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Keep it simple to move seniors successfully

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

According to experts, from 2000 until 2011, senior citizens 65 years and older grew nearly 18 percent, up to 41.4 million. Nearly 81 percent of that age group owned homes at the end of 2011.

Children and families of the Baby Boomer generation — people born between 1946 and 1960 — will soon find themselves helping elderly loved ones move.

Moving a senior family member is challenging. No one wants to upset that person, and everyone wants the move to go as smoothly as possible. This can sometimes seem like an impossible task.

The important thing to remember when moving a senior is to stay organized and calm throughout the move, say the experts at TWO MEN AND A TRUCK®. When moving a senior into a living facility, consider contacting management to find out what can be brought onto the campus, what are appropriate moving hours, and do they have any best practices for the move.

Remember:

  • Start packing several weeks in advance. Pack early to avoid being overwhelmed as moving day draws near.
  • Wrap small items in colored paper. This prevents items such as knick-knacks from becoming lost or thrown out.
  • Label boxes on top and sides. Mark the top and sides of boxes as they’re packed. Make sure to label boxes containing breakable or sentimental items with “fragile.”
  • Pack all electronic equipment in original boxes. Otherwise use low-static bubble wrap when packing these items
  • Always use packing paper. When wrapping fine china and precious items, the ink from printed newsprint may bleed onto valuables.
  • Sealing all boxes with packing tape. This makes it easier to stack and protect belongings.
  • Use boxes designed for the items you are packing. Use dish pack boxes for dishes and wardrobe boxes for clothing.

TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® is the largest franchised moving company both in the United States and internationally. Currently there are more than 240 national locations and 1,500 trucks operating in the U.S.; in total, the company operates 260 locations and 1,600 trucks. TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® has performed more than 4.5 million moves since its inception in 1985. The company has seen consistent monthly growth dating back to December 2009 and more than 20 months of double-digit growth. Each location is independently owned and operated. Visit twomenandatruck.com.

Contact: Dawn Kroeger
dawn.kroeger@twomen.com
(517) 803-2901

In an Aging Society – Are Senior Citizens Driving Safely? by Diane Carbo

August 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Remember when you couldn’t wait until you were old enough to drive. Getting a driver’s license gave us an opportunity to experience a new freedom we did not have before. For those of us with two parents working, driving meant taking ourselves and our siblings to after school activities and work. Driving took us to a level of independence that we had not experienced before. In an aging society of drivers, those very same feelings exist in many today. Driving gives us a sense of independence and freedom, the ability to go out and socialize, go to work or to church. Safety issues are a concern as many move into the golden years. The life expectancy of seniors is increasing. There are more active senior citizens out on the road today than ever before. Since we all age differently, many aging adults, can drive into their seventies and eighties. As we age, the risks for having a serious car accident that requires hospitalization rises. Statistics show that fatal car accidents rise after the age of seventy.

If you know an aging adult driver who is experiencing difficulty with driving, it is important to carefully monitor the situation. This article can help you determine whether you should take steps to encourage the senior to stop driving.

An aging society and risk

Some key risk factors that affect our aging society are:

Vision declines affecting depth perception and ability to judge speed of oncoming traffic. Night vision becomes a problem as our eyes loose the ability to process light. By age 60, you need three times the amount of light that you did at age 20 in order to drive safely after nightfall. We also become more sensitive to bright light and glare. Signs and road markings can be difficult to see.

With age, flexibility may decrease as response time increases. A full range of motion is crucial on the road. Turning your head both ways to see oncoming traffic, moving both hands and feet can be difficult for those with chronic conditions such a rheumatoid arthritis, or Parkinson’s disease, heart disease and diabetes.

Older adults in an aging society will often need to begin to take medications. Certain medications, as well as a combination of medications and alcohol, can increase driving risk. Be aware and careful about medication side-effects and interactions between medications. It is important to talk to your pharmacist to be aware of interactions that could affect your driving safely. Some medications cause drowsiness.

Aging affects our quality of sleep, resulting in daytime sleepiness. Falling asleep at the wheel is a major concern for those that dose off during the day.

The beginning of dementia or mental impairment can make driving more dangerous. A decreased mental capacity or decrease tolerance to stressful driving situations such as complex and confusing intersections may cause delayed reactions to sudden or confusing situations on the road. An aging brain and body does not have the same response time as we did when we were younger.

Look for warning signs

There are multiple warning signs that an aging adult is becoming or is an unsafe driver. Some of them are small, but if there are multiple concerns it may be time to talk about your concerns with the aging driver. Warning signs of an unsafe driver include

 

  • Abrupt lane changes, braking, or acceleration.
  • Increase in the dents and scrapes on the car or on fences, mailboxes, garage doors, curbs, etc
  • Trouble reading signs or navigating directions to get somewhere
  • Range-of-motion issues (looking over the shoulder, moving the hands or feet, etc.)
  • Becoming anxious or fearful while driving or feeling exhausted after driving
  • Experiencing more conflict on the road: other drivers honking; frustration or anger at other drivers. Oblivious to the frustration of other drivers towards them
  • Getting lost more often
  • Trouble paying attention to signals, road signs, pavement markings, or pedestrians
  • Slow reaction to changes in the driving environment
  • Increased traffic tickets or “warnings” by traffic or law enforcement officers
  • Forgetting to put on a safety belt

 

If you are concerned about an aging adult driver, closely monitor their driving before deciding whether they need a refresher coarse on their driving skills or approaching them to give up their driver’s license altogether. Ongoing and open communication is important to addressing the issue of driving. Studies conducted by Harvard and MIT show that while most drivers preferred to discuss the issue with their spouse, doctor or adult children (in that order), this is not the case for everyone. The right person may not necessarily be the most forceful or outspoken one, but rather someone whose judgment and empathy are especially trusted by the driver.

Talk with other family members, your doctor, and close friends to determine the best person for “the conversation.” Remember driving signifies independence, freedom and being self sufficient to active senior citizens. Realize you may meet with resistance and the aging driver may become defensive. Emotion may get in the way of a rational conversation. Express your concerns and give specific reasons for those concerns.

The goal is to get the aging driver be part of the decision making process

You may begin by asking your loved one to make some concessions because of your concerns.

 

  • Taking a driver refresher course
  • Not driving at night
  • Suggest they not drive on busy thoroughfares or during rush hour
  • Taking shorter trips
  • Not driving under adverse weather conditions
  • Encourage a visit to their primary care physician or pharmacist to go over medications that may affect driving skills. Your physician may be able to recommend a Driver Rehabilitation Specialist. This individual can assess driving safety by an office exam and driving test and make recommendations regarding special equipment or techniques that can improve the driver’s safety. Consider ways to decrease the need to drive. Check out alternatives to shopping by car, including:

  • Arrange for home deliveries of groceries and other goods, and try to arrange for home visits by clergy, medical and personal care providers, and government service providers.
  • Use financial services that don’t require bank visits, like automatic bill paying, direct deposit, and bank-by-phone or on-line banking services.

Fears of those living in an aging society 

Fear of isolation and decrease in socializing is a real concern for the aging driver. It is important to keep spirits high as the aging driver makes the adjustments to becoming a non driver. Be in tune to their need for fun, volunteering, work and religious activities. Create a transportation plan that can make it easier for the aging driver to give up driving. You can create a list of friends and family that are willing to drive, contact the church and the local Area Agency on Aging in regards to transportation programs in the area.

Some seniors may adjust better if they can keep their own car, but have others drive them. Their own car may feel more comfortable and familiar, and the sense of loss from not driving may be lessened. Remember, baby boomers have grown up walking out the door and being able to go where they want to go. We need to keep the aging adult driver and those on the road with them safe.

Diane Carbo RN- As a geriatric care manager, that has cared for her father and mother in law in their homes, she learned first hand how overwhelming, stressful, and time consuming caring for a loved one can be. Staying in their homes was very important to them. As a result, Diane started http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com to assist others age in familiar surroundings and avoid the emotional and frustrating task of maneuvering the medical delivery system

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

Sometimes Little Things Can Be Huge!

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

By Thair Phillips, President, RetireSafe

A small and relatively new product is making life easier for older Americans. It’s a simple thing, but unit dose laundry detergent packs (or pods) are helping seniors perform necessary laundry chores that they might not otherwise be able to do without help. The laundry packs’ small size and pre-measured, consistent content is perfect for aging hands and eyes. With ten thousand of our fellow Americans reaching the age of 65 each day, it’s a really big deal!

While younger Americans can choose from many options, the pods are a huge help to the frail and the disabled.  Consider those who suffer from arthritis, for example. According to 2007-2009 data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), an estimated 50 million adults have self-reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis. That number is expected to grow to 67 million by the year 2030, per NHIS data. Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States, negatively impacting function and mobility for millions of senior citizens. The laundry pods meet the need created by those who can no longer heft a jug of detergent and pour it into a measuring cup. The small (but not too small to handle) size detergent pod fits the bill for aging-in-place seniors who wish to remain self-reliant.

And then there are those who must struggle each and every day with impaired vision.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), individuals over the age of 65 accounts for roughly 30 percent of the U.S. population considered to be visually impaired. Dimming eyesight can reduce physical, functional, emotional, and social well-being.  Doing the laundry can be a chore for all of us, but trying to measure the exact amount of liquid or powder for the person who is vision impaired can be a laundry room disaster resulting in ruined clothes and dangerous messes. For age-in-place seniors with cataracts, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and/or diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes that causes visual impairment, anything that can help simplify the laundry measuring process is truly a godsend.

Keep in mind that many older Americans in single family homes and apartments may well have to take their laundry and laundry supplies to a communal laundry room or a Laundromat.  Having the convenience of smaller, self-contained detergent pods to carry instead jugs of liquids and large boxes of powder is a big advantage for the elderly.  This is especially true for those navigating with canes or walkers, or those needing to keep one hand free for stability.

In short, pre-measured laundry detergent packs or pods are critical innovations for seniors. This is one small-sized product with a huge functional impact for seniors. In an aging America, we need every one of these impactful products, and many, many more.

RetireSafe is a nationwide organization of 4000,000 supporters that advocates on behalf of seniors on issues regarding Social Security, Medicare, health and financial well-being.

Contact Thair Phillips, (202) 628-5095

City Of Las Vegas April 2013 Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle!

 

Spring Celebration and Foster Connect (all ages)
Saturday, April 6, noon to 4 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road, (702) 229-8100.
Families will enjoy a spring celebration with amusement rides, jump houses, crafts, games, farmers’ market, community vendors, music and much more. Interested families will be able to receive information on becoming a foster family.

 

Summer Themed Specialty Camp Registration (ages 6-15)

Thursday, April 11, 8 a.m. registration packets are available for pick up.

Thursday, April 11, 5 p.m., registration opens for Summer 2012 alumni at Mirabelli.

Saturday, April 13, 8 a.m., open registration at both sites in person. No online registration.

Cost: $115 per week for the first child; $110 each additional child from the same family.

MirabelliCommunity Center, 6200 Hargrove Ave., (702) 229-6359.

VeteransMemorialLeisureServicesCenter, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.

Two community centers will offer themed specialty camps with additional activities, cooking, and/or field trips from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday, beginning June 10. A few specialty camps have higher prices. Mirabelli special camp list is available online.

For more information on summer camps, call 229-6175.

 

Summer Camp Registration (ages 6-15)

Registration opens Saturday, April 13, 8 a.m. in person at the following sites.

Cost: $75 per week for the first child; $70 for each additional child from the same family.

Lorenzi Adaptive Summer Camp, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-6358.

CimarronRoseCommunity Center, 5591 N. Cimarron Road, (702) 229-1607; ages 6-11 only.

DoolittleCommunity Center, 1950 N. J St., (702) 229-6374.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

StupakCommunity Center, 251 W. Boston Ave., (702) 229-2488.

Camps will be offered from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays, beginning June 10; Lorenzi Adaptive camp will begin at 7:30 a.m. For more information on summer camps, call 229-6175. No online registration.

 

Ward 6 Free Shredding Event
Saturday, April 13, 10 a.m. to noon.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive.
Bring your documents that need to be shredded. Complimentary shredding takes place in the Centennial Hills Community Center Active Adult Center parking lot. Limit of five boxes per vehicle.

Dula Gymnasium Indoor Pickleball Tournament (ages 18+)

Friday, April 19, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Cost: $15 if registered by April 5; $20 if registered after April 5.

Dula Gym, 441 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6307.

Enter the Inaugural Promotional Pickleball Tournament. Four indoor courts will host Men’s Doubles, Women’s Doubles, Mixed Doubles and 50+ groups with A and B divisions. This is a double-elimination tournament. Minimum registration of four teams per division with a guarantee of three matches. First-place winners will receive awards. Please call 229-6307 for more information and registration flyer.

 

Ward 6 Free Movie in the Park – “Odd Life of Timothy Green”
Friday, April 19, 6:30 p.m.

Free admission.
Centennial Hills Park Amphitheatre, 7101 N. Buffalo Drive, Buffalo and Deer Springs.
Enjoy the PG-rated family film, the “Odd Life of Timothy Green” in the park. Bring a blanket or folding chair to be more comfortable. For more information, call (702) 229-5463.

 

Ward 1/Ward 2 Free Shredding Event

Saturday, April 20, 10 a.m. to noon.

All AmericanSportsPark, 1551 S. Buffalo Drive

Bring your documents that need to be shredded. For more information, call (702) 229-4645.

 

Mayor’s Health Walk (all ages)

Saturday, April 27, 8 to 9:30 a.m.

Free admission and open to the public

Kellogg Zaher Sports Complex, 7901 W. Washington Ave. at Buffalo Drive.
For more information, call (702) 229-6720.

Adaptive Recreation

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)

Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m.  Closed school district staff development days and holidays.

Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

Participants will enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

 

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)

Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

 

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)

Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed school district staff development days and holidays.

Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.

CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Call 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence

City Of Las Vegas March 2013 Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

City Of Las Vegas March 2013

Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

 

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle!

 

Ward 1 Puppy Love Event (all ages)

Saturday, March 2, 10 a.m. to noon.

WoofterPark (DogPark), 1600 Rock Springs Drive (Corner of Rock Springs Drive & Vegas Drive).

Prepare to enjoy the Dog Costume Parade (with prizes), food trucks, vendors, raffles and information booths. Pet adoptions will be available. Spay and neuter clinic information will be available. Hosted by Ward 1 Councilwoman Lois Tarkanian. For more information, please contact Kimberly Reid at (702) 229-2299 or kreid@lasvegasnevada.gov.

 

Corporate Challenge Opening (all ages)

Saturday, March 2, 8 a.m. Torch Relay; 3:30 p.m. Family Fun; 5:30 p.m. Executive Relay; 7 p.m. Opening Ceremonies

Free admission.

Fremont Street East between Las Vegas Boulevard and Seventh Street.

Opening ceremonies will include a parade of flags and banners, a Corporate Challenge Light Show and musical entertainment.

 

Ward 5 Coffee With The Councilman

Thursday, March 7, 9 to 10 a.m.

Free admission and open to the public.

Starbucks, 751 N. Rancho Drive, at Bonanza Road.

Join Ward 5 Councilman Ricki Y. Barlow for coffee and conversation about your ideas to improve Ward 5 and Las Vegas.

 

The Fast and the Furriest Dog Walk & Health Fair (all ages)
Saturday, March 9, 10 a.m. to noon. Walk begins at 10:30 a.m.
Free and open to the public.
Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road, (702) 229-8100.
Bring your four-legged friends and family out for a walk in the park. Community vendors will be participating in this event to provide information to help you, your family and your four-legged friends stay healthy this year. The animal foundation will share information about low-cost spay and neuter, microchip and vaccination clinic.

Coffee With The Mayor

Thursday, March 14, 8 to 9:30 a.m.

Free admission and open to the public.

Starbucks, 751 N. Rancho Drive, at Bonanza Road.

Residents looking to meet and converse with Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman and Ward 5 Councilman Ricki Y. Barlow will have the opportunity from 8 to 9:30 a.m. Coffee with the Mayor is an opportunity for residents who have issues to discuss, or would simply like to meet the mayor.

 

Spring Youth Flag Football Leagues (ages 6-14)

Games on Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., March 16-May 11. Advance registration required.

Fee: $75, includes NFL jersey, black shorts, flags, and trophies or medals.

CimarronRoseCommunity Center, 5591 N. Cimarron Road, (702) 229-1607.

VeteransMemorialLeisureServicesCenter, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.

For boys and girls ages 6-14. Birth certificate is required at registration. Practices will be held once or twice each week for 1-1½ hours in locations to be determined. There will be 6-8 games, based on size of league. Divisions: Pee Wee (ages 6-8), Juniors (9-11), and Seniors (12-14). Participants must purchase their own mouth pieces and rubber cleats. Coaches are always needed. There will be a city championship for the top four teams in each division for an additional $10 fee.

 

Ward 3 Free Shredding Event

Saturday, March 16, 10 a.m. to noon.

Kmart, 5051 E. Nellis Blvd. on east side near Nellis.

Ward 3 Councilman Bob Coffin sponsors this complimentary shredding event. Bring your documents that need to be shredded. Limit five boxes per vehicle. For more information, call 229- 4623.

 

Spring Break Splash Camp (ages 6-11)

Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Cost: $110 per child

Municipal Pool, 431 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6309.

Camp activities include daily swim lessons and more. Excursions will be included for an additional fee. Campers should bring a sack lunch, beverages, swim suit, towel and a change of clothes each day. Limited to 25 youth. Advance registration is required. Call 229-6309 to register.

 

Spring Break Kids Camp (ages 6-11)

Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Cost: $75 first child, $70 each additional child.

CimarronRoseCommunity Center, 5591 N. Cimarron Road, (702) 229-1607.

VeteransMemorialLeisureServicesCenter, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.

Youth need to bring a sack lunch and snacks each day. Enjoy sports, games, arts, crafts and more fun.

 

Free Souper Spring Egg Hunt (ages walking-13)

Saturday, March 30, 10 a.m. to noon.

Dula Gym, 441 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6307.

Bring a canned good or non-perishable food item and receive an extra ticket to win a prize egg.  Donations will be delivered to Three Square Food Bank. Children will be released at listed times in designated areas of Dula Gym to search for eggs filled with treats and discoveries. Tots ages walking-4, gym floor 9:30 a.m.; ages 5-6, dance room 9:50 a.m.; ages 7-8, fitness room 10 a.m.; ages 8-9, computer lab 10:10 a.m.; and ages 10-13, gymnasium floor 10:20 a.m.

Ward 2 Spring Egg Hunt Eggstravaganza (all ages)

Saturday, March 30, 10 a.m. to noon.

Free and open to the public.

VeteransMemorialLeisureServicesCenter, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.

Bring the family to enjoy DJ music, photos with Easter Bunny, egg hunts, craft projects, games, face painting, jump houses and raffle drawings.

 

Adaptive Recreation

8th Annual Vision Forum (all ages)

Thursday, March 7, 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Free admission. Those who pre-register by Feb. 27 are guaranteed a free lunch, raffle ticket and expedited Paratransit service, if requested.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Registration and vendors exhibit hall in the adjacent Dula Gym will be open 8-10 a.m. Workshops scheduled 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. include fitness, nutrition, technology tips, goal setting, ADA guidelines, blindness training, transportation, education, health advocacy, low-vision information and a family session. The day is sponsored by the city of Las Vegas, Blindconnect, Nevada Council of the Blind and the Veterans Administration Vision Program. For more information and a registration form, call 229-6454.

 

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)

Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m.  Closed March 25-29, school district staff development days and holidays.

Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

Participants will enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

 

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)

Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

 

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)

Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed school district staff development days and holidays.

Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.

CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Call 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence.

Socks For Seniors

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Socks for Seniors is an annual community service project through which we organize collecting NEW socks to be distributed to elderly in local area nursing homes around the holidays.

 

The program begins with Make A Difference Day Saturday October27 – The Official Kick-off of the 2012 Socks For Seniors Campaign and runs thru Christmas.

 

We are looking for local area coordinators near Henderson to help with collecting socks this year.

 

There are two major ways that you could help us-

 

1. Help us promote Socks For Seniors. We are available for interviews. Media support in 2011 helped us grow the program into over 250 cities coast to coast. Complete information is available on our website about the program which my wife and I started 11 years ago. It is 100% volunteer based. We neither take or make money from it. We do not collect money, we collect SOCKS!

 

If you could schedule a time for an interview to help promote Socks For Seniors near Henderson please visit this link:

 

http://www.socksforseniors.com/media.html

 

In 2011 we did hundreds of media interviews. This form will help us keep everything organized so (hopefully) nothing falls thru the cracks!

 

2. Host a Sock Drive. It all starts with 1 person, 1 box, 1 location. It’s easy…and all the socks stay in the local Henderson area! If you have a nursing home, assisted living center or other senior community in mind for distribution – GREAT! If not,we will help connect you with a local senior community for distributing the socks at the end of the sock drive.

 

If you can decorate a box and find a location or locations for boxes – that’s all there is to it. Then together we can promote the sock drive.

 

To collect Socks For Seniors – please sign up atthis link:

 

http://www.socksforseniors.com/register.html

 

Then we can stay in touch with you during the campaign with updates and answering any questions you may have. You will also receive an email with signs and logos for the drive and otherinformation.

 

A BIG THANKS for reading this about Socks For Seniors. I wanted to get it out before everyone gets busy and begins thinking about the Holidays – which always seems to happen right after Halloween.

 

If I can answer any questions – please just reply to this email. If you can help us promote the program or collect socks please click a link above and you will be taken to the sign form.

 

Thanks again!

 

Jamie
Socks for Seniors
www.socksforseniors.com

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Medicine Disposal Program

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

www.paininthedrain.com

PAIN IN THE DRAIN

IN THE COMMUNITY!

Did You Know… …You can dispose of your expired and unused medicine at any Police Department in Clark County?
Drop Boxes are now located in the lobby of the Boulder City Police Department, the City of Henderson Police Department Substations, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department substations, the North Las Vegas Police Department substations and the Mesquite Plice Department substations.

Don’t Rush to Flush!  Dispose of your expired medicines properly!

Only public employees may access public manholes for maintenance or monitoring activities. Other, illegal discharges might result in:

  • Clogged or overflowing sewer lines
  • Disruption of wastewater treatment plant processes
  • Damage to sewer lines and laterals
  • Buildup of toxic gases in the lines
  • Harmful discharges into the environment

An example of an illegal discharge is a commercial vacuum truck dumping its contents of grease interceptors, sand/oil interceptors and septic tanks into the sewer system. Illegal dumping into public manholes is most likely to occur at night and away from major streets. If you see a potentially unauthorized discharge, please contact the Water Reclamation District at 702-668-8354.

Introducing F.O.G.G.

The Clark County Water Reclamation District and the Cities of Las Vegas, Henderson and North Las Vegas have teamed up to ask our residents to Just Can It! and help keep cooking fat, oils, grease and grit (FOGG) out of our community’s sewer systems. These agencies maintain extensive collection systems of several thousand miles of pipeline underneath the streets to deliver wastewater from homes, businesses and schools to the treatment facilities.
We call it wastewater, but it is not wasted at all. We reclaim every drop of this valuable resource by treating it to very high levels until suitable for reuse- for golf courses, soccer fields, industrial cooling and, most importantly, for return to Lake Mead and the Colorado River system for Return Flow Credits. In order to clean the water to the very high standards necessary, these agencies must keep the wastewater flowing through the pipelines to reach the plants for treatment.

F.O.G.G. FAQs

Q:  What is FOGG, and is it a problem? A:  FOGG is made up of fat, oil, grease, and grit, and it is a very BIG problem! FOGG does not mix with water because its components are insoluble and have a tendency to separate from a liquid solution. When fat, oil and grease are poured down the drain, they stick to the sewer pipe walls creating layers of buildup that restrict the wastewater flow. This problem requires pipes to be cleaned more frequently, causes pipes to be replaced sooner than expected, and causes blockages that can result in sewer overflows.

Q:  How does fat, oil, grease, and grit (FOGG) create a sewer blockage? A:  Fat, oil, grease, and grit in a warm, liquid form may appear to be harmless since they flow easily down the drain. However, as the liquid cools, the FOGG solidifies and floats to the top of the other liquid in the sewer pipes. The layer of FOGG sticks to the sewer pipes and over time, the flow of wastewater becomes restricted and can cause a backup or overflow. The gritty particles, including coffee grinds, eggshells, aquarium gravel, grain, rice, seeds, etc. get trapped in the greasy buildup, accelerating the problem rapidly.
Over time, FOGG accumulates in the sewer system in much the same way that cholesterol accumulates in our arteries. As FOGG builds in the pipes, wastewater becomes increasingly restricted. Suddenly, sometimes without warning, a sewer pipe backs up and overflows, similar to a heart attack. The result is a home flooded with sewage, or sewage overflowing in the street, where it flows – untreated – into area waterways.

Q:  What products contain fat, oil, grease, and grit (FOGG) A:  Fat, oil, grease and grit are natural by-products of the cooking and food preparation process. Common sources include food scraps, meat fats, cooking oils, lard, baked goods, salad dressings, sauces, marinades, dairy products, shortening, butter and margarine, coffee grinds, eggshells, grain, rice, seeds, etc. Anything put through the garbage disposal adds to the buildup.

Q:  What can I do to keep fat, oil, grease, and grit (FOGG) out of the sewer and help prevent a grease related sewer overflow from occurring in my house or on my street? A:  Everyone plays a role in preventing FOGG from damaging our sewer system. The following easy tips can help prevent a sewer overflow in your home or neighborhood.

  1. Fat, oil, grease, and grit should NEVER be poured down the sink. Sink drains and garbage disposals are not designed to handle these materials properly.
  2. Before washing, scrape and dry wipe pots, pans and dishes with paper towels and dispose of materials in the trash.
  3. Pour fat, oil, grease and grit into a disposable container, such as an empty glass jar or coffee can. Once the liquid has cooled and solidified, secure the lid and place the container in the trash.
  4. Disconnect, or at least minimize use of the garbage disposal to get rid of food scraps. The garbage disposal chops up food into small pieces, but can still cause a blockage in the pipe. Use sink strainers to catch food items, and then empty the strainer into the trash.

Q:  Why is it important to dispose of FOGG properly? A:  Sewer system maintenance in neighborhoods that experience sewer blockages and backups due to fat, oil, grease, and grit is expensive and can contribute to the amount that customers pay for sewer service. A sewer blockage or backup can also result in expensive repairs to the home.

Q:  What should I do if I experience a sewer blockage or overflow? A:  Call your sewer service provider at one of the following numbers:

  • Clark County Water Reclamation District: 702-434-6600
  • City of Las Vegas: 702-229-6594
  • City of Henderson: 702-267-2500
  • City of North Las Vegas: 702-633-1275

Pain in the Drain | Why Flushing is Bad

Why Flushing is a Bad Idea When you flush medication down your drain, it ends up at one of our treatment facilities. These ingredients can remain in the treated water when it is released into the water cycle. Handful of PillsWhen prescription or over-the-counter drugs are flushed down the sink or toilet, their chemical components may be added to the water supply. The presence of these substances in the environment is emerging as an important national and international issue. Although the concentration levels of these products in the environment is very low, research and monitoring are continuing worldwide.
Putting medications down the drain is not just a local concern. Increasingly, prescription and non-prescription medications, many of which are not effectively destroyed by sewage treatment plants, are finding their way into streams and drinking water supplies. A study conducted by the United States Geological Survey found that 80 percent of the 139 streams sampled across 30 states detected very low concentrations of chemicals commonly found in prescription drugs. While the concentration levels of these products are very low, they may be enough to cause adverse effects in the environment and to human health.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!