Nevada Senior Guide – Silver Hills

November 3, 2015 by · Comments Off on Nevada Senior Guide – Silver Hills
Filed under: Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing & Memory Care, Las Vegas 

http://www.covenantcare.com/Locations/Silver-Hills-Health-Care-Center/Facility-Home

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Welcome to Silver Hills Health Care Center.

When you enter Silver Hills Health Care Center, you enter a community of compassion. You’ll see it in our people and in our service. 

We are committed to meeting the individual needs of our residents, families, and community. We act as an extended family of sons and daughters, brothers and sisters, friends and companions, all united in a circle of care and linked by a covenant of shared responsibility for our residents. It is this community of compassions and attention to individual needs that sets us apart as a model of quality care.

We are a 155 bed nursing home located in a quiet residential area of Northwest Las Vegas. Our residents enjoy state of the art conveniences in a warm, comfortable, home-like environment. Each resident room is furnished with cable television, an electric bed, private bedside telephone plus closet and drawer space.

“We Are Family Serving Families”

3450 N. Buffalo Dr.
Las Vegas, NV 89129

Phone: (702) 952-2273
Fax: (702) 952-2270

Arbors Memory Care Community Wins Family Owned Business Award

May 22, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Stutchman Family Business Recognized with “When The Going Gets Tough” Award

For the past 40 years the Stutchman family has been in the business of senior care, presently owning and operating Arbors Memory Care Community. During their tenure they’ve seen highs and lows in their business, including economic downturns and the death of a husband/father/principal partner.  Through it all though, they’ve not only survived, but they’ve been able to thrive.

The Stutchman family was recently recognized by the Nevada Business Magazine through the publication’s annual Family Owned Business Awards.  They received the award for “When The Going Get’s Tough.”  The winner of this award is defined as “A business that faced adversity and made changes to adapt to what was sure to be a tough time.”

The magazine received several hundred nominations and narrowed those down to three finalists and then one winner in 10 categories for both the South and North part of the state.

Nevada Business Magazine had this to say about the Arbors, “Founded by Connie and Tom Stutchman, Arbors Memory Care Community is in a tough business, assisted living.  Couple that with the recent economic downturn and the Arbors had to adapt to survive.  Run today by the Stutchman’s daughter, Gina and her husband Jason Lewis, the organization has found a way to adapt their business model and provide affordable, yet quality assisted living.”

Some of the ways the Arbors has adapted is to add triple occupancy to their room mix, creating a more affordable option for families who need care for their over one with Alzheimer’s.  They also began to offer fixed-rate, all-inclusive pricing which enabled families to count on a consistent monthly amount for care throughout their family member’s entire stay.  Lastly the Arbors remodel project has just begun as well which will provide an even brighter and more inviting environment for residents and staff.

“We are absolutely thrilled to win this award and to be recognized by the business community for our years of dedication to quality senior care in Northern Nevada.  We look forward to caring for our seniors and providing jobs in the Reno/Sparks community for another 40 years,” says owner Gina Stutchman.

Arbors Memory Care Community is a locally owned and operated residential community providing care for individuals with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.  The Arbors, which is licensed for 72 beds, consistently receives an A grade in state inspections.

For more information, please contact Arbors Memory Care Community at (775) 331-2229 or visit www.arborsmemorycare.com.

Furniture Pieces That All Senior Citizens Need by Monika Kay

July 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As you get older, the body starts to break down and simple tasks can suddenly become very difficult. Going down the stairs or taking a bath can pose hazards that previously never existed. It might eventually be necessary to purchase furniture and accessories that can help you to get around the house easier. Here are some pieces that senior citizens should consider purchasing in the immediate future.

A Wheelchair

A wheelchair can be purchased for able-bodied and disabled individuals alike. For people who can still walk, using a wheelchair once in a while can take away the strain that is often felt in the joints. For individuals who have great difficulty walking, a wheelchair allows them to travel for long distances and participate in out-of-the-home activities.

A Bath Lift

Bath lifts are great apparatuses for the home because they take away a lot of the danger that can be found in bathrooms. Slippery floors and spills can make entering the tub a precarious activity. Bath lifts, on the other hand, slowly lower individuals from the top of the tub to the bottom. This makes bath time a considerably safer time.

A Lift Chair

Getting up from the couch or the recliner can be much more difficult for senior citizens. A lift chair takes away this difficulty by raising the back end of the apparatus, helping an individual to get up from a sitting position into a standing one. This is a great chair for any living room or den.

A Reclining Bed

These types of beds are very similar to the ones found in hospitals in that they can recline and lift at the headboard and the baseboard. Reclining beds meant for the home are a lot more comfortable and a lot less sterile. This is really good for older individuals who may have difficulty sleeping or who need to rest in a certain position.

A CD Player

This might seem like an odd choice but it has to do with quality of life as opposed to practicality. Several studies have shown that music can enliven and excite even the most comatose individuals. Many senior citizens fight off depression and loneliness and great music is one of the best cures for these conditions.

When it comes to acquiring furniture, older individuals should purchase things according to their needs. Older and more fragile bodies require assistance and all furniture pieces should accommodate this. The better equipped a home is, the more likely an individual can continue to live a full and happy life.

You must absolutely check out and browse the Lift Chair Store if you want to save BIG on mobility furniture, lift recliners and more… http://www.lift-chair-store.com/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Monika_Kay

 

RENOWN HEALTH WELCOMES 71 NURSE GRADUATES

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

RENO, Nev. (July 5, 2013) – Renown Health is excited to welcome 100 new
employees, including 71 local registered nurse (RN) graduates, several
experienced RNs, and 20 more employees in front-line patient care and other
roles. The new hires will meet for their first day of orientation at Renown
Regional Medical Center on Monday, July 8.

“We are pleased that so many of the area’s graduates choose Renown as the
place to build their career. Renown nurses and other healthcare
professionals have a tremendous opportunity to develop skills in multiple
areas. The Renown Health network includes three acute care hospitals, a
rehabilitation hospital, a skilled nursing facility and a large physician
practice,” said Michelle Sanchez-Bickley, Vice President Human Resources.
“With the wide range of clinical services we offer at Renown, employees have
a wealth of options to explore.”

As a private employer, Renown has developed programs to train healthcare
professionals and works closely with the university and community colleges
to offer residencies, clinical rotations, mentoring programs and local
faculty. The newly graduated RNs will participate in Renown’s nurse training
programs, which provide clinical support, education and mentoring. According
to Sanchez-Bickley, “Our residency and preceptorship programs are extremely
beneficial for new nurses they transition from the classroom to the
bedside.”

Renown is the region’s largest private employer and according to a recent
report from the Center for Regional Studies at University of Nevada, Reno,
the healthcare sector is a chief driver of western Nevada job growth. In
fact, healthcare employment grew by 9.6 percent over the past five years
while other sectors experienced a decline in jobs.

“We are committed to hiring, developing and retaining local employees,” said
Sanchez-Bickley. “To have a recruitment class of this size is very exciting
for Renown, and I hope for the new employees as well.” In total, Renown
employs 5,200 people and more than 1,400 of those are RNs.

Renown is a strong supporter of regional nursing programs, partnering with
the University of Nevada, Reno Orvis School of Nursing, Truckee Meadows
Community College, Western Nevada College and Carrington College. “Through
these partnerships,” said Sanchez-Bickley, “we are able to strengthen our
community ties, helping to provide education and support to individuals who
are looking to enter into the healthcare industry.”

# # # #

About Renown Health
Renown Health is Reno’s only locally owned, not–for–profit integrated
healthcare network. As the region’s largest private employer with a
workforce of more than 5,000 members, Renown provides more services than all
other local healthcare networks combined. It is comprised of three acute
care hospitals, a rehabilitation hospital, a skilled nursing facility, the
largest medical group and urgent care network and the region’s largest and
only locally owned not-for-profit insurance company, Hometown Health. Renown
also carries a long tradition of being the first in the region to
successfully perform the most advanced procedures.

Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center
recently achieved the Pathway to Excellence® designation, becoming the first
and only hospital in Nevada to receive this designation by the American
Nurses Credentialing Center. As a Pathway to Excellence designated
organization, Renown is committed to nurses’ satisfaction.

Senior Citizens Need Their Pets by Debbie Foster

June 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Most senior citizens who have pets treat them like they are their children. Of course, you don’t need to be a senior to do that, but homes without children of the human kind truly do have children of the furry kind.

In addition to providing companionship, unconditional love and a calming effect, larger pets can also provide a sense of safety to seniors. Its also been shown that people who have pets tend to live longer. Pet ownership, as we all know, also has its responsibilities. Sometimes these responsibilities are more difficult on seniors and keeping their pets can present problems. The escalating cost of veterinary bills and the ability to transport their pets when many don’t drive are very real issues.

Several cities in Colorado have been surveying their veterinarian population to find out which ones offer discounts to senior citizens for pet care, as well as which ones either make home visits or provide some type of transportation assistance and other help. In Fort Collins, their Senior Advisory Board obtained a grant allowing it to start a mobile veterinary service for seniors called Elder Pet Care. What a great idea!! Seniors are charged based on a sliding scale for veterinary services performed at their homes. The program is now self-sustaining after ten years.

Some transit systems, like the city of Loveland, CO are also on board by allowing pets to ride in crates. Transit systems in Boston, Toronto, Seattle and San Francisco allow full size dogs on leashes to come on board as well as ferries in some of these cities.

I think all these programs are worth duplicating across the United States. Next time you’re at your vet, why not ask if they’re involved in any programs that offer discounts or mobile pet care to seniors. After all, it never hurts to ask!

Debbie Foster is the owner of Pet Beds Unlimited and an avid animal lover. You can find a wide selection of quality pet beds, dog crates, dog carriers [http://www.petbedsunlimited.com/dog_carriers.html], dog pens [http://www.petbedsunlimited.com/dog_pens.html], cat beds, cat carriers and pet strollers at [http://petbedsunlimited.com]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Debbie_Foster

Senior Citizens and Pets by Kay Catlett

April 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As baby-boomer pet parents reach retirement age it is common to think about  putting aside the dog collars, pet clothing and dog harnesses and retire from  being pet parents. This is especially common as a beloved pet may die. The usual  questions of a grieving pet owner are magnified by older pet owners. The only  real questions with younger owners concerns whether or not they miss the joy of  pet ownership and whether they still possess the desire to take on the  responsibility of another pet. As the pet parent ages, more questions have to be  asked. The age and health of the human along with whether or not the needs of  particular pets can be managed are the most important questions for aging pet  parents.

The primary question concerns whether or not a pet is beneficial for aging  people.

Many seniors crave and miss nurturing. Often, a lifetime of nurturing has  defined a person, first as a parent, friend, spouse or grandparent. With  children and grandchildren growing older, nurturing may no longer required on a  personal basis. Senior citizens may find the circle of friends narrowing as  interests change, people retire and move, and activities lessen. Having a pet to  nurture, and providing that pet with food, comfort, exercise, toys, play and  companionship can fill the void in a changing life.

As the years pass, people may find their lives boring and lonely. Having a  pet cat or dog can fill this void. Taking care of a pet can provide meaning and  provide positive feelings of caring for another being. A pet can provide  structure missed by people following the routine of working outside of the home.  Caring for a pet provides some structure: time to eat, time to play and go  outside, time to be combed, time for naps. At the same time, the pet parent has  a role: to take care of the pet. This sense of responsibility provides structure  as well as a sense of being needed.

Another plus for seniors to have dogs, is for the protection a dog can give.  Seniors are often prey for intruders since the resistance of a senior citizen is  perceived as being lower and often it is known that there are less people living  in the home. However with a dog, the fear of barking or being bitten inhibit the  activities of intruders to that home. Research shows that homes with barking  dogs are violated fewer times than homes without dogs. Dogs provide safety to  seniors.

Another benefit of a senior owning a dog is that it makes them more active.  Owning a dog will compel the senior to live a more active lifestyle then if they  are by themselves. The dog will need to go outside to use the bathroom; feeding  and grooming must take place. These simple activities will give the owner  exercise. Matching the activity needs of the pet to the activity level of the  owner is an important factor to consider in deciding what kind of pet or breed  is best for both the senior and the pet.

Aging pet parents need to think about the future of their pets as time goes  on. A plan for pet care should be arranged so that if a hospitalization is  necessary, or a period of recovery in the home should occur, the needs of the  pets need to be met in those circumstances. Pet care in the home of another,  kennel care or acquiring the assistance of others to provide assistance in the  home are all necessary elements of a pet care plan. Pet parents of every age,  but especially senior citizens need to investigate alternatives in the dire case  of having to give up the pet. This author strongly suggests that “no-kill” pet  shelters need to be listed in the plan in the direst situations.

Overall, a senior owning a pet is an excellent idea. Dogs and cats provide  excellent companions and safety to senior citizens. Studies show that seniors  with pets are happier and live longer then seniors without pets. Preparing the  home properly with crates, dog collars, cat harnesses and pet beds coupled with  preparing plans for all contingencies will make for happy seniors and their  happy pets.

Kay Catlett [http://www.PetCollarStoreAndMore.com]

I believe that as we are humane to our pets, they make us more human. My  online pet store has carefully selected products at competitive prices.

I welcome your input on what products you like and want me to  carry.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kay_Catlett

 

Staying Safe: Tips to Prevent Falls, Burglary & Other Senior Safety Woes

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

In a recent survey of 1,616 people over the age of 45, AARP found that eight out of 10 people plan to stay in their homes as long as possible. This trend, called “aging in place,” is continually gaining traction as more seniors opt to update their homes instead of moving into retirement or senior-care facilities. If you are committed to staying in your home, there are a few essential updates to help make your home as safe as possible for years to come.

Prevent Bathroom Falls

No matter how healthy you are, a wet, slippery bathtub or shower can be dangerous. Add anti-slip adhesive strips for a quick fix. If you don’t like the look of adhesive strips, consider having a professional apply a clear coating that’s just as effective. For those with joint pain who have a bathtub/shower combination, it’s worthwhile to upgrade to a curbless shower with a built-in bench. Stepping into the bathtub can become difficult as mobility decreases.

Install grab bars in the bathtub and shower as well as outside of them to help you get in and out safely.

Prevent Break-ins

Add an alarm system to protect your home from becoming the target of local burglars. A recent article in the Washington Post notes that houses without alarm systems are three times more likely to be burglarized than those with security systems. With so many types of systems available, the options can be overwhelming. Look up home security reviews online to find out what systems are easy to use and meet your needs.

Whatever system you choose, it should come with a yard sign and a few stickers. Affix the stickers in a prominent place, such as on the windows near your front and back door. Stake the yard sign in your front yard so it’s clear to passersby that your house is protected.

Prevent Heat Stress & Cold Stress

Install an easy-to-read digital thermometer that displays the indoor and outdoor temperatures. If your thermostat breaks or your furnace or air conditioner fails, you’ll quickly be able to see that there’s a problem. Hang the thermometer in a high-traffic area of the home, such as the kitchen or living room. This is also helpful so you’ll know when it’s too hot to be outside during the scorching Nevada summers.

Prevent Eye Strain

As your vision declines, having ample lighting throughout your home becomes increasingly more important. Each room of your home should have a variety of lighting to suit the tasks you do in those rooms. The kitchen should have plenty of overhead lighting and task lighting near any food preparation areas. Your bedroom should have bedside reading lamps in addition to an overhead light.

When choosing fixtures for the bathroom and entryway, opt for those with multiple bulbs. This way when one bulb burns out, you won’t be left in the dark until you replace the old bulb.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Valley Group Homes – Las Vegas

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Group Homes 

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Valley Group Homes, LLC

Spring Valley Alzheimer’s Care
Center

Special Loving Care Alzheimer’s
Center

Alebris Care Home

Alzheimers & Memory Care of Las Vegas

As Time Goes By

Beehive Homes of Henderson Assisted Living

Monarch Group Home

Magnolia House

Nevada-Senior-Guide The Elderly Aristocrat – Las Vegas

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Group Homes 

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The Elderly Aristocrat

3700 Tioga Way

2380 Mohigan Way

Las Vegas, NV 89109

12 beds, Category I & II

(702) 768-2304

Nevada-Senior-Guide Jory Trail Home Care – Las Vegas

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Group Homes 

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Jory Trail Home Care

4133 Jory Trail

Las Vegas, NV 89108

10 Beds, Category II, Alzheimer’s, Hospice

Respite

(702) 339-6727

Nevada-Senior-Guide Alebris Care Home – Henderson

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Group Homes 

www.alebriscarehome.com

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Alebris Care Home

 

1012 Paradise View St. (Eastern & Sunridge Heights), Henderson, NV 89052

 

5883 Golden Wing St, Las Vegas NV 89113 (Rainbow & Russell)

 

Alzheimer’s Hospice Respite 702-235-2584

 

10 beds, Category II,

 

www.alebriscarehome.com

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!