Warning: trim() expects parameter 1 to be string, array given in /home/nvsenior/public_html/wp-content/plugins/custom-post-order-category/wp-customcategorypostorder.php on line 492
caregiver | Nevada Senior Guide

“Best of Home Care” Award – Third Year in a Row

August 6, 2014 by · Comments Off on “Best of Home Care” Award – Third Year in a Row
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

No Place Like Home Senior Care today announced that it has been recognized with Home Care Pulse’s “Best of Home Care” Provider of Choice distinction.  Awarded to the top 25% of agencies in client and employee satisfaction scores from Home Care Pulse, No Place Like Home Senior Care is ranked among a select few of the best agencies in the country.

What is the Best of Home Care® Award?

Agencies with the highest quality receive the Best of Home Care Award® from Home Care Pulse, the leading quality assurance firm for home care. This award is based on client and caregiver satisfaction scores from several categories, including Compassion, Work Ethic, Communication, and Training.  “As of June our combined last 12 month client satisfaction rating is 98.2% and our combined last 12 month caregiver satisfaction rating is 97.8%” advised Founder/Executive Director Rick Ackerson.

Why Choose a Best of Home Care® Provider of Choice?

When you choose a Best of Home Care® Provider of Choice, you can be confident you are choosing the right home care agency for you and your family.

An agency recognized as a Provider of Choice is best-in-class for quality care. Their client satisfaction scores rank in the top percentile nationally in one or more categories. These scores are based on monthly third-party phone interviews with the agency’s clients, conducted by Home Care Pulse. As a client of a Best of Home Care® Provider of Choice, your agency will be preferred home care provider with award-winning care.

“We want to congratulate No Place Like Home Senior Care for winning the “Best of Home Care” award and commend their commitment to placing high priority on client and employee satisfaction,” concluded Aaron Marcum of Home Care Pulse.

About Home Care Pulse

Home Care Pulse was launched in 2008 and is a company specializing in measuring and benchmarking client and employee satisfaction for private duty home care agencies.  Recently Home Care Pulse conducted the largest study ever performed on behalf of the private duty industry.

About No Place Like Home Senior Care

No Place Like Home Senior Care is the premier non-medical home care agency in Northern Nevada and Lake Tahoe, providing a wide range of in-home care services. No Place Like Home Senior Care has expanded services to Lake Tahoe and Reno/Sparks.

Providing Certified Caregivers & Hospice Specialist.

Further information can be found at www.NvNoPlaceLikeHome.com or call 775-392-2000.

Nevada Senior Guide – Visiting Angels Reno

April 26, 2014 by · Comments Off on Nevada Senior Guide – Visiting Angels Reno
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Homecare, Reno, Support Services 

www.visitingangels.com/reno

NSGMayJuneJuly2014_Web15

Visiting Angles, serving Reno, Sparks and the surrounding communities

 

Why Elderly Care by Visiting Angels

At Visiting Angels, we realize it is never easy bringing someone into your home to provide elderly care services.  That’s why we strive to make staying at home a positive experience.  We do this by allowing you to select your caregiver from a group of experienced  elderly care providers, allowing you to maintain your schedule and providing you or your loved one with personalized elderly care services.

 

You Are In Charge – We’re On “Your” Schedule

With Visiting Angels, you’re in charge of everything.  Your Visiting Angels elderly care provider will not dictate to you what your schedule is to be (i.e. what time to get up, when to bathe, meal schedules, etc.).  It is our job to adjust to your schedule and to see to it that you remain comfortable in your home.  Visiting Angels – Senior Home Care at its Best!

 

Bonded, licensed and insured

Your locally owned and operated Visiting Angels office is licensed by the state of Nevada and is insured and bonded.  This can give you the peace of mind that a trustworthy elderly care provider will be in your loved one’s home.

 

Monitoring is essential

At Visiting Angels’ we continually monitor our elderly care providers through our system of continued personalized contacts.  Through telephone check-in’s and home visits, we will be checking regularly with your loved one.  We want to ensure that our elderly care recipients receive the best possible care.

 

Tailor your care to your needs

No two people are the same.  Therefore their elderly care needs are going to be very different.  Whether you need respite care, in home care, part time or full time care, or care at an assisted living facility, Visiting Angels can provide an experienced elderly care provider that is right for you.  Our agency tailors your program of elderly care based on your needs.  Your elderly care program is flexible and you can change the program as different needs arise.  We will also work along with any home health agency or nursing agency that may be assisting your loved ones after a recent hospital stay.

 

Visiting Angels Reno

The Visiting Angels office located in Reno Nevada is locally owned and operated by Monica and Robert Pence.  For additional information on how we can help you or a loved one, please contact our office at 775-852-4663 or visit our website at www.visitingangels.com/reno.  We look forward to assisting you with your care needs.

2 Easy Travel Tips for Long Trips With Elderly Seniors

January 20, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Are you planning on any traveling with your elderly parents this year – for holiday visits with long distance family members or perhaps just to have a fun trip out to see sights and enjoy lovely scenery? My senior mom and I just returned from a 7 hour drive to visit some of her great-grandkids. It was a lovely visit but we did come back with a few tips to share with fellow journey-ers.

I routinely keep 4-5 lap blankets of different weights in my car – for her and for my grandkids. That way, if the car is too cool for anyone, they can balance it out easily with a snuggly warm blanket. Then, if they get too hot, it’s easy to toss it off. And the different weights are especially helpful for my senior mom, as she can go from very cold to very warm much faster than normal. This allows her to easily swap blankets as her body temperature changes without having the heater or the cooler blast her in the face to try to accomplish the same thing.

She has always enjoyed car trips in the past, but the past couple of years they’ve been less pleasant. She has found that sitting too long bothers her back and her arthritis. On the trip out, we stopped every couple of hours to walk around, get a drink, use the restroom, etc. and that worked well. By the time we headed home, she was happy over the visit, exclaiming, “This was SUCH a nice time together,” yet aching more than her normal amount. She took some medicine before we left that helped a bit and also encouraged sleeping on the way. She didn’t feel up to…  (keep reading… http://eldercareabcblog.com/2-easy-travel-tips-for-long-trips-with-elderly-seniors/)

New Survey Reveals that Aging Parents and Adult Children Aren’t Always On the Same Page!

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

In honor of National Family Caregivers Month, life transition planning and daily money management firm LifeBridge Solutions, LLC surveyed nearly 400 aging parents and adult children. The national survey was conducted online November 12 – 14, 2013.

Survey results indicate that adult children are generally more concerned about their aging parent’s wellbeing than the older adult is about his or her own situation. Both generations are concerned about the older adult’s general health and safety and about driving. However, the aging parents top concerns include worry about running out of money and how they will pay for care, while the adult children worry about their parent not asking for (or accepting) the help they need and about their parent’s inability to manage medications.

LifeBridge Solutions’ President Sheri L. Samotin says, “Unfortunately, adult children often live a long distance from their aging parents and don’t see them as often as they’d like. As a result, they worry about what’s going on with Mom or Dad and feel a need to put mechanisms in place to keep their parent safe. By the same token, many aging parents are adept at hiding their need for assistance from their children as they fear that their children will try to take over.” Samotin is the author of the forthcoming book, Facing the Finish: A Road Map for Aging Parents and Adult Children (www.FacingtheFinish.com).

While only 25% of the aging parents surveyed report that they are stressed because of their adult children, nearly twice as many adult children report being stressed because of their aging parents. Consistent with these results, it is not surprising that more adult children than aging parents would change something about their relationship with the other generation. However, the top thing both groups would change is to live closer to and/or see the other more often. The next most common wish for both groups is to have better relationships with one another.

According to government statistics an estimated 25% of adult children currently provide hands-on and/or supervisory care for one or more of their parents. This number has tripled over the past fifteen years and is expected to increase dramatically as the population ages. Caring for aging parents is often referred to as the new mid-life crisis.

LifeBridge Solutions, LLC, founded in 2009 provides life transition planning, daily money management and medical billing advocacy services to clients nationwide.

For more information contact:
Sheri L. Samotin, President, LifeBridge Solutions, LLC
323.452.2680

Read more news from LifeBridge Solutions.

Holiday Season Is Perfect Time to “Talk Turkey” about End-of-Life Care Wishes

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Compassion & Choices Provides Tips to Families to Discuss Issue Everyone Will Face

The upcoming holiday season is the perfect time to “talk turkey over turkey” with your family about an important issue we all will face: our wishes for end-of-life care. It is the key message in the featured holiday story of the fall 2013 issue of Compassion & Choices Magazine.

Fewer than half of Americans over age 40 have completed an advance directive outlining what medical treatments they would want if they couldn’t communicate, according to a poll by the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Ironically, more than half of the Americans over 40 in the survey have already been caregivers for a sick relative or friend.

Compassion & Choices’ End-of-Life Consultation (EOLC) program has provided confidential, personal support for thousands of people over the last 20 years. People call our toll-free number (800-247-7421) specifically about end-of-life planning, such as preparation of advance directives.

“Everyone wants to die peacefully and with dignity. But it takes more than hope to achieve this end-of-life outcome,” said Compassion & Choices President Barbara Coombs Lee, who was an ER and ICU nurse and physician assistant for 25 years. “Making and communicating end-of-life plans is absolutely necessary to ensure we get the treatment we want – and to avoid treatment we don’t want. This step is especially important to prepare for a time we may be unable to speak for ourselves.”

How do families start this uncomfortable conversation? After many attempts to engage her family, one Compassion & Choices client set her Thanksgiving table with advance directive forms at every place setting and announced: “Nobody gets dinner until these are filled out.”

That tough-turkey tactic may not work for everyone. The best approach is the one that suits you and your family. While it’s important to fill out this paperwork, it’s essential is to get the conversation going.

“Talking Turkey Over Turkey” tips include:

  • “Appetizers” that could lead the way to a satisfying dialogue;
  • Four key questions your conversation should cover; and
  • Free tools you need to guide your conversation and document the results.

For more information, visit www.compassionandchoices.org/what-we-do/advance-planning, or call 800-247-7421 to speak to a Compassion & Choices’ consultant or to request information.

With over 30 local groups and 40,000 members and supporters throughout the United States, Compassion & Choices leads the end-of-life choice movement. We support, educate and advocate. Learn more at: www.compassionandchoices.org.

Contact: Sean Crowley, 202-495-8520-c, scrowley@compassionandchoices.org

National Report: Oral Health of Older Americans In A ‘State of Decay’

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Oral Health America Launches First-of-its-Kind Website to Connect Older Adults to Affordable Dental Care and Resources

The oral health of older Americans is in a state of decay, according to a new national report released today by Oral Health America (OHA).  A State of Decay, a state-by-state analysis of oral healthcare delivery and public health factors impacting the oral health of older adults, reveals more than half of the country received a “fair” or “poor” assessment when it comes to minimal standards affecting dental care access for older adults. Florida and Arizona, areas with large older adult populations, rank in the bottom five states due to a shortage of oral health coverage, a strained dental health work force, and deficiencies in prevention programs.

“While we are seeing improvements in certain areas of older adult dental care, there is still a lack of progress in advancing the oral health of such a vulnerable population,” said Dr. Ira Lamster, Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, ColumbiaUniversity, Mailman School of Public Health. “Older adults face significant health challenges if their oral health is poor, and there is no coordinated program to help fund necessary services.”

A State of Decay gave a rating of “fair,” “poor,” “good,” or “excellent” based on state level data analyzing five variables impacting older adult oral health: adult Medicaid dental benefits, inclusion of older adult strategies in state oral health plans, edentulism (loss of teeth), dental health professional shortage areas, and community water fluoridation.

The final evaluations in the report for each state are mixed, with several states performing well in some variables, but still in need of improvement in other important areas. The top findings of this report that require scrutiny and action are:

  • Persistent lack of oral health coverage across much of the nation. Forty-two percent of states (21 states) provide either no dental benefits or provide only emergency coverage  through adult Medicaid Dental Benefits.
  • Strained dental health work force. Thirty-one states (62 percent) have high rates of Dental Health Provider Shortage Areas (HPSAs), meeting only 40 percent or less of dental provider needs.
  • Tooth loss remains a signal of suboptimal oral health. Eight states had strikingly high rates of edentulism, with West Virginia notably having an adult population that is 33.8 percent edentate. Photo – PRN Photo Desk, photodesk@prnewswire.com
  • Deficiencies in preventive programs. Thirteen states (26 percent) have upwards of 60 percent of their residents living in communities without water fluoridation (CWF), despite recognition for 68 years that this public health measure markedly reduces dental caries. Hawaii (89.2 percent) and New Jersey (86.5 percent) represent the highest rates of citizens unprotected by fluoridation, an unnecessary public peril.

Daily, 10,000 Americans retire and only 2 percent do so with a dental benefit plan. The State of Decay analysis provides a tool for states to use in addressing shortfalls in oral health status, dental professional access sites, dental benefits for low-income adults, and population-based prevention, all of which affect the oral health of older adults, the fastest growing segment of the American population.

To help older adults and their caregivers address oral health needs and overcome many of the barriers to accessing affordable dental care, OHA launched toothwisdom.org. The website is a first-of-its-kind online tool that connects older adults to dental care and educates on the importance of maintaining oral health with age. The American Dental Hygienists’ Association (ADHA) and Special Care Dentistry Association (SCDA) supported OHA and the launch of the website by encouraging their members to provide meaningful articles for the toothwisdom.org.

“Dental Hygienists have the opportunity to assist older Americans with the oral health challenges they may face as they age,”” said Ann Battrell, Executive Director, American Dental Hygienists’ Association. “We’re all committed to sharing the message that oral health matters and changing the common misperception that with age comes a decline in oral health.”

Few websites focus on oral and systemic health topics, and even fewer provide resources for older adult oral health. Toothwisdom.org offers oral care resources by state – including direct links to dental care, caregiving support, financial tools, social services, and transportation. It also shares the latest news and reliable health information from dental experts across the country on relevant oral health issues, the importance of continuing prevention with age, and the impact of oral health on overall health.

“My dental procedures have been very costly and I had to contact a social worker to help me understand my bills. Dental care should be more available and affordable because we know poor dental care affects overall health, which is particularly important for seniors,” said senior Patricia Cosgrove, a client of The Carter Burden Center for the Aging, Inc.  “Toothwisdom.org can help me find a community health center so I can finally get an affordable check-up and stay up-to-date on oral health information.”

A State of Decay and toothwisdom.org are part of Oral Health America’s Wisdom Tooth Project™, an initiative designed to meet the oral health challenges of a burgeoning population of older adults with special needs, chronic disease complications, and a growing inability to access and pay for dental services.

Links to the 2003 and 2013 editions of A State of Decay can be viewed on toothwisdom.org.

About OHA’s Wisdom Tooth Project
For 55 years, Oral Health America has been the leading national non-profit dedicated to improving the oral health and well-being of Americans throughout the entire spectrum of life. Over the decades, the organization has evolved and adapted to the dynamic nature of our country’s demographics and specific health needs. The Wisdom Tooth Project was born in 2010 due to the current and future implications of an aging population and the need for oral health resources for them mean that we must take meaningful action now.

About Oral Health America
OHA is a national, non-profit association dedicated to changing lives by connecting communities with resources to increase access to oral health care, education, and advocacy for all Americans, especially those most vulnerable. For more information about Oral Health America, please visit www.oralhealthamerica.org.

Keepsakes, Family Heirlooms Passed Down More Effectively with New Legacy Builder Tool Chest from LegacyStories.org

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Allianz American Legacy Studies researchers asked a group of Baby Boomers and their parents to rank on a scale of 1-10 (10 being most) what was more important to them when it comes to passing down an inheritance: values and life lessons or financial assets.

Perhaps not so surprisingly, the results showed that passing down values were over seven times more important than passing down valuables.

Yet only a small fraction of these three generations has made any provisions, mostly due to lack of awareness, education and the tools to do the job properly.

In addition to values and life lessons, a lot more should be included when building and passing down a legacy. Keepsakes and awards often represent defining moments and milestone events and can become family heirlooms when the stories behind their acquisitions are documented.

Identifying people in a select group of vintage family photos is one the best ways to document personal history, as some of the people in the old photos might as well be strangers to grandchildren. Those who grew up in the 20th century were first generations to record special events and moments.

Today’s digital technology offers a chance to pass down a purposeful legacy that will survive the ravages of time, and the experts at LegacyStories.org have developed an innovative Legacy Builder Tool Chest to help.

Consisting of fourteen drawers, each “toolkit” focuses on a specific legacy topic with interactive how-to guidebooks, downloadable forms, video tutorials and lots of helpful resources.

Toolkit topics include “Life Lessons and Values“, “Keepsakes & Heirlooms”, “Vintage Legacy Photos”, and one titled “Loved Ones in Care” to help caregivers build a legacy for victims of Alzheimer’s, people in hospice care, or seniors living in assisted or skilled nursing facilities.

“Since passing down life lessons and values is the highest priority, we provide members the ‘Life Lessons and Values’ toolkit at no cost,” says Tom Cormier, co-founder of LegacyStories.org. “Membership in LegacyStories.org is also free so there are no obstacles to prevent anyone from securing an honored place in family history. They just need to take action before regretting it.”

The Legacy Builder Tool Chest is also being recommended by financial advisors, estate planners and elder law attorneys as a means to engage with their clients in a purposeful way.

Content for the individual toolkits is contributed by top legacy experts including members of The International Assoc. of StoryKeepers (I-ASK) and the Association of Personal Historians (APH).

Our goal is to help people establish themselves as “effective elders” while they are alive, and to become “awesome ancestors” when they pass on,” Cormier states. “Our grandchildren and descendants will one day have an interest in learning about their family history. Because so few people will take the time to document their personal history, those who do will live on forever as their descendants’ go-to awesome ancestor.”

Contact info:
Tom Cormier — Co-founder
Phone: 423-295-5904
Email
Website: www.legacystories.org

Read more news from LegacyStories.org

AARP Report Highlights Need for Innovative Long-Term Care for the Aging Baby Boomer Population; Japan’s Technological Secrets May Hold the Answers

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

A newly published AARP report illustrates a profound demographic shift that will have consequences for decades to come, particularly in the senior living and long-term care industry. Baby boomers are entering their retirement years, while the ratio of potential family caregivers to those who require long-term services and support is beginning to drop. Fewer available caregivers will mean the senior living industry must rapidly adapt to a surging market. The AARP’s full report is available here: http://bit.ly/156phYi

Family caregiving is a low-cost but often burdensome approach to elder care. Becoming a primary caregiver often involves leaving behind a career, among other sacrifices. Plus, these well-intentioned caregivers may not have the expertise necessary to provide the level of care needed by an aged parent. Adults in these roles often feel enormous pressure and stress, sometimes even resentment. At any rate, the nation’s changing demographics will make today’s family caregiving situation far different in the near future.

Between 1990 and 2010, there were about 7 potential caregivers for every one person aged 80-plus. That ratio is at the start of a freefall that will force society to change the way it cares for its elderly members. By 2030, the ratio of caregivers to elderly will be 4 to 1. All remaining baby boomers will have reached their years of highest risk (80+) by 2050, when the caregiver ratio will have plummeted still further to 3 to 1.

Kevin Williams, president of SeniorMarketing.com, suggests innovative thinking will be required to bridge this care gap: “Naturally, with fewer family caregivers available, the responsibility will largely shift to senior living communities, care agencies and already overextended government programs. But it will take more than simply building more communities or training more staff—assuming an adequate number of candidates are even available. Technological innovation may be the silver bullet to raise the standard of living for aging boomers, improve efficiency, and reduce costs.”

The nation of Japan, which has the greatest life expectancy and one of the oldest average populations in the world, has recently experienced a demographic transition of its own. Recently, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare put out a call for 2 million new professional caregivers, but only received 1.3 million eligible candidates. With low birth rates being the norm, that shortfall will only increase. A tech-savvy society to begin with, the Japanese have embraced robotics and automation as a solution to the elder care issue. Motorized, assistive devices can help older individuals perform tasks themselves, while automated pill dispensers can prevent dangerous medication mistakes. A recent blog post on The Economist explained Japan’s inventive approach to the elder care dilemma: http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2013/05/automation-elderly

Williams concluded: “This demographic shift is a great challenge but also a great opportunity. Forward-thinking, entrepreneurs will be leading the way in this new environment. Technology to assist with daily tasks, provide medical care, monitor, and connect seniors to loved ones is advancing at a faster pace every year. It’s not unreasonable to predict that the future will witness even better care for our future seniors.”

About SeniorMarketing.com

Baltimore-based SeniorMarketing.com was created with twin goals in mind. First, the company helps connect caregivers and seniors with local, affordable care options. Second, the company increases income for senior living communities and health care agencies.

Contact:

Kevin M. Williams, President
SeniorMarketing.com
5024 Campbell Blvd., Suite D-3
Baltimore, MD 21236
Phone: 1-888-523-3311

Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

National Council on Aging Launches Second Year of Education Program for Older Adults and Those Who Care for Them Aimed at Helping to Protect More Older Adults from the Flu

Actor Lee Majors, best known for his iconic roles on The Big Valley, The Fall Guy, and The Six Million Dollar Man, is joining the National Council on Aging (NCOA) Flu + You program to help protect older adults from influenza (commonly known as “the flu”). Flu + You aims to inform adults 65 and older, their caregivers, and those who care about them, about the dangers of the flu, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options.

As a part of his involvement in the Flu + You campaign, Majors will appear in a public service announcement (PSA) that follows him as he embarks on an important and action-packed mission: learning about his vaccine options and getting vaccinated against the flu. The PSA will educate the public about the increased risk of flu in adults 65 years of age and older and the importance of knowing your vaccine options and getting a flu vaccine, even for tough guys like Majors.

Every year in the United States, roughly nine out of 10 flu-related deaths and more than six out of 10 flu-related hospitalizations occur in people 65 and older. Older adults are at a greater risk for flu due, in part, to the weakening of the immune system that typically occurs with age. This means that no matter how healthy or youthful we feel, as we age we become more vulnerable to the flu and its related complications.

“The CDC recommends an annual flu vaccine as the single best way to protect yourself from the flu, yet a third of people 65 and older still don’t get vaccinated,” said Richard Birkel, PhD, MPA, NCOA Senior Vice President for Healthy Aging and Director of NCOA’s Self-Management Alliance. “As NCOA continues to educate older adults about the flu and the potential severity of the illness, we hope to encourage more people to protect themselves and their loved ones by getting an annual flu shot.”

The flu vaccine offers the best defense to protect against the flu, and adults 65 years of age and older have several vaccine options. In addition to the traditional flu vaccine (which helps protect against three strains of the flu virus), there is also a quadrivalent vaccine (which helps protect against four strains), and a higher dose vaccine that was designed specifically for adults 65 and older. By improving the production of antibodies in older patients, the higher dose vaccine can provide a stronger immune response to the flu than traditional vaccines. All flu vaccines are covered as a Medicare Part B benefit, which means there is no copay for Medicare beneficiaries 65 years of age and older.

“I get the flu shot every year and encourage my peers to do the same – it’s a simple step you can take to protect yourself from the flu,” says actor Lee Majors.  “I urge everyone 65 years of age and older to talk to their health care provider about their vaccine options this flu season.”

The flu can make existing health conditions worse, and it is especially dangerous for people with lung disease, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer—conditions that commonly affect older adults. Nationwide, 86 percent of adults 65 years of age and older have at least one chronic health condition and approximately 66 percent of Medicare beneficiaries have two or more chronic conditions, putting them at increased risk of the flu and flu-related complications, which can be severe and include hospitalization and even death.

For more facts about flu, and to order free educational materials, including a brochure and fact sheet, visit www.ncoa.org/Flu.

About Flu + You
Flu + You is a national public education initiative, from the National Council on Aging with support from Sanofi Pasteur, to educate adults 65 years and older about the dangers of the influenza virus, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options. Older adults and their caregivers can learn more on the Flu + You website, www.ncoa.org/Flu, which features a public service announcement with Lee Majors and facts about the flu. Also available on the website is a calendar of Flu + You events that will be held in 12 cities throughout the United States in September and October. At the events, older adults will have the opportunity to learn more about their risks for flu and available vaccine options, as well as talk to a health care provider and receive a flu vaccination.

About NCOA
The National Council on Aging is a nonprofit service and advocacy organization headquartered in Washington, DC. NCOA is a national voice for millions of older adults—especially those who are vulnerable and disadvantaged—and the community organizations that serve them. It brings together nonprofit organizations, businesses, and government to develop creative solutions that improve the lives of all older adults. NCOA works with thousands of organizations across the country to help seniors find jobs and benefits, improve their health, live independently, and remain active in their communities. For more information, please visit:

www.NCOA.org | www.facebook.com/NCOAging | www.twitter.com/NCOAging

 

CONTACT: Dana Kinker, (212) 301-7181, dkinker@wcgworld.com

Deserving Senior Caregivers to be Rewarded through “Caring for the Caregiver” Program Sponsored by Twilight Wish Foundation and Parentgiving

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Deserving Senior Caregivers to be Rewarded through “Caring for the Caregiver” Program Sponsored by Twilight Wish Foundation and Parentgiving

Caregiver nominations taken online at www.twilightwish.org until October 15

The national nonprofit Twilight Wish Foundation and Parentgiving are pleased to announce the “Caring for the Caregiver” award. According to a recently released Bureau of Labor Statistics survey, over 39 million Americans provide hours of unpaid care to someone over the age of 65. Caregivers often struggle with their own physical, financial and mental needs. This program was created to recognize and reward these deserving senior caregivers who often put their own needs last by providing a respite from caregiving duties.

“Often, caregivers are seen as hidden patients themselves,” said Cass Forkin, founder of Twilight Wish. “Although caregiving is a labor of love to many, the stress and strain of providing around-the- clock care often takes a toll on the caregivers, both mentally and physically.”

According to David Spain, CEO of Parentgiving, many caregivers are often not able to get the break from their responsibilities that they need. “This program offers caregivers the chance to relax and rejuvenate, away from their daily duties,” said Spain. “We want them to know that their selfless contributions and dedication are appreciated.”

Twilight Wish and Parentgiving chose August 21 to launch “Caring for the Caregiver” because it’s National Senior Citizens Day, first proclaimed by President Ronald Reagan in 1988. “Older citizens are reinforcing their historical roles as leaders and as links with our patrimony and sense of purpose as individuals and as a Nation,” said the late president.

Anyone can nominate a deserving caregiver by filling out an application at www.twilightwish.org.  Caregivers can nominate themselves. Entries will be accepted through October 15, 2013. The winner will be notified in early November 2013. The “Caring for the Caregiver” award may be a two-night hotel stay, restaurant meal(s), spa treatment(s), or tickets to an event or any combination of these as chosen by the award winner. The winner will also receive free in-home caregiving services from a local senior homecare organization, ensuring a worry-free getaway.

Twilight Wish Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit charitable organization whose mission is to honor and enrich the lives of deserving seniors through wish granting celebrations that connect generations. Since its founding in 2003, Twilight Wish has granted over 1,931 individual wishes to deserving, low-income seniors, thanks to volunteers, corporate and community involvement, and donations. Recent wishes granted include a visit from a string band for a nursing home resident’s 89th birthday, transporting a nursing home resident to Christmas Eve dinner with family, and hearing aids for an Army veteran who wished to be able to hear his grandchildren’s voices. For more, visit www.twilightwish.org.

Parentgiving.com is a leading online destination for seniors and their caregivers, offering a wealth of information on eldercare, news, Q&As with experts, and healthy aging resources as well as a store with thousands of homecare products and medical supplies, delivered right to the home. Bestsellers include walkers, bed rails, bath safety bars, incontinence supplies, and daily living aids. For more, visit www.Parentgiving.com. For more about Parentgiving’s mission, contact Julie Davis at 203-984-4424.

For more about the “Caring for the Caregiver Award,” contact Mary Farrell, Twilight Wish Director of Community Relations, 215-230-8777 ext. 103

Read more news from Parentgiving

Treat them like a person, not a patient

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Treat them like a person, not a patient

New living systems developmental model of care shifts the focus of treating Alzheimer’s disease and other debilitating illnesses

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. – Donald H. Ford observed that advanced Alzheimer’s patients, like his mother-in-law, are typically bored and lonely, and often depressed, frightened or angry.  His professional knowledge convinced him it didn’t have to be that way.  When Alzheimer’s struck his wife, he created a scientifically based alternative form of Alzheimer’s care that enabled her to still have a satisfying life.
Ford shares this revolutionary plan he used with his wife, Carol in the new book Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey: Treat Them Like a Person, Not a Patient. He is an experienced psychology professional and developed a living systems developmental model for care that incorporates an individual’s humanity. It helps patients live a meaningful and pleasurable life, despite their limitations. Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey is a guide for caregivers of senior citizens with serious limitations to improve their care receivers’ quality of life.
“Traditional medical model caregiving focuses on what’s wrong with a person and tries to fix it. However, when what is wrong can’t be fixed, the caregiver can’t succeed and that’s discouraging,” Ford says. “In Our developmental model of care, the focus is on what the person can still do and on designing experiences from which they get satisfaction.”
As people continue to gain more awareness of Alzheimer’s disease and other seriously debilitating diseases, plans like the model in Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey become more relevant. Based on his professional research, Ford believes that a person always functions as an integrated unit, so a model was needed that combined the biological, psychological, behavioral, social and contextual aspects of a person’s patterns of behavior when planning for elder care. Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey asks society to adopt the view that it is not enough to focus on keeping senior citizens alive and “warehousing them” until they die.
Ford’s plan in Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey is a person-centered quality of care focus.  It replaces the traditional medical emphasis on what is wrong with the person with a positive emphasis on using their remaining capabilities to create a satisfying life, despite limitations.

 

Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey: Treat Them Like a Person, Not a Patient
By Donald H. Ford
ISBN: 978-1-3008-0321-8 (sc); 978-1-3009-9178-6 (e)
Softcover, $26.55
Ebook, $8.99
Approximately 564 pages
Available at www.LuLu.com, www.amazon.com and www.barnesandnoble.com.

 

About the author
Donald H. Ford earned a Bachelor of Science, Master of Science and doctorate degrees in mathematics and psychology from KansasState and PennsylvaniaStateUniversities.  He spent the first 10 years of his career creating a new kind of psychological and developmental services program at PennState for students and their families.  Then PennState asked him to create a new kind of college called Health and Human Development.  It stimulated other universities to develop similar colleges.  After 10 years as Dean, he resigned and returned to his first love of teaching, scholarly and professional work.  He published seven books about psychotherapy and human development.

Circle of Life Community Hospice – Reno Nevada

August 27, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Reno 

www.colhospice.com

COL-Logo-New_CS6-2

Circle of Life Hospice helps people in the advanced stages of a chronic or terminal illness who have made the decision to live their remaining days with dignity and surrounded by compassionate caregivers. Our hospice team consists of nurses, aides, social workers, spiritual care advisers, physicians, volunteers, dietitians, therapists and bereavement counsel with that will facilitate helping you “live with” versus “dying from” an illness.

If we can help you see death through new eyes , it will help you to transform your grieving process and change how you view your world, forever.

We have learned from our patients that the Art of Living at the end of life is a time of life that can involve tremendous personal and spiritual growth.

Circle of Life Hospice

1575 Delucchi Lane,

Suite 214

Reno, NV 89502

775-827-2298

Convenience and Product Selection Encourage More People to Manage Incontinence Online, Parentgiving.com Survey Reveals

July 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Convenience and Product Selection Encourage More People to Manage Incontinence Online, Parentgiving.com Survey Reveals

For the first time in its five-year history, the senior wellness site Parentgiving.com conducted an opinion survey on incontinence, reaching out to nearly 5,000 of its customers who shop for self-care products in this category. The focus was to learn how people best cope with incontinence and if a greater awareness about it as a medical issue has erased its stigma and prompted more people to talk to their doctors about treatment. Respondents were also asked to share both their frustrations and their strategies for maintaining quality of life.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130724/PH51806LOGO)

Results show that progress is being made. Slightly over 70 percent have talked to their healthcare provider about incontinence—many of them are taking or have tried medications, and a few have had surgical procedures.

But nearly 30 percent of respondents have still not sought medical attention. Reasons are varied. A few people still feel too embarrassed to bring it up, even in front of a doctor, while some assume it’s just a normal part of old age (it’s not!) or don’t know that there are treatments that might help. Others say they have more life-threatening medical issues, from diabetes to stroke recovery, that take precedence when they’re at the doctor’s office. For a few, the possibility of yet another medication to add to their existing regimen would be financially out of the question.

More Key Points From the Parentgiving Survey

* Fear of accidents is the top concern.
Two-thirds of respondents ranked this as their number one worry. The lack of product selection came in second at 21%. People want more product choices, which will, in turn, help them feel more secure about avoiding accidents.

* Online is the way people want to buy products.
Nearly 46% buy products online where they can get the widest selection and have anonymity.

* Absorbency is the key feature in choosing products.
An overwhelming 81% ranked this first. Information on a product’s absorbency should be front and center on product descriptions, say the respondents. Comfort ranked second and the ability to buy a product online ranked a strong third at 36%, above both cost and anatomical design of items.

* Many people are satisfied with their incontinence products. In fact, 40% are very satisfied. However 44% are only somewhat satisfied—there’s room for better education about products to help people find those that are more effective for them and the respondents had numerous suggestions for incontinence product manufacturers to improve styles.

For complete survey results, go to http://www.parentgiving.com/elder-care/incontinence-survey-results/. There is also a companion article, “Survey Says: 50 Top Strategies for Managing Incontinence,” featuring respondents’ experiences and suggestions at http://www.parentgiving.com/elder-care/survey-says-50-top-strategies-for-managing-incontinence/. For more information, please contact Julie Davis, Chief Content Officer at 203-984-4424 or email.

About Parentgiving. Parentgiving.com is the online destination dedicated to the health and wellness needs of seniors and their caregivers. A comprehensive website, Parentgiving offers hundreds of informative articles on eldercare, plus Q&As with experts on healthy aging. The Parentgiving Store sells find thousands of products from medical supplies to practical tools for the activities of daily living. Everything can be ordered by phone or online with fast shipping right to the senior. For more information please visit www.Parentgiving.com or follow us on Twitter.

Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads

June 5, 2013 by · Comments Off on Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads
Filed under: Articles 

Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads

BOSTON, May 2, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Mother’s and Father’s Day celebrations are approaching, yet millions of adult children care for parents year round while on the brink of burnout.  Catapulted into the accidental caregiver role without warning, stressed-out kids are doing their best to hold life together when everything seems to be falling apart.

Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom issues a timely warning. “You must seek support as a caregiver.  The life you save may be your own.”

Bloom offers practical coping strategies to help family caregivers recharge their energy and avoid burnout during a free monthly Caregiving Power Hour.  During these tele-sessions, caregivers get tactical solutions to get through the week ahead.  Bloom wants to inspire and train caregivers to provide quality support for their loved ones while fully living their own lives.

“It’s coaching, community, and caring in the gift of an hour of sacred time that can really make a difference,” Bloom says.

Bloom knows the stressful caregiving journey well.  He served as the primary, live-in caregiver for his parents during their final years.  His father passed away in 2009 and, after a courageous battle with cancer, Bloom’s mother passed away in his loving arms on Mother’s Day 2012.

“Caregivers put the well-being of loved ones first which can mean putting their own needs and plans on the back burner.  The regret for career or life enhancing opportunities not taken can be a bitter pill to swallow,” Bloom says.

He honors the legacy of his parents by sharing key steps along the roadmap to caregiving without regret.

  1. Release Crisis Mode. Stop being a victim to circumstances so you feel stronger and become laser-focused to meet your family’s needs.  Supporting loved ones through medical challenges is overwhelming and scary.  When you become aware that feeling like a victim or in a state of crisis is a mindset, you can successfully shift back into taking control and positive action.
  2. Overcome Conflict.  Communicate and cope with calm and clarity. Otherwise, you will crash while riding the emotional roller coaster associated with disability or disease. Mastering your own trigger points for anger and frustration will lead you to deal effectively with the most challenging people and circumstances in your life.
  3. Achieve Buy-In. Motivate others to contribute based upon their individual abilities, preferences, and talents so your loved one receives the most satisfying support possible.  Giving others choices for how they can serve will foster their desire to gladly help on a regular basis.
  4. Deliver Greatness and Compassion in Equal Doses.  Become the inspiring caregiver that people cheer for and gladly support in meaningful ways.  Let your compassion shine through in all actions as you support your loved one.  Devote equal time for self-care so you have the energy to let your best shine through even during tough times.
  5. Magnetize and Motivate Talent. Create an atmosphere that attracts and retains the best people to join your loved one’s care team and experience brilliant performance.  Stay positive and open to the opinions of others so you can facilitate options for the best care and support.
  6. Access Intuition.  Trust your instincts and let your care and dedication guide your decisions.  Share any concerns and questions with key support professionals.  It is better to explore a concern that proves to be okay rather than ignore something that could be life threatening.
  7. Put Chocolate in Your Pill Box.  Find ways to fuel your soul so you can thrive during the caregiver journey and develop the passion and purpose for your life beyond caregiving.  Dose yourself regularly to avoid burnout while creating enduring satisfaction and success.

About Certified Professional Coach and Energy Leadership™ Master Practitioner A. Michael Bloom

Since 2011, A. Michael Bloom has revitalized the careers of hundreds of family and professional caregivers with practical, tactical soul-saving coping strategies that support them in saving lives – including their own.  An in-demand New England speaker, workshop leader, and coach, Bloom has influenced hundreds of caregivers to follow a roadmap to avoid burnout and recharge their caregiving energy.  The author of the forthcoming book, The Accidental Caregivers Survival Guide: Your Roadmap to Caregiving Without Regret, Bloom welcomes media interviews, speaking engagements, and the opportunity to inspire caregivers around the world via his monthly Caregiving Power Hours.  Learn more at http://www.bloomforcoach.com/powerhour/.

Caring.com’s New Referral Program Supported by Leading Assisted Living Operators

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Caring.com’s New Referral Program Supported by Leading Assisted Living Operators

Caring.com Named Preferred Provider by Assisted Living Federation of America (ALFA)

SAN MATEO, Calif., May 6, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — A group of the nation’s largest senior living providers — including Brookdale Senior Living (NYSE: BKD), Emeritus Senior Living (NYSE: ESC), Benchmark Senior Living, and Senior Star — have chosen Caring.com as their agency of record for national buying of Internet leads for families looking for housing and care for their elderly loved ones. Separately, the Assisted Living Federation of America (ALFA) named Caring.com as its preferred partner for Internet marketing services.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20070921/AQF020LOGO)

With surging demand in the U.S. senior housing market, more Americans than ever before are turning to the Internet and online word of mouth to find and select the best senior living providers for their senior loved ones. About 30-50% of the senior living industry’s leads are coming from the Internet and that number is expected to rise, as tech adoption among baby boomers and seniors alike continues to increase. Whether seeking independent livingassisted living, or memory care, about two million consumers every month turn to Caring.com to find expert guidance about their options, research local providers, and get help in making well-informed selection decisions.

The country’s top senior living providers have chosen Caring.com to increase visibility of their senior living communities, optimize inquiry-to-visit rates, and leverage Caring.com’s resources to better nurture leads from the moment the search begins, through the research and decision-making phases, all the way to community selection and move-in.

In Q4-2012, Caring.com expanded its service offering with the launch of a new toll-free referral help line. Available seven days a week to those seeking senior housing, Caring.com’s family advisors explain different types of senior living options, help identify local senior communities matched to the prospective resident’s needs and preferences, schedule tours, share and encourage consumer reviews, and answer a range of senior living questions. With this added consumer support infrastructure, as well as other new and expanded capabilities for lead qualification and nurturing, the group of senior living community partners announced Caring.com as the agency of record for lead qualification and development, starting January 1. The help line is now referring nearly four thousand prospective residents per week.

“Caring.com has been great to work with as they’ve added the referral model to their business,” said Jayne Sallerson, executive vice president of sales and marketing at Emeritus Senior Living. “Emeritus wanted to consolidate our Internet lead buying with a company we could trust, and Caring.com has demonstrated their commitment to consumers, to us, and to the industry. Their new program is showing positive signs of increased tours and conversions.”

“Caring.com has proven themselves to be a strong partner for Brookdale,” said Jim Pusateri, senior vice president of sales at Brookdale Senior Living. “Working with fewer Internet lead sources has improved our operational efficiencies, lowered our marketing costs, and improved consumers’ experience with Brookdale Senior Living.”

Separately, ALFA, the largest national association of providers of professionally managed communities for seniors, signed Caring.com as its preferred provider for Web-based lead services as well as to power the organization’s new ALFA Senior Living Community Directory.

“Caring.com is our preferred provider of Web-based services because they are an exceptional online resource,” said Richard P. Grimes, president and CEO of ALFA, which is the largest national association exclusively dedicated to professionally managed, consumer-driven senior living communities. “Caring.com’s high-quality content, easy-to-use directory, and online reviews help prospective residents and their families find the right solutions for their needs — this is good for consumers and good for senior living.”

“From the beginning, we’ve focused on building the most comprehensive and most credible online resource to help those caring for a senior parent, spouse, or other loved one,” says Andy Cohen, co-founder and CEO of Caring.com. “Unlike some other Internet resources that will only share information about those providers who pay them, we’ve stayed true to our social mission and help connect consumers to a variety of quality resources for their needs. Working with ALFA and the leading senior living communities helps enable our ability to best serve those in need of senior care — and we continue to offer referral to free and low-cost support resources as well.”

More information for senior living providers interested in partnering with Caring.com is available here: http://providerinfo.caring.com/ProviderGetListed.html Consumers can begin their search for senior housing here: http://www.caring.com/local

About Caring.com
Caring.com is the leading website for family caregivers seeking information and support as they care for aging parents, spouses, and other loved ones. Caring.com provides helpful caregiving content,online support groups, and the most comprehensive Senior Care Directory in the United States, with 35,000 consumer ratings and reviews and a toll-free senior living referral line (1-866-824-8174). In January 2012, Caring.com launched the Caring Stars award program recognizing America’s best assisted living communities based on consumer reviews. This year, 383 communities in 40 states were named the Caring Stars of 2013. Based in San Mateo, California, Caring.com is a private company funded by DCM, Intel Capital, Shasta Ventures, and Split Rock Partners. Connect with Caring.com onFacebookTwitterGoogle+, PinterestLinkedIn and/or YouTube.

CONTACT: PR@caring.com, 650-762-8190

Respecting The Rights Of Senior Citizens – 4 Factors To Pick The Right Care Facility For The Elderly by Abhishek Agarwal

June 4, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

There is no formal ‘Senior Citizens Bill of Rights’, but as individuals, senior citizens are entitled to their rights. However, the senior citizens have little energy left in them in their old age to fight for their rights and therefore, it is the duty of the children to see that their elderly parents are getting what they are rightfully entitled to.

Every right must be claimed to be deemed as a right. There are laws in existence for the running of nursing homes for the elderly and retirement communities. Even if your elderly mom or dad is in an assisted care facility, there are certain laws that are fundamental and expected to be followed by these care facilities too. It is your duty as a caregiver to see that they are following the laws and living up to the expectations.

There are some factors that you must verify before selecting a facility for your elderly parents:

– Ensure that the facility will provide the basic cleanliness and safety. Check out the evacuation plans in place, in case of an emergency situation. Verify whether the evacuation plan is a workable one, considering the fact that the facility may be full of elderly and invalids who may be slow in moving out of the building in case of a fire. Find out if there is emergency power available to operate the automatic doors and elevators so that everyone can get out safely.

– If food is provided by the facility, ensure that meals will be provided three times a day. The meals should be healthy and the food should be delivered to the room if your parent is disabled or injured. There should be some variety in the diet and since there is a separate charge for the food, it is not wrong to expect some quality and variety in the food.

– If your parent has moved to an assisted care facility, they have every right to live as they wish in that apartment, since they have paid for it. However, they have to observe certain restrictions because they are living in a community setting. They should be able to live without any interference from the staff of the facility and have the freedom to select the décor of the apartment or have family and friends to visit.

– Another fundamental right of a senior citizen is to be treated with compassion, respect and dignity. Although this is not a tangible right, how the staff at the facility treats the elderly is an important aspect in the selection of a facility for your parents. The staff of the facility must be respectful and pleasant in their dealings with your parents. If your parent complains of any emotional or verbal abuse, you must investigate and hold the facility accountable for it.

As a primary caregiver, responsible for the well being of your elderly parents, you have the right to remind the assisted care facility of their responsibilities. Ensure that your parents are getting the service and care that they paid for and that they are comfortable in their living quarters and enjoying their stay there.

Abhishek successfully runs an Old Age Home and he has got some great Eldercare Secrets up his sleeves! Download his FREE 80 Page Ebook, “How To Take Great Care Of Elders” from his website http://www.Senior-Guides.com/560/index.htm. Only limited Free Copies available.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Abhishek_Agarwal

Marketing, Selling, and Serving the Older Adult, Senior Citizens, Family Caregivers by Barbara Mascio

May 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Are your clients pleased by the fine quality service that you provide?  Validating your clients’ endorsement of you through Certification as a Senior Approved Service will increase your client base.  Senior Approved Certification leads a family towards a service like yours side stepping the possibility of connecting with a less than desirable service.

If you serve the older adult, the disabled or those with chronic illnesses you may qualify for an independent consumer-driven survey process leading to certification as a Senior Approved Service.

You will not pay for clients, leads or referrals.  You will not violate HIPAA or the Anti-kickback rulings.  You will not pay for membership or advertising space.

Certifications are offered for medical, non-medical, alternative healing practices, housing, elder-law, and financial planners – virtually any type of business that reaches this population.  “We are building the ultimate one-call solution,” states Barbara Mascio, founder.  “Seniors are need of many kinds of service, including lawn care, handyman services and so on.  We save the headache of shopping around and completely remove the guess work.”

Confident business owners recognize the benefits of being part of an exclusive network of Certified Senior Approved Services.  See [http://www.qualityeldercare.com/senior-services.html]

Jean F. Wales, President of Wales Consulting LLC and Author of “Do It Now! An Organizing Handbook for Families and Senior Citizens writes  Becoming a Senior Approved Service instantly raised the credibility of my book “Do It Now! An Organizing Handbook for Families and Senior Citizens.  [http://www.seniorsapprove.com/organizing.html]

Ester Whitney, owner of Sweet Adeline’s Home writes  I feel I have been given a great opportunity to be the first Residential Home Care Provider to be approved by Senior Approved Services in the Dallas Area … everyone has been impressed …  [http://www.sweetadelineshomes.com/]

Tony Latina and Peggy Schmidt, co-owners of Advanced Laser Solutions writes  We have had nothing but positive feedback from the referrals from Senior Approved Services. They have been excellent to work with and we strongly recommend them.   [http://www.seniorsapprove.com/stop_smoking.html]

Paul Stone, owner of Occasional Help for Seniors a general cleaning and handyman service writes  We are so proud to be Certified as a Senior Approved Service. Putting this on our brochures, business cards and other advertisement pieces has clearly, without a doubt, increased our client base. Barbara is right; seniors need services but are afraid or confused about which one to call. [http://www.seniorsapprove.com/occasional-help.html]

See [http://www.qualityeldercare.com/providers] for details.  Mention Savings Code 0630 when you apply for certification.

Barbara Mascio, Founder of Senior Approved Services – a National Network of Products, Resources and Services Endorsed by Seniors

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Barbara_Mascio

Traveling With Senior Citizens by Karissa Price

May 28, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Traveling with elderly patients can certainly be a challenge, but there are many things that caregivers and family members can do to make it easier, safer, and less stressful. Planning ahead is essential to make sure everything goes smoothly and also to ensure that the traveler gets the most for their money. Last minute bookings are often expensive and should be avoided if possible.

When flying, here are some tips for easier travel:

1. Arrive at the airport with plenty of time to spare; getting through security can take much longer if the airport is busy or the patient moves slowly, and having to rush will only add to the stress
2. If possible, arrange in advance to have a wheelchair available and access to any special services offered to senior citizens
3. Make sure that the traveler has all of their identification, insurance information, itinerary, money, and medications; have copies of any instructions from physicians about medications or medical devices such as a pacemaker
4. Try not to pack too many clothing or other items; comfortable shoes are definitely necessary
5. To make the actual flight more comfortable, take a pillow and reading material or anything else for entertainment on the flight such as crossword puzzles or card games.

A common theme among senior citizen travel is to visit out of town family members, especially children, grandchildren, or even great grandchildren for a special event or just for a vacation. As soon as a wedding, birthday, or graduation announcement arrives, start planning the vacation! In addition to visiting family, there are many vacation destinations that cater to senior citizens. Many cruise lines have special senior citizen cruises, which can be a wonderful social experience for any seniors who want to enjoy the company of others and make new friends on their trip. Many destinations (such as Branson, Missouri, for example) have tons of specialty tours for senior citizens. Caregivers can find an abundance of information online about these tours, and should also check with the Better Business Bureau to make sure they are legitimate companies before paying for anything.

For more information, please visit http://www.trustedhandsnetwork.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Karissa_Price

Enjoyable Activities for a Senior Citizen Party by Misha Anatolia

May 3, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

Senior citizens are not too old to enjoy themselves, especially if the right  activities are chosen for a party. Great senior party activities keep seniors  engaged, ignite their imaginations, and let them rest. Here’s what to consider  when planning a party for seniors.

Give it a purpose Senior citizens are in their golden years, and they’ve  earned their rest. They’ve also earned the right to strong opinions, and  sometimes have very strong ideas about what they will and will not do. When  planning a party for senior citizens, don’t assume you know what is best for  your guests. Plan the party with a purpose, give them a reason to be interested,  but leave the joining in activities to the participants. Some good activities  that bring a sense of purpose to a party involve charity. You can plan a party  around knitting, sewing, quilting, or crocheting for charity. Lilybug is a  charity that makes blankets and caps for babies in the neonatal intensive care  units of hospitals. Operation Caregiver is a knitting charity that creates warm  handknits for hardworking men and women in service. Having a clear purpose when  at a party allows guests to relax into the experience.

Ignite their imaginations One of the best things about growing older is  being able to lay down the mantel of hard work and eventually return to a sense  of childlike play. Believe it or not, seniors often like to engage in art,  crafts, and imaginative play. Engage this sense of imagination with activities  like calligraphy lessons, watercolor painting, or crochet. Hire a magician,  musician, or storyteller, and then let the guests have the floor while they tell  their own stories. Decorate the party with lots of color or with sweeping themes  to create a wonderland for your guests to lose themselves in.

Let them rest Great party activities, like dancing, get guests moving.  Choose music from every era of their lifetime, and get their memories moving  along with their bodies. At a party for senior citizens, it is important to have  adequate rest, as well. Plan a high tea with finger sandwiches, ladyfingers,  tea, and petit-fours. Arrange furniture in conversation circles near tables  laden with refreshments. Host a film noir movie night where guests can attend as  their favorite old film stars, but can also feel free to put their feet up or  doze when the movie runs too long.

Cater to seniors’ imagination, sense of play, and desire to be a part of the  world. Make the party mean something. Give the party a theme and a purpose. Then  let your guests be your guides. If they want to spend the entire party standing  by the refreshments and reminiscing over the last time they encountered  croissants as fluffy as these, but they don’t have any interest in the ceramics  lesson you’ve got planned, float with it. Let the party go where it will. Being  a good host is about letting the party become a success in spite of you, not  because of you.

Misha Anatolia is a relationship and bridal shower writer. For more bridal shower planning tips and other bridal shower information, go to bridal-showers.org. If you  want more articles, visit our site and click on the Contact Us link.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Misha_Anatolia

 

Senior Citizens – Burdened With Grief and Anger by Jessie Penn

April 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Grief and anger often becomes a heavy burden for people as they age. Throughout life, people experience grief over many things. They grieve if there home burns down, lose a job or a pet. However, an area of loss that is not usually considered with grief is the physical decline during the aging process.

Grief can be detected, in seniors, by the comments they make about losing their youth. Many times, they speak with remorse at lost youth, decreased functionality, and body strength. When a senior citizen notices they are losing muscle strength, or begin experiencing arthritis, stiffness, and joint pain, it’s not unusual to notice anger. They become upset and wish to escape the betrayals of their bodies, and become very angry in the process.

No one asks to get old or feeble. Most likely, if we had a choice, most of us would vote to discontinue and ban getting old. A person might grieve when they are bestowed the title of “Senior Citizen.” At first, a senior citizen, might not notice the changes that are taking place in the physical aspects of the body or the mind. And, perhaps, as much as they hate the thought of getting old, family members also grieve about losing the ‘young’ mom or dad they once knew.

Unfortunately, getting angry about growing old has no escape; there’s no one to blame it on. So, sometimes the result is that seniors lash out at the ones closest to them. Anger and frustration with the aging body can cause tempers to rage or flare up unexpectedly. Many times, a senior lashes out at a loved one or caregiver because they are nearby and easily accessible. The aging person knows it isn’t fair, but may have a hard time explaining their actions.

Learning how to cope with anger about aging is necessary so you don’t hurt the innocent ones around you. But, it is also unhealthy to keep your grief bottled up inside you. If seniors are not allowed to vent and get rid of their anger, the body can decline at a faster rate.

It’s been suggested that people become angry because they feel a false sense of entitlement. This crops up when expectations do not line up with reality. A feeling of undo entitlement happens when we believe we do not deserve to get old.

There is just one way to confront getting older, and that is to recognize that we are not alone, everyone will get old, and we are not entitled to be exempt from the aging process. Recognizing this fact can help to eliminate anger from the arena as we cope with the affects of aging.

Attempting to deny the advance of life’s end, is probably the sole cause of midlife crisis’s. Trying to behave as if they are not getting older and hiding emotional responses to aging can cause devastating results. Avoiding the feelings about aging has caused many to act irresponsibility or make bad decisions.

By recognizing the problems that naturally happen through aging, some of the anger can be avoided. Instead of dwelling on declining abilities, senior citizens can minimize the impacts by living with a healthier attitude toward aging.

Focusing on your diet, exercise, keeping busy, and doing everything you can to stay rested and emotionally sound. Thinking about or getting involved with other people can help to create a healthier attitude toward aging and minimize its effects.

Try to keep your spirits up, be happy through achievements and seemingly small enjoyments. Keep a young at heart attitude and get in touch with the child inside you. You’ve come too far, traveled many winding paths, and you deserve to feel content and happy. Emotions about how you feel about yourself can play a major role in the person you choose to be as a senior citizen.

Get free information to protect your loved ones when a medical emergency or security treat happens. Go to http://personalsecuritydevices.walkinsarewelcome.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jessie_Penn

The Benefits of Becoming a Senior Citizen by Rahmat Suki

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Most people hate or dislike the fact that in the years to come, they will be  living the second half of their lives as an old man or as an old woman. Being  old has been stereotyped to becoming ugly, slow, weak and isolated. But this is  not the reality at all times; some people grow old without the comfort of their  loved ones or even the care of other concerned citizens, but most of us have the  privilege to stay with our families and loved ones as we grow older each day.  Aging has its own disadvantages and unpleasant consequences, but there are a lot  of privileges being given to a senior citizen. The benefits that you can derive  from growing old are truly valuable and can help you deal better with aging.

To be considered as a senior citizen, one must reach the age of sixty-five in  the United States or depending on the age stated on the laws of a country. The  age of becoming a senior citizen is also considered as the retirement age for  professionals who have dedicated themselves to their work. Every month, there  are over one million people who turn sixty-five and imagine the fraction of the  population that belongs to this age group. By the time you have reached this  age, you are qualified for numerous benefits exclusive.

In the official context, a senior citizen is a term used for legal and  policy-related causes in verifying individuals who are eligible for specific  benefits to the age group. Some of the benefits of aging include caregivers  resources, consumer protection for seniors, education, jobs, and volunteerism  for seniors, end-of-life issues, federal and state agencies for seniors, health  for seniors, housing for seniors, laws and regulations concerning seniors, money  and taxes for seniors, retirement and travel and recreation for seniors. Even  for those seniors who are raising their own grandchildren have corresponding  benefits for doing so. Becoming old is not entirely full of detriments.

Senior citizen is a responsibility of every community. Every country has  responded to the needs of their graying population and being a senior citizen  means that you have fulfilled your role in your own community.

Do visit [http://www.agingpeople.net] to find out more FREE tips and secrets  of Anti-aging solutions.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Rahmat_Suki

 

Depression in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Depression is a medical condition that is characterized by feeling down,  depressed, or hopeless; low self-esteem; and loss of interest in things one used  to enjoy. Senior citizens are prone to life-altering changes that can lead one  to feel depressed. Dealing with the trials life throws at us such as, loss,  change, loneliness, or a chronic medical condition can be quite overwhelming.  Still, depression is not a “normal” part of aging. Like heart disease or  diabetes, depression is a medical condition and it can be treated with  medication and therapy. Treatment is effective at alleviating symptoms within a  few weeks in at least 80 percent of people.

It is important that senior citizens and those providing their elder care  understand the symptoms of depression. If you think you or someone you know may  be suffering from depression, identify your symptoms by using the checklist  provided below. Then, if necessary, seek assistance. For senior citizens, the  most frequently used resource is a family doctor. Bringing a trusted friend or  relative may help ease any anxiety when going to an appointment. Understand that  your doctor may suggest a checkup and begin treatment or refer you to a mental  health specialist.

Before you say, “I’m okay”….

Do you feel:

  • Anxious or “empty”
  • Guilty or useless
  • Agitated or irritable
  • Less interested in things you used to enjoy
  • Like no one loves you
  • Life is not worth living

Or if you are:

  • A change in sleeping habits
  • A change in eating habits
  • Persistent headaches, stomach aches, or pain

Remember that these  may be real symptoms of a real medical condition that can be effectively  treated. Talk to your doctor today. Though many senior citizens suffer from  depression, feeling depressed is not a normal part of aging.

 

Health and Wellness tips

There are many measures senior citizens can take to help relieve the symptoms  of depression. Those involved in the elder care of senior citizens experiencing  depression should encourage the senior to follow these tips and improve their  wellbeing.

Check your medications. Senior citizens often take many  medications. Some medications, including those for sleep, blood pressure, and  nervousness, may affect mood. Talk with your doctor about each of the  medications you are taking. Be sure to include all over-the-counter medicines,  vitamins, and herbal supplements to minimize the chances of having side  effects.

Limit alcohol consumption. Alcohol use can bring about  depression. And, when alcohol and drugs are combined, interactions that lead to  depression can occur.

Stay connected. Sometimes, senior citizens find it more difficult  to get out and stay connected with others. Still, talking with friends and  family members, getting a pet, or even finding a new interest or hobby can help  one through this tough time.  Get involved in activities you take pleasure  in, such as reading a good book, going to a ballgame or a taking a class in a  subject that interests to you.

Be active. Physical activity can improve physical and mental  wellbeing. Though some senior citizens believe they cannot exercise, there are  activities like walking, gardening, or working out (even if one is in a  wheelchair) that can be helpful. Make a goal of 30 minutes of activity 5 days a  week. If you have not taken part in physical activity in a while, be sure to  check with your doctor and get his OK before you begin.

Eat healthy and drink plenty of fluids. Choose healthy snacks  like fruits, vegetables, yogurt, or nuts to increase your nutrition and energy.  Also, try to eat well-balanced meals.  Some senior citizens suffer from  loss of appetite and weight loss; if you have experienced either of these,  consult your doctor.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects  caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for  families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking  employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3021412

Hearing Loss in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many senior citizens are affected by some hearing problems. If left  untreated, any extent of hearing loss may worsen over time. It is important that  senior citizens with difficulty hearing consult their doctor. Companions or  caregivers who notice a senior citizen is experiencing trouble hearing should  facilitate and encourage the senior to seek medical attention. Knowing the  symptoms and taking appropriate treatment measures can help stop and, in some  cases, even reverse hearing degradation.

Hearing is very important for daily functioning so problems with hearing are  quite serious and should be addressed as soon as possible. Senior citizens who  experience hearing problems may feel isolated or embarrassed as a result. Still,  if you find that you have trouble hearing, talk to your doctor about the many  treatment options available.

Symptoms

Senior citizens who have hearing loss often complain of:

  • Having trouble hearing on the phone
  • Difficulty with following conversations, especially when multiple people are  talking
  • Needing to have volume levels of electronics so high that others notice and  complain
  • Difficulty hearing things over background noise
  • Sensing that people always seem to mumble
  • Cannot understand when women or children speak to  you

Diagnosis

 

If a doctor finds that you have hearing loss, they may refer you to an  otolaryngologist who specializes in the ear, nose, and throat. After this doctor  conducts diagnostic tests, they may refer you to an audiologist who is trained  to measure hearing function. Audiologists can test your hearing for certain  pitches and loudness levels in order to find if a hearing aid is needed. These  tests are painless.

Hearing loss is caused by degeneration of nerves with age, one of the reasons  it is prevalent among senior citizens. Other common contributions to hearing  loss are earwax build-up, exposure to very loud noises over long periods of  time, viral and bacterial infections, heart conditions, head injuries, tumors,  medications, and heredity.

Types of Hearing Loss

Some different types of hearing loss include:

Presbycusis: This is age-related hearing loss. Senior citizens  affected by this condition can either have a hard time hearing or have low  tolerance for loud noises. It can be caused by damage to the inner ear known as  sensorineural hearing loss.

Tinnitus: This condition is characterized by hearing ringing, roaring,  or some other continuous noise in the ears. It can be caused by exposure to loud  noises, hearing loss, medications, other health problems, allergies, and  conditions of the heart and blood vessels. The source of noise caused by  tinnitus is unclear and varies in how long it affects the sufferer. Senior  citizens can treat the condition by either using a hearing aid to make other  sounds louder or using a masker that makes tinnitus noise less noticeable.  Others use music to drown out the extra noise. Avoiding smoking, alcohol, and  loud noises can decrease the effects of tinnitus.

Conductive hearing loss: This is caused by blockage between eardrum  and the inner ear. This can be caused by ear wax build-up, fluid in the middle  ear, abnormal bone growth, punctured ear drum, or ear infections. For ear wax  blockage specifically, it is suggested that sufferers use mild treatments like  mineral oil, baby oil, glycerin, or commercial ear drops to soften ear wax. If  you think the eardrum may be damaged, you should contact a doctor.

Treatment

Senior citizens who suffer from hearing loss have many options for treatment  and alleviating symptoms of decreased hearing functioning. These include:

Hearing aids: these are small devices placed on the ear that make  certain noises louder. Audiologists can help find the right hearing aid for you  and may allow you to test it in a trial period. Pick a hearing aid manufacturer  who will work with you while you adjust to wearing the product, and be sure that  you are aware of how to maintain a hearing aid, such as replacing batteries and  how to use it properly.

Assistive / Adaptive devices: There are a variety of products that fit  within this category like:

  • Telephone amplifying device: can be a receiver or entire phone that makes  phone conversations louder
  • TV and radio listening systems: avoids having to turn the volume up on  regular devices
  • Assistive listening systems: these are sometimes available in public venues  like theaters, churches, synagogues, and meeting places
  • Alerts: allow for signals that replace doorbells, smoke detectors, and alarm  clocks in order for the hearing impaired to hear them properly. These usually  employ vibrations or flashing lights to replace noise.

Cochlear  implants: If hearing loss is severe, a small electronic device can be placed  under the skin, behind the ear. It allows sound to bypass the malfunctioning  part of the ear and send signals directly to the brain. This process is not  helpful for all cases of hearing loss or deafness.

 

Tips for Senior Citizens

For senior citizens affected by hearing loss, here are some helpful hints for  communication:

  • Let people know you have trouble hearing them
  • Ask people to face you, talk slower, or ask them to speak without  shouting
  • Pay attention to facial expressions and gestures
  • Let people know when you don’t understand them
  • Ask people to reword things for you when you don’t  understand

Tips for Caregivers

 

Elder caregivers taking care of senior citizens who suffer from hearing loss  can use these helpful hints when speaking to their patients:

  • Face the person and talk clearly
  • Speak at a normal speed and do not cover the mouth
  • Stand in good lighting and avoid background noises
  • Use facial expressions and physical gestures
  • Repeat yourself if necessary
  • Keep a hearing impaired person involved in a conversation rather than  talking to others  about the individual while in their presence
  • Be patient,positive and relaxed during the interaction
  • Ask how you can help them understand you

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects  caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for  families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking  employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3125166

Healthy Eating, Exercise and Lifestyle Guide For Senior Citizens By David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Healthy Eating and Lifestyle

While it is important for people of all ages to stay healthy, it is especially important for senior citizens to maintain healthy eating habits as well as to stay active which is important in the prevention of chronic illnesses like diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. By practicing healthier living practices, senior citizens can maintain a healthy weight, avoid depression, and stay mentally sharp. Those participating in caring for the elderly should be aware of these healthy living practices and work to both encourage and facilitate them.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a healthy diet includes many different types of food that are rich in nutrients. They have outlined specifically what this eating plan entails at the website.. Because this eating plan is designed specifically for senior citizens, it focuses on the types of foods that are important for preventing common ailments of older Americans like obesity and serious chronic illnesses.

Healthy Eating 101:

By following some of the tips listed, senior citizens can start a healthier lifestyle today:

  • Don’t skip meals. It is important to eat regularly in order to maintain normal metabolism and not become tempted to eat higher fat foods when food is consumed.
  • Eat a diet that is high in fiber. By eating foods like whole-grain breads, beans, vegetables, and fruits, you can lower your susceptibility to diabetes and heart disease.
  • Senior citizens especially should begin to adjust their diet to one that includes less calories and fat because the body will need less as it ages.
  • Calcium and Vitamin D are very important for nutrition and keeping bones strong. You can get this by either getting in at least three servings of dairy every day, or substituting these with soy-based beverages and proteins.
  • Senior citizens will have a harder time absorbing adequate amounts of the B12 vitamin. For this reason, it is important to eat cereals fortified with this nutrient or taking vitamin B12 supplements with meals.
  • Snack the smart way. Senior citizens will want to limit the amount of unhealthy snacking they do which involves foods high in calories and sugars. Instead, keep small portions of dried fruit, peanut butter, or crackers at hand to keep the appetite under control while remaining healthy.
  • Drink plenty of water. Although senior citizens often feel less thirsty then they used to, it is important to stay hydrated by either drinking water or water-based beverages like tea, coffee, soup, and skim milk.

Planning and Preparing Meals

 

Sometimes people find it hard to eat healthily because eating is often a social event which involves many people with different eating preferences and goals. While it is important to be able to enjoy a meal with family and friends, it is also important to maintain your own eating integrity by making sure everyone is on board with your personal healthy eating goals. Friends and family, as well as those providing elder care should facilitate healthy eating, not detour from it. The following tips address ways that senior citizens can maintain the healthy eating habits without sacrificing the social aspect of sharing a meal with others or learning to adjust to a lifestyle that involves eating with less people on a day-to-day basis.

  • Grocery shopping with others. This can be a fun and smart way to control the cost and quantity of food that you consume. If you don’t live with many people, this is a good way to split large-quantity items like potatoes and eggs which you may not be ableto use before expiration.
  • A time saving a smart way to eat healthy is cooking large quantities of food ahead of time and portioning for heating on later dates.
  • A quick way to prepare meals for yourself or for guests involves keeping frozen or canned fruits and vegetables on hand. Draining and/or rinsing canned foods is a good way to lower sodium or calories in foods that are kept in high sugar or high salt fluids.
  • Eating or preparing a meal shouldn’t always be a chore. Trying new recipes or eating outside can be a fun new twist on a meal with someone special.
  • Try to eat with people you enjoy to be around.
  • Some senior citizens have difficulty preparing meals, which is why it is important to become informed about home health care agencies or eldercare facilities that can aid in providing meals. The Eldercare Locator number is 1-800-677-1116.

Loss of Appetite or Desire to Eat

 

There are various reasons for why some senior citizens may not eat as well as they should or lose the desire to eat completely.

If you find that it is difficult to eat well, then it is best to speak with a healthcare provider or someone involved in your elder care about what can be done to help you eat better.

Some senior citizens are unable to eat well due to issues involving the condition of their teeth or issues with dentures. Checking with a dentist about physical pain that occurs when eating or other issues can help with these issues that lead to poorer eating habits.

When senior citizens lose family and friends or become depressed about events in their life, they may lose the desire to eat. In these instances, it is of the utmost importance that these individuals seek help from people they trust like their family, friends, church community, or those assisting with their elder care that will happily help them in finding ways to continue a healthy lifestyle and eating plan.

Some senior citizens complain that the flavor of foods change when they begin to take certain medications. While it is best to consult with a physician about issues surrounding medication, people can also take vitamin supplements with food that will help them stay healthy.

If you have someone who assists with your in home care, ask them to be vigilant about helping you eat healthy. Have them remind you to eat, and ask them to lend you a hand in preparing meals that are good for you.

Healthy Weight

Maintaining a healthy weight is important for being able to function in day-to-day life as well as stay mentally sharp. Senior citizens often lose or gain weigh as they age. If you are unsure about what weight you should maintain, consult your physician.

Health Risks Associated with Being Underweight

  • poor memory
  • compromised immunity
  • osteoporosis (weak bones)
  • decreases strength
  • hypothermia (lowered body temperature)
  • constipation

Health Risks Associated with Being Overweight

  • type 2 diabetes
  • high blood pressure
  • high cholesterol
  • heart disease
  • stroke (lack of oxygen transported to the brain)
  • some cancers
  • gallbladder disease

 

Because healthy weights will differ for everyone, it is important to verify with a physician whether it is healthy for you personally to lose or gain weight.

Staying Active

Participating in regular healthy amounts of physical activity can not only make you feel better, but it can make you less prone to diabetes, heart disease, and colon cancer. Staying active can be difficult for senior citizens, still it is an important part of a healthy lifestyle.

The following are some tips for maintaining a lifestyle that incorporates physical activity:

  • Know what amount of physical activity is appropriate for you. Everyone has different levels of activity that is safe for them, and while remaining active is important, always consult a health care provider about what is right for your lifestyle.
  • Take time to warm up, cool down, or take breaks when participating in a session of increased physical activity.
  • Take it slow. Always start slowly and build up to more intense levels of physical activities.
  • If you experience any pain, dizziness, or shortness of breath during exercise, stop the activity immediately.
  • Drink water.
  • Dress appropriately if you decide to exercise outdoors. Wear warmer clothes during the winter and wear lighter clothes during the summer while applying sunscreen or wearing sunglasses.
  • Wear the correct shoes for the activities that you participate in.

Types of Activity

 

Aerobic activities include activities that increase the heart rate and work the larger muscle groups. You may be able to speak a few words, but would not be able to carry on an entire conversation due to breathing patterns. Some examples of aerobics include:

  • brisk walking
  • water aerobics
  • tennis
  • house work
  • active play with children or pets
  • dancing

 

Begin incorporating small periods of this activity into your schedule during the week while slowly increasing the duration and frequency as time progresses. It is also important to incorporate different types of exercise that focus on balance and flexibility. Becoming used to a lifestyle with regular patterns of aerobic activity can reduce the effects of aging, control weight, lower risk of heart disease, improve flexibility, increase mood and energy, and expand social networks by meeting new people while doing various activities.

Strengthening activities involve the use of muscle groups against resistant forces like when lifting weights or doing yard work that involves lifting, digging, or pushing a lawn mower. This type of activity can keep muscles strong, reduce the need for a cane, reduce risk of bone injury, and help maintain a healthy weight.

Balance activities focus on muscles in specific areas of the body that encourage control as you move through space, reducing the likelihood of falls. This kind of activity could include walking heel to toe, standing on one foot, getting out of a sitting position without the use of the hands, and standing on the tip of your toes. Balance activities can help you stay steady on your feet and reduce the risk of fall and subsequent injury.

Flexibility activities increase the length of the muscles and can include stretching, yoga, and popular exercise programs like pilates. These activities can maintain the felxibility of joints, prevent stiffness, prevent injuries, and lower stress levels in general.

Weight-bearing activities require the muscles to work against gravity where the arms or legs bear the weight of the body. Activities like walking, tennis, and climbing stairs can build and maintain bone mass or reduce the risk of bone fractures.

Some activities incorporate multiple types of strengthening addressed above. What is important is that senior citizens find an enjoyable and do-able activity that will help them incorporate as many benefits as possible which will have far-reaching benefits to their health.

It’s Easy to Stay Healthy

A common misconception is that it takes an excessive amount of time and extra energy to maintain a healthy lifestyle. However, by just taking short walks for ten minutes a time or cleaning the house regularly can be practical ways to incorporate different physical activities into your daily schedule. And remember, staying healthy as a senior citizen will have increasing benefits as you continue to age.

Staying Motivated to Take Care of Yourself

Just because we age doesn’t mean that we are any less stressed by occurrences in life that may make us feel bad about ourselves or decrease our motivation to be good to ourselves. If anything, many of the challenges senior citizens face add stress.  Losing loved ones and friends or having trouble being independent with the added stressed of disease and functioning due to aging can cause depression or lifestyle changes that contribute to bad health. Here are some important tips for being good to yourself when you may not feel motivated due to circumstances out of your control:

  • Get plenty of sleep
  • Stay connected with family and friends
  • Join clubs or other social groups that you enjoy
  • Spend time with people that you enjoy
  • Volunteer at organizations in your community
  • Work a part-time job that isn’t too stressful or demanding
  • Watch a funny movie or find a way to laugh
  • Take up a hobby that you enjoy

 

Most importantly, senior citizens should remember that it is relatively easy and worth-while to maintain a healthy lifestyle as they age. Be sure to keep family, friends, and those involved in your elder care informed of your goals as they can help assist you. And remembering to eat healthy meals regularly, getting in physical activity, getting enough sleep, and being good to yourself are critical for maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

Nevada Senior Guide – Out ‘n’ About Services

Concierge Assistance – YOUR time is valuable!

Call:  (775) 772-5373

Email:  outnaboutservices@hotmail.com

 

Nevada Senior Guide – Senior Safeguards – Easier Independent Living

www.seniorsafeguards.net

Senior Safeguard

Senior SafeGuards specializes in Ramping, Handrailing and Independent Living Aids. We are a family oriented small business in the Reno, Sparks area of Nevada. We sell Modular, Suitcase, Multifold, Threshold, Solid, and Van Ramps. We also carry Independent Living Aids and disability equipment.

We are one of the few companies in the area that will install your ramp for you. We also have RENTAL RAMPS available if you are laid up for just a few months.

Give us a call at (775) 359-3889 for a free quote. We look forward to working with you.

Email:  rick@seniorsafeguards.net

 

Social Services and Education Programs

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

March calendar of social services and education programs for individuals, caregivers, and family members impacted by the diseases we treat.  All of these programs are open to the community and are offered free of charge.

 

Lending Library (4th Floor)

Featuring hundreds of books, videos and brochures for patients, families and the community-at-large.  Open to the public Monday – Thursday, 10 am – 2 pm.  Receive a free tote bag when you check out a book.

 

Healthy Living: Up2Me

New 6 week session begins Mar 29, 12:30 pm – 3:00 pm

Join us for this proven six-week program designed to help caregivers and individuals with chronic diseases set goals and develop skills for success.  Free and open to the public, advance registration is required.  Contact Susan, 483-6055, solorzs@ccf.org.

 

Lunch & Learn

 

Wednesdays, 12 noon – 1 pm

888 W. Bonneville Avenue, Las Vegas

Bring your lunch, drink & dessert are provided; open to the public.

 

Mar 6: Brain Stimulation to Improve Movement, Brach Poston, PhD, Project Scientist, Cleveland Clinic

 

Gain an understanding of non-invasive brain stimulation techniques shown to improve the motor skills of individuals with Parkinson’s Disease as well as in older adults.  Learn about current Cleveland Clinic projects using these techniques along with their future therapeutic potential.

 

Mar 13: In Case of Emergency, Rodney Anderson, MHA, Department Supervisor, Cleveland Clinic

 

Learn tips and strategies to prepare for emergency situations and to keep you and your loved ones safe.

 

Mar 20: Healthy Meal Ideas, Master Chef Gustav Mauler, Spiedini

 

Answer the age-old question, “what’s for dinner” with quick, simple, and nutritious meal ideas.  Recipes and samples will be provided.

 

Mar 27: Interior Design – Supporting Daily Activities, Attila Lawrence, Professor, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

 

Discover inspiring ideas for the design of interior spaces to improve the quality of independent living for individuals and caregivers.

 

Cleveland Museum of Art Series

 

Dynamic conversations about art through videoconferencing.

 

All art education programs are held at the LouRuvoCenter for Brain Health Library, 888 W. Bonneville Avenue, Las Vegas; open to the public.

 

America’s Story through Art: America Emerging; 1700s

Mar 5, 11:00 am – 12:00 noon

America Emerging is a discussion of the 1700s.  This program includes the developing American identity, folk art, the influence of the Age of Reason, the effect of the mercantilist economy, and underlying causes of the Revolution.

 

America’s Story through Art: America Expanding; 1801 – 1861

Mar 19, 11:00 am – 12:00 noon

Art in the first half of the 19th century was a reflection of American values, identity, and political culture.  America Expanding explores frontier life, the results and impact of westward expansion, landscape painting, Jacksonian democracy, and genre art.

 

Contact Susan Solorzano, 483-6055 or solorzs@ccf.org for additional information.

 

Support Groups

 

MEMORY LOSS SUPPORT GROUP

Wednesdays, 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Meetings are held weekly for adult members who provide care for loved ones with memory loss.  Contact Donna, 483-6035, municd@ccf.org.

 

PARKINSON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP

Mar 12, 12:00 noon – 1:00 pm

(Held the 2nd Tuesday of every month)

 

Separate groups for early stage individuals and adult family members.

 

Contact Jennifer, 483-6036, gayanj@ccf.org.

 

HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP

Mar 26, 12:00 noon – 1:00 pm

(Held the 4th Tuesday of every month)

 

Separate groups for gene-positive individuals (asymptomatic and early stage) and adult family members.

 

Contact Jenna, 483-6054, cliffoj@ccf.org.

 

 

 

 

 

Social Services

LouRuvoCenter for Brain Health

Cleveland Clinic |  888 W Bonneville Ave  |  Las Vegas, NV89106

Desk: (702) 331-7042  |  Fax: (702) 260-9797 |  E-mail: louruvosocialserv@ccf.org

Connect:  www.keepmemoryalive.org

“Best of Home Care” Award – Second Year in a Row

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

No Place Like Home Senior Care today announced that it has been recognized with Home Care Pulse’s “Best of Home Care” Provider of Choice distinction. Awarded to the top 25% of agencies in client and employee satisfaction scores from Home Care Pulse, No Place Like Home Senior Care is now ranked among a select few of the best agencies in the country.

What is the Best of Home Care® Award?

Agencies with the highest quality receive the Best of Home Care Award® from Home Care Pulse, the leading quality assurance firm for home care. This award is based on client and caregiver satisfaction scores from several categories, including Compassion, Work Ethic, Communication, and Training. “Our combined current client satisfaction rate is 96.8%” advised President/CEO Rick Ackerson.

Why Choose a Best of Home Care® Provider of Choice?

When you choose a Best of Home Care® Provider of Choice, you can be confident you are choosing the right home care agency for you and your family.

An agency recognized as a Provider of Choice is best-in-class for quality care. Their client satisfaction scores rank in the top percentile nationally in one or more categories. These scores are based on monthly third-party phone interviews with the agency’s clients, conducted by Home Care Pulse. As a client of a Best of Home Care® Provider of Choice, your agency will be preferred home care provider with award-winning care.

“We want to congratulate No Place Like Home Senior Care for winning the “Best of Home Care” award and commend their commitment to placing high priority on client and employee satisfaction,” concluded Aaron Marcum of Home Care Pulse.

About Home Care Pulse

Home Care Pulse was launched in 2008 and is a company specializing in measuring and benchmarking client and employee satisfaction for private duty home care agencies. Recently Home Care Pulse conducted the largest study ever performed on behalf of the private duty industry.

About No Place Like Home Senior Care

No Place Like Home Senior Care is the premier non-medical home care agency in Douglas County and surrounding areas, providing a wide range of in-home care services. No Place Like Home Senior Care is a locally-owned and operated company and is passionate about serving seniors and those in need throughout Northern Nevada.

Only agency in Northern NV providing Certified Companion Aides & Certified Hospice Companion Aides.

Further information can be found at www.NvNoPlaceLikeHome.com or call 775-392-2000.

National Nonprofit Twilight Wish Foundation Joins Forces with Parent-giving to Increase Awareness of Contributions of Caregivers

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

The national nonprofit Twilight Wish Foundation is pleased to announce a new partnership with Parentgiving.com, based in Montclair, New Jersey. Keith Maddox, CEO of Parentgiving, presented a check for $10,000 to Cass Forkin, founder of Twilight Wish Foundation at their Doylestown, PA offices on January 10, 2013. The funding received from Parentgiving will be used to create a program to recognize and reward deserving senior caregivers.

“As Twilight Wish celebrates the 9th anniversary of our first wish granted, we are thrilled to be embarking on a new path with Parentgiving, a company that shares our dedication to meeting the needs of the elderly,” said Forkin. “There are over 42 million caregivers in the U.S. and many of them struggle with their own physical, financial and mental needs. The main goal of this partnership is to increase awareness of the contributions of caregivers and recognize all they do for their loved ones.”

Said Maddox, “Parentgiving recognizes the strains people face when a senior family member needs care due to health and/or mobility issues. We applaud Twilight Wish for all their work to improve the lives of seniors and are thrilled to partner with them on a program to make caregivers’ wishes come true.” Parentgiving, which sells thousands of caregiving products for seniors, has arranged for additional ongoing contributions to Twilight Wish through a special coupon code, available on the Twilight Wish website, which gives customers deep discounts and Twilight Wish 5% of each sale.

Twilight Wish Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit charitable organization whose mission is to honor and enrich the lives of deserving seniors through wish granting celebrations that connect generations. Since its founding in 2003, Twilight Wish has granted over 1,865 individual wishes to deserving, low-income seniors, thanks to volunteers, corporate and community involvement, and donations. Recent wishes granted include a visit from a string band for a nursing home resident’s 89th birthday party, transporting a nursing home resident to Christmas Eve dinner with her family and hearing aids for an Army veteran who wished to be able to hear his grandchildren’s voices. For more information on Twilight Wish Foundation, visit its website at www.twilightwish.org or call 1-215-230-8777 ext. 104.

Parentgiving.com is a fast-growing online destination for seniors and their caregivers. The Parentgiving Store offers thousands of homecare products, medical supplies and incontinence products, delivered fast right to the home. The store’s top sellers include durable medical equipment, such as walkers, bed rails, bath safety bars, incontinence items, and daily living aids. Parentgiving.com also offers a wealth of free information on eldercare, including original articles and news, Q&A with experts on aging, senior housing and homecare directories, and other aging-related resources. For more information please visit www.Parentgiving.com or follow them on Twitter.

CONTACT: Mary Farrell, Director of Community Relations, Twilight Wish, 215-230-8777, ext. 103

Healthy Aging: Up2Me

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Healthy Aging: Up2Me – January 18, 12:30 – 3:00 PM
Join us for this proven six week program helping caregivers and individuals with chronic diseases set goals and develop skills for success. Free and open to the public, advance registration required. Contact Susan, 483-6023, hirschs2@ccf.org

Lunch & Learn
Wednesdays, 12 noon – 1 pm
888 W. Bonneville Avenue, Las Vegas
Bring your lunch, drink & dessert provided; open to the public

Jan 9: Yoga for Everyone!
Marilyn Kovach and Sandy Rickards
Yoga can exercise our body, mind and spirit. Learn simple techniques that can be used to promote increased flexibility and provide a break from everyday stresses.

Jan 16: Understanding Complementary Therapies
Lisa Browder, RA, ICA, CR, Complementary Therapies Manager, Nathan Adelson Hospice
Increase your understanding of techniques that can be used to promote health and wellbeing.

Jan 23: Getting Your Legal and Financial Ducks in a Row
Kim Boyer, Certified Elder Law Attorney
This presentation will provide an overview of common legal documents such as durable power of attorney, wills and trusts as well as benefits programs to help cover the cost of care.

Jan 30: Super Aging – The Science Behind Successful Brains
Sarah Banks, PhD, Neuropsychologist, Cleveland Clinic
Most people experience some cognitive decline with age, it’s normal. But others show no real decline: What makes these superagers different?

Cleveland Museum of Art Series
Dynamic conversations about art through videoconferencing
All art education programs are held at the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health Library, 888 W. Bonneville Avenue and open to the public.

L’Art de L’Afrique
January 15, 11:00 – 12:00 Noon
Explore the rich history and traditional arts of former French colonies including Mali, The Democratic Republic of Congo and The Cote d’Ivoire. Styles, materials, techniques and functions of art works will be discussed.

Contact Susan Hirsch, 483-6023 or hirschs2@ccf.org for additional information.
Support Groups
MEMORY LOSS SUPPORT GROUP
Wednesdays, 1 pm-2:30 pm
Meetings are held weekly for adult members who provide care for loved ones with memory loss.
Contact: Donna Munic-Miller 483-6035, municd@ccf.org
PARKINSON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP: January 8, 12 noon -1 pm
(Held the 2nd Tuesday of every month)
Separate groups for early stage individuals and adult family members.
Contact: Jennifer 483-6036, gayanj@ccf.org

HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP: January 22, 12 noon -1 pm
(Held the 4th Tuesday of every month)
Separate groups for gene positive individuals (asymptomatic and early stage) and adult family members.
Contact: Jenna 483-6054, clifforj@ccf.org

ElderCarelink.com launches contest to reward family caregivers

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

ElderCarelink.com is hosting the “Share Why You Care” contest that asks caregivers to share stories about their caregiving experiences. Readers vote for their favorite caregiver to win a free spa day and in-home care of their loved one for a day.

January 7, 2013 (VOCUS) Foster City, Calif. – – ElderCareLink.com, a one-stop elder care resource, is hosting a contest this January specifically for caregivers. The “Share Why You Care” contest is designed to give a voice to the approximately 76 million unpaid family caregivers in the U.S. From January 7, 2013 to February 1, 2013 the site encourages these dedicated individuals to share their stories, struggles and memories.

As the first wave of the Baby Boomer generation prepares for retirement, many are finding themselves in caregiving positions because their parents are living longer than ever before. In some cases, plans for a leisurely retirement have been put on hold have so they can be available 24 hours a day, seven days a week for aging loved ones.

“It can be exhausting being responsible for someone else all the time,” explained Vicki DeLuca, spokesperson for ElderCareLink.com. “We want our users and caregivers to know they are appreciated for all they do.”

Caregivers may submit an essay of 300 words or less describing why or how they became a caregiver and what caregiving means to them. Optionally, users may also submit a photo of themselves and those they have cared for. Essay submissions are entered automatically into the competition for a chance to win weekly $50 prizes and the submission with the most votes will be awarded the grand prize of a free spa day and in-home care of their loved one, worth $350.

“Caregivers aren’t always appreciated for all the work they do,” continued DeLuca. “The real value of the ‘Share Why You Care’ contest is that their voices can be heard.”

To see the entries or enter the contest, please visit the contest homepage and follow ElderCareLink.com on Twitter and Facebook.

About ElderCareLink.com
ElderCarelink.com, a one-stop elder care resource, provides a community of support, advice, and caregiving resources for families in need of elder care. To date, ElderCarelink has provided information and assistance to more than one million families nationwide with finding in-home care, assisted living, nursing homes, adult day care, private duty nursing, and care management services. ElderCareLink.com is owned and operated by QuinStreet, Inc. (NASDAQ: QNST), one of the largest Internet marketing and media companies in the world. QuinStreet is committed to providing consumers and businesses with the information they need to research, find and select the products, services and brands that meet their needs. The company is a leader in visitor-friendly marketing practices. For more information, please visit QuinStreet.com

Healthy Aging: Up2Me

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Healthy Aging: Up2Me
According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than 125 million people suffer from at least one chronic illness. If you are an adult with a chronic condition such as diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, heart disease, chronic pain or anxiety, this Healthy Aging : Up2Me workshop can help you.

It’s also important for family caregivers to avoid developing a chronic illness due to stress and neglect of their own health and well being.
• Join this FREE 2 1/2 hour workshop held each week for six weeks.
• Learn from trained volunteer leaders who have cared for those with chronic
health conditions.
• Set goals for yourself.
Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health
888 W. Bonneville Ave • Las Vegas, NV 89106
Fridays: September 28 – November 2, 2012
12:30 – 3 p.m.
Sign up with Susan Hirsch at hirschs2@ccf.org or 702-483-6023.

How to Care for an Elderly Person or Senior

October 11, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

How to Care for an Elderly Person or Senior
by: Starlet Nicole

It is not always easy caring for an elderly person. Their physical condition, health issues and their emotional state can present challenges for you, the caregiver. There are no doubts that caring for an elderly person is admirable, but it certainly comes with stress and at times can be overwhelming.

Far too many people feel guilty that they can not care for an elderly person on their own. Life presents far too many challenges and more often than not raising a family, paying into a mortgage and keeping food on the table can be challenging enough let alone adding to this caring for an elderly loved one. Although this can be challenging – it is not impossible. Preparing yourself and your family members for the transition is essential in order to make this work well.

Physical Considerations

Get informed about the physical needs of your loved one. Talk to the doctor and to anyone else who may have the wisdom and knowledge to help you care for the elderly member of your family. Know what to expect, what medications are required. Using services provided by a certified in-home caregiver from a professional agency can assist you in times that you need that extra help.

Keeping all important information in one file is important and this includes all medical information including test results, names and phone numbers of doctors, appointment dates, hospital cards, and insurance information. If your loved one is taking a lot of medications, make a chart to help keep track of what medication is to be taken and when.

Always be sure the home is safe. If your loved one uses a walker be sure throw rugs are secure, and there are no obstacles for them to trip over. Install safety railings should this help. If your loved one can get confused at times, it’s also a good safety precaution to have a baby gate positioned high enough in the door frame at staircases so that they can not fall down.

Emotional Considerations

Spending time caring for the elderly does not have to be all about taking care of their personal needs. Spend time asking them about their life. Everyone has stories to share about their life and some seniors have great experiences to share.

Teach an elderly person about the Internet. Many elderly people are nervous about computers and teaching them about all the amazing benefits of the Internet can spark new life in the person you are caring for.

The brain likes to stay active and no better way to do this than to play word games, crossword puzzles or even some board games such as Scrabble.

Always remember to be understanding because as we get older we tend to be very set in our ways and this means being stubborn at times. If the person you are caring for is being very stubborn and it is not a big issue, let it go. If the stubbornness is over something that is not negotiable it’s much easier to handle and you’ll have much less stress when you know to expect it.

When you have all the tools you need, it will make caring for the elderly much easier.

About The Author

Starlet is professional author for GC Nexus Group, Elderly Caregivers Agency help in finding professional caregivers throughout Montreal and Toronto in Canada. GC Nexus offers Live in Caregivers Canada, senior caregiver and elderly home care services for your parents and spouses by professionals.

http://www.gcnexus.com/elderly-care/
The author invites you to visit:
http://www.gcnexus.com

Fall Prevention Week!

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Fall Prevention Week Is Rapidly Approaching! “Don’t Fall Down! Fall Prevention 101 for Older Adults” Now Available as E-Book

The third week in September has been nationally recognized as “Fall Prevention Week” and we need your help to increase awareness of the growing public health concern of falls among our aging population!

Falls are the leading cause of accidental death and non-fatal injury for people over the age of 65. The greying of America is causing major concern among government agencies due to the financial and emotional costs to individuals, their families and society. In 2000, the average cost of a fall was over $28,000 (CDC, 2006). The good news is that up to 50% of falls can be prevented through increased awareness and behavior change.

“Don’t Fall Down! Fall Prevention 101 for Older Adults” explains situations that increase the risk of a fall and how a person can reduce that risk. Some factors can be changed and others must be accepted. The first step a person can do to prevent falls is become aware of things that contribute to instability and then make the necessary change when possible.

Balance is a complicated messenger system and this 70-page book offers scientifically-researched concepts in an easy to understand manner. The reader will gain a better understanding of what may be causing loss of balance, how to reduce the risk of a fall and where to go for help.

The index includes a “Help, I’ve Fallen and I CAN Get Up” demonstration, Fall Risk Medications List, Home Safety Checklist and a Senior Resource Directory.
Written in large print, this is a must read for older adults, loved ones, family members, caregivers, staff members, program planners, activity directors, nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, and doctors.

Knowledge is empowering. This easy to read book encourages a person to take responsibility his/her well-being in order to remain independent.

To request a review copy of this e-book, or to arrange an interview with the author, please contact:

Name: Kelly Ward, aka, “The Fall Prevention Lady”
E-mail: wardkelly@mac.com
Website: http://www.thefallpreventionlady.com
Tel: 916-821-5715

Cleveland Clinic September calendar of social services and education programs

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

September calendar of social services and education programs for individuals, caregivers and family members impacted by brain diseases. All of these programs are open to the community and offered free of charge.

Healthy Aging: Up2Me – New Session Begins on September 28, 12:30 pm – 3:00 pm
Join us for this proven six week program helping caregivers and individuals with chronic diseases set goals and develop skills for success. Free and open to the public, advance registration required. Contact Susan, 483-6023, hirschs2@ccf.org

Lunch & Learn
Wednesdays, 12 noon – 1 pm
888 W. Bonneville Avenue, Las Vegas
Bring your lunch, drink & dessert provided; open to the public

Sept 5: What You Need to Know Before a Hospital Stay, Rose O’Donnell-Barker, RN BSN, Valley Hospital Medical Center
A hospital stay can be stressful for anyone. For those with Alzheimer’s or other memory disorders, being in an unfamiliar environment presents unique challenges. Learn strategies to address issues that can arise for patients and caregivers during a hospital stay.

September 12: Understanding Grief & Loss, Esther Langston, PhD, Professor Emeritus, UNLV School of Social Work
This presentation will explore grief and loss over the life span and increase our understanding of how we are affected as individuals and caregivers.

Sept 19: Tea Time & Spices of Life, Kristopher Hightower, Keep Memory Alive Café
A conversation about teas and spices of the world and their benefits. Tasting and samples!

Sept 26: Special Social Service Programs: CarePRO & Health Aging: Up2Me, Susan Solorzano, Pam Fine & Patti Nixon
Join us for this presentation on two special social service programs which have been proven to be effective: 1) CarePRO which provides education and support for dementia caregivers and 2) Healthy Aging: Up2Me, a 6 week program helping caregivers and individuals with chronic illness to set goals and develop skills for success.

Cleveland Museum of Art Series
Dynamic conversations about art through videoconferencing
All art education programs are held at the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health Library, 888 W. Bonneville Avenue and open to the public.

Ancient American Art: The Aztec and their Ancestors
September 4, 11:00 am – 12:00 noon
Learn about the art of selected cultures in ancient Mesoamerica. Ceramic, gold and stone objects will be examined to shed light on religion and rulership among the Aztec, Maya and other cultures.

Self Portraits
September 18, 11:00 am – 12:00 noon
Our self image influences many elements including our perspective, decision-making and daily experiences. We will explore ways in which artists from Rembrandt to Picasso represent themselves through their personal statements, historical moments and other approaches.

Contact Susan Hirsch, 483-6023 or hirschs2@ccf.org for additional information.
Support Groups
MEMORY LOSS SUPPORT GROUP
Wednesdays, 1 pm-2:30 pm
Meetings are held weekly for adult members who provide care for loved ones with memory loss.
Contact: Donna Munic-Miller 483-6035, municd@ccf.org
PARKINSON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP: September 11, 12 noon -1 pm
(Held the 2nd Tuesday of every month)
Christopher Borsellino, MA Ed of Deaf, MS/CCC-SLP from Speech Logic is guest speaker. Early stage group and adult family members meet together in the Library.
Contact: Jennifer 483-6036, gayanj@ccf.org

HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP: September 25, 12 noon -1 pm
(Held the 4th Tuesday of every month)
Separate groups for gene positive individuals (asymptomatic and early stage) and adult family members.
Contact: Jenna 483-6054, clifforj@ccf.org

There’s No Place Like Home

September 1, 2012 by · Comments Off on There’s No Place Like Home
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Press-Media Releases 

There’s No Place Like Home
By Michael Clark

If you are on Medicare and have had a recent hospital stay, experts say there is about a 1-in-5 chance you will find yourself back in the hospital again within a month. Hospital readmissions are not only expensive they are hard on both patients and families. According to analysts, three-fourths of these readmissions are potentially avoidable.
Now, the Nevada Partnership for Value-driven Healthcare (NPV) has an initiative with an ultimate goal of reducing these hospital readmissions by at least 10%. The No Place Like Home Campaign is being implemented in Nevada by HealthInsight, the state’s Medicare Quality Improvement Organization.

Typically, problems begin when patients receive inadequate preparation for discharge from the hospital. The handover from the hospital to outpatient providers is poorly handled, and patients and their family caregivers are left to cope on their own with medical issues that they don’t understand. In fact, only about half of discharged patients follow up with their primary-care physicians after they leave the hospital, and those who don’t are much more likely to be readmitted than those who do see a doctor.
“Have we properly prepared the patient for a return home?” asks Deborah Huber, executive director of the non-profit organization HealthInsight, a prominent member of the NPV. “Poor communication is at the heart of the problem.”
Huber points out that too often people released from hospital care do not know when to go to their primary-care doctor, or which medications to take, or the costs involved. Making matters worse, there are no clear lines of authority. As a result, the system sets these individuals up to fail and creates a dangerous situation for patients, according to Brian Jack, an expert on hospital engineering.

In one study, for example, 78 percent of patients discharged from the ER did not understand their diagnosis, their ER treatment, home care instructions, or warnings signs of when to return to the hospital. Health care providers are partly responsible for this lack of comprehension.

IHI, a Boston-based nonprofit organization, advises hospitals and other institutions to use a patient-centered approach that looks at post-discharge care through a patient’s eyes. By doing “deep dives” into several patient histories, IHI says, and finding out why the patients were readmitted, it’s possible to understand where the entire process falls short and begin to fix it.

Another area that needs improvement has to do with what is called the transitions of care…do the health care providers receiving the patient know what the ones sending the patient home knows? “The patient gets stuck in the middle. They don’t know what to do,” Huber noted. And what about Advanced Planning…end of life care? Have patients and their families made these ultimate decisions? If not, these issues must be addressed. What if patients don’t want to go back to the hospital? Are they aware of what palliative care or hospice can do? “Medicare provides a good hospice benefit. The whole family can benefit from that.”

Here the goal is to make someone as comfortable as possible and give family members the support they need to help them through this difficult time. “These are the type of things I see every day with my home health patients, I see where patients would not have to return to acute if the goals set here could be obtained,” said Lucia Cleveland a home health occupational therapist.

HealthInsight’s goal is to reduce 30-day readmissions by 20% by October 2013. Finally, Huber observes “this is a community problem, not merely a hospital problem.” This community effort will produce sustainable and replicable strategies to achieve high-value health care for individuals in our communities and save potentially millions of dollars in healthcare costs.

“One way we support this statewide community effort is through a web-based campaign where providers, payers, and patients can pledge their support and become an active participant,” noted Jackie Buttaccio, HealthInsight’s Quality Improvement Manager. “The website is a one stop shop for all things readmissions with resources and tools that can be downloaded, and local success stories can be shared. “ The address is http://noplacelikehomenv.com

HealthInsight also supports this work through face to face workshops for providers to learn more about what they can change about their systems of care to keep patients safe from an avoidable hospital readmission.

Medical Alert Provider Rescue Alert of California(TM) Announces Improved Senior Blog Rescue Alert of California

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

Medical Alert Provider Rescue Alert of California(TM) Announces Improved Senior Blog
Rescue Alert of California™, has announced a newly updated senior blog in an effort to improve the user-experience for their network of seniors and caregivers.

Rescue Alert Medical Alert System
We want to provide the vital information on eldercare and senior health in an easy-to-find, user friendly way so that more people benefit from this valuable information.
Rancho Santa Margarita, California (PRWEB) August 23, 2012

Medical alert provider Rescue Alert of California,™ in a continued effort to provide helpful resources and information on a variety of health and safety topics for seniors, has announced a restructure of it’s senior blog. Rescue Alert of California’s™ enhanced blog is one place to find information on everything from changes in Medicare to flu shots to retirement.
“Our website is an important tool for us and for our customers,” said Lindsey Brewster of Rescue Alert of California™. “we want to provide the vital information on eldercare and senior health in an easy-to-find, user friendly way so that more people benefit from this valuable information.”
Rescue Alert of California™ has improved its senior blog by adding more resources, in a variety of categories such as senior safety, health, technology, medical alert systems, caregiver resources, and senior assistance. There is now more content, and easier navigation, so that seniors and caregivers can find what they want to know with ease and efficiency.
About Rescue Alert of California™:
Rescue Alert of California™ has been enabling senior citizens to live safe, happy and independent lives through education and quality medical alert systems for over a decade. They offer EMD certified responders available 24 hours a day, and the peace of mind that comes with knowing that help is available at the push of a button.
To view the resources available for seniors and caregivers, visit our website:
http://rescuealertofca.com
To join a supportive network of senior resources and experts in the field, follow us on Twitter @rescuealertofca, or “Like” us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/RescueAlertofCA

30th Annual Caregiver Conference

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

Aging Services Directors Organization

Come join us for our 30th Annual Caregiver Conference!

Wednesday, October 24th at UnitedHealthcare
Registration forms forthcoming – 200 seats available.

Theme is “ HEALTHY AGING”

Keynote Speaker is Aging and Disability Serices Division’s Mary Liveratti

5 Estimated CEUs available!

12th Annual Walk n’ Roll and 5K Run for ALS of Nevada

August 31, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Leisure, Press-Media Releases 

12th Annual Walk n’ Roll and 5K Run for ALS of Nevada – helps fund services for ALS patients and their families. Walk n’ Roll/5K takes place in beautiful Police Memorial Park. Participants can create their own Team and reach out to more people to support their donation to ALS.

Each Adult 18 + participant is required to donate a minimum of $35 to participate in the Walk n’ Roll or the 5K. Awards will be given in all age groups for the 5K, as well as to participants who raise the most money for both events. The event is open to the public.

Anyone interested in participating to support ALS of Nevada’s mission – from babies to seniors – are welcome. Event is wheelchair and stroller accessible.

Saturday, October 13, 2012
Registration for run at event: 6:00 through 8:00 am
Registration for walk at event: 6:00 am through 8:00 am
Welcome from Mayor Pro-Tem Anthony at 7:45 am until 8:00 am
Events starts: 8:00 am Run starts
8:15 am Walk n’ Roll starts
Balloon release in honor of ALS patients who have left us at the conclusion of the event in Memorial Tree Grove

Police Memorial Park, 3250 Metro Academy Way, Las Vegas, NV 89129

$35 for Adult (18+) walkers, rollers and runners; . $25 per participant from 5-17 years for Walk and Run; (Children 5 and under are free.) Donations support much-needed services for Nevada’s ALS patients, their caregivers and their families.

For more information and to sign up in advance for the walk or the run, visit http://als.kintera.org/WalknRoll or call Megan Testa at 702-777-0500.

Cataract Rates are on the Rise in Americans Age 40 and Older

August 21, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Cataract Rates are on the Rise in Americans Age 40 and Older

American Academy of Ophthalmology Offers Tips for Cataract Detection and Treatment

SAN FRANCISCO – August 16, 2012 – The incidence of cataracts in the U.S. has risen 19 percent since 2000, impacting nearly 25 million Americans age 40 and older.[i] In fact, more than half of all Americans will develop cataracts by age 80, according to Prevent Blindness America’s Vision Problems in the U.S. report. In response, the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart program is educating the public about cataract risk factors, detection and treatment options during Cataract Awareness Month.

Cataract is a clouding of the eye’s lens, which can make it more difficult to focus light onto the eye’s retina – the light-sensitive tissue that sends images to the brain. Cataracts, a natural part of aging, are the most common cause of vision loss in the U.S. They typically develop slowly, so symptoms may not be immediately apparent. Over time, cataracts can cause vision to become blurry, cloudy, dull, or dim, and can interfere with daily activities.

The good news is that cataracts are almost always treatable with cataract surgery. During cataract surgery, an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor with the training and certification to provide the full range of eye care and surgery – removes the eye’s cloudy natural lens and replaces it with a clear artificial lens implant called an intraocular lens (IOL). Cataract surgery is often performed as an outpatient procedure and does not require an overnight hospital stay. Cataract surgery is one of the safest types of surgery, and 90 percent of patients who have cataract surgery enjoy better vision afterward.[ii]

“If you notice vision changes, cataracts could be to blame and you might need more than a new pair of glasses,” said David F. Chang, M.D., a clinical correspondent for the American Academy of Ophthalmology and a clinical professor at the University of California, San Francisco. “If you do have a cataract, you should be reassured that it is a normal aging change and not an eye disease. Cataract surgery usually carries an excellent prognosis, and you should talk to your ophthalmologist about whether surgery should be done to restore your eyesight.”

As the aging population grows, it is increasingly important for seniors and their caregivers to understand cataract risks, symptoms, prevention, and treatment options. The American Academy of ophthalmology recommends the following tips to maintain healthy vision:
• Get a baseline exam by age 40. All adults should get a baseline eye exam by age 40 when early signs of eye disease and vision changes may start to occur. During this visit, your ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.) will advise you on how often to have follow-up exams.
• After age 65, schedule regular eye exams. Anyone age 65 and older should visit an ophthalmologist regularly to detect eye diseases and conditions like cataract early, and to monitor any vision loss. Seniors age 65 and older may qualify for an eye exam and up to 1 year of care at no out of pocket cost through EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of American Academy of Ophthalmology. See if you qualify at www.eyecareamerica.org.
• Know your risk factors for cataract. Diabetes, smoking, extensive UV exposure, serious eye injuries, steroid use, and a family history of cataract can increase your risk for developing a cataract.
• Reduce your risks to prevent or delay the onset of cataracts. Use sunglasses and hats to protect your eyes from UV damage. Don’t smoke. If you have diabetes, control your blood sugar carefully through diet, exercise and medications if needed.
• Talk to your ophthalmologist about your treatment options. Vision loss from cataracts can interfere with daily activities. Talk to your ophthalmologist about whether cataract surgery is right for you. When preparing for surgery, give your doctor your complete medical and eye health history, including a list of medications that you have taken. Some medications can cause the iris to move out of its normal position and may require your ophthalmologist to adjust his or her surgical technique.

For more information on cataract symptoms, risk factors, surgery, and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org.

About EyeSmart
The American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

Million Hearts™ Social Media- Caregiver Video Contest

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Million Hearts™ Social Media- Caregiver Video Contest
Twitter @MillionHeartsUS

Week One (7/9)- We are launching our first video #contest next week in partnership with @CDCgov! Check back for details on #prizes and more!

Week Two (7/16)- Our first video #contest launches today! We invite #caregivers to join and share their stories. http://go.usa.gov/vEq @CDCgov

Week Three (7/23)- Please RT: Join the Million Hearts™ Caregiver Video Challenge. Submit your video by Aug. 31. http://go.usa.gov/vEq

Week Four (7/30)- Only 1 month left to show us how you control #bloodpressure! Submit your video and you could win a $500 #prize. http://go.usa.gov/vEq

Week Five (8/6)- #Caregivers, made your video yet? Share your story of how you keep your loved ones or clients heart-healthy! http://go.usa.gov/vEq

Week Six (8/13)- Show off your creativity. Make a video that shares how YOU help control the #bloodpressure of those you care for. http://go.usa.gov/vEq

Week Seven (8/20)- Just 2 weeks left until our Caregiver Video Challenge closes on 8/31. Enter your video for a chance to win $500! http://go.usa.gov/vEq

Week Eight (8/27)- Still want to join our video contest? You aren’t too late! Submit your video by FRIDAY at 5 PM. http://go.usa.gov/vEq

Facebook
Week of 7/16- We are excited to announce our caregiver video contest with @CDCgov launching this week! Share the story of how YOU help someone you care for control or maintain blood pressure. To join the contest, submit a video before August 31! http://go.usa.gov/vPF

Week of 7/30- One month left to submit a video to “Million Hearts™ Caregiver Video Challenge.” Share the story of how you help others control their blood pressure. The contest closes at 5 PM EST on August 31. http://go.usa.gov/vPF

Week of 8/13- Check out our Video Contest on http://go.usa.gov/vPF. Create a video for a chance to win up to $500 in prize money donated by our partners at the @CDCFoundation and share your tips for blood pressure control with thousands!

Week of 8/27- This is the last week to share your story of how you help your loved one control their blood pressure and maintain their heart health! Submit your video before 5 PM EST on Friday, August 31 at http://go.usa.gov/vPF.

Nevada Senior Guide Announces Arbors Memory Care Community Top Rating

August 10, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Nevada Senior Guide Announces Arbors Memory Care Community Top Rating

Nevada Senior Guide Announces Arbors Memory Care Community Receives State’s Top Rating in Annual Survey. Family owned memory care community in Nevada receives another “A” grade.
Sparks, NV, August 09, 2012 –(PR.com)– Family owned memory care community in Nevada receives another “A” grade

Arbors Memory Care Community has received another “A” grade from the State of Nevada Department of Health and Human Services.

This is the 9th year in a row the community in Sparks, which specializes in the care of people with Alzheimer’s and related dementias, has received the highest rating from the Health Division’s Bureau of Health Care Quality and Compliance.

Owned and operated by the Stutchman family, the Arbors has never been resurveyed to achieve the A grade. They have consistently received the highest rating on the first survey or inspection.

Some assisted living and memory care communities receive a lower grade on the first inspection and then must be resurveyed once any deficiencies have been corrected.

During the annual survey state inspectors show up unannounced and check on resident care, medication management, employee fingerprints and background checks, resident medical records, cleanliness of the building and fire safety.

Survey results may be viewed at http://www.health.nv.gov/Deficiencies_Qry.asp#agc_ and click on the AGC/AGZ link.

Each licensed community in the state is surveyed on an annual basis. Facilities then receive a grade between A and D. An A grade means the community is well run with minor administrative issues and no harm is likely to occur. A grade of D means serious harm has occurred or a condition or incident has resulted in death or serious harm and/or multiple administrative issues were cited.

“We are so incredibly proud of our continuous A grade,” said owner Gina Stutchman. “One of the many benefits to being family-owned is that all of the decisions regarding the quality of care are made right here in our building, not at corporate headquarters in another state.”

Stutchman also said the Arbors provides ongoing staff training that far surpasses the state requirements.

“Our training focuses on the fact that each person with memory loss is unique and is affected in a different way. Understanding the disease process and learning a variety of ways to communicate allows our caregivers to reduce anxiety and create a comfort zone for our residents and their families.”

Arbors Memory Care Community is a family-owned and operated residential community providing care for persons living with Alzheimer’s or other dementias.

The Arbors, located at 2121 E. Prater Way in Sparks, offers long term stays, as well as respite stays for caregivers needing a short-term care solution.

For more information, please contact Stephanie Hanna, Arbors Memory Care Community (775) 331-2229 or visit www.arborsmemorycare.com.

For more information about Nevada Senior Guide, please go to http://www.nvseniorguide.com

Nevada-Senior-Guide Nevada Personal Care Services Inc

August 10, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Las Vegas 

www.nevadapersonalcareservices.com

At Nevada Personal Care, you’re in control.

You choose the time/days your aide comes!

You choose the aide!

You always have the option to change caregivers!

  • You choose how much help you want. From a few hours a week, to around-the-clock care. We’re flexible. We can work around doctors’ appointments, work schedules and sleep patters.

You always have the option to change caregivers!

  • You choose how much help you want. From a few hours a week, to around-the-clock care. We’re flexible. We can work around doctors’ appointments, work schedules and sleep patters.

  • We can assign a caregiver, or you have the option to assign a friend or relative, (but not a spouse) to care for you. In some cases, we can bill Medicaid or Long-Term care insurance, then we pay that friend or relative to provide care.

Most people love their caregivers, but once in a while there’s friction. If you’re not getting along with your aide, just call us and we’ll arrange for another to provide care. We want you to be satisfied with your care and your caregiver.

Personal Care Assistance

PCA services are provided in the client’s home by a qualified professional called a Personal Care Assistant. PCA programs offer assistance with activities of daily living (ADL’s) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL’s).

Respite Care

(Similar to PCA/Chore services) Respite is provided when the primary caregiver (Friend or Family member) needs temporary relief.

Chore Services

Chore services include general housekeeping, laundry, shopping, Meal planning and preparation, running errands and more

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Care Giver Assistance Directory – Northern Nevada Rural

Community Home-Based Initiative Program

(CHIP) – Carson City

State of Nevada – Aging & Disability Services Agency – Northern Nevada

Short-Term Respite Care for the Elderly –

Carson City

(775) 687-4210 Carson City County

(775) 738-1966 Elko County

(775) 688-2964 Washoe County

www.nvaging.net

Provides short-term relief up to 24-hours of

care for the primary caregiver, Elder abuse

Nevada-Senior-Guide Support Groups Directory – Northern Nevada

ALS of Nevada

1575 Delucchi Lane, Suite 223, Reno, NV

702-787-9343

Respite, Support Groups

Alcoholics Anonymous – Central Office

436 S. Rock Blvd., Sparks, NV 89531

(775) 355-1151, call for meeting info

American Cancer Society

691 Sierra Rose Dr. #A, Reno, NV 89511

(775) 329-0609, www.cancer.org

Referrals, transportation

American Lung Association of Nevada

10615 Double R Blvd. Suite #100, Reno, NV 89521

(775) 829-5864

Newsletter, need volunteers, lung information

American Parkinson Disease Assoc. (APDA), Inc.

975 Kirman Ave., Reno, NV 89502

(775) 328-1715, www.apdaparkinson.org

Info and referrals, Veterans Welcome

Better Breathers Club

The American Lung Association of Nevada

10615 Double “R” Blvd #100, Reno, NV 89521

(775) 829-5864

Registered Nurse & Therapist Help Call Center

(800) 548-8252

Children of Aging Parents Education & Support Group

3700 Grant Dr., Ste. A, Reno, NV 89509

(775) 829-4700

Adult Day Program, Support groups

Continuum Caregiver Support Group

3700 Grant, Ste. A., Reno, NV 89509

(775) 829-4700

Family Resource Center

1950 Villanova Dr., Reno, NV 89502

(775) 321-5037

Referrals, Emergency Assistance

Senior Outreach Services (SOS)

401 West 2nd St., Reno, NV 89503

775-784-7506

To aid 60’s and older with difficulties to live on their

own. Social Support, Driving, Dr. Appointments,

Errands, Activities

State of Nevada Suicide Prevention

Reno, NV

(775) 784-8085 Business, 1 (800) 992-5757 Crisis Line

Nevada-Senior-Guide Education Directory – Northern Nevada

Center for Healthy Aging, Larry Weiss, PhD

11 Fillmore Way, Reno, NV 89519

775-376-3210, larry@addinglifetoyears.com

Life Line, Emergency Response & RX Programs,

Provide life span respite training, OASIS                               CATCH, Healthy Habits, Elder Gap

 

Community Health Program/Urban Indians                            Outreach

745 W. Moana Ln., Ste. 375, Reno, NV 89502

1-775-788-7600

Health promotion, AIDS education

 

Continuing Education, UNR

18600 Wedge Pkwy., Reno, NV 89511,

(775) 784-4046. www.olli.unr.edu – Info and                          Locations. Lifelong Learning Institute                            Program for Retirement, Extended studies.

 

Downtown Reno Library

301 South Center St., Reno, NV 89501

775-327-8312. Please call for hours.

 

Moments of Memory, Lynette Schweigert

775-848-4757, momentsofmemory@charter.net

www.momentsofmemory.org. Art classes for                       those with Alzheimer’s & other dementias

 

Nevada Geriatric Education Center

Patricia Swager, M.Ed.

411 W. Second St. / MS #150, Reno, NV  89503

775-327-2285, www.medicine.nevada.edu/ngec

Continued education

 

Truckee Meadows Community College Education

5270 Neil Rd. #216, Reno, NV 89502

(775) 829-9010

Silver College 65+; Computer/Internet,                                Wellness, Creative Writing, Digital Camera’s &           Photography, Call for additional activities

 

Washoe County Senior Center Library

1155 E. 9th Street, Reno, NV 89512

(775) 328-2586. Open Tues-Fri, 9am-1pm

Large print, DVD (No VHS available), computers

Nevada-Senior-Guide Counseling Services – Northern Nevada

Sierra Behavioral Solutions

639 Isbell Rd., Ste. 380, (775) 348-5800, ext. 0

www.sierrabehavioralsolutions.org

Adult Mental Health, Grief Counseling,
Couples & Family Therapy, Addiction Therapy,                      Caregiver Counseling, Chronic Pain Support

Nevada-Senior-Guide Adult Day Care Directory – Northern Nevada

The Continuum/ReGenerations

3700 Grant Dr., Reno, NV 89509

775-829-4700, www.thecontinuum-reno.com

Outpatient OT/PT/SLP, adult day care, home

safety evaluations and modifications,

Support group, Early Intervention Program

 

Day Break Adult Health Services

1155 E. 9th Street, Bldg. E, Reno, NV 89512

(775) 328-2575 Main – Senior Services

Therapeutic activity for disabled adults in a

supportive, supervised environment, nursing,                        group care.

 

More to Life, Adult Day Health Center, LLC

1963 East Prater Way, Sparks, NV 89434

(775) 358-1988, jeffdold@gmail.com

www.adultdaycarereno.com

Sat Hours, Friendly Nurses, Extensive

Caregiver Support, Enriching Activities,

Approved Medicade provider, VA Provider,                            Open most holidays, Date Night – 1st and

2nd Friday, 5pm-9pm

Nevada-Senior-Guide Support Groups Directory – Southern Nevada

Adult Diabetes Education & Mgmnt.

West Charleston Library

6301 W. Charleston Blvd., LV, NV 89146

(702) 349-7370, www.diabetes-lasvegas.org

Support Group 2nd Tues. each month, 6-7:30pm

 

Alcoholics Anonymous

1431 E. Charleston Blvd., #15, LV, NV 89104-1734

702-598-1888, www.LVcentraloffice.org

Meeting Schedules, Telephone Reassurance,

12 Step-calls, literature

ALS of Nevada

4220 S. Maryland Pkwy., Bldg. B, Ste 404

Las Vegas, NV 89119

(702) 777-0500

Support Groups, ALS Clinic, Medical

Equipment to Lend (Lou Gehrig’s Disease)

 

Alzheimer’s Association S. Nevada Chapter

5190 S. Valley View Blvd.,#104, LV, NV 89118

(702) 248-2770, www.alzdsw.org

Referral Services, Resources, Support Groups,

24-hour Help Line 1-800-272-3900, respite
care, safe return program, education on
Dementia & Alzheimers

American Cancer Society

6165 S. Rainbow Blvd., Bldg. 12, LV, NV 89118

702-891-9009, www.cancer.org. Referral                             Service, call for appointment & event info.

American Diabetes Association

For diabeties info, call 702-369-9995 or

801-363-3024 x 7069, 888-342-2383

Resource/Referrals, Advocacy

American Lung Association

3552 W. Cheyenne Ave. #130, N. LV, NV 89032

(702) 431-6333, www.lungusa.org

Literature, Support Group, Better Breathers
Club, Freedom from smoking club

American Heart & Stroke Association

4445 S. Jones Blvd.,Ste. B1, LV, NV 89103

(702) 789-4370, www.strokeassociation.org

Resources to Physicians, hospitals, healthcare

professionals, and individuals, CPR classes

 

Arthritis Foundation Nevada

1368 Paseo Verde Pkwy, S-200B

Henderson, NV 89012. 702-367-1626

www.arthritis.org. Telephone Reassurance,                         Referral Service, Literature, Exercise Classes,         Aquatics, self-help programs

 

Cancer Connection

Comprehensive Cancer Centers of Nevada

3730 S. Eastern Ave., Las Vegas, NV 89109

(702) 952-3400 Call for Info and Locations

 

Divorced & Widowed Adjustment, Inc.

P.O. Box 26504, Las Vegas, NV 89106

(702) 735-5544, www.info4nv.org

Counseling Service

 

Epilepsy Support Group

Sunrise Hospital Auditorium

3186 S. Maryland Pkwy., LV, NV 89109

702-731-8115. 2nd Wed. of the month, 5:30pm.                     Meet other people with seizures

 

For the Cure, So. NV Affiliate

4850 W. Flamingo Rd., #25, LV, NV 89103

702-822-2324, www.komensouthernnevada.org

Education, Resources, Friendly Visitation,

Telephone Reassurance

Grief & Loss Support Groups

702-796-3157, www.NAH.org. Call for additional info

 

Hemophilia Foundation of Nevada

7473 W. Lake Mead Blvd., Ste 100, LV, NV 89128

(702) 564-4368, www.HFNV.org

Telephone Reassurance, Advocacy,

Education on bleeding disorders

Las Vegas Valley Lewy Body Dementia

Caregiver Support Group

Call (702) 789-8371 – Joan

Caregiver, Support group meets at Pacifica                          Green Valley: 2620 Robindale Rd., Henderson,                        last Monday of month – 2pm.

 

Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

6280 S. Valley View Blvd.,#342, LV, NV 89118

(702) 436-4220, www.lls.org/snv

Information Resource Center, Education,                             Referral, Financial Aid, Support Groups

 

Muscular Dystrophy Assn.

6320 W. Cheyenne #150, Las Vegas, NV 89108

(702) 822-6920, www.mgausa.org

Counseling, Telephone Reassurance, Medical                      Care, Referral, Medical equipment available,                           must be registered with Muscular Dystrophy

 

National Kidney Foundation

15490 Ventura Blvd., Suite 210

Sherman Oaks, CA 91403, 1 (800) 747-5527

Patient Helpline 1-855-653-2273

www.kidney.org. Info, Referrals.

National Multiple Sclerosis Society

2110 E. Flamingo, Ste., 203, LV, NV 89119

(702) 736-1478, www.nationalmssociety.org                         9am-5pm. Provide information, education,                   support services for families & persons with MS

Nevada Council on Problem Gambling

5552 S. Fort Apache Rd., Ste 100, LV, NV 89148

(702) 369-9740, www.nevadacouncil.org

Telephone Reassurance, Referral,

Problem Gambling Helpline:1-800-522-4700

 

Nevada Tobacco Users

Real help for smokers who want to stop.

Call 1-800-784-8669 (QUIT NOW)

 

No to Abuse – NV Outreach

621 S. Blagg Rd., Pahrump, NV 89048

Crisis line: 1-775-751-1118

Education, Food, Referral, 24/7 Crisis Line,                         Shelter, Counseling, Advocacy, Support                   Groups, intervention & prevention groups,                                parenting groups, shelter for domestic

violence, legal services

 

Ostomy Las Vegas – St. Rose Siena Hospital

Eastern and St. Rose Pkwy., Henderson, NV

Group meets from Sept. to June, 2nd Sat of                          Month, 2pm-4pm, 2nd Tues – Sept. – June, 7:30pm

www.ostomylasvegas.weebly.com

(702) 483-8116 for Info, snvostomy@gmail.com

 

Ovarian Cancer Alliance of Nevada

(702) 796-0430, www.ocan.org

Call for phone support from other women

 

Prostate Support Group, “Us Too”

702-917-7779, www.prostatetaskforce.nv.org

3rd Wed. of the month @7pm, St. Rose

Dominican Hospital, San Martin campus

8280 W. Warm Springs Rd. LV, NV

 

So. NV Association of Polio Survivors –

Las Vegas, Henderson, Pahrump & Boulder City

(702) 644-5091 – Diane. Call for locations.

Support Group for polio survivors , monthly

meetings every 3rd Saturday at 1pm, sharing

knowledge, information, social activities

Sunrise Hospital Breast Cancer Support

The Breast Cancer Center at Sunrise

3006 S. Maryland Pkwy., Ste. 250 LV, NV 89109

Oncology Nutrition Program: 6-7:30pm,

3rd Wed of the Month, need to RSVP

(702) 784-7870. Taichi: Thursdays

11am – 12pm, $5. Call for other programs.

 

Sunrise Hospital Stroke Support Group

Sunrise Hospital – Auditorium

3006 S. Maryland Pkwy., Las Vegas, NV 89109

Meet other people that have suffered a stroke.

3rd Wednesday of the month at 6pm. Free                              and open to the public. Registration not                    required. Learn valuable, educational info about                      strokes. This class is for adults only and you are
welcome to bring a friend or loved one.

Call 702-784-7983 for more info.

 

The Barbara Greenspun Women’s

Care Center of St. Rose

2651 Paseo Verde Pkwy, Ste. 180

Henderson, NV 89074, (702) 616-4902

Senior peer counseling for seniors 50+,
issues such as loss, bereavement, health                                problems, relationships and retirement

 

The Center – Wize Womyn

401 S. Maryland Pkwy. LV, NV 89101

702-733-9800, www.thecenterlv.org

Social and support group for LGBTQ Senior

drop ins. M-F 10:30am-2pm

 

The Center (Gay Men’s Forum)

401 S. Maryland Pkwy., LV, NV 89101

702-733-9800, www.thecenterlv.org

Social and support group for gay and bisexual                    men of all ages, each Wed. at 6pm.

 

Veterans National Caregivers Support Line

1-855-260-3274 VA Clinic Info 8am-8pm EST.

caregiver.va.gov

Nevada-Senior-Guide Counseling Services Directory – Southern Nevada

Bridge Counseling Associates

1640 Alta Dr., Ste 4, LV, NV 89106

702-474-6450

www.bridgecounselingassociates.org

Alcohol, Substance Abuse, Sliding Scale

Unless Court Ordered

Community Counseling Ctr.

714 E. Sahara, Suite 103, LV, NV 89104

(702) 369-8700. Counseling Services:
Mental health, grief and addiction therapy,

HIV groups, Stress & anger management

M-F, 7:30am-8pm, substance abuse

 

Financial Guidance Center

2650 S. Jones Blvd., LV, NV 89146

(702) 364-0344, www.ccsnnevada.org

Counseling Service: Financial, Education for

credit & checking account, budgeting and                            identity theft, BK & reverse mortgages,

Pre and Post BK counseling, Delinquent

housing, First Time Buyers, Development &
Education for small business. Call for

Henderson location appointments

 

Nevada State Medicare (SHIP)

1820 E. Sahara Avenue, Suite 205

Las Vegas, NV 89104, (702) 486-3478

Medicare State Health Insurance Assistance

Program, Medicare Counseling

1-800-307-4444 General Information

 

State of Nevada Suicide Prevention

1-800-992-5757 – Crisis Hotline (NV Only)

1-800-273-8255 – Suicide Prevention

1-800-784-2433 – National Line & Veterans Crisis

 

The Barbara Greenspun Women’s Care

Center of St. Rose

2651 Paseo Verde Pkwy., Ste. 180

Henderson, NV 89074, (702) 616-4902

www.strosehospitals.org

Senior peer counseling for seniors 50+,

issues such as loss, bereavement, health problems, relationships and retirement,

counseling, support groups, screening

The Center For Compassionate Care

4131 Swenson St., LV, NV 89119, 702-796-3167

www.centerforcompassionatecare.org

Assistance for those facing life-limiting

illness

Nevada-Senior-Guide Nevada Aging and Disability Services Division

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

http://www.nvaging.net/

The Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD) in the State of Nevada, Department of Health and Human Services, represents Nevadans aged 60 years and older and those with disabilities.

Mission Statement The Aging and Disability Services Division provides leadership and advocacy in the planning, development and delivery of a high quality, comprehensive support service system across the lifespan. This allows all of Nevada’s elders, adults and children with disabilities or special health care needs to live independent, meaningful, and dignified lives in the most integrated setting appropriate to their needs. Developmental Services

State of Nevada Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD)

Programs/Services

 

Advocate for Elders

Advocacy, assistance, information and referral to frail seniors, who are 60 years of age or older, primarily homebound and living in the community, and their caregivers.

Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs)

Provides citizen-centered “one-stop” entry points into the long-term support system. Serves individuals in need of long-term support, caregivers, and those planning for future long-term support needs.

Assisted Living (AL) Waiver

Assisted living supportive services to eligible individuals in a residential facility as an alternative to nursing home placement.

 

Community Options Program for the Elderly (COPE)

Non-medical services to older persons to help them maintain independence in their own homes as an alternative to nursing home placement. Similar to the HCBW Program.

 

Disability Rx (External link) Assistance with the cost of prescription medicines to qualified individuals with disabilities.

 

Disability Services (External link)The Office of Disability Services provides resources at the community level which promote equal opportunity and life choices for people with disabilities through which they may positively contribute to Nevada.

Elder Protective Services (EPS)

For persons 60 years old and older who may experience abuse, neglect, exploitation, or isolation.

 

Grants

Information for current and/or prospective grantees.

 

Home and Community Based Waiver (HCBW formerly CHIP)

Non-medical services to older persons to help them maintain independence in their own homes as an alternative to nursing home placement.

 

Homemaker Program

General housekeeping, limited meal preparation, shopping, laundering, errands, standby assistance with bathing, and home management services.

 

IDEA Part C Office

Provides oversight of Part C (early intervention services) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Addresses issues and problems faced by residents in long term care facilities, which includes residential facilities for groups.

 

Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)

The goal of the SMP program is to empower seniors to prevent Medicare/health care fraud through outreach and education.

 

Senior Rx

Nevada’s plan to provide Nevada seniors relief from the high cost of prescription medicine.

 

Senior Tax Assistance/Rent Rebate Program

This program is no longer available.

 

State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP)

Medicare Counseling Information

Counseling and assistance to Medicare Beneficiaries in Nevada, utilizing a statewide network of volunteers.

 

Taxi Assistance Program (TAP)

Discounted taxicab fares to seniors and persons with disabilities in Clark County. (Washoe County also has a program of this type.

 

 

Waiver for the Elderly in Adult Residential Care (WEARC)

Non-medical services in a group care setting to offer individuals a less expensive alternative of supervised care in a residential setting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Helping Hands of Vegas Valley – Las Vegas

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

www.hhovv.org

NSG_AugSeptOct2016_Web-44

SERVING SENIORS in SOUTHERN NEVADA

No Cost Services Assist Seniors to Remain Independent

  Established in 2000, Helping Hands of Vegas Valley is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization with the mission to provide free, assistive services to senior citizens in Southern Nevada, allowing them to maintain their dignity and independence while improving health and daily living.

Our services include:

  • Transportation
  • Food Pantry
  • Respite Care Vouchers

Volunteer at your convenience!

SERVICES

We are a community agency providing the following free services to seniors 60 and over in the Las Vegas Valley.

Transportation

Transportation

HHOVV has two Para transit buses that can accommodate wheelchair clients. Rides are provided for medical appointments, grocery store shopping and other errands.

HHOVV volunteer drivers provide transportation to and from medical appointments, shopping trips and errands. All volunteers receive orientation training and a background check.

New clients meet with HHOVV’s intake coordinator for an assessment and must be 60 years of age or older, show proof of Nevada residency and display a need for assistance. Individuals needing services are typically alone and frail, chronically ill, homebound, and/or dependent on a primary caregiver. Reassessments are completed on an annual basis. HHOVV does not charge for these services. Volunteers and staff do not accept tips, gifts, fees, loans or anything of value from clients.

To be added to the waiting list for transportation services please contact Myrna or Nichole at 702-633-7264 x29.

Respite Care Vouchers

Respite Care Vouchers

The HHOVV respite voucher program is funded by the state Aging and Disabled Services Division and provides temporary relief for caregivers. Individuals who do not take time off while caring for a loved one may compromise their physical and mental well-being. Utilizing respite services is one way to reduce stress, allowing individuals to be more effective caregivers. Also, using respite services may delay early institutionalization

Food Pantry

Food Pantry

HHOVV also keeps a food pantry stocked with non-perishable items and delivers a free bag once a month to clients who meet eligibility requirements. Clients must be 60 years of age or older, show proof of Nevada residency and proof that their annual income is at or below 150% of current poverty guidelines. To become a pantry recipient a senior may call 702-633-7264 x22 and leave their name and phone number.

The organization accepts donations of non-perishable food items at a warehouse office in North Las Vegas. Donations are always appreciated!

If you are interested in holding a food drive for HHOVV please contact Lorri Highet at 702-633-7264 x30.

An organization serving the Seniors of Las Vegas.

2320 Paseo Del Prado #B112

Las Vegas, NV 89102

702-633-7264

E-mail: hhofvv@aol.com

Nevada-Senior-Guide Visiting Angels – Summerlin and Henderson

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care 

www.visitingangels.com/vegas

Las Vegas Home Care, Las Vegas Senior Care and Elder Care

Visiting Angels is the nation’s leading nationally respected network of non-medical, private duty home care agencies providing senior care, elder care, personal care, respite care and companion care to help the elderly and adults continue to live in their homes. We are family owned by Michael and Jackie DiAsio.

With offices in Las Vegas and Henderson, we provide senior home care to these areas and the surrounding communities.

We are one of Las Vegas’ largest and most established home care agencies. In 2012, we completed our 12th year serving Las Vegas and Henderson. During 2012, we again performed over 200,000 care giving hours to our clients and their families. We currently have over 225 screened and trained employees (caregivers.) who have been with us an average of 4 years. We assist of about 450 people each day with our flexible program. In our 12 years, we have provided over 1,750,000 care giving hours of service to our clients and their families.

We are licensed thru the State of Nevada and during our 2012 unannounced Focused State Re-licensure Survey conducted by the State of Nevada’s Bureau of Health Care Quality and Compliance, we had no deficiencies. In addition to our private pay service, we are also a State of Nevada Medicaid Provider and during our 2012 unannounced Program Compliance Review by the State of Nevada’s Division of Health Care Financing and Policy, we obtained an overall score of 98%.

nevada-senior-guide-Pacifica Senior Living – Henderson and Las Vegas


Henderson Senior Living – Pacifica Green Valley

Pacifica  Senior Living understands that at any age, maintaining a sense of  freedom and independence is very important. At our Henderson senior living community you  will enjoy a lifestyle of choice. Our Heartland Assisted Living staff  is trained to provide the services you may need in a supportive  environment. Our goals are to promote an active and self-reliant  lifestyle; to recognize when assistance is necessary; to provide caring  attention; and to continue to educate our community.

Living Options

Pacifica Senior Living Green Valley provides the most innovative healthcare solutions for senior living in Henderson, NV to our residents and their families. By embracing the latest research available, we have developed the best care solutions available for assisted living and memory care for seniors in Henderson.

Services and Amenities

Grandmother and grandaughter hugging enjoying our Pacifica Senior Living Services in Henderson.

Pacifica  Senior Living Green Valley is a gracious single story full-service  retirement community nestled among beautifully manicured grounds,  gardens, and walking paths.

We  encourage our residents to allow us (the staff) to assist them in any  way we can. We believe it is our residents’ turn to relax and enjoy  retirement living at its fullest. Our mission is to help them feel at  home each and every day.

In addition to the apartment home maintenance, we offer generous amenities and services.

Pacifica Senior Living Amenities Include:

  • A charming, gated community with a single story, cottage-style design – no long corridors, stairs or elevators.
  • 24-hour on-site professional staffing
  • Family-style dining – three times a day
  • Weekly housekeeping, linens and personal laundry
  • All utilities (phone at an additional fee)
  • Cable television
  • Scheduled transportation
  • Social, educational, spiritual, and recreational programs
  • Full service beauty salon (additional fee)
  • Access to comfortable indoor and outdoor leisure areas
  • Manicured and maintained landscaped grounds with water fountain
  • Expansive rose garden and walking paths
  • Library
  • Vibrant activities program-rose hall community center
  • On-site apartment home maintenance
  • Pets welcome! (additional fee)

Our separate, secured memory care community offers:

  • Personalized memory care in a secure, comfortable setting
  • 24 hour safety supervision and assistance
  • Daily programs to enhance resident engagement
  • Secure exterior courtyards specifically designed for resident outdoor experiences

Cottages of Green Valley

(702) 992-0000 

2620 Robindale Road 

Henderson

West of Pecos

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Atria Sunlake – Las Vegas

www.atriasunlake.com

NSG_FebMarApr_2013_Web24

Atria Sunlake Terrace

Atria Seville Terrace,
Atria Sunlake Terrace
and Atria Sutton Terrace

Who Knew?

Who knew senior living could provide me with so much independence?

I moved into an Atria assisted living community. Now, I spend less time doing things I had to do more time doing the things I love. Hassle-free living in a fun and friendly environment – I couldn\’t ask for more. Experience the Atria lifestyle for yourself. Call today for a tour and be our guest for lunch.

Call today to dine with us and tour our community.

Atria Seville2000 N. Rampart
Las Vegas, NV 89128702-804-6800

Atria Sunlake3250 S. Fort Apache Rd.
Las Vegas, NV 89117702-256-6500

Atria Sutton3185 E. Flamingo Rd.
Las Vegas, NV 89121702-436-9000

 

Discover Superior Senior and Assisted Living in Las Vegas, NV, at Atria Sunlake

Atria Sunlake is a charming assisted living community nestled in the heart of one of the most desirable neighborhoods in Las Vegas, Nevada. With a full social calendar and a 24-hour staff of caregivers, residents will find the support they need to participate in active and independent living. Atria Sunlake is conveniently located near the distinctive Sahara West Library, and is close to shopping, restaurants and places of worship that enable a more fulfilling retirement living experience.

Beautiful landscaping along with luxurious interiors create an elegant assisted living community. Our attentive care staff supplies exceptional 24-hour senior care, making Atria Sunlake superior to surrounding Nevada retirement living communities.

Services

  • A choice of floor plans
  • A full-time events director
  • An emergency call system in every apartment
  • Assistance with activities of daily living
  • Concierge
  • Delicious meals served restaurant-style daily
  • Medication assistance
  • Retreat/temporary stays
    Atria offers a respite (retreat) program for seniors who need assisted living services on a short-term basis. Atria Retreat permits seniors to test the waters of senior living. By allowing guests to stay for a short time in an Atria community, potential residents can decide if senior living is right for them. The retreat program is also an alternative to high-cost inpatient rehabilitation following an illness or surgery. Should a patient be ready to leave the hospital but not ready to go home, Atria offers the comforts of home and 24-hour assistance until they get back on their feet. All of our Retreat guests enjoy the same great amenities as our full-time residents, including delicious meals served daily, a full calendar of social activities, scheduled transportation service and more.
  • Scheduled local transportation
    Local scheduled transportation is available to residents for medical appointments, shopping, religious services and other desired local destinations.
  • Trained staff available 24 hours a day

Amenities

  • Cafe with complimentary snacks and beverages
  • Engage Life programming
    Explore our events programming, tailored to nurture the mind, body and spirit of every resident.
  • Pets welcome

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!