series webinar on the early warning signs of heart attacks. Karen Meskimen, DNP, RN, will be the featured presenter. Register for this webinar at renown.org/onlinehealthseries.

8. Thursday, Feb. 28, Renown will host its annual Save Your Heart Luncheon featuring Letitia Anderson, MD, FACC. The educational luncheon will be from 12 noon to 1 p.m. at the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa, Paradise Ballrooms D & E. Doors open at 11:30 a.m. Cost is $10 and includes lunch. To RSVP, call 775-982-6483.

9. Friday, March 1, the American Heart Association will host its annual Go Red For Women Luncheon from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa:

National Surgical Association Comes to Las Vegas

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) is hosting its 71st Annual Scientific Conference in Las Vegas on February 11-14, 2013 at Mandalay Bay Resort & Conference Center. ACFAS is a professional society of more than 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons dedicated to promoting the art and science of foot, ankle, and related lower extremity surgery; addressing the concerns of foot and ankle surgeons; and advancing and improving standards of education and surgical skill.

This year’s conference will bring about 1,500 surgeons and 150 exhibiting companies to the city of Las Vegas and we are looking forward to the Las Vegas experience! During the conference our surgeons will discuss the latest trends and procedures in foot and ankle surgery to help improve the health and quality of life for patients. Three of those topics have been turned into consumer-aimed press releases for distribution during the conference. The three press releases, which are embargoed until the conference, include:
Smoking and Bone Healing – A Risky Combination: Smokers take nearly 50 percent longer to heal after surgery than non-smokers. For every non-smoking patient whose bones heal normally, four smokers will experience non-union, or failure of the bone to mend. Surgeons discuss ways to treat this challenging patient population.
Lisfranc Injury – Easy to Miss, Hard to Get Over: Left untreated, this little-known and often overlooked foot injury can lead to serious long-term problems like osteoarthritis, chronic pain and even foot deformities. Surgeons assess the best treatment options for this complex injury that seems to be afflicting more and more professional athletes.

Pediatric Flatfoot Deformity – A Cause for Alarm? Left untreated, pediatric flatfoot poses a serious developmental threat to children. Foot and ankle surgeons re-examine the best course of treatment for optimal long-term health.
Please contact Tracy Hulett or Melissa Matusek if you are interested in receiving advance copies of these embargoed releases, or if you are interested in setting up interviews/photo opportunities with the College’s physician media spokespeople. You can reach us by e-mail at the below addresses or by phone at 773-693-9300. You can also visit FootHealthFacts.org, the College’s patient education website for more valuable foot and ankle health information.
Thank you and we hope to see you in Vegas!
Tracy Hulett
Manager, Public Relations and Communications
tracy.hulett@acfas.org
Melissa Matusek
Director of Marketing and Public Relations
melissa.matusek@acfas.org

Research Suggests Massage Therapy Is Effective For Health Conditions In People Of All Ages

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Massage Therapy Shown to be Beneficial for Enhancing Immune Function in Preterm Infants, Decreasing Blood Pressure and Improving Stability in Older Persons and Reducing Stress in Cancer Patients.

People of all ages are beginning to understand the many benefits of massage therapy, including the role it can play in overall health and well-being. Recent research compiled by the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) suggests that massage can enhance the immune function in preterm infants, decrease blood pressure and improve stability in older persons, as well as reduce stress and anxiety in cancer patients.
Massage Therapy for Improved Immune Function and Weight Gain in Preterm Infants
Research[1] published in Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), showed that for stable, preterm infants, daily massage therapy is positively associated with higher natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity and weight gain. American Massage Therapy Association President, Cynthia Ribeiro, says of the study, “This research demonstrates that massage therapy can benefit preterm infants by enhancing immunity and stimulating growth. Parents of preterm infants are encouraged to speak with a certified massage therapist to learn more about certain techniques designed to aid in their child’s development.”
Massage Therapy for Improvements in Balance, Neurological, and Cardiovascular Measures in Older Adults
Research[2]published in the International Journal of Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (IJTMB ) found that older adults who receive massage therapy for up to six weeks could benefit from decreased blood pressure and improved stability. “This study suggests that regular massage therapy can produce several advantages for the older generation, including a relaxation affect for the entire body, lowering blood pressure, decreasing stress and improving balance, amongst other things,” says American Massage Therapy Association President, Cynthia Ribeiro.
Massage Therapy for Decreasing Stress in Cancer Patients
Research[3] published in BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care indicates that massage therapy can have a positive influence on the quality of life of people suffering serious illnesses such as brain cancer. The American Massage Therapy Association acknowledges these study results, which suggest that massage therapy can improve physical as well as emotional well-being in patients with late stage disease and when used in combination with standard care, massage can help reduce stress, anxiety, pain and fatigue.
View AMTA’s Research Roundup Volume 2 online
Visit AMTA’s Find a Massage Therapist® to find a qualified massage therapist in your area.
Research Roundup, Volume 1
AMTA issued its first research roundup in 2012 which also highlighted the growing body of evidence showing that massage therapy can be effective for a variety of health conditions, including:
• Osteoarthritis of the knee
• Inflammation after exercise
• Chronic low-back pain
• Fibromyalgia
View this research in further detail.
Massage Therapy Facts
• Between July 2010 and July 2011 roughly 38 million adult Americans (18 percent) had a massage at least once
• 75 percent of American’s surveyed claim that their primary reason for receiving a massage was medical (43 percent) and stress (32 percent) related
• 89 percent of individuals believe that massage can be effective in reducing pain; with 29 percent of respondents admitting they have used massage therapy for pain relief
• 50 percent of people claim their doctor has either strongly recommended or encouraged them to get a massage
Visit AMTA’s research section for more information from our consumer and industry fact sheets.
About AMTA
The American Massage Therapy Association® (AMTA®) is a professional association of more than 56,000 members. AMTA professional members have demonstrated a level of skill and knowledge through education and/or testing and must meet continuing education requirements to retain membership. AMTA provides information about massage therapy to the public and works to improve the professional climate for massage therapists. The association also helps consumers and healthcare professionals locate qualified massage therapists nationwide, through AMTA’s Find a Massage Therapist® free national locator service available at www.findamassagetherapist.org.
[1] Ang J, Lua J, Mathur A, et al. A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial of Massage Therapy on the Immune System of Preterm Infants. Pediatrics. 2012; 130(6):e1549-58.
[2] Sefton JM , Yarar C, Berry JW, et al. Six weeks of massage therapy produces changes in balance, neurological and cardiovascular measures in older persons. International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork.2012; 5(3):28-40.
[3] Keir SM and Saling JR. Pilot study of the impact of massage therapy on sources and levels of distress in brain tumour patients. BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. 2012; 2:363-36.
For more information, contact:
Bob Szafranski
Edelman, 312.240.2687
Bob.Szafranski@edelman.com
or
Caroline Dowdy
Edelman, 312.240.2801
Caroline.Dowdy@edelman.com

Healthy Aging: Up2Me

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Healthy Aging: Up2Me
According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than 125 million people suffer from at least one chronic illness. If you are an adult with a chronic condition such as diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, heart disease, chronic pain or anxiety, this Healthy Aging : Up2Me workshop can help you.

It’s also important for family caregivers to avoid developing a chronic illness due to stress and neglect of their own health and well being.
• Join this FREE 2 1/2 hour workshop held each week for six weeks.
• Learn from trained volunteer leaders who have cared for those with chronic
health conditions.
• Set goals for yourself.
Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health
888 W. Bonneville Ave • Las Vegas, NV 89106
Fridays: September 28 – November 2, 2012
12:30 – 3 p.m.
Sign up with Susan Hirsch at hirschs2@ccf.org or 702-483-6023.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Laser Wellness PMA

August 10, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Las Vegas 

www.laserwellnesspma.com

We Believe in 3 Things…

Laser Wellness PMA believes in truly a three word motto:  Learn, Invest, Share We know that today is more important than ever for people to Learn about their health conditions, Learn about what natural options are out there, and to Learn how to think with a winning attitude towards health and life.  We believe that by Investing in your health you are taking responsibility for your health and not just relying on someone else alone.  It has been proven again and again that being an active partner in your health and wellness journey can make all the difference.  Most people have never really invested in their health before, they pay insurance, they supplement, they pay for medications, but they never really invest in their health and miss out on truly being responsible and given themselves the best quality of life possible.  We also believe in Sharing health and wellness with everyone you know.  Once you invest in LLLT, whether you are a professional or a consumer, Share it with every family member, friend, neighbor, and co-worker so they can get a glimpse of what LLLT can do for them…

Do You Believe In Health & Wellness?

 What is it that keeps our  Health in somewhat dismay?  As we age, we have been trained to think that taking medications, surgeries, pain, lack of energy, lack of mobility, memory and vision loss, are all just the way it is and “normal.”  The TRUTH is we have given up responsibility of our own health journey.  Who is Responsible for our health and our families, our Doctors? Our Government? Our Insurance Companies? FACTS are that we are living longer, but not healthier, we are living sicker, longer!  We have more disease, sickness, pain, and injury problems than ever, and we take more prescriptions and have more surgeries than ever, yet we seem to be unhealthier!  The US is near the bottom in Longevity and Life Expectancy out of all the industrialized nations on Earth!

Call for a FREE Information Packet with dvd AND for a FREE Consultation from our Specialist:  (605)791-2283 Direct

Low Level Laser Therapy Works!

Light Amplication by Stimulated (Oscillation) Emission of Radiation or “Laser” has continued to bring out new changes in just about every medical and consumer field there is.  “Why is Low Level Laser Therapy so effective and continues to show tremendous results thru research all over the world?”  The answer is simple, LLLT works at the cellular and atomic level.  It carries electrons back into the body, and it helps to Re-energize sick, injured, damaged cells and allows better permeability to take place once again…So what can LLLT do for you since it works at the cellular level? As we continue to do more research, to get more understanding of how to effectively use LLLT, we continue to understand that we have just begun to see the wonderful results that LLT can produce…LLLT and Qlaser is truly Tomorrow’s Health & Wellness Care Today….

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Dr Peter Randall – Randall Chiropractic Rehabilitation – Las Vegas

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care 

http://drpeterrandalllasvegas.com/

Bio

My journey started studying mathematics and sciences in college. I was a college athlete and I always made fitness and eating well a high priority in my life. In the late 1970’s my interest in health care was very strong, but I decided to pursue a career in mathematics or engineering simply because I could not find what I was looking for in the healthcare field of traditional medicine. I wanted to pursue a direction that emphasized more health than sickness. This all changed for me when I met a chiropractor at a health club that I was working in. He explained to me what chiropractic care was about, and after doing my own research, it sounded great! So my next assignment for myself was to contact local chiropractors in my area to observe their working with patients. I have to say that after practicing as a doctor of chiropractic for over twenty six years, having performed over one million chiropractic adjustments in my career, I still absolutely love what I do! In fact, I would not choose to do anything else for a career except chiropractic.

My chiropractic education and training was at Palmer College of Chiropractic. I enrolled there in 1982 and I graduated from Palmer College in 1985 having earned the degree of Doctor of Chiropractic. I also hold an additional board certification as a chiropractic sports physician and have worked with many high school athletes, professional athletes, and high school and professional teams throughout my career. Beyond my formal education at Palmer College of Chiropractic, I have completed several additional studies in the diagnosis and treatment of many conditions which affect our human bodies. These include, but are not limited to, disc, injuries, arthritis, aging, knee and shoulder injuries, nutritional deficiencies, gentile techniques and treatment for more difficult to manage patients, osteoporosis, MRI interpretation, CAT scan interpretation, and X-ray interpretation. I have also consulted with the New York State Attorney General’s office rendering expert opinions in civil litigation cases. I am a member of the Nevada Chiropractic Association, The Elks Club, and I am past President of Business Networking International in Las Vegas, NV.

I am licensed to practice chiropractic in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts since 1985, the State of New York since 1987, and the State of Nevada since 2007.

My practice uses a holistic, whole body, approach when treating each patient’s condition and necessary spinal and extremity joint adjustments, physiotherapy modalities including gentile electrical therapies, cold packs, hot packs, rehabilitation stretching and strengthening exercises, nutrition and weight loss for optimal health and healing. My office offers very caring and gentle approaches when treating each individual patient.

I live in North Las Vegas with my family consisting of my wife, our three daughters, our son, our two dogs and two cats. When I am not seeing patients I love to exercise, play golf, read both fiction and nonfiction novels. My wife and I enjoy going to Ballroom dancing lessons together. We have actually competed in several ballroom dance competitions in the past. I have fallen in love with the Las Vegas Valley and consider it my home (we have extended family that has lived here since 1986). Lastly, it is my mission to help all people in Las Vegas, and the surrounding communities, to feel better, suffer less pain, and lead healthier happier lives.

 

My patients say:

Bryan says:

Dr Randall is wonderful.  He not only fixed my back, he helped me even when my insurance initially declined my claim.

He’s very open and has such an easy-going manner, you feel like you can talk to him about anything.

He knows how to use pressure in a gentle manner, if that makes sense.

I would recommend Dr Randall.  He helped me and I know he can help you, too.

Te says:

 I’d never had chiropractic treatment in my life and Dr Randall explained everything to me.

He understood why my body just didn’t feel like ‘me’ – and his suggestions of things to do at home really helped much more than I expected.

I would recommend Dr Randall to anyone who is not sure what’s going on with their body and their bones – if you don’t feel like ‘you’, see Dr Randall.

It was a great experience.  Thank you.

Meg Mathis, Publisher/CEO, NV Senior Guide say:

Being 50+ has never slowed me down. My weekly visits to Dr. Randall have kept me in the gym at optimum performance. I’m strong, agile, and most of all I feel great all over!

Leigh S. says:

Orthopedic Doctors, Chiropractors, and other similar medical professionals have been part of my life since I was a child – and as such, I have around 40 years of experience in being able to know a quality health care professional when I find one.

Dr Randall is one of the best I have ever encountered.  He is an exceptionally experienced and knowledgeable doctor, and also one who trusts his instincts – and I trust him.

Without exception, I recommend Dr Peter Randall.  He is quality, through and through.

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!