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care communities | Nevada Senior Guide

Study by Harvard Medical School Researchers Examines Senior Living’s Role in Changing Health Care System

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Individuals in senior living communities require an array of health and supportive services to maintain an optimum quality of life. Often, these older adults receive fragmented care through multiple providers and payers, resulting in unnecessary health care expenditures and lower quality-of-care. To address these challenges, Brookdale is partnering with researchers at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and other senior living industry peers to establish the Assisted Living Sector Healthcare Policy Research Fund.

“This support allows us to examine what role senior living providers have in the new models of care that have emerged under health care reform,” says David Grabowski, PhD, professor of health care policy at HMS, who is leading this research study.

Grabowski and his team will examine whether providing more comprehensive, coordinated services in the senior living sector reduces the need for Medicare-paid services and Medicaid-financed nursing home services.

According to Will Clark, Brookdale’s senior vice president of strategy and brand and a member of the HMS Health Care Policy Advisory Council, society’s ability to meet the needs of an aging population is an important political, economic, clinical, and social imperative.

“Harvard’s reputation for tackling some of health care’s biggest challenges and generating meaningful insights that shape our nation’s policy is unparalleled. We are confident Dr. Grabowski and his colleagues’ research will be influential in determining the appropriate role senior living can and should play in our evolving health care system,” Clark said.

Brookdale’s goals for this effort are to create awareness for the potential senior living has to positively impact the health, well-being and overall cost of care for seniors; to identify barriers to creating more integration among senior living and the health care system; influence policy; and identify innovative models that integrate senior living with our health care system.

The initiative is funded through a cumulative contribution of $150,000 from Brookdale and eight other senior living providers — Atria Senior Living, Elmcroft Senior Living, Emeritus Senior Living, Erickson Living, HCP, Inc., Health Care REIT, Inc., Sunrise Senior Living, and Ventas, Inc. Together, these organizations hope to begin a dialogue among health care providers, policy makers, regulators, and consumers on the value of senior living and its role in creating an integrated, outcomes-driven health care system.

The study will occur in two phases. The first phase will consist of analyzing the role of assisted living in new payment-delivery models and presenting a conceptual model of how an integrated model might work, as well as the opportunities and challenges associated with such an approach. Building on the results of the first phase, the second phase of the project will consist of primary data work and potentially the development of a pilot program.

For additional information about the study, contact David Cameron, HarvardMedicalSchool’s director of science communications, at 617-432-0441 or david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu.

For more information about Brookdale, visit www.brookdale.com.

Brookdale Senior Living Inc. is a leading owner and operator of senior living communities throughout the United States.  The Company is committed to providing senior living solutions within properties that are designed, purpose-built and operated with the highest-quality service, care and living accommodations for residents.  Currently, Brookdale operates independent living, assisted living, and dementia-care communities and continuing care retirement centers, with more than 650 communities in 36 states and the ability to serve approximately 67,000 residents.  Through its Innovative Senior Care program, the Company also offers a range of outpatient therapy, home health, personalized living and hospice services. For more information, visit http://www.brookdale.com.

Contact: Andrea Turner, 615-564-6829, aturner2@brookdaleliving.com

Nevada Senior Guide: The Arbors – Sparks, Nevada

www.arborsmemorycare.com

Alzheimer’s care communities are designed to sensitively care for those with Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia. These communities offer safe and secure residential care for those who need 24 hour assistance. Residents will receive the individual care they need, while maintaining their dignity and comfort in a caring and compassionate environment.

Nevada Senior Guide Announces Arbors Memory Care Community Top Rating

August 10, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Nevada Senior Guide Announces Arbors Memory Care Community Top Rating

Nevada Senior Guide Announces Arbors Memory Care Community Receives State’s Top Rating in Annual Survey. Family owned memory care community in Nevada receives another “A” grade.
Sparks, NV, August 09, 2012 –(PR.com)– Family owned memory care community in Nevada receives another “A” grade

Arbors Memory Care Community has received another “A” grade from the State of Nevada Department of Health and Human Services.

This is the 9th year in a row the community in Sparks, which specializes in the care of people with Alzheimer’s and related dementias, has received the highest rating from the Health Division’s Bureau of Health Care Quality and Compliance.

Owned and operated by the Stutchman family, the Arbors has never been resurveyed to achieve the A grade. They have consistently received the highest rating on the first survey or inspection.

Some assisted living and memory care communities receive a lower grade on the first inspection and then must be resurveyed once any deficiencies have been corrected.

During the annual survey state inspectors show up unannounced and check on resident care, medication management, employee fingerprints and background checks, resident medical records, cleanliness of the building and fire safety.

Survey results may be viewed at http://www.health.nv.gov/Deficiencies_Qry.asp#agc_ and click on the AGC/AGZ link.

Each licensed community in the state is surveyed on an annual basis. Facilities then receive a grade between A and D. An A grade means the community is well run with minor administrative issues and no harm is likely to occur. A grade of D means serious harm has occurred or a condition or incident has resulted in death or serious harm and/or multiple administrative issues were cited.

“We are so incredibly proud of our continuous A grade,” said owner Gina Stutchman. “One of the many benefits to being family-owned is that all of the decisions regarding the quality of care are made right here in our building, not at corporate headquarters in another state.”

Stutchman also said the Arbors provides ongoing staff training that far surpasses the state requirements.

“Our training focuses on the fact that each person with memory loss is unique and is affected in a different way. Understanding the disease process and learning a variety of ways to communicate allows our caregivers to reduce anxiety and create a comfort zone for our residents and their families.”

Arbors Memory Care Community is a family-owned and operated residential community providing care for persons living with Alzheimer’s or other dementias.

The Arbors, located at 2121 E. Prater Way in Sparks, offers long term stays, as well as respite stays for caregivers needing a short-term care solution.

For more information, please contact Stephanie Hanna, Arbors Memory Care Community (775) 331-2229 or visit www.arborsmemorycare.com.

For more information about Nevada Senior Guide, please go to http://www.nvseniorguide.com

The Difference Between Assisted Living and Nursing Homes (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
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Overview of Assisted Living

Assisted Living, sometimes called Personal Care, is a type of care that supports individuals with their basic Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), including bathing, dressing, preparing meals, and, in some cases, medication assistance or reminders. Residents of Assisted Living communities, whether stand-alone or part of Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC), benefit from the community’s planned social, educational and recreational programs, as well as the daily opportunities for socialization with peers. Three daily meals are generally provided.

Assisted Living housing tends to be more intimate, offering an enhanced home-like atmosphere. Apartments are generally studio or one-bedroom, with kitchenettes. Safety features such as call systems and handrails are standard.

Paying for Assisted Living

Assisted Living can be paid for from private funds or with a mixture of private funds and long-term care insurance. Supplemental private insurance will not pay for Assisted Living.

Overview of Nursing Care

Often called skilled nursing and rehab centers or nursing homes, Nursing Care communities offer both long-term skilled nursing care and short-term skilled nursing and rehabilitation services. While supporting individuals with their basic Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), including bathing, dressing, preparing meals, these communities also provide complex medical care in which the services of licensed nurses and therapists (physical, occupational, nutritional and speech) are utilized. These services are often utilized by individuals requiring short-term medical support after an injury, surgery or illness-related hospital stay. Nursing Care communities generally have 24-hour licensed care staffing.

Nursing Care housing is generally a private suite or shared accommodations. Well-designed communities enhance recovery and healing with planned social, educational and recuperative programs, as well as with an emphasis on home-like comforts.

Paying for Nursing Care

Reimbursement for Nursing Care community patients and residents depends largely on length of stay. Different funding sources kick in at different intervals. Short-term rehabilitation stays are often covered by Medicare and/or private insurance, including long-term care insurance. (Certain criteria in terms of length of hospital stay and care requirements while in the Nursing Care community have to be met to receive Medicare payments and it is worthwhile to discuss these with a discharge coordinator at the hospital.) For long-term care residents, private funds, Medicaid, and long-term care insurance are the typical methods of payment.

To learn more about Senior Living options, visit this website: www.areyourparentsthriving.com

Watermark Retirement Communities

Denise Barnes is the Electronic Communication Specialist at Watermark Retirement Communities in Tucson, AZ.

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Senior Housing Options Explained (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
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Deciding to move to a senior retirement community is one of the biggest decisions you make. It can be an exciting time, but it can also cause some confusion when it comes to choosing which type of community is best for you or your loved one. People have different needs. Living options are not “one size fits all.”
To help you find the best fit, this article explains the main types of senior retirement options, including independent living, assisted living, skilled nursing, memory care and continuing care retirement communities.

Independent Living

Independent living facilities are apartment style homes that allow a person to maintain complete autonomy. This type of facility is a very good option for those that can still do everything for themselves but need contact with other people – and less isolation than living at home alone. Senior independent living facilities usually have on site staff members that provide minimal supervision. Independent living facilities also offer activities and services for residents, ranging from tennis and swimming to fine dining and hair salons.

Assisted Living

Assisted living facilities are designed to help those that have difficulty caring for themselves to the extent that they can no longer live in their own home. These facilities are staffed 24 hours a day. Employees are trained to assist residents with their needs and provide supervision. A typical person living in an assisted living facility may need help managing medication, bathing, or getting dressed. While assisted living provides residents with assistance with the activities of daily living, they do not provide round-the-clock skilled nursing services.

Skilled Nursing Centers

For round-the-clock medical supervision, Skilled Nursing is the way to go. Skilled Nursing facilities are designed to house and assist individuals who have health conditions that require constant monitoring and the availability of medical personnel. Because of the high level of monitoring that skilled nursing facilities provide, they are staffed with medical personnel 24 hours a day. Skilled nursing facilities provide an invaluable service to those that have medical problems that require constant medical monitoring and/or high levels of assistance.

Senior Memory Care Communities

Caring for those who have dementia requires special expertise. Alzheimer’s and dementia care communities represent a special form of assisted living, with housing, supportive services and care to those who have varying levels of dementia. Staff members are carefully selected and trained to understand and manage the unique challenges associated with dementia care. Physical and behavioral issues as well as life history are key factors in creating daily routines and service plans for residents. Memory Support Centers provides daily structure seven days per week to help maintain the resident’s abilities and encourage the use of their remaining skills.

Continuing Care Retirement Communities

Continuing Care Retirement Communities, or CCRCs, provide a place where seniors can live, socialize and receive they care they need, while knowing that they can remain in the same community should their care needs change in the future.

A CCRC setting is one that will be able to accommodate you or your family member’s needs now, as well as in the future – all in the same community. If their need for care increases, a person who chooses a CCRC will be able to remain in the same community setting, but get Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing or Dementia care, while keeping the same neighbors and living in a familiar setting.

This means that the ideal living situation is one that can provide for an individual’s current and future needs while allowing him to maintain as much of his independence as possible.

Carol Cummings is a RN and Certified Wellness Coach at Brookdale Senior Living. She shares her knowledge and experience at Brookdale’s Optimum Life Blog. Brookdale Senior Living has a full spectrum of senior living communities throughout the United States, including Independent Living, Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing Centers and Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care Residences. Find a Brookdale Senior Living Community near you at http://www.brookdaleliving.com/.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Carol_Cummings

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  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!