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blindness | Nevada Senior Guide

Eye Drops And Ultraviolet Light — U.S. Clinical Trial Has Potential To Dramatically Change Landscape For Patients With Keratoconus And Corneal Ectasia

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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San Leandro, California Ophthalmologist One of Few Doctors Offering Treatment in Clinical Trials  

An exciting new treatment option for patients suffering from Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia is in U.S. Clinical trials right now.  Corneal Cross-linking is a non-invasive treatment that has the potential to halt the progression of Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia, possibly saving patients from the need for corneal transplant.

Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia

Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia cause the cornea (the clear front part of the eye) to thin and become weak, to bulge and protrude outward thereby causing visual problems. Keratoconus occurs naturally, while Corneal Ectasia can occur when the cornea is weakened by LASIK or PRK procedures. Both conditions can severely compromise eyesight and may lead to legal blindness and corneal transplant surgery.

Corneal Cross-linking

The Corneal Cross-linking treatment being investigated in the clinical study is Avedro’s VibeX eye drops (Riboflavin) and KXL device (Ultraviolet light). Corneal Cross-linking may help improve vision by stabilizing the cornea and reducing astigmatism.  Traditional treatments include Rigid Gas Permeable contact lenses, corneal implants, or corneal transplant.

The study was initiated to investigate an alternative way to treat Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia in patients after LASIK and PRK.  Only a small percentage of patients who have the surgery develop the sight-threatening condition, however, it frequently leads to corneal transplant or loss of vision.

Nicholas Batra, M.D.

Dr. Nicholas Batra, Medical Director of Batra Vision Medical Group in San Leandro, California, is one of only a handful of clinical investigators nationwide enrolling patients in this study.

“As a cornea specialist, I see this therapy has the potential to dramatically change the landscape of treatment for patients with Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia. The United States is the only western industrialized nation where Corneal Cross-linking is not approved for use outside of clinical trials.”

Corneal Cross-Linking therapy is offered to patients in Mexico, Canada and Europe and other countries around the world. Dr. Batra is currently accepting US patients for the post-LASIK and Keratoconus segment of the Cross-Linking study.

Dr. Batra was awarded his Doctorate of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and completed his ophthalmology residency at the University of California, San Francisco. In addition, Dr. Batra received a fellowship from UCSF/Proctor Foundation in Cornea and Refractive surgery and a Fellowship with the prestigious Heed Foundation.

(www.batravision.com)

For media interviews contact:
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Linda Zanides
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Ophthalmologists Warn that Fireworks-Related Injuries Can Cause Permanent Vision Loss

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Ophthalmologists Warn that Fireworks-Related Injuries Can Cause Permanent Vision Loss
American Academy of Ophthalmology and Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology urge parents to closely supervise children when around fireworks

LAS VEGAS – June 26, 2013 – As the Fourth of July holiday approaches and Americans make plans to celebrate the stars and stripes with a little red glare from celebratory rockets, the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology urge the public to take important steps to prevent fireworks-related eye injuries. The academies ask parents and other adults to be especially cautious when children are in the presence of fireworks.

Of the more than 9,000 fireworks injuries that occur in the United States each year, [I]approximately 45 percent are sustained by children age 15 and under.[II] Eyes are among the most injured body parts,[III] and one in six fireworks-related eye injuries results in permanent vision loss or blindness.[IV]

All fireworks are dangerous if not properly handled; however, sparklers cause the most injury and are particularly dangerous since many children handle them on their own. Sparklers typically burn at 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit. That temperature is nearly 1,000 degrees hotter than the boiling point of water, double the heat required to burn wood, hot enough to melt glass and cause third-degree burns to the skin.[V] Out-of-control bottle rockets also cause some of the most serious eye injuries, including corneal abrasions, traumatic cataract, retinal detachment, optic nerve damage and rupture of the eyeball – all of which can lead to potential blindness.

Both Academies advise the public that the best way to avoid potentially blinding injuries is to attend a professional public fireworks display instead of using consumer fireworks. For those who still decide to use legal consumer fireworks, the Academy recommends they follow these safety tips to prevent eye injuries:

  • Never handle fireworks without protective eyewear and ensure that all bystanders are also wearing eye protection.
  • Never let young children play with fireworks of any type. If older children are permitted to handle fireworks, ensure they are closely supervised by an adult and wear protective eyewear.
  • Clear the area of flammable materials and view fireworks from at least 500 feet away.
  • Leave the lighting of professional-grade fireworks to trained pyrotechnicians.

For those who attend professional fireworks displays and/or live in communities surrounding the shows:

  • Respect safety barriers at fireworks shows.
  • Do not touch unexploded display (show) fireworks; instead, immediately contact local fire or police departments to help.

“It’s vital that the public take seriously the dangers of using consumer fireworks. If mishandled, devastating injuries can occur – particularly to the eyes,” said Adam J. Rovit, M.D., president of the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology. “We urge parents and adults to be on high alert about these risks, especially if children are in the presence of fireworks, and take these safety measures to reduce the risk of eye injury.”

The Academy and the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology believe these tips can help to ensure safe Independence Day observances for everyone. If, however, a fireworks-related eye injury occurs, call 911 and seek medical help immediately. These injuries typically need advanced care by an ophthalmologist, a medical doctor who specializes in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

For more fireworks safety tips and additional information on how to maintain healthy vision, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology
The mission of the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology is to promote and advance the science and art of medical eye care. The Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology’s members are dedicated to treating and preventing eye diseases for all patients.  Learn more at Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide.  Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org.

About EyeSmart
The American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.orgto learn more.

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[I] Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2011 Fireworks Annual Report, accessed at http://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/113888/2011fwreport.pdf

[II] Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Fireworks-Related Injuries to Children, accessed at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/108/1/190.full

Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2011 Fireworks Annual Report, accessed at http://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/113888/2011fwreport.pdf

[IV]  British Journal of Ophthalmology, Ocular firework trauma: a systematic review on incidence, severity, outcome and prevention, accessed athttp://bjo.bmj.com.proxy1.library.jhu.edu/content/94/12/1586.full#ref-11

[V] National Fireworks Protection Agency fireworks tips, accessed at http://www.nfpa.org/assets/files/pdf/public%20education/fireworkssafetytips.pdf

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

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    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
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