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challenges | Nevada Senior Guide

Carol Ann Kimble – Nevada Senior Guide

July 31, 2015 by · Comments Off on Carol Ann Kimble – Nevada Senior Guide
Filed under: Las Vegas, Support Services 

www.carolannkimble.com

Carol Ann Kimble is an Impathic Counselor.  She has the ability to feel the feelings of others by bonding with their subconscious mind.  By doing this, she is able to assist them in releasing any blocks or fear that is within the channel of energy that exists between the conscious and subconscious mind.  She calls this ability her “love-energy” gift.  Through her one-on-one Sharing sessions, she is able to connect the individual with their God-self or true beingness to assist them in getting out of their own way!

There is so much revealed during the Sharing session, that Carol Ann always records the session so the individual has total access to their own psychic DNA for a lifetime.  There is not any way that all the information shared could be received and processed at one time.  It is genuinely life changing!  And the best part is, one session is all that is required.  Of Course, she does have those individuals who give themselves the gift of another Sharing session, but it totally is not necessary.

Through the release of fear in your subconscious mind, you will set yourself free to experience life with the benefit of your full potential to overcome challenges you face and to fulfill your own desires.  Again, simply stated, to get out of your own way!  Isn’t it time to get on with it?!

carolann@carolannkimble.com

How to Talk to Aging Parents About Senior Housing

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

One in three adults ages 65 and older will fall each year. Use this podcast to learn how to talk to aging parents about senior living before an accident occurs.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in three adults ages 65 and older fall each year. Of these falls, 20–30 percent result in debilitating injuries limiting seniors’ ability to live on their own. It is more important than ever for seniors and their adult children to plan for senior living accommodations—before an accident occurs.

Of course, the conversation about senior living can be emotional and taxing for aging parents. Seniors may view the change as a loss of independence, and it can be difficult to think about leaving their home and existing lifestyle to join a new community.

In a recent podcast from MySilverAge.com, Lisa Holland—regional director of quality improvement at be.group, a nonprofit provider of California senior living communities—offers expert tips to ease these challenges and strategies to help start the conversation. Holland explains how to approach the subject respectfully and sensitively, and how to offer the right support for each parent’s unique needs.

To hear all of Holland’s tips on talking to aging parents about senior living, including whom to include in the discussion and ways to prepare for potential responses, visit: www.mysilverage.com/thetalk.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

Baby Boomers and Seniors face nutritional triple threat of obesity, weight loss and lack of balanced meals

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Livliga dishware is a new solution to help these two generations eat right and stay healthy 

Americans are living longer than ever, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, but the fight to stay healthy is just as challenging as it has been with past generations. Recent studies show that the Silent Generation, born from 1927 to 1945 and Baby Boomers, born from 1946 to 1964, collectively face three major nutritional challenges.

 

A Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine study shows Baby Boomers have higher rates of hypertension, diabetes, obesity and high cholesterol when compared to their previous generation. The Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations also shows the highest obesity rates are currently found in Baby Boomers.

 

For the Silent Generation, currently ages 68 to 85, the National Institute on Aging says its main challenge is related to lack of balanced nutrition and getting enough calories.

The NIA says this group has:

  • decreased appetite
  • trouble chewing food
  • less socialization around food
  • diminished sense of taste and smell
  • medication interference with food enjoyment
  • fixed incomes

One new solution is Livliga, a tool Baby Boomers and Silent Generation seniors can use to promote right-sized food portions to reach target weights as well as to guide intake of balanced nutritional meals. Created with an Advisory Committee including a cardiologist and certified nutritionist, Livliga offers easy, subtle cues to improve and control the food environment.

 

“Livliga is a solution for every stage of life,” says inventor, Sheila Kemper Dietrich. “It can be used by people who are under eating and need to be reminded to take in more calories or to help those who are struggling to shrink their waistlines. The guide to portion sizes combined with reminders of what comprises a balanced meal are the keys to better health for both groups.”

 

Livliga is Swedish for LIVELY, VIBRANT or VIVID, which is the company’s core philosophy. Kemper Dietrich’s vision was to create an attractive suite of place settings designed for a healthy lifestyle and suitable for entertaining family and friends in both formal and informal settings. The beautiful designs on the dishware offer elegant visual cues to guide appropriate and right-sized servings. The initial product launch was a 4-piece place setting in two patterns, including a dinner plate, salad/luncheon plate, bowl and mug. Livliga also offers a serving bowl, etched water and wine glasses.

 

For Baby Boomers or Silent Generation seniors with grandchildren, Kidliga can also be helpful to promote healthy habits for the entire family. Kidliga is whimsical, fun dishware for kids, accompanied by a health-oriented children’s storybook. Sammie & Sax in the Land of Quinoa: The Search for a Balanced Meal just won a Moonbeam Award in the Health Issues category and is a useful tool and solution to help families in the fight against childhood obesity.

 

Livliga products are specifically designed to help both adults and children address the “psychology of eating”.  The rim sizes, color palette, and designs all combine to encourage slower eating, make portion sizes look larger, as well as make food more visually appealing.

 

A 4-piece Livliga place setting is available on the company website at www.LivligaHome.com at an introductory price of $49.95 (MSRP $59.95). All of the additional products and pricing can be easily found on the website as well. Kemper Dietrich says plans call for further product launches, including additional patterns and a set of LivSpoons that makes for easy, everyday measuring and serving of right-sized portions.

 

To purchase Livliga, visit the online store at www.LivligaHome.com.  “Like” Livliga on Facebook at facebook.com/LivligaHome, follow on Twitter @LivligaHome and visit our blog at LivligaHome.blogspot.com.  Watch our videos on YouTube.com/LivligaHome.

 
Audrey Strong
Agency Zero Public Relations
audrey@agencyzero.com
720.231.6097

U.S. Veterans Honored by Encore.org’s 2013 Purpose Prize

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Seven Awards for People Over Age 60 Solving the World’s Toughest Social Problems

The Purpose Prize has become a “MacArthur genius award for people who develop a second career as social service entrepreneurs.” – The New York Times.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy organizes a network of volunteers across the country to teach disabled veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan how to combat stress — through fly-fishing.

A public relations executive helps wounded warriors find and renovate foreclosed homes – and transforms lives and neighborhoods in the process.

These are two of the seven winners of the 2013 Purpose Prize, awarded by Encore.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who translate decades of skill and experience into “second acts” that contribute to society’s greater good.

Now in its eighth year, The Purpose Prize is the nation’s only large-scale investment in people over 60 who are combining their passion and experience for the social good. Created in 2005 by Encore.org, the prize is aimed at those with the passion to make change and the wisdom to know how to do it, showcasing the value of experience and disproving the notion that innovation is solely the province of the young.

Two winners will receive $100,000 each and five winners will receive $25,000 each.

This year’s winners:

* Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. ($100,000 winner of The Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra)

* Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron taps into her own experience as a cancer survivor to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. ($100,000)

* Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing emotional wounds through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. ($25,000)

* Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
Fennelly runs a unique summer camp behind bars that is transforming federal prisoners into involved parents. ($25,000)

* Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
Huttinger’s project is on a path to eradicate human schistosomiasis, a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. ($25,000)

* Reverend Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. ($25,000)

* Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
Young’s rise from immigrant nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. ($25,000)

The Purpose Prize winners will be honored on December 5, 2013, at an awards ceremony in Sausalito, Ca. NBC’s Jane Pauley will emcee the event for hundreds of Encore leaders and the Purpose Prize winners.

Twenty-one judges – leaders in business, politics, journalism and the nonprofit sector – chose the seven winners from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees. Judges include Sherry Lansing, former CEO of Paramount; David Bornstein, author and New York Times columnist; Eric Liu, writer and founder of CitizenUniversity; and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, The Purpose Prize is a program of Encore.org, which aims to engage millions of boomers in encore careers combining personal meaning, continued income and social impact in the second half of life.

This year, Symetra is sponsoring the $100,000 Purpose Prize for Future Promise, which recognizes an individual whose approach for helping society has the potential to grow steadily over the next five years. The company plans to sponsor another Purpose Prize for Future Promise in 2014.

“While Purpose Prize winners are helping to solve a wide range of pressing social problems, they have one thing in common,” said Marc Freedman, CEO and founder of Encore.org and author of The Big Shift (PublicAffairs Books). “They – and millions of others in encore careers – are turning personal passions and decades of experience into invaluable contributions across sectors, continents and generations, often through entrepreneurship.”

Short summaries for all winners follow. Photos are attached. Longer bios and higher resolution photos are available.

Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas, winner of this year’s Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra, rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. Following a 35-year-career as a fundraising and marketing dynamo, she became the director of communications at Purple Heart Homes in 2008 in an effort to provide greater services for veterans who have service-connected disabilities. In just three years, Thomas helped take the fledgling nonprofit to new heights. She has raised millions for Purple Heart Homes in financial contributions and material donations. Revenue shot up 600% in her first year with the startup. She’s developed an innovative program that matches veterans with foreclosed homes donated by banks, then raises the funds to renovate a home for the individual veteran’s needs. It’s a win-win for all generations—and communities too. It helps veterans to grow assets, towns to recoup lost taxes and neighborhoods that have struggled with foreclosures to stabilize.

Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron is an award-winning journalist with more than 42 years in television broadcasting. She tapped into her own experience as a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. To focus on the plight of low-income Latinos fighting the disease, Duron founded Latinas Contra Cancer (Latinas Against Cancer), an organization committed to educating, supporting and providing essential services to low-income Spanish speakers often overlooked by the health care system. Latinas Contra Cancer has offered a range of programs that have taught more than 3,000 men, women and teens about the disease, resulting in more than 300 preventative cancer screenings. The group has provided psychological and social support to over 100 patients per year. However, the call to action Duron answered has had an impact far beyond the Bay Area. Her passionate commitment is helping Latino communities across the U.S. gain access to cancer support, information and treatment. Her great empathy for cancer patients has made her utterly clear on her bigger purpose in the second stage of life.

Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing the emotional wounds of battle through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. A cancer survivor and war veteran himself, Nicholson was impressed by the fortitude of disabled veterans at the Walter Reed military hospital, where he was treated for prostate cancer in 2005. It spurred him to found Project Healing Waters, a program dedicated to helping disabled soldiers and veterans recover from the trying aftermath of war through the sport of fly-fishing. One-on-one connections have been key to Project Healing Waters’ approach since the beginning. Nicholson knew there were fly-fishing groups and facilities all over the country. His innovation was to convince them to start, manage and lead fly-fishing instruction and outings with veterans through military and Veterans Administration facilities. The quiet bonds forged over fishing lines began to transform lives. Again and again Nicholson heard from family members who said their loved ones had returned from war withdrawn, angry, and difficult to be around. But after fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters, they’ve become happier, more open and engaged. Project Healing Waters works closely with VA Recreational and Occupational therapies to identify those who would most benefit from the program. Many are in wheelchairs or using prosthetics. A few are blind. Participants reflect of full spectrum of disabled veterans and include all ages, genders, ethnicities and disabilities. Nicholson says the impact “goes well beyond the mechanics of fly-fishing.”

Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
A lifelong social activist who ran homeless shelters in the District of Columbia for 17 years, Carol Fennelly abandoned her plans to retire in 1998 when she learned that D.C. inmates had been transferred to Youngstown, OH. One woman made 10-hour round-trip drives twice a week to visit her son. Moved to answer a social need, Fennelly thought about opening a hospitality house in Youngstown for family members visiting inmates. She soon learned that while 93% of the federal inmate population is male, in sheer numbers there are more programs for mothers in prison than there are for fathers. She decided she had what it took to change things. “I had spent years organizing, dealing with government, making change happen, and that emboldened me to think I could go into prisons and start all these radical programs,” Fennelly says. So she launched an encore career with Hope House, an innovative organization that helps prison inmates stay in regular contact with their children. In the past 14 years, Hope House has hosted 200 video teleconferences, 18,000 personalized book readings by fathers and 31 week-long summer camps, which allow kids to spend time with their fathers free of the usual restrictions that come with visitor hours and family chaperones. California recently decided to implement the Hope House model in its 33 state prisons. Prisons in Texas, Idaho and New Hampshire may follow. In 2013 Fennelly was honored at the White House as a Champion of Change.

Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
International public health expert Elizabeth Huttinger spotted a big idea in shrimp, and launched an encore career that could eradicate a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. Huttinger’s project – founded in 2006 – is targeting human schistosomiasis, an infectious parasite carried by river snails. Understanding that the population of prawns that eat those snails had precipitously declined, Huttinger, 63, has devoted her encore career to restoring the prawn population in the SenegalRiver Basin. Projet Crevette’s mission is multifaceted: the restoration of the prawn population diminishes the spread of schisto, provides new economic opportunities to afflicted communities and heals families infected by the disease. Today, Projet Crevette is a prawn-farming microenterprise, operated by locals at public watering holes. It has brought social innovation, new microbusinesses, environmental restoration and improved health to communities. Huttinger is confident Projet Crevette will meet its bold goal to fully restore the indigenous prawn population—and improve countless lives in the process.

Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Reverend Violet Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. After 14 years as parish pastor trained in psychotherapy, Little left behind her traditional congregation to create a religious refuge for the homeless on the streets of the city, which became the “WelcomeChurch.” The church relies mostly on word of mouth, and services can pop up in a city park or on a sidewalk. No questions are asked, and everyone is welcome. The WelcomeChurch coordinates medical services through local universities, helps people get into rehab or jobs, and offers educational services to the public on the causes of homelessness. Little estimates 40 percent of her congregants have moved off the streets into permanent housing and the WelcomeChurch celebrates each and every one of them, many of whom stay connected with Little through their transition. Little’s congregation has grown to include hundreds of homeless as well as non-homeless volunteers in the EvangelicalLutheranChurch in America.

Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
An immigrant from the West Indies who built a meaningful life on meager income, Young’s gritty rise from nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. She’s encouraged thousands to stand up for their right to earn a living wage, and counsels and trains others to become leaders themselves. In 2004, Young began building a movement to legislate a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in New YorkState, which would make overtime, paid time off and rest days mandatory. In 2009, when she heard then Governor David Patterson say on the radio that he’d sign the bill if it made it to his desk, she put on a full court press, becoming the engine behind passage of the law in 2010. The law is the first of its kind in the country, but Young is committed to making sure it isn’t the last. She’s now a key player in the NDWA’s expansion from 11 to 44 affiliated organizations with 15,000 members, up from 5,000 in 2007. Young’s passion for serving her community has only just begun.

Read More About Encore’s Purpose Prize at www.encore.org/prize.

About Encore.org

Encore.org is a national nonprofit that promotes the idea that people in their second acts have the talent and experience to solve some of society’s greatest problems.

About The Atlantic Philanthropies

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. In keeping with the Giving While Living philosophy of founder Charles “Chuck” Feeney, The Atlantic Philanthropies believes in making large investments to capitalize on significant opportunities to solve urgent problems now, so they are less likely to become larger, more entrenched and more expensive challenges later. The Atlantic Philanthropies also seeks to encourage others of significant wealth to engage in major philanthropic pursuits in their lifetime.

About The John Templeton Foundation

The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, supporting research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.

About Symetra

Symetra Financial Corporation (NYSE: SYA) is a diversified financial services company based in Bellevue, Wash. In business since 1957, Symetra provides employee benefits, annuities and life insurance through a national network of benefit consultants, financial institutions, and independent agents and advisors.

 

CONTACT: Sara Ying Rounsaville, srounsaville@encore.org, 415-952-5121, or Russ Mitchell, rmitchell@encore.org, 510-969-0801

Staying Safe on the Road: Senior Driving Guide

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Learn the challenges that may keep older adults off the road and find tips for staying safe behind the wheel

According to a recent study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, drivers in their mid- to late-80s have lower overall crash rates than drivers in their early 20s and roughly half as many crashes as teenagers—making them among the safest drivers on the road.

However, fatal crash rates skyrocket for drivers ages 85 and older. In “The Guide to Driving Safety for Older Drivers” from MySilverAge.com, Jake Nelson, AAA director of traffic safety advocacy and research in Washington, D.C., says it’s important to understand what health factors can compromise safe driving. If senior drivers have ongoing limitations that could put them or their passengers at risk, they may want to reconsider their capacity to continue driving.

Older drivers should evaluate how the following factors affect their driving ability:

  • Vision. How well a driver can see accounts for about 90 percent of his or her ability to drive safely. Weak visual aptitude can be measured by an inability to read signs, street markings, or to see other cars and pedestrians in low-light conditions.
  • Mobility. Loss of strength, coordination and flexibility can make it challenging to control a vehicle. Mobility difficulties may also be signaled by pain and discomfort performing daily activities as well as arthritis in the neck and shoulders.
  • Behavior. Trouble remembering familiar routes, anxiety or confusion while driving, or problems distinguishing the gas from the brake pedal are causes for immediate concern.

For a complete list of driving safety tips, including information on driver improvement courses, new driving technologies and alternate modes of transportation, download the driving guide for seniors.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

National Report: Oral Health of Older Americans In A ‘State of Decay’

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Oral Health America Launches First-of-its-Kind Website to Connect Older Adults to Affordable Dental Care and Resources

The oral health of older Americans is in a state of decay, according to a new national report released today by Oral Health America (OHA).  A State of Decay, a state-by-state analysis of oral healthcare delivery and public health factors impacting the oral health of older adults, reveals more than half of the country received a “fair” or “poor” assessment when it comes to minimal standards affecting dental care access for older adults. Florida and Arizona, areas with large older adult populations, rank in the bottom five states due to a shortage of oral health coverage, a strained dental health work force, and deficiencies in prevention programs.

“While we are seeing improvements in certain areas of older adult dental care, there is still a lack of progress in advancing the oral health of such a vulnerable population,” said Dr. Ira Lamster, Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, ColumbiaUniversity, Mailman School of Public Health. “Older adults face significant health challenges if their oral health is poor, and there is no coordinated program to help fund necessary services.”

A State of Decay gave a rating of “fair,” “poor,” “good,” or “excellent” based on state level data analyzing five variables impacting older adult oral health: adult Medicaid dental benefits, inclusion of older adult strategies in state oral health plans, edentulism (loss of teeth), dental health professional shortage areas, and community water fluoridation.

The final evaluations in the report for each state are mixed, with several states performing well in some variables, but still in need of improvement in other important areas. The top findings of this report that require scrutiny and action are:

  • Persistent lack of oral health coverage across much of the nation. Forty-two percent of states (21 states) provide either no dental benefits or provide only emergency coverage  through adult Medicaid Dental Benefits.
  • Strained dental health work force. Thirty-one states (62 percent) have high rates of Dental Health Provider Shortage Areas (HPSAs), meeting only 40 percent or less of dental provider needs.
  • Tooth loss remains a signal of suboptimal oral health. Eight states had strikingly high rates of edentulism, with West Virginia notably having an adult population that is 33.8 percent edentate. Photo – PRN Photo Desk, photodesk@prnewswire.com
  • Deficiencies in preventive programs. Thirteen states (26 percent) have upwards of 60 percent of their residents living in communities without water fluoridation (CWF), despite recognition for 68 years that this public health measure markedly reduces dental caries. Hawaii (89.2 percent) and New Jersey (86.5 percent) represent the highest rates of citizens unprotected by fluoridation, an unnecessary public peril.

Daily, 10,000 Americans retire and only 2 percent do so with a dental benefit plan. The State of Decay analysis provides a tool for states to use in addressing shortfalls in oral health status, dental professional access sites, dental benefits for low-income adults, and population-based prevention, all of which affect the oral health of older adults, the fastest growing segment of the American population.

To help older adults and their caregivers address oral health needs and overcome many of the barriers to accessing affordable dental care, OHA launched toothwisdom.org. The website is a first-of-its-kind online tool that connects older adults to dental care and educates on the importance of maintaining oral health with age. The American Dental Hygienists’ Association (ADHA) and Special Care Dentistry Association (SCDA) supported OHA and the launch of the website by encouraging their members to provide meaningful articles for the toothwisdom.org.

“Dental Hygienists have the opportunity to assist older Americans with the oral health challenges they may face as they age,”” said Ann Battrell, Executive Director, American Dental Hygienists’ Association. “We’re all committed to sharing the message that oral health matters and changing the common misperception that with age comes a decline in oral health.”

Few websites focus on oral and systemic health topics, and even fewer provide resources for older adult oral health. Toothwisdom.org offers oral care resources by state – including direct links to dental care, caregiving support, financial tools, social services, and transportation. It also shares the latest news and reliable health information from dental experts across the country on relevant oral health issues, the importance of continuing prevention with age, and the impact of oral health on overall health.

“My dental procedures have been very costly and I had to contact a social worker to help me understand my bills. Dental care should be more available and affordable because we know poor dental care affects overall health, which is particularly important for seniors,” said senior Patricia Cosgrove, a client of The Carter Burden Center for the Aging, Inc.  “Toothwisdom.org can help me find a community health center so I can finally get an affordable check-up and stay up-to-date on oral health information.”

A State of Decay and toothwisdom.org are part of Oral Health America’s Wisdom Tooth Project™, an initiative designed to meet the oral health challenges of a burgeoning population of older adults with special needs, chronic disease complications, and a growing inability to access and pay for dental services.

Links to the 2003 and 2013 editions of A State of Decay can be viewed on toothwisdom.org.

About OHA’s Wisdom Tooth Project
For 55 years, Oral Health America has been the leading national non-profit dedicated to improving the oral health and well-being of Americans throughout the entire spectrum of life. Over the decades, the organization has evolved and adapted to the dynamic nature of our country’s demographics and specific health needs. The Wisdom Tooth Project was born in 2010 due to the current and future implications of an aging population and the need for oral health resources for them mean that we must take meaningful action now.

About Oral Health America
OHA is a national, non-profit association dedicated to changing lives by connecting communities with resources to increase access to oral health care, education, and advocacy for all Americans, especially those most vulnerable. For more information about Oral Health America, please visit www.oralhealthamerica.org.

Study by Harvard Medical School Researchers Examines Senior Living’s Role in Changing Health Care System

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Individuals in senior living communities require an array of health and supportive services to maintain an optimum quality of life. Often, these older adults receive fragmented care through multiple providers and payers, resulting in unnecessary health care expenditures and lower quality-of-care. To address these challenges, Brookdale is partnering with researchers at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and other senior living industry peers to establish the Assisted Living Sector Healthcare Policy Research Fund.

“This support allows us to examine what role senior living providers have in the new models of care that have emerged under health care reform,” says David Grabowski, PhD, professor of health care policy at HMS, who is leading this research study.

Grabowski and his team will examine whether providing more comprehensive, coordinated services in the senior living sector reduces the need for Medicare-paid services and Medicaid-financed nursing home services.

According to Will Clark, Brookdale’s senior vice president of strategy and brand and a member of the HMS Health Care Policy Advisory Council, society’s ability to meet the needs of an aging population is an important political, economic, clinical, and social imperative.

“Harvard’s reputation for tackling some of health care’s biggest challenges and generating meaningful insights that shape our nation’s policy is unparalleled. We are confident Dr. Grabowski and his colleagues’ research will be influential in determining the appropriate role senior living can and should play in our evolving health care system,” Clark said.

Brookdale’s goals for this effort are to create awareness for the potential senior living has to positively impact the health, well-being and overall cost of care for seniors; to identify barriers to creating more integration among senior living and the health care system; influence policy; and identify innovative models that integrate senior living with our health care system.

The initiative is funded through a cumulative contribution of $150,000 from Brookdale and eight other senior living providers — Atria Senior Living, Elmcroft Senior Living, Emeritus Senior Living, Erickson Living, HCP, Inc., Health Care REIT, Inc., Sunrise Senior Living, and Ventas, Inc. Together, these organizations hope to begin a dialogue among health care providers, policy makers, regulators, and consumers on the value of senior living and its role in creating an integrated, outcomes-driven health care system.

The study will occur in two phases. The first phase will consist of analyzing the role of assisted living in new payment-delivery models and presenting a conceptual model of how an integrated model might work, as well as the opportunities and challenges associated with such an approach. Building on the results of the first phase, the second phase of the project will consist of primary data work and potentially the development of a pilot program.

For additional information about the study, contact David Cameron, HarvardMedicalSchool’s director of science communications, at 617-432-0441 or david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu.

For more information about Brookdale, visit www.brookdale.com.

Brookdale Senior Living Inc. is a leading owner and operator of senior living communities throughout the United States.  The Company is committed to providing senior living solutions within properties that are designed, purpose-built and operated with the highest-quality service, care and living accommodations for residents.  Currently, Brookdale operates independent living, assisted living, and dementia-care communities and continuing care retirement centers, with more than 650 communities in 36 states and the ability to serve approximately 67,000 residents.  Through its Innovative Senior Care program, the Company also offers a range of outpatient therapy, home health, personalized living and hospice services. For more information, visit http://www.brookdale.com.

Contact: Andrea Turner, 615-564-6829, aturner2@brookdaleliving.com

“Aging in Place” is the focus of a multi-platform report by the PBS NEWSHOUR

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

“Aging in Place” is the focus of a multi-platform report by the PBS NEWSHOUR

Report is the latest in TAKING CARE: a 6-part series the challenges of long-term care

 NewsHour Online offers tips for seniors, profiles a pilot program in Baltimore, and shares personal stories

As Americans live longer, more-productive lives, many seniors are seeking ways to “Age in Place” – to grow old in their own homes rather than move in with family or to traditional retirement facilities.  As part of its ongoing reporting on the challenges of aging and long-term care, Ray Suarez reports from Boston on a non-profit membership organization that helps seniors grow old in their own homes.  The broadcast report airs Thursday, August 08, 2013 on the PBS NEWSHOUR (check local listings.)

The group, Beacon Hill Village, was founded by Susan McWhinney-Morse and 10 of her friends and neighbors who wanted to find a way to grow old in their homes without having to depend on their children for help.  For an annual membership fee, the group offers transportation, social events, and other low-cost services for seniors. The organization has become a model for the nation – there are now over 100 villages across the country and over 200 in development.

Produced with support from The SCAN Foundation, the report is the second in TAKING CARE: a 6-part series on long-term care that will continue throughout the year with reports that show the magnitude of the problem, the challenges faced by individuals and governments, and some of the models for change being tested.

PBS NEWSHOUR’s reporting on “Aging in Place” continues online:

  • 7 simple repairs to help seniors safely age in place  and an opportunity to share your own tips;
  • a “quilt” of photos and anecdotes of living alone, submitted by seniors and their relatives;
  •  an extended interview with one of the founders of Beacon Hill Village;
  • And on Friday –a video showing the work of CAPABLE, a Johns Hopkins-run, Baltimore-located organization that fixes up homes to increase mobility and function.

The SCAN Foundation is an independent, non-profit public charity devoted to advancing a world where all of us can age with dignity, independence, and choice.

PBS NEWSHOUR is seen by over 5 million weekly viewers and is also available online, via public radio in select markets and via podcast. The program is produced with WETA Washington, D.C., and in association with WNET.org in New York. Major corporate funding for the PBS NEWSHOUR is provided by BAE Systems and BNSF Railway with additional support from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and public television viewers. www.pbs.org/newshour

Fullfilling Your Dreams, As a Senior Citizen by Eva Fry

August 12, 2013 by · Comments Off on Fullfilling Your Dreams, As a Senior Citizen by Eva Fry
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Senior-Citizen-Health-Care

Today there are 30 million seniors. In 2030 there will be 70 million. The senior years can be an opportunity to fulfill dreams. Think of how happy those 70 million seniors will be if they believe they still have time to live their dreams. Think of how much happier and better our world will be when it is filled with people who are productive, doing good and living fulfilled lives, in their latter-years.

When we were young, we each had dreams of what we wanted to do with our life. Unfortunately many of us have never realized those dreams.

Why? We may have had parents who didn’t provide the opportunities we needed, when we were young. We may have married young, had children and the responsibilities of life took over. Before we knew, it we were seniors and believed we were too old to live our dreams.

I’m happy to report I am not one of those who live with regret or wish they had done more with their lives. Today, I am 67 years old and I am living my dreams.

I had three dreams when I was a young girl. My first, to be married, have children, and be a good mother with a happy family. My second, to be an entertainer and my third dream was to be a missionary.

Thankfully I have accomplished all three of my dreams and I’m starting on new ones.

My husband and I have been married for 48 years. We have three wonderful grown children and nine grandchildren. Why was this dream so important to me? My father was alcoholic and my mother emotionally ill. My childhood was sad and troubled. I desperately wanted a happy family like some of my friends. I was blessed to have that dream come true because I worked hard to make it come true.

Through the years, I never forgot my dreams to become an entertainer and a missionary. I just put them on hold. These dreams took a long time coming, but today my dreams have come true.

How have I accomplished my long-awaited dreams, in my senior years?

Change is the answer! Life doesn’t always stay the same. One door to our life may close but a new door always opens and we must be ready for it. When my children grew up and started their own lives, it left me in an empty nest. I was smart enough to use it as a launching pad to direct me toward my life-long dreams. I now had time to pursue them.

It began with me going back to college and taking a speech class. I took it to overcome my shyness and to learn to be more outgoing to I would have a chance at being an entertainer. You must know that I had no musical training and could not play an instrument so I had big dreams.

The class was a big step toward my dreams. I discovered I was a pretty good speaker and was asked to be on the college speech team. I traveled all over the USA competing with my speeches with intelligent teenagers. It was so much fun and I won a national speaking award. I joined Toastmasters and became president of my club. I took a stand-up comedy class. For many years I spoke for Mother’s Against Drunk Driving, because I had been a victim of a drunk driver when I was a teenager. These all helped me gain confidence in myself and encouraged me to see what I could do as an entertainer.

I began to learn words to old songs and entered a talent contest for the city of San Diego and won another award. For several years now, I have been the master of ceremonies for the same talent show and for their variety show at the San Diego Fair.

At the age of 60 I began entertaining at senior residences and to learn to play the piano and guitar. I began to write my own music. I have produced 60 songs and had my music played on 150 radio stations. For several years now I have entertained with my own show using my own music at many functions.

I feel I have actually accomplished my second dream to become an entertainer. I wrote a book to encourage others to do the same called “You Must Have a Dream.”

Accomplishing my third dream, to become a missionary, has been a wonderful blessing to me. Because I spoke for MADD, I was asked to speak at Juvenile Hall in San Diego. Because of my involvement with incarcerated kids, I began my own program called “Be a Winner in Life.’ which I presented for ten years to over 10,000 young people. From this I wrote two books to help the kids “Be a Winner in Life” and “Letters From Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids.”
This work has helped me be a missionary to these children teaching them true values and principals of life. My books help me share the message of The Gospel of Jesus Christ and the joy that it brings.

I am a senior citizen now and very thankful to God that I was able to fulfill the dreams of my heart.

We can all live to be 100 years old. How will your life turn out? I hope that when your life is over you will have no regrets and you will never have to say “I wish”, “if only”, but rather you will say, ” I fully lived my life and I have no regrets. I loved my life because I lived my dreams! This is how I feel about my life. I am so thankful. The Lord has truly blessed me. I pray He will bless you too.

My books can be purchased at http://www.evafry.com . I hope they will encourage you to live your dreams.

Eva Fry’s mission is to help others become better and happier. She is an inspirational author, singer/songwriter/ motivational speaker and seminar leader. Eva has published three books – “YOU MUST HAVE A DREAM” -for seniors, “BE A WINNER IN LIFE”-for good kids, troubled kids and their parents. “LETTERS FROM JUVENILE HALL, KIDS HELPING KIDS” (Actual letters from kids at Juvenile Hall, intended to save other kids from destroying their lives) She invites you to use the FREE ARTICLES she has written for: at- risk kids Also FREE ARTICLES of inspiration to help meet life’s challenges. http://www.evafry.com She has produced 7 Music CD’s

“Remember” (new music for seniors), “Oh What Joy Christmas” “The Little Things” (inspirational country), “I Love Living The Teachings of The Lord” (Gospel/Christian) “Savior of Mine” – (Christian) “God Gave You Intelligence” (for children)

“Classical Style” (instrumental)

Her music and books can be purchased at http://www.evafry.com Her books can also be ordered at any bookstore. Her articles have been published, all over the world.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eva_Fry

No One Told Me Being A Senior Citizen Would Be Such Fun by Eva Fry

July 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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choir

I am a late-bloomer singer/songwriter from San Diego. I didn’t know how much fun it would be to be a senior citizen but my senior years have been my most exciting and I hope to inspire other seniors to live their dreams, as I am doing.

Let me tell you of my accomplishments, so you have an idea of what I have done and
why I hope to inspire you.

First, my age is a factor. I am now a Medicare recipient. I am 67. This doesn’t mean much, except seven years ago I began to write music. At the age of 60 I wrote my first
song, something I had no idea I could do. Since that time I have written 60 songs and
had all of them produced. I have completed six CD’s and have four of them on the
market. The amazing thing is, I have had 150 radio stations play my music.

Before I began to write music, I had no musical training. I could not read music and could not
play a musical instrument. I am now learning to play the guitar and piano. During these
seven years I also wrote and published three books. As you can tell, I have been busy,
but I am having the time of my life.

I hope to encourage others to live their dreams too. As I am proving, we can all do more
than we think we can. Your life can be exciting too!

At the age of 67, I am a singer/song writer, author, entertainer, motivational speaker and
comedienne. I am the MC for the City of San Diego Senior talent contests and have my
own shows at the San Diego and Orange County Fairs. I was 1st and 2nd runner up in the
Ms Senior America Pageant here in San Diego in 2005 & 2006
How was I was able to change my life from a stay-at-home Mom to entertainer? I did it
with a dream!

First, let me tell you about my youth. When I was young, I had two dreams. I wanted to
be a missionary and I wanted to be an entertainer, but life didn’t provide opportunities
for my dreams. My father was alcoholic. My childhood was very difficult. I married
young and began a family. My family then became my dream. I wanted to be a good
Mom, give my kids what I didn’t have and help my husband. I was successful. I have
three grown, responsible and righteous children who are now being good parents to my
nine grandchildren. My husband, Al, and I have been married for 47 years. We have a
happy life together.

I’m grateful for my “Mom” stage of life, but life moves on. When my children grew up,
a new stage developed. Time for old dreams! I still enjoy my family, but now I have a
life of my own too.

In my book “You Must Have a Dream” I tell of being in my empty nest and writing down
my old dreams and making plans to live them. I was shy and needed to overcome my
shyness, if I wanted to accomplish my dreams. In my 50’s I decided to go to college and
take a speech class. I was chosen to be on the speech team at Palomar College, in San
Marcos, California. I traveled for two years, all over America, with fun, intelligent
young people, competing in speech competitions. I won a national speaking award!

This accomplishment gave me the confidence I needed. I used my newfound talent to help others. For many years, I spoke for Mother’s Against Drug Driving, because I had
been a victim of a drunk driver, when I was young. I then began a volunteer program at
Juvenile Hall in San Diego, speaking to incarcerated young people, helping them change
their lives. I ultimately wrote my book “Be a Winner in Life”, for at-risk- young people
and their parents. This was part of my missionary dream. I have many letters of thanks
from troubled young people. My book is being used as a manual in a school in
Mississippi, in their drug and alcohol prevention program. My latest book is “Letters
From Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids, A book of letters from the kids to help save
others from their consequences and a book of encouragement and council to the kids.

For my entertainment dream, I now had the confidence to be in front of people. I began to learn the words to old songs, which my mother loved, and entertain at care homes and
senior centers. The sweet souls, in my audience, loved my shows. They also thought I
was young, since most of them were many years older than I. I had such fun with them
and still do.

It was then I wondered if I could write my own songs. My first song was written in the
car, as I drove to my daughter’s home, in Las Vegas. I was age sixty. I could not read
music or play a musical instrument so I just sang into a cassette recorder. I wrote two
more songs and was told to take them to Justin Gray, the Music Director at Lawrence
Welk Theatre, ten minutes from my home. Justin produced my first songs and launched
my career. This was why I wrote my second book – “You Must Have a Dream” to show
others seniors how they can live their dreams, as I am doing.

What is my life like now? I love performing in my shows and making people happy. I
love inspiring others to live their dreams. Recently, a 78-year-old lady gave me two
books she had written and published. She was inspired after reading my book. I am so
proud of her. Her husband also just published a book. I have had many people thank me
for my books and inspiration. It feels good to help others.

I now know that God blesses us, when we choose to use the talents he has given us.

I believe we all need a philosophy for our own lives. My philosophy is this: I believe God
sent each one of us here on a mission. He gave us gifts and talents and potential. It
should be our life’s work to discover those gifts, develop them and reach our potential
and then take what we have learned and share it with others. We must do all we can to
make our world a better place. This is what I try to do and encourage others to do.
Whoever you are or whatever your age, with this philosophy, you will discover the true
meaning of happiness. Someone said, “Happiness lies in following a dream. I know this
is true.

I hope that my life story will inspire you to discover and live your dreams. You can do
more than you think you can! I’m grateful to be a late-bloomer, living my dreams and
having so much fun!

Eva Fry’s mission is to help others become better and happier. She is an inspirational author, singer/songwriter, motivational speaker, and seminar leader. Eva has published three books: “YOU MUST HAVE A DREAM” -for seniors, “BE A WINNER IN LIFE”-for good kids, troubled kids and their parents, and “LETTERS FROM JUVENILE HALL, KIDS HELPING KIDS” (Actual letters from kids at Juvenile Hall, intended to save other kids from destroying their lives). She has produced 7 Music CD’s: REMEMBER (new music for seniors), OH WHAT JOY CHIRSTMAS THE LITTLE THINGS (inspirational country), I LOVE LIVING THE TEACHINGS OF THE LORD (Gospel/Christian), SAVIOR OF MINE – (Christian), GOD GAVE YOU INTELLIGENCE (for children), CLASSICAL STYLE (instrumental).

Her music and books can be purchased at =>http://www.evafry.com Her books can also be ordered at any bookstore. email eva@evafry.com

Her articles have been published, all over the world. She invites you to use the FREE ARTICLES she has written for: at-risk kids as well as FREE ARTICLES of inspiration to help meet life’s challenges. Visit =>http://www.evafry.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eva_Fry

WestCare Foundation Announces Expanded Veterans Programs

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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WestCare Foundation Announces Expanded Veterans Programs

(Las Vegas) – WestCare, a community-based nonprofit providing responsive human services and behavioral health care programs for four decades, announced today that it has expanded its Veterans’ services.

WestCare, founded in Las Vegas 40 years ago, serves approximately 5,000 veterans throughout the United States annually.  America’s returning warriors often face health challenges including substance abuse and mental health disorders, identified as this generation’s “invisible wounds of war.”   Among them are post traumatic stress, brain injury, sexual trauma, anxiety and depression.  Episodes of homelessness, unemployment, and criminal justice involvement are not uncommon among our Veterans.

“These challenges present opportunities for community organizations, led by specially trained, qualified and informed staff, to assist with issues such as social isolation, domestic violence, reintegration and transition, and other problems a Veteran, as well as Veteran family members, may be experiencing,” said veteran and Director of Veteran Services, Dan Bernal. “WestCare is committed to helping Veterans and military family members live positive, productive and healthy lives.”

WestCare’s expanded programs are aimed at addressing a broad range of issues for Veterans and their families through services that  include: treatment for substance abuse and mental health disorders with gender or youth-specific services as appropriate, HIV/AIDS-specific programs, assistance to homelessness  including transitional shelters and permanent housing projects, family counseling, community reintegration, assistance to those who are justice involved, educational and vocational programs for both youth and adults, and case management.

From the top down, starting with WestCare’s President and Vietnam Veteran, Richard Steinberg, more than 10 percent of WestCare’s leadership and staff are Veterans and members of military families. The organization has a deep understanding of military culture at every level and in every program.  “Serving those who have served” is more than a slogan at WestCare.

Since the organization’s inception, Veterans have been welcomed into WestCare programs.  Today, the expanding reach of Veteran-specific programs is aimed at extending services to the men and women who deserve respect for their service, understanding of where they have been and opportunities for their future.

WestCare

WestCare, whose mission “uplifting of the human spirit,” was founded 40 years ago in Las Vegas.  Since its inception, it has grown to more than 100 locations in 16 U.S. States, the US Virgin Islands and the Pacific Islands headquartered in Guam.  The non-profit organization has a variety of programs available in each of the communities it serves.   For more information on the WestCare Foundation and its mission, visit www.WestCare.com.

ALZHEIMER’S SET TO MOVE FROM THE MOST DAUNTING GLOBAL HEALTH CRISIS TO THE 21ST CENTURY’S FISCAL NIGHTMARE

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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ALZHEIMER’S SET TO MOVE FROM THE MOST DAUNTING GLOBAL HEALTH CRISIS TO THE 21ST CENTURY’S FISCAL NIGHTMARE

OECD and the Global Coalition on Aging Convene at Harris Manchester College, Oxford University to Shape New Approaches for Solutions

Oxford, UK (26 June 2013) – The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Harris Manchester College, Oxford University and Global Coalition on Aging (GCOA) concluded on Friday 21 June, an “Expert Consultation on Unlocking Global Collaboration to Accelerate Innovation for Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia.”  Aimed at providing input to the OECD action agenda for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, the Consultation brought together the highest level of global experts across health, economics, public policy, business, biotechnology and beyond.

Its timing is aligned with UK Prime Minister David Cameron’s recent recognition that dementia is fast becoming the biggest pressure on care systems around the world.  “That’s why we’re using our G8 to bring together health ministers, clinical researchers and healthcare companies,” he said.  “If the brightest minds are working together on this then we’ve got a greater chance of improving treatments and finding scientific breakthroughs.  I’ve said before that we need an all-out fight-back against dementia that cuts across society. Now we need to cut across borders and spearhead an international approach that could really make a difference.”

The objectives of the Consultation included:

  • Providing a space for country experts, policy makers, and scientific, medical and academic experts to share views on the main scientific, technological and policy challenges Alzheimer’s and dementia raise in the context of creating a pathway for aging populations to be sources of economic growth in the 21st century; and
  • Creating an opportunity for multidisciplinary exchange on a collective action plan that maps the way forward.

“The impact of Alzheimer’s and dementia on individuals, families, health systems and national economies as populations age will become truly crippling, and no one nation or research organization can solve this global epidemic alone.” said Michael Hodin, Executive Director of GCOA.  “It requires global understanding, sharing and collaboration, and this Consultation was a critical step in our ongoing fight against Alzheimer’s – a fight we must win if we are truly to unlock our aging populations as new sources of economic growth.”

Alzheimer’s afflicts one in eight over 65 and one-half of all those over 85, and the economic, social and personal costs will only increase with age-related demographic change.  In 2010, the global cost of Alzheimer’s and dementias equalled 1 percent of global gross domestic product (GDP), or $604 billion.  The prevalence and cost, combined with the stigma, which prevents recognition of symptoms and subsequent treatments, signal an urgent call to action.

“Traditional strategies around healthcare services and investments in research are not enough to address the growing worldwide onslaught of Alzheimer’s and dementias,” said Marc Wortmann, Executive Director of Alzheimer’s Disease International.

“The global scale of the pending healthcare-economic crisis mandates a bold forward looking action plan to harmonize a multi-nation attack on the problem,” noted  Zaven Khachaturian, recognized at the meeting as the ‘Chief Architect’ of Alzheimer & Brain Aging research in the United States, now the President of the Campaign to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease by 2020. He indicated the urgent need for a “multinational strategic goal for reducing the prevalence of Alzheimer’s and other chronic brain disorders by 50 percent within a decade” – thus urging the OECD to “identify the framework conditions to accelerate multi-national collaborative R & D.”

George Vradenburg, Chairman of USAgainstAlzheimer’s and convener of the Global CEO Initiative on Alzheimer’s, called for new attention, resources, commitment and collaboration to defeat Alzheimer’s disease. In his keynote speech, coined “The Oxford Accord,” he called for G8 leadership equivalent to the G8 Summit that created the HIV/AIDS Global Fund.

Consultation experts presented their views for proactive public policy and an OECD role in supporting actions to : promote broad-based partnerships; identify incentives, frameworks and infrastructures for enhanced international data sharing; leverage big data as strategies to advance our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease, improve care, promote global exchange of good practice and move toward cure and even prevention.

The Consultation was borne out of the September 2012 OECD workshop, “Anticipating the Special Needs of the 21st Century Silver Economy: From Smart Technologies to Services Innovation,” co-hosted by the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, OECD and Waseda University, with the support of the Japanese government.  The workshop concluded that innovation was needed to meet the challenges and opportunities of global demographic change and mitigate the health, social and economic impacts of aging.

The Consultation was held on 20-21 June, 2013 at The Harris Manchester College (HMC), Oxford University in collaboration with the OECD.

For more information see OECD’s website: oe.cd/innovating-against-alzheimers.

ABOUT THE GLOBAL COALITION ON AGING

The Global Coalition on Aging (GCOA) aims to reshape how global leaders approach and prepare for the 21st century’s profound shift in population aging. GCOA uniquely brings together global corporations across industry sectors with common strategic interests in aging populations, a comprehensive and systemic understanding of aging, and an optimistic view of its impact. Through research, public policy analysis, advocacy and communication, GCOA is advancing innovative solutions and working to ensure global aging is a path for fiscally sustainable economic growth, social value creation and wealth enhancement. For more information, visitwww.globalcoalitiononaging.com.

Informative Information for Female Senior Citizens and Purse Snatching by Lawanna Bean

June 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Female Senior Citizens and Purse Snatching

I have read several articles recently about older women having their purses snatched. I am a 70 year old female senior citizen and realize that women who are older are perfect victims for purse snatchers. Mainly, because they are not able to defend themselves as well as a younger, more alert and strong person. Being a female senior citizen, this concerns me personally.

Did you know that statistics are that the majority of purse snatchers are young men under the age of 18? They are quicker, stronger and more alert, so an older woman would be a prime target for them.

By the way, if you try to hold on to your purse or resist in any way, there is always the possibility that you could fall and break a hip. Older people don’t have the balance they once did when they were younger. And for some reason, we tend to fall differently. When we are younger we are able to think quick enough to try and brace our fall. But as we get older, we don’t always think to do that, therefore we are more prone to broken bones.

There are a lot of challenges being a senior citizen. Just to name a few:

 

  • Balance,
  • Difficulty hearing
  • Impaired vision
  • Forgetfulness
  • Our side peripheral vision is not as good as it once was

 

Personally, I have to admit carrying a purse is just one more thing to keep up with when I’m out and about. And now we have to remember to have our cell phones with us at all times as well as our keys and our and purses. It’s just too much! So it’s very important to eliminate as many opportunities of having your purse snatched as possible.

Scenarios for Purse Snatchers:

 

  • It’s not a good idea to go shopping alone. If possible, go with a friend.
  • I know better, but I have been guilty of walking a few feet away from the grocery cart at the grocery store with my purse in it. NOT a good idea. Never leave your purse open or unattended.
  • Waiting for a bus at a bus stop.
  • Areas that are not well lit at night.

 

Common Sense Ideas:

If it’s at all possible, leave your purse at home. Put the credit card and/or checkbook in your pants or jacket pocket. That way, the opportunity is eliminated entirely. For some reason, we tend to think that we have to have all of our credit cards, checkbooks, etc with us at all times.

 

  • A good investment would be a Fanny or Belt Pack. Granted they certainly aren’t very pretty, and you can’t carry very much in them. But they have the advantage of fitting snugly around your waist and are easily accessible when you need them. You can even wear them under your shirt or jacket. They have just enough room for a little cash, a credit card and your driver’s license, all the things that are necessary for a shopping trip.
  • And for goodness sake, don’t be guilty of putting your name or address on your keys. Then you not only have lost your purse, but you have the added worry of knowing the person now knows where you live.
  • One idea that works for me, if I think of it, is to put my purse at the bottom of the grocery cart before I start shopping. That way, someone would have to literally empty my cart to get to my purse.

 

Carry a Purse if You Must

Some of us old timers think a purse is a necessity. So if you really have to take a purse with you only carry whatever is absolutely necessary. Leave all unnecessary valuable items at home.

If you do carry a credit card, it’s a good idea to make a copy of the number and phone number so you can call and report it as lost or stolen.

Ways to Protect Yourself

 

  • For under $10.00, you can have a small container of Pepper Spray or Mace. Pepper spray often has a quick release key chain that allows you to separate your keys from the pepper spray container. It sprays up to 10 feet and will temporarily blind your attacker.
  • There are inexpensive personal alarms that can be put on your key chain. If you are in harm’s way, just a touch of a button will send off a high decibel crisis alarm and send the perpetrator packing!
  • There is an alarm that fits around your wrist and also attaches to your purse. If someone tries to grab your purse, the pull of the purse will set off an alarm immediately. In most cases, the person will drop the purse and run for their life.

 

Remember, when you carry a purse, it’s always in plain sight. That, in itself gives the purse snatcher a golden opportunity to just grab it and run. Always take precautions and protect yourself!

Don’t be a Victim!

Lawanna Bean is passionate about marketing products that will help people stay safe. The products she found are top quality and competitively priced. Most of us can’t afford an expensive home security system, but that’s no reason we can’t be protected. A canister of mace or Pepper Spray costs under $10.00. Personal safety for you and your family should be your No. 1 priority!

Be sure and visit her website, http://www.peppersprayetcstore.com. Get informed and take action today!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lawanna_Bean

 

TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

 

Terry Murphy, a longtime local businesswoman and community leader who is president of Strategic Solutions and serves as president of Downtown Las Vegas Alliance, is the SHARE Humanitarian for the month of May for her volunteering efforts with Veterans Village, The Rape Crisis Center and the Variety Early Leaning Center Lorenzi Campus.TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

Murphy also serves as Honorary Consul for the Republic of Ireland and as a board member of The Smith Center for the Performing Arts.

 

Each month, SHARE honors those in the community who give without hesitation to help others in need. Murphy was selected for this honor from the more than 1,500 SHARE volunteers in Southern Nevada.

SHARE is involved with raising funds for various social causes including housing assistance and neighborhood support service programs.

 

About SHARE:

SHARE is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1994 by business executives dedicated to providing affordable housing for individuals in need. During its nearly 20 year history, the organization has served hundreds of families, seniors, veterans and those with physical challenges or terminal illnesses. sharelasvegas.org

 

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org

 

About The Rape Crisis Center:

The Rape Crisis Center (RCC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1974 by Florence McClure and Sandra Petta as the Community Action Against Rape (CAAR) with the goal of helping those in Clark County heal from the trauma of sexual violence. Today, The Rape Crisis Center operates a 24/7 crisis hot line for sexual assault victims and provides counseling, advocacy and support to help victims begin the healing process and navigate the legal system. The RCC is also committed to the prevention of sexual assault through educational programs and community outreach. To assist victims to become survivors, the organization depends on a core base of dedicated volunteers and staff. These individuals are empathetic and enthusiastic people who give their time, energy, and personal sacrifice to continue to serve Clark County’s victims of sexual violence. This service is provided through face-to-face and over-the- phone intervention with newly victimized individuals.The Rape Crisis Center hotline number is 888-366-1640.  For more information, visit www.therapecrisiscenter.org.

 

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

At a time when thousands of Baby Boomers are reaching the age of 65 every day, the issues of senior rights, elder laws, and anti-ageism have never been more important, more volatile, or more questioned. After all, this is the generation that was ready to take down the establishment fifty years ago, and they haven’t lost any of their desire to change the world for the better. And, they have the numbers to do it. Here are our 100 top blogs for seniors dealing with senior rights, law & policy, and anti-ageism.

Boomers Against The Law

  1. Elder Law Plus: lawyer Evan H. Farr blogs about topics concerning elder law, including probate strategies and parental care.
  2. Michigan Elder Law Blog: the attorneys at Barsch & Joswick provide seniors and their loved ones with sage advice on a variety of Elder law issues.
  3. Everything Elder Law: Evan Farr is back at it again, this time focusing on Elder Law news, concepts, and innovations from around the country.
  4. Massachusetts Estate and Elder Law Blog: lawyer and blogger Stephanie Konarski gives tips on estate planning and other elder law topics.
  5. New York Elder Law Attorney Blog: your source for elder law news and comment in New York, this blog analyzes nursing home legislation and elder care costs.
  6. Elder Law Prof. Blog: Elder Law professor Kim Dayton authors a really nice blog that covers a wide range of Elder law issues, from Supreme Court cases to seminars.
  7. The Pop Tort: can a consumer advocates blog dealing with civil justice be cute? This blog proves it can, complete with an adorable “Pop Tort” logo, even while exploring such issues as Medicare and Medicaid lawsuits, nursing home scams, and medical malpractice against the elderly, among other legal issues.
  8. Supportive Senior Solutions: this blog from a geriatric care management practice in New York covers issues related to geriatric care, caregiving, and healthcare laws for the elderly and infirm.
  9. Aging Beats the Alternative: elder care specialist Lorie Ebers uses her blog to talk about overcoming the challenges of aging, caring for aging parents, and the less talked about side of elder law: Boomer divorce.
  10. Elder Law Blog: lawyer Ronald C. Morton’s elder law blog is full of sage advice for seniors looking how to tap into Veteran’s benefits, how to plan for their golden years, and more.
  11. The Best Elder Law Blog: published by the attorneys at Lamson & Cutner, this blog discusses elder law cases, the Affordable Care Act, and same-sex marriage.
  12. Elder Law Tips and News: the lawyers at Cooper, Adel & Associates bring you posts on living trusts, aging issues, and general estate planning.
  13. The Connecticut Elder Law Blog: lawyer Michael Keenan provides his readers with estate planning tips, elder fraud, and Medicare rules.
  14. The Teddy Bear Lawyers: attorney Rick Law gives readers a great resource for Elder Law in the Chicagoland area. Find articles on protecting vulnerable seniors and financial planning.
  15. Oregon Elder Law: attorney Orrin Onken blogs on elder law, estate planning, and probate proceedings in plain, easy to understand language.
  16. Florida Elder Law and Estate Blog: this informative blog includes great articles on VA benefits, estate planning, and trusts.
  17. Golden Law Center: written by attorney Sasha Golden, the Golden Law Center blog discusses elder law, special needs planning, guardianship, wills and trusts, and estate administration.
  18. Kraft Elder Law: attorney Robert Kraft blogs about Medicaid, Medicare, wills, trusts, probate, veterans benefits, and other elder law topics.
  19. Pennsylvania Law Blog: this elder law blog by the attorneys at the law offices of Shober & Rock discusses Medicaid, taxes, Veterans, banks, and annuities.
  20. Long Beach Elder Law Blog: this blog focuses on elder abuse, estate protection, the Cal MediConnect program, and reform of health law.
  21. Houston Elder Law Blog: the folks at Wright Abshire Attorneys blog about care planning, estate planning, Medicaid Planning, Probate & Estate Administration, and and Veteran’s Benefits.
  22. Hauptman Law Blog: readers of this blog can learn more about elder, estate, and special needs law. Includes articles on the Medicare Settlement and VA Aid.
  23. Fulkerson Elder Law Blog: the function of this elder law blog is for the firm to respond to common questions clients have about elder law and review developments in the law impacting elder law and estate planning.
  24. CMLP Estate Planning and Elder Law Blog: readers can look forward to reviewing articles on simplifying their estate plan and elder law news items of note.
  25. Massachusetts Estate Planning and Probate Blog: attorney Matthew Karr keeps readers up to date on estate planning and probate news and information.
  26. Marshall Elder and Estate Planning Blog: the author of this elder law blog has over 30 years experience in estate planning, special needs planning, and estates.
  27. Hartford, CT Elder Law Blog: the attorney’s at Ruggiero Ziogas & Allaire discuss estate planning, care planning, Medicaid, Veteran’s Benefits, and Probate.
  28. El Paso Elder Law Blog: the law firm of Stephanie Townsend Allala and Associates blogs on estate planning, guardianships, Medicaid Planning, Nursing Home Abuse, and Trust & Probate.
  29. Miami Probate Law Blog: the folks at the Byrant law firm keep readers up-to-date on estate administration, probate court, estate litigation, and the nuisances of will and trust disputes.
  30. Elder Law News: attorney Brian A. Raphan is based in New York City and specializes in Wills, Estates, Trusts, and Elder Care issues. His blog is full of great resources.
  31. Aging & Law in West Virginia: this blog contains news in law and aging in West Virginia, written by the West Virginia Senior Legal Aid organization.
  32. Florida Elder Law and Estate Planning: this Florida Certified Elder Law attorney provides in depth insights and news to help Floridians protect themselves and preserve their assets.
  33. Family Law Blog Maryland: while this blog looks at all matters pertaining to Family Law, elder law sneaks in as a prevalent theme in many of the cases discussed. They look at legal matters like when divorce and retirement coincide, or when grandparents wish to take custody of their grandchildren.
  34. Phoenix AZ Family Law Blog: looking at issues older couples face in Arizona, this family law blog explores the specific challenges elders face in divorces and custody battles, complete with the latest policy changes and laws.
  35. Otherspoon: hospice volunteer and blogger Ann Neumann talks about care-giving and the realities, politics, and senior rights involved in death and dying.

Seniors Talk Policy And Politics

  1. Aging in Place: this blog is concerned with seniors who are dealing with shrinking benefits and increasing costs—seniors find answers on how to protect themselves.
  2. Estate in Denial: providing news, analysis, and commentary on abusive practices occurring in probate courts. Features original perspective and direct communication.
  3. Florida Estate Planning Lawyer Blog: this blog covers estate planning legal issues, cases of interest, and news with a focus on Florida elder law.
  4. McGuire Woods: the people at McGuire Woods author this great blog on long term care legal issues, including timely news, articles, and white papers.
  5. Illinois Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: published by the law office of Wilson & Wilson, this blog covers asset protection, banking, estate planning, and trusts.
  6. Illinois Nursing Home Abuse Blog: covers Illinois nursing home law, including Supreme Court cases and other information relating to residents and family members.
  7. Law Office of Donald D. Vanarelli Blog: provides readers in New Jersey with information on elder law, estate and special needs planning, and mediation services.
  8. Maryland Nursing Home Lawyer Blog: this blog offers insight on nursing home abuse reports, legislation, and legal opinions of elder law in Maryland.
  9. Massachusetts Estate Planning, Probate & Elder Law: elder law attorney Brian Barreira writes on legal issues involving death, taxes, special needs, and long-term elder care.
  10. New Jersey Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: blog posts explore life and death in New Jersey from a perspective of estate planning, elder law, taxation, probate, and estate administration.
  11. Medina Law Group: postings provide readers with advice on estate planning and management, estate taxes, elder law, and VA benefits.
  12. North Carolina Wills and Trusts: this blog provides readers with estate planning and elder law news with a North Carolina focus.
  13. California Nursing Home Abuse Law Blog: covers nursing home abuse, elder law abuse, and features many quality articles relating to California elder law.
  14. Nursing Home Law Blog: this well written blog discusses elder issues, legislation, legal news, protections of elder rights, and helpful health tips.
  15. PA Elder Estate and Fiduciary Law Blog: focuses on elder law, long-term care, end-of-life and health care surrogate decision-making, and estate planning.
  16. Patti’s Blog: find information about this lawyer’s practice, which concentrates on advocacy for seniors. She shares personal interests and her passions.
  17. Pennsylvania Nursing Home Abuse Lawyer Blog: this blog discusses nursing home abuse laws, cases, and news items from Pennsylvania.
  18. Barbara Cashman Blog: Barbara blogs about elder law and policy issues, and often hosts guest bloggers to share their insights on elder law and news.
  19. NJ Elder Law: lawyer Kenneth Vercammen blogs about topics related to estate planning and elder law. He was once awarded the NJ State Bar Municipal Court Practitioner of the Year.
  20. The Senior Sentinel: a blog compiling news and information for Baby Boomers, the Senior Sentinel concentrates on the intersection of ageism and public policy both nationally and world-wide.
  21. Elder Consult: this geriatric medicine blog not only covers Alzheimers, dementia, financial decision making, and medications, it also discusses related legal issues such as elder financial abuse.
  22. Grey Pride: a UK blog by the Anchor Digital Marketing team is dedicated to keeping older people at the top of the political agenda and petitioning the government to create a Minister for Older People to ensure their needs are met.
  23. Over 65 Blog: project organizers from Harvard, Yale, and The Hastings Center host this blog for “seniors seeking solutions for health care and security, mainly looking at health care system reforms, elder law policies and practices, and how seniors can achieve a stronger role in the future of health care.
  24. Reaping Hope Blog: a blog from an NGO in Nepal promoting dignified aging and elder rights, Reaping Hope explores elder abuse and elder oppression while actively helping elderly people claim their rights and challenge discrimination.

Age Against The Machine: Anti-Ageism

  1. Ageist Beauty: the musings, product reviews, and random thoughts of a woman who is fighting against her age.
  2. Everyday Ageism Project: this blog aims to capture people’s everyday experiences dealing with ageism. The author has discovered that ageism is the most commonly experienced form of prejudice.
  3. The Lonely Gerontologist: professor Kelly Yokum blogs about all things aging—including aging stereotypes and other aging topics that come to mind.
  4. My Elder Advocate: this blog provides comprehensive coverage of ageism, the dangers of nursing homes, elder abuse, and elder care.
  5. The Roaming Boomers: David and Carol are great examples of a couple who doesn’t let age get in the way of living life to the fullest.
  6. The Gypsy Nester: Veronica and David show readers how to rock the empty nest and get the most out of life as you age.
  7. Changing Aging: this multi-blog platform challenges conventional views on aging. The authors believe aging is a strength, rich in developmental potential and growth.
  8. The Elders: founded by Nelson Mandela in 2007, the Elders is a group of seniors committed to addressing global challenges, including child marriage and climate change.
  9. Beauty and Wisdom: the blog of photographer Robbie Kaye, who traveled to salons throughout the US to photograph and interview women in their 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s and discovered that beauty is ageless.
  10. Advanced Style: don’t tell these women they are too old to model hip and alluring fashions. This blog teaches women how to dress to impress and that age is only a number.
  11. RL TV: the only cable network and online destination for folks 50+, features a nice blog that provides tips on elder issues and promotes active living.
  12. The 70-Something Blog: blogger Judy informs readers how to live a full and engaging life as she chronicles her journey of aging.
  13. Retirement is Work: newly retired librarian and blogger resolves to post one good thing about retirement every day for a year, but along the way struggles with senior rights and anti-ageism.
  14. Yo Is This Ageist?: a humorous blog by Ashton Applewhite dedicated to determining whether age-related remarks are offensive, “challenging the stereotypes that segregate us by age.”
  15. This Chair Rocks: a smart and sassy blog by Ashton Applewhite that challenges the ideas of ageism with humor and snark. All stereotypes and insensitive remarks are grounds for brilliant blog posts.
  16. Senior Planet: “aging with attitude” is the tagline of this blog community of older adults using technology to connect with each other and take on the issues of ageism and senior rights.
  17. Changing Aging: a blog founded by Dr. Bill Thomas to promote “a radical reinterpretation of longevity” which focuses on anti-ageism and senior rights, as well as getting the most out of a long life.
  18. Time Goes By: Ronni Bennett takes on aging, ageism and related issues with humor, exploring the truth of “what it’s really like to get old.” She starts by rejecting the “cutesy” terms for old people – they’re called “elders” around here!
  19. The Magic of Middle-Aged Women: author Daniel Even Weiss – a man – blogs on the theme of his latest book, The Magic of Middle-Aged Women, where he challenges the prevailing ageist idea that women don’t get better as they age. They do.
  20. Advanced Style: Ari Seth Cohen, a young-ish photographer, roams the New York City streets photographing stylish and creative elders. Here, art challenges the paradigm that age and beauty can’t co-exist.
  21. The New Old Age: the New York Times blog on aging takes advantage of the newspaper’s top writers to explore the unprecedented intergenerational challenge of the Baby Boomers.
  22. The Little Old Lady Stays Put (or doesn’t): explores the “lives, lifestyles and issues of interesting older people,” touching on the issues surrounding ageism, elder rights, living with dementia, and overcoming the struggles of aging with strength and good humor.
  23. Naked at Our Age: advocate of ageless sexuality, Joan Price, talks about sex and aging, taking on Senior Rights subjects like safer sex for seniors while providing helpful tips.
  24. Aging & Work at Boston College: scholars, academics, and researchers share their findings on ageism in the workplace and the challenges aging workers face in this PhD-heavy blog by The Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College.
  25. Ethnic Elders: this newsy blog by New America Media examines the Senior Rights issues and Elder Law of minority groups such as age discrimination, lawsuits related to Social Security, and elder healthcare reform.
  26. The Everyday Ageism Project: blending blogging and research, this site’s goal is to capture the experience of age discrimination. The forum is full of people sharing their experiences in a supportive environment.
  27. Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens Blog: the Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens sub-blog offers wide ranging posts on issues including senior rights and ageism – with its signature left-wing perspective.
  28. Clinical Geriatrics: created as more of a peer-reviewed clinical journal by the American Geriatrics Society, some of the top scholars in geriatrics converge on this blog to discuss geriatric health and wellness issues, which often cross over into legal and anti-ageism issues.
  29. Age Action Alliance: this organization brings together a network of 300 organizations and individuals committed to helping older people. Its blog is dedicated to improving older people’s lives through advocating against ageism, particularly in Britain.
  30. Manitoba Senior Centres: this Canadian blog covers the rampant ageism in Canada and promotes world elder abuse awareness. It also has a list of resources for older adults.
  31. Fierce with Age: defying ageism goes mainstream at this blog, created by veteran journalist Dr. Carol Orsborn. Having written about the Boomer generation for major newspapers and blogged for the Huffington Post and NPR’s Next Avenue, Orsborn is well equipped to take on the spiritual and policy hurdles of aging.
  32. Live Better Boomer!: a Philadelphia-based blog, by social worker Tiffany Matthews, devoted to helping educate and empower Boomers advocate for their own improved healthcare.
  33. Third Age: billed as “health for Boomers and beyond,” Third Age offers relatively fluffy fare, like “Change your Mood with Color,” to the legal issues surrounding Boomer divorce and care-giving.
  34. The Old Gunhand: one facet of senior citizen rights you don’t see every day is elder gun advocates. This website not only tells you the best types of guns for elderly wielders, it also goes into gun policy and senior self-defense.
  35. Age Discrimination Info: a simple name for a one-stop source of statistics and information on age discrimination, including legislation, cases, news, publications, events and training. The perfect resource for the activist.
  36. Age UK: the largest organization in the United Kingdom for working with and for older people, this website has an entire section dedicated to age discrimination and ageism.
  37. National Youth Rights Association: not just for youngsters, the National Youth Rights Association combats ageism in all its forms. In fact, they probably wouldn’t appreciate being called “youngsters.”
  38. Disability and Representation: a blog by writer, photographer and activist Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg that discusses (and tries to change the discourse about) disability rights and ageism, along with autism.
  39. Over 50: Career coaching and workshops for the over-50 crowd, this blog doesn’t stop at finding a job. This site explores Baby Boomer activism in and out of the workplace.
  40. Activist Post: while this blog deals with many topics requiring advocacy, they often include issues that regard Senior Rights, Elder Law and anti-ageism.
  41. California Booming: an informational blog dedicated to California Baby Boomers, this blog covers everything from sex, to diet, to politics of the Boomer generation, including issues concerning senior rights and ageism in the workplace.

Senior Citizens Can Become Great Customers by Michael McCann

April 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

If you think the senior citizen market isn’t dynamic, then you’re really out  of touch with marketing. Thirty-five percent of our population is over 55 years  old, and these very affluent seniors control almost 45 percent of the disposable  income of our country.

Neither Madison Avenue nor the advertising agency down the block takes this  group seriously, and as a result, the market is virtually untapped. Here are  four suggestions on how to target your business efforts to penetrate this  market.

o Gain an understanding of this large market… Throw out  everything you ever heard about the over-55 group. These people are vibrant and  full of life. They are looking for new ideas, challenges, and new and innovative  ways to enjoy life. Thanks to Social Security, wise investing and good  retirement plans, they have the money to pay for what they want. Most senior  citizens want what you want: health, happiness and security. Many want  excitement, romance and adventure. They want to maintain close ties with their  children and grandchildren.

o Target products and services… Yes, senior citizens want to  know about cruise ships, vitamins and wheelchairs, but so do thousands of people  under 55.

The difference is that seniors are looking for solutions to problems. They  want to make their life easier and more enjoyable, and they have the money to  pay for the services and products that can help them achieve these goals. If  your product solves a specific problem, you will find this market is for  you.

o How to advertise to seniors… Forget the flowery phrases, cute  word plays and fast-action ads. Senior citizens want to know the facts and what  benefits those facts will provide for them.  Your products and services are just  the carrier of benefits, not benefits in themselves.

Seniors want to know how your offering will make life easier or better or  more fun. Problem solving is high on the list of benefits wanted, and proof of  claim is requirement. Straight talk is appreciated, and as usual, a picture is  worth a thousand words.

Two-step advertising works well in the senior market. Seniors have time, so  snap decisions are seldom made. Advertisements that offer more information work  especially well. Always be positive in your advertising, and never talk down to  your audience. Most seniors are a lot smarter than you or I.

o Things to avoid… It is not a good idea to sell marginal ideas  to senior citizens such as work-at-home projects and get-rich-quick business  schemes. The senior lobby had watchdog groups looking for scam artists, and  these two topics top the list of no-nos. Get on their list and you will find  your business in trouble.

If you’re looking for the best source of information as to how to advertise  to the senior market, read what they read. Buy some of the newsstand magazines  on retirement, vacations, travel, cooking or investing targeted toward seniors,  and read both the articles and the ads. Find copies of Modern Maturity.  This and other magazines and periodicals will provide valuable insight into how  to advertise to this lucrative market.

Make more money faster by easily connecting with hard-to-reach decision  makers who can buy your products and services…NOW! Get started free by getting  Michael McCann’s new Special Report excerpted from his newest edition of his  popular business development book, Connecting with Key Decision Makers (How to  Reach Hard-to-Reach Businesspeople Who Can Say “Yes”)…just for asking at http:/www.GlobalBusinessCafe.com/  http://Twitter.com/MikeHMcCann Go now!

Michael McCann is a 25-year veteran of developing unique and professional  business development programs that create tangible results for individuals and  companies. Let him help you instantly…free!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Michael_McCann

 

ConnectMyFolks iPad App Offers New Way For Tech-Resistant Seniors To Connect With Family, Friends

April 22, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events 

ConnectMyFolks iPad App Offers New Way For Tech-Resistant Seniors To Connect With Family, Friends

EUGENE, Ore., April 18, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — A new iPad app that’s free to download and use will keep technologically challenged seniors in safe, simple and easy electronic touch with their friends, children and grandchildren. ConnectMyFolks delivers email, texts, photos and videos instantly to technophobes of all ages, although it’s designed to be used by people 65 and older. It is now available in the App Store.

Email and texting have replaced letter writing and phone calls for most people, and that leaves seniors out of the loop, says ConnectMyFolks co-founder Steve Lee. “If someone’s not able to get email or texts, they can end up isolated from their own family,” Lee says. “These days if you’re not receiving emails or texts, you’re left behind.”

Although the nation’s tech-savvy population is aging and bringing its expertise with it, the 85-year-old and up age category is the fastest growing demographic in the United States . Many of these seniors never acquired tech skills and are often intimidated by computers and smart phones.

ConnectMyFolks is simple and secure. Only people on the senior’s approved list can communicate through the app. That eliminates spam, scammers and other threats. “Whether it’s a nephew who’s always asking for money, or it’s a random phishing attempt, those emails won’t get through,” Lee says.

Housed on the intuitive iPad, ConnectMyFolks is designed for people easily overwhelmed by traditional tech devices. It launches with three big buttons – one for mail, one for pictures and one for videos. Forward, back and home buttons make navigation simple. “You absolutely cannot get lost in this app,” Lee says. “You can’t break it. When it doubt, just ‘go home.'”

A key feature is the simple web-based admin panel, where a designated friend or relative can set up the senior’s approved ConnectMyFolks sender list, select reply options based on the senior’s needs (pre-set replies, typed emails or voice recordings) and make adjustments to font sizes and other interface settings.

The app is expected to be popular in part because families are so geographically scattered. Even grown children who take care of their folks are often helping from afar, according to the US Census Bureau, which reports 7 million to 10 million adults care for their aging parents long distance.

ConnectMyFolks was developed by In the Loop, a Eugene , Oregon , company devoted to the use of technology to solve everyday challenges faced by modern families. Learn more at www.connectmyfolks.com.

Taking Care of a Senior Citizen in Your Own Family by Richard Fowler

April 19, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

You may want to take care of a member of your family who is already a senior  citizen. Your desire is sincere and is definitely there and you truly want to be  of help, but you should be aware of a lot of things before you actually do so.  It is not an easy thing to do, for one thing. There are plenty of challenges  involved in taking care of a senior citizen, and that’s even if you take into  consideration the fact that you are going to do it for a member of your own  family.

It is important that you know right away of the challenges that you are  likely to face early on, so that you can decide if you really want to do it. The  difficulty of dealing with elderly family members is a good place to start. You  would have to be prepared to deal with them, with their behavior and the  tantrums that they are likely to have once you do assume the task of taking care  of them. And of course there are the health issues that are quite serious when  you talking about senior citizens. The costs of their medication and different  health issues are something that you really need to consider seriously.

Above all that however, is the fact that you want to do it because you  genuinely care for them. The love that you have for your senior family members  goes beyond any of the things that you need to deal with or worry about. It all  becomes easy and even fun to do and you are not really going to worry about all  the stuff that is connected with taking care of your senior family member.  However, even if you have all the right intentions, you still need some tips and  the right information about how you could do things the right way.

Here then are some tips for you to follow if you are going to take care of a  citizen at home:

  • Make sure that the bathrooms in your home, especially those that are  frequently used by the elderly, are always clean and kept as dry as you can so  that they would not slip and fall. There have been too many cases of senior  citizens slipping and falling in bathrooms and you definitely don’t want that to  happen to your loved ones.
  • Needless to say, the home where you and your senior citizen family members  are staying should be as clean as possible. You need to make sure that your  home; specifically its interiors and the rooms where the elderly are staying are  free from dust and have very good ventilation.
  • Senior citizens need to be reminded of different things on a constant basis.  It can be about anything, the medication that they need to take or the time that  they need to take their nap. The important thing is that you remain patient even  though they may display some irritability and some anger at times. Just maintain  your patience and understanding at all times.

If you or someone you love suffers from a handicap or disability due to an  accident, disease, or illness and find it difficult to get around and function  in the current home environment, then you have come to the right place. We offer  chair lifts new jersey that are commercially available or just make whatever you may need from  scratch.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Richard_Fowler

 

Riding to Death: How Healthy Eating Can Improve the Health of Senior Citizens by Stan Onodu

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Are you a senior citizen? Medical science told us that there are ailments  associated with age. You’ll agree with me that it is virtually unheard of for  youngsters to complain of illnesses like osteoporosis, high blood pressure,  diabetes, heart disease, arthritis and certain cancers. But these are mostly the  health challenges of older adults. As a senior citizen, you need to know that  you can effectively manage these diseases through healthy eating. Let me show  you how.

Fluids. Naturally, you’ll observe, in most cases, that the skin and the  entire body frame of older adults shrink as they get older and older. This is as  a result of the fact that they tend to dehydrate so easily, which may not be  unconnected with their inability to feel thirsty most of the time. As a senior  citizen therefore, you should form the habit of constantly ingesting water and  fruit juices into your system.

Proteins. Proteins are body-building foods. They are also in the business of  repair and or replenishment of worn-out body cells and tissues. The healthy  proteins for senior citizens include eggs, lean meats, turkey or poultry and  fish. From these, minerals such as calcium, zinc and iron, greatly needed by the  elderly can be sourced.

Carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are energy-giving foods. It is a known secret  that senior citizens need a lot of energy derivable from this kind of foods in  order to sustain their ability to perform basic daily activities like dressing,  bathing, etc. Whole grains, cereals and their derivatives form excellent diets  for them. And more so, with some fibre content in the foods, these older folks  will be less exposed to constipation.

Fats. Only unsaturated fat foods, as in lean meats, fish, low-fat diary  products, avocados, nuts and seeds, should be taken by senior citizens. The  reason being that other fats contain HDL kind of cholesterol that can aggravate  blood pressures, thereby putting their heart conditions at very high risk.

Moderate Exercise. Man shall not leave by bread alone. Our senior citizens  need some bit of exercises – taking a walk, light gardening, riding bicycles,  etc – which can help them burn off calories thereby reducing weight; improving  heart and lung functions, and ultimately engender overall feeling of well-being.  It is important to note, however, that before they embark on any form of  exercises, their doctors must be aware.

If our senior citizens can strive to adopt the above healthy lifestyles or  habits, I guarantee their good health even though, for sure, their health cannot  be as it used to be when they were younger. Healthy eating is a gateway to a  healthy, long life and the case of our senior citizens cannot be  different.

What is that health condition that constitutes a burden in your life? Do you  know that through healthy eating you can overcome it? You can learn a lot more  here: http://www.healthyeatingpalace.blogspot.com/.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Stan_Onodu

 

Healthy Eating, Exercise and Lifestyle Guide For Senior Citizens By David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Healthy Eating and Lifestyle

While it is important for people of all ages to stay healthy, it is especially important for senior citizens to maintain healthy eating habits as well as to stay active which is important in the prevention of chronic illnesses like diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. By practicing healthier living practices, senior citizens can maintain a healthy weight, avoid depression, and stay mentally sharp. Those participating in caring for the elderly should be aware of these healthy living practices and work to both encourage and facilitate them.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a healthy diet includes many different types of food that are rich in nutrients. They have outlined specifically what this eating plan entails at the website.. Because this eating plan is designed specifically for senior citizens, it focuses on the types of foods that are important for preventing common ailments of older Americans like obesity and serious chronic illnesses.

Healthy Eating 101:

By following some of the tips listed, senior citizens can start a healthier lifestyle today:

  • Don’t skip meals. It is important to eat regularly in order to maintain normal metabolism and not become tempted to eat higher fat foods when food is consumed.
  • Eat a diet that is high in fiber. By eating foods like whole-grain breads, beans, vegetables, and fruits, you can lower your susceptibility to diabetes and heart disease.
  • Senior citizens especially should begin to adjust their diet to one that includes less calories and fat because the body will need less as it ages.
  • Calcium and Vitamin D are very important for nutrition and keeping bones strong. You can get this by either getting in at least three servings of dairy every day, or substituting these with soy-based beverages and proteins.
  • Senior citizens will have a harder time absorbing adequate amounts of the B12 vitamin. For this reason, it is important to eat cereals fortified with this nutrient or taking vitamin B12 supplements with meals.
  • Snack the smart way. Senior citizens will want to limit the amount of unhealthy snacking they do which involves foods high in calories and sugars. Instead, keep small portions of dried fruit, peanut butter, or crackers at hand to keep the appetite under control while remaining healthy.
  • Drink plenty of water. Although senior citizens often feel less thirsty then they used to, it is important to stay hydrated by either drinking water or water-based beverages like tea, coffee, soup, and skim milk.

Planning and Preparing Meals

 

Sometimes people find it hard to eat healthily because eating is often a social event which involves many people with different eating preferences and goals. While it is important to be able to enjoy a meal with family and friends, it is also important to maintain your own eating integrity by making sure everyone is on board with your personal healthy eating goals. Friends and family, as well as those providing elder care should facilitate healthy eating, not detour from it. The following tips address ways that senior citizens can maintain the healthy eating habits without sacrificing the social aspect of sharing a meal with others or learning to adjust to a lifestyle that involves eating with less people on a day-to-day basis.

  • Grocery shopping with others. This can be a fun and smart way to control the cost and quantity of food that you consume. If you don’t live with many people, this is a good way to split large-quantity items like potatoes and eggs which you may not be ableto use before expiration.
  • A time saving a smart way to eat healthy is cooking large quantities of food ahead of time and portioning for heating on later dates.
  • A quick way to prepare meals for yourself or for guests involves keeping frozen or canned fruits and vegetables on hand. Draining and/or rinsing canned foods is a good way to lower sodium or calories in foods that are kept in high sugar or high salt fluids.
  • Eating or preparing a meal shouldn’t always be a chore. Trying new recipes or eating outside can be a fun new twist on a meal with someone special.
  • Try to eat with people you enjoy to be around.
  • Some senior citizens have difficulty preparing meals, which is why it is important to become informed about home health care agencies or eldercare facilities that can aid in providing meals. The Eldercare Locator number is 1-800-677-1116.

Loss of Appetite or Desire to Eat

 

There are various reasons for why some senior citizens may not eat as well as they should or lose the desire to eat completely.

If you find that it is difficult to eat well, then it is best to speak with a healthcare provider or someone involved in your elder care about what can be done to help you eat better.

Some senior citizens are unable to eat well due to issues involving the condition of their teeth or issues with dentures. Checking with a dentist about physical pain that occurs when eating or other issues can help with these issues that lead to poorer eating habits.

When senior citizens lose family and friends or become depressed about events in their life, they may lose the desire to eat. In these instances, it is of the utmost importance that these individuals seek help from people they trust like their family, friends, church community, or those assisting with their elder care that will happily help them in finding ways to continue a healthy lifestyle and eating plan.

Some senior citizens complain that the flavor of foods change when they begin to take certain medications. While it is best to consult with a physician about issues surrounding medication, people can also take vitamin supplements with food that will help them stay healthy.

If you have someone who assists with your in home care, ask them to be vigilant about helping you eat healthy. Have them remind you to eat, and ask them to lend you a hand in preparing meals that are good for you.

Healthy Weight

Maintaining a healthy weight is important for being able to function in day-to-day life as well as stay mentally sharp. Senior citizens often lose or gain weigh as they age. If you are unsure about what weight you should maintain, consult your physician.

Health Risks Associated with Being Underweight

  • poor memory
  • compromised immunity
  • osteoporosis (weak bones)
  • decreases strength
  • hypothermia (lowered body temperature)
  • constipation

Health Risks Associated with Being Overweight

  • type 2 diabetes
  • high blood pressure
  • high cholesterol
  • heart disease
  • stroke (lack of oxygen transported to the brain)
  • some cancers
  • gallbladder disease

 

Because healthy weights will differ for everyone, it is important to verify with a physician whether it is healthy for you personally to lose or gain weight.

Staying Active

Participating in regular healthy amounts of physical activity can not only make you feel better, but it can make you less prone to diabetes, heart disease, and colon cancer. Staying active can be difficult for senior citizens, still it is an important part of a healthy lifestyle.

The following are some tips for maintaining a lifestyle that incorporates physical activity:

  • Know what amount of physical activity is appropriate for you. Everyone has different levels of activity that is safe for them, and while remaining active is important, always consult a health care provider about what is right for your lifestyle.
  • Take time to warm up, cool down, or take breaks when participating in a session of increased physical activity.
  • Take it slow. Always start slowly and build up to more intense levels of physical activities.
  • If you experience any pain, dizziness, or shortness of breath during exercise, stop the activity immediately.
  • Drink water.
  • Dress appropriately if you decide to exercise outdoors. Wear warmer clothes during the winter and wear lighter clothes during the summer while applying sunscreen or wearing sunglasses.
  • Wear the correct shoes for the activities that you participate in.

Types of Activity

 

Aerobic activities include activities that increase the heart rate and work the larger muscle groups. You may be able to speak a few words, but would not be able to carry on an entire conversation due to breathing patterns. Some examples of aerobics include:

  • brisk walking
  • water aerobics
  • tennis
  • house work
  • active play with children or pets
  • dancing

 

Begin incorporating small periods of this activity into your schedule during the week while slowly increasing the duration and frequency as time progresses. It is also important to incorporate different types of exercise that focus on balance and flexibility. Becoming used to a lifestyle with regular patterns of aerobic activity can reduce the effects of aging, control weight, lower risk of heart disease, improve flexibility, increase mood and energy, and expand social networks by meeting new people while doing various activities.

Strengthening activities involve the use of muscle groups against resistant forces like when lifting weights or doing yard work that involves lifting, digging, or pushing a lawn mower. This type of activity can keep muscles strong, reduce the need for a cane, reduce risk of bone injury, and help maintain a healthy weight.

Balance activities focus on muscles in specific areas of the body that encourage control as you move through space, reducing the likelihood of falls. This kind of activity could include walking heel to toe, standing on one foot, getting out of a sitting position without the use of the hands, and standing on the tip of your toes. Balance activities can help you stay steady on your feet and reduce the risk of fall and subsequent injury.

Flexibility activities increase the length of the muscles and can include stretching, yoga, and popular exercise programs like pilates. These activities can maintain the felxibility of joints, prevent stiffness, prevent injuries, and lower stress levels in general.

Weight-bearing activities require the muscles to work against gravity where the arms or legs bear the weight of the body. Activities like walking, tennis, and climbing stairs can build and maintain bone mass or reduce the risk of bone fractures.

Some activities incorporate multiple types of strengthening addressed above. What is important is that senior citizens find an enjoyable and do-able activity that will help them incorporate as many benefits as possible which will have far-reaching benefits to their health.

It’s Easy to Stay Healthy

A common misconception is that it takes an excessive amount of time and extra energy to maintain a healthy lifestyle. However, by just taking short walks for ten minutes a time or cleaning the house regularly can be practical ways to incorporate different physical activities into your daily schedule. And remember, staying healthy as a senior citizen will have increasing benefits as you continue to age.

Staying Motivated to Take Care of Yourself

Just because we age doesn’t mean that we are any less stressed by occurrences in life that may make us feel bad about ourselves or decrease our motivation to be good to ourselves. If anything, many of the challenges senior citizens face add stress.  Losing loved ones and friends or having trouble being independent with the added stressed of disease and functioning due to aging can cause depression or lifestyle changes that contribute to bad health. Here are some important tips for being good to yourself when you may not feel motivated due to circumstances out of your control:

  • Get plenty of sleep
  • Stay connected with family and friends
  • Join clubs or other social groups that you enjoy
  • Spend time with people that you enjoy
  • Volunteer at organizations in your community
  • Work a part-time job that isn’t too stressful or demanding
  • Watch a funny movie or find a way to laugh
  • Take up a hobby that you enjoy

 

Most importantly, senior citizens should remember that it is relatively easy and worth-while to maintain a healthy lifestyle as they age. Be sure to keep family, friends, and those involved in your elder care informed of your goals as they can help assist you. And remembering to eat healthy meals regularly, getting in physical activity, getting enough sleep, and being good to yourself are critical for maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

Nevada Honors Impact of AmeriCorps during AmeriCorps Week

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

[RENO/LAS VEGAS] — Nevada is taking part in AmeriCorps Week, March 9-17, a national celebration to recognize the vital work done by AmeriCorps members in communities across the nation and in Nevada since the national service program began 19 years ago.

 

“We are proud of and grateful to the AmeriCorps members who are getting things done in Nevada communities,” said Shawn Lecker-Pomaville, CEO of Nevada Volunteers, the Governor’s Commission on Service which distributes approximately 2 million dollars in federal funding and is the state authority on volunteering. Believing that AmeriCorps is a powerful pathway to career opportunities, Nevada Volunteers wanted to record testimonies directly from AmeriCorps members.  The video, “Everyone Can Serve,” highlights the benefits of AmeriCorps and how to get involved. To view the video, click here.

 

“It’s pretty humbling when you’re doing work that is bigger than yourself.  You’re having a greater impact and you realize just how small we are but how big of an impact we can have in our natural world,” said Nic Brancato, Nevada Conservation AmeriCorps member through the Great Basin Institute.

 

Governor Brian Sandoval joined Nevada Volunteers in recognizing AmeriCorps Week by proclaiming March 9-17 AmeriCorps Week in Nevada. To view the Governor’s proclamation, click here.

 

AmeriCorps members typically remain actively engaged in their communities long after their service is complete. An AmeriCorps longitudinal study found that AmeriCorps alums are more attached to their communities, aware of community challenges, and significantly more likely to go into public service careers.

 

To find out more about AmeriCorps in Nevada visit www.nevadavolunteers.org.

Top Five Tips To Save Your Vision: EyeCare America Encourages Prevention and Early Detection

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Many people take their vision for granted, but what if you lost your peripheral vision, developed a black spot in the center of your visual field, or even went blind altogether?  For more than 4.2 million Americans living with serious vision loss or blindness,  these and other vision challenges can make it difficult to enjoy life’s simple pleasures such as reading, playing cards, or watching grandchildren grow. Vision loss can also make it difficult to live independently, work, or drive. That’s why it is so important to prevent eye disease and vision loss whenever possible.

Often, preventive care and lifestyle choices can help keep your vision healthy. Ophthalmologists – eye physicians and surgeons – encourage seniors to follow these top five tips to safeguard vision:

  1. Get an eye exam. To protect healthy vision, seniors age 65 and older should have a dilated eye exam every 1-2 years, or as recommended by their ophthalmologist. Visit www.eyecareamerica.org to find out if you or a loved one qualifies for an eye exam at no out-of-pocket cost with one of EyeCare America’s volunteer ophthalmologists.
  2. Know your family history. Eye diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma can run in families, so it’s important to know your family’s history of eye disease and talk to your ophthalmologist about any possible genetic risk factors.
  3. Don’t smoke. Tobacco smoking is directly linked to many adverse health effects, including cataracts and AMD. Studies show that current smokers and ex-smokers are more likely to develop AMD than people who have never smoked.
  4. Eat right. A variety of vegetables, especially leafy green ones, are an important part of an eye-healthy diet. Researchers have found people on diets with higher levels of vitamins C and E, zinc, lutein, zeaxanthin, omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA are less likely to develop early and advanced AMD. For delicious recipes that incorporate these essential nutrients, EyeCare America offers a free, downloadable cookbook, called Feast Your Eyes on This.
  5. Protect your eyes from injuries. An estimated 2.5 million eye injuries occur in the U.S. each year, so it is critical to wear proper eye protection to prevent eye injuries, especially during home projects like gardening and cleaning. Eye injuries can also be prevented by securing loose rugs, railings, or other hazards that could cause falls or slips.

Seniors age 65 and older are at the greatest risk for eye disease and vision loss, and because diseases like AMD and glaucoma often have no early symptoms, comprehensive eye exams are especially important. EyeCare America provides care at no out-of-pocket cost to seniors age 65 and older through its corps of volunteer ophthalmologists across the U.S. and Puerto Rico.

EyeCare America is designed for people who:

  • Are U.S. citizens or legal residents;
  • Are age 65 and older;
  • Have not seen an ophthalmologist in three or more years; and,
  • Do not receive eye care through an HMO or the VA.

To see if you or a loved one age 65 or older is eligible, visit www.eyecareamerica.org. EyeCare America is co-sponsored by the Knights Templar Eye Foundation, Inc., with additional support provided by Alcon. The program is endorsed by state and subspecialty ophthalmological societies.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. Since its inception, EyeCare America has helped more than 1.7 million people.  More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

New International Federation on Ageing Report Declares Vision Loss No Longer an Inevitable Part of Ageing

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Calls for Investments in Preventive Eye Health to Reduce Social and Economic
Burdens of Vision Loss

The International Federation on Ageing (IFA) today released a new report describing the health, social and economic burdens of vision loss on a global society that is rapidly ageing. The report calls for increased public education and awareness programs, improved public policies and greater integration of preventive eye health interventions into public health systems.

The report, titled “The High Cost of Low Vision: The Evidence on Ageing and the Loss of Sight ,” highlights that vision loss is no longer an inevitable part of the ageing process, as people can now age with strong, healthy vision, given 21st-century innovations in diagnosis, biomedicine, nutrition, technology and preventive care.

“The economic implications are equally huge as we now have it in our grasp to delink vision loss from ageing, which will have great impact on active, productive and more enjoyable ageing. This shift in the traditional perception of ageing is truly transformative,” said Jane Barratt, BSc, MSc, PhD, Secretary General of the IFA. “As 80 percent of vision loss is preventable, it is our ethical responsibility and a public health imperative that we take action now.”

“As the 21st century’s seminal challenge of population ageing leads to increasing prevalence of deteriorating vision, it brings about huge social, personal and economic consequences,” said Kathy Spahn, President and CEO of Helen Keller International. “This report is both timely and critical as a tool for raising awareness of and driving solutions for preventable vision loss, which can have a positive and profound impact on economic growth and the human condition.”

The over-60 population is expected to reach 2 billion by mid-century. As this cohort rapidly grows to become the largest population segment of many societies globally, rates of preventable vision loss are also soaring. Today, 285 million people around the world are visually impaired, including 39 million who are totally blind, and that number will explode without preventive measures. The direct costs of vision impairment worldwide are estimated to reach $2.8 trillion by 2020, and the indirect costs will add another $760 billion.

“IFA’s report highlights the critical need for action and investment in preventive eye health,” said Francisco Rodriguez, MD, Retina and Vitreous Specialist and Scientific Director, Fundación Oftalmológica Nacional in Colombia. “Across the globe, new policies to improve the diagnosis, management and care associated with preventable eye diseases – especially among ageing populations – will go a long way in alleviating the burdens triggered by age-related vision loss.”

“As millions around the world are living longer – bringing about increasing prevalence in visual impairments – global institutions, governments, the scientific and medical communities, payers, patient groups, NGOs and businesses must partner to find innovative solutions to treat and prevent vision loss – one of the greatest challenges of global population ageing,” said Dr. Kemal Malik, Head Global Development at Bayer Healthcare.

The report emphasizes that measures to prevent vision loss are cost-effective and calls for urgent attention in key areas: Download the Executive Summary
Download the Report
Media Contact:
Melissa Mitchell
+1.212.332.3942(T) +1.646.404.1149(M)
mmitchell@globalcoalitiononaging.com
About the International Federation on Ageing
The International Federation on Ageing (IFA)is an international non-governmental organization with a membership base of NGOs, the corporate sector, academia, government, and individuals. IFA aims to generate positive change for older people throughout the world by stimulating, collecting, analyzing, and disseminating information on rights, policies, and practices that improve the quality of life of people as they age.
“The High Cost of Low Vision: The Evidence on Ageing and the Loss of Sight” was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant by Bayer Healthcare to the International Federation on Ageing.

Tips to increase safety and lower the risk of hearing loss when listening to music while exercising

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Listening to loud music through headphones can make a walk, run or bike ride more enjoyable, but it can distract from potential hazards. There are two serious issues: compromised safety and the risk of increased hearing loss. Serious accidents involving pedestrians wearing headphones with electronic devices such as iPods and MP3 Players have more than tripled since 2004. The risk of danger increases significantly with hearing loss.

Research in the January 2012 Injury Prevention Journal reports that 70% of collisions end in fatalities. Two out of three victims were male, under the age of 30. It was reported that nearly a third of the vehicles sounded some type of warning signal prior to the crash. Pedestrians wearing headphones are less likely to hear the warning signals around them, increasing their risk of injury. Many times the listener turns the volume of the music high to overcome the surrounding noise, but the loud music can mask the sound of a car horn, siren, or even a train whistle.

Researchers also advise against wearing Noise Cancelling Headphones when exercising outdoors.

In addition to safety issues, prolonged exposure to loud music can put a person at an increased risk of permanent hearing loss. Hearing loss is on the rise and occurring at a younger age. It affects one in five Americans over the age of 12. Untreated hearing loss can contribute to depression, withdrawal from social situations, relationship challenges, lower earnings, and increased risk for personal safety.

Below are tips to increase safety and lower the risk of hearing loss when listening to music while exercising:

1. Turn the volume on the electronic device down. Good rule of thumb: “60/60”. Listen at 60% volume for no more than 60 minutes at a time.
2. Listen through only 1 ear bud when exercising outdoors.

Reference: Lichenstein et al, Headphone use and pedestrian injury and death in the United States: 2004–2011, Injury Prevention Journal, January 2012.
To schedule a hearing test contact hi HealthInnovations at 1855-523-9355.

 

Local Leader Larry W. Ruvo to receive national honor and one NV senior to receive $20,000 Horatio Alger scholarships

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans, Inc., is pleased to announce that Larry W. Ruvo is one of 11 individuals selected to receive the Horatio Alger Award in 2013.

The Horatio Alger Award is presented each year to individuals who have overcome obstacles to become successful entrepreneurs or community leaders. Based in Nevada, Larry W. Ruvo is the Senior Managing Director of Southern Wine & Spirits of Nevada. Recipients of this award become lifelong members of the Horatio Alger Association, and they serve as role models for its young scholarship recipients.

The Horatio Alger Association is pleased to announce that 106 students, who hail from every state in the nation, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, have been selected to receive National Scholarships. This is the Association’s top college scholarship, valued at $20,000, to be used toward a bachelor’s degree. It is accompanied by an all-expense-paid trip to Washington, D.C., to attend the annual Horatio Alger award ceremonies. These exceptional students were selected to receive National Scholarships because of the courage they demonstrated in overcoming personal challenges to attain academic success.

The 2013 Horatio Alger National Scholarship recipient from Nevada is:
• Jesus O. Dominguez-Becerra, North Valleys High School, Reno.

Both the Horatio Alger Award recipients and the National Scholarship recipients will be honored in Washington, D.C., during the 66th Annual Horatio Alger Awards Induction Ceremonies on April 4-6, 2013.

“The Association is proud to salute men and women of exceptional achievement with the Horatio Alger Award, and we are grateful to them for joining in our efforts to enable more and more young people to achieve their own versions of the American Dream through higher education,” said Tony Novelly, President and CEO of the Horatio Alger Association.
As a role model, the association will share Larry W. Ruvo’s life experiences with its scholars and the American public. Larry Ruvo began his career at the Sahara and Caesar’s Palace hotels in Las Vegas then went on to be the youngest manager at the Frontier Hotel. He established a liquor distribution company with famed Las Vegas entrepreneur Steve Wynn. He then created Southern Wine and Spirits and currently serves as the company’s managing director. The company is Nevada’s largest wholesale liquor, wine and beer importer and distributor. He is a longtime supporter of numerous charitable organizations. Dissatisfied with the pace of advances made in treating Alzheimer’s, Mr. Ruvo started a charitable organization called Keep Memory Alive, and he was instrumental in building the preeminent Cleveland Clinic LouRuvo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas. With the leadership of Mr. Ruvo, Keep Memory Alive increases awareness and raises funds for the research, management, and treatment of brain disorders at the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health. He has been listed as one of the Most Influential Businessmen of Southern Nevada and received the Governor’s Philanthropist of the Year Award.
The Association is also proud to announce that Joseph Neubauer, Chairman of the Board of ARAMARK Corporation based in Philadelphia, PA, has been selected to receive the 2013 Norman Vincent Peale Award. This award is annually conferred on an association member who has made exceptional humanitarian contributions to society, who has been an active participant in the association, and who continues to exhibit courage, tenacity and integrity. The award is named for Dr. Norman Vincent Peale who provided valuable leadership for the Horatio Alger Association for more than 40 years.

For a complete listing of all the 2013 Horatio Alger Award honorees, please visit http://www.horatioalger.org

The Horatio Alger Association
Founded in 1947, the Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans celebrates those individuals in our society whose determination and hard work have enabled them to overcome life’s obstacles to achieve success. As a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit, the Association provides college scholarships and mentorship to at-risk students who demonstrate courage in the face of adversity and dedication to pursuing higher education. The Horatio Alger Association has awarded almost $100 million to nearly 20,000 Scholars since the inception of its scholarship programs in 1984.

Jewish War Veterans Come Together to Help Veterans Village Las Vegas

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Veterans Village Las Vegas, is a comprehensive housing and resource facility for U.S. veterans and their families and located in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel on Las Vegas Boulevard, has a new support group – more than 60 members of the Jewish War Veterans Murray L. Rosen Post 64. According to Senior Vice Commander Steve Seiden, the group recently signed a Memo of Understanding with Veterans Village to establish a formal working relationship. The group’s Edward Kline Memorial Homeless Veterans Fund, Inc. will underwrite housing at Veterans Village, as its funds allow, for vets and their families who need temporary housing and other critical services.

“Our group, which is comprised primarily of war veterans who served in all conflicts since WWII, developed an Independence Day Program several years ago to help find housing for homeless vets and their families,” Seiden said. “But given limited resources in the community, particularly for disabled veterans with families, we could only do so much. As we formulated a plan to enlarge our scope and our efforts, we became aware of Veterans Village. Ever since our first visit to Veterans Village, we have been meeting regularly with its founder, Arnold Stalk, and directing much of our efforts and donations to supporting this remarkable public/private partnership that does so much to help those who have defended our freedoms.”

Seiden, who also serves as president of the Edward Kline Memorial Homeless Veterans Fund, Inc., formerly referred to as the Independence Day Program, says most of its members are between 65 and 80 years of age with a few in their 90s, but the group also has younger members who served in the Korean and Vietnam wars. “We are actively recruiting younger members who share our passion for helping veterans and to continue our good work for years to come,” Seiden said.

Veterans Village opened in 2012 in a renovated Econo Lodge Motel with 120 rooms. Thanks to the ongoing generosity of the Home Depot Foundation and hundreds of hours provided by Home Depot employees, the facility is undergoing a comprehensive retrofit and update. In addition to providing temporary housing for vets and their families, Veterans Village provides a comprehensive roster of services through partnerships with other community organizations and government agencies, including employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events.

According to Arnold Stalk, Veterans Village founder and visionary, the contributions of the Jewish War Veterans are especially meaningful. “The group’s deep understanding of the challenges often faced by war veterans fuels their passion and enthusiasm for doing all they can to help,” Stalk said. “When members of the Jewish War Veterans visit us, they always put a smile on the faces of our residents. We are grateful for their support and appreciate their contagious enthusiasm for helping veterans.”

“There are all sorts of resources there,” said Seiden of the an all-encompassing facility that provides basic necessities like food and medical services, but also specialized services for those with substance abuse and other conditions. “For vets, Veterans Village is much more than just a roof over their head,” Seiden said. “It’s a place to heal and get critical help for success in the future. We’re excited about our relationship with Veterans Village. “

About Veterans Village:
Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel. It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed. Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need. SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.

No more “empty nest”: middle-aged adults face family pressure on both sides

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

The “empty nest” of past generations, in which the kids are grown up and middle-aged adults have more time to themselves, has been replaced in the United States by a nest that’s full – kids who can’t leave, can’t find a job and aging parents who need more help than ever before.

According to a new study by researchers at Oregon State University, what was once a life stage of new freedoms, options and opportunities has largely disappeared.

An economic recession and tough job market has made it hard on young adults to start their careers and families. At the same time, many older people are living longer, which adds new and unanticipated needs that their children often must step up to assist with.
The end result, researchers suggest, are “empty nest” plans that often have to be put on hold, and a mixed bag of emotions, ranging from joy and “happy-to-help” to uncertainty, frustration and exhaustion.

“We mostly found very positive feelings about adults helping their children in the emerging adulthood stage of life, from around ages 18 to 30,” said Karen Hooker, director of the OSU Center for Healthy Aging Research.

“Feelings about helping parents weren’t so much negative as just filled with more angst and uncertainty,” Hooker said. “As a society we still don’t socialize people to expect to be taking on a parent-caring role, even though most of us will at some point in our lives. The average middle-aged couple has more parents than children.”

The findings of this research were just published in the Journal of Aging Studies, and were based on data from six focus groups during 2009-10. It was one of the first studies of its type to look at how middle-aged adults actually feel about these changing trends.
Various social, economic, and cultural forces have combined to radically challenge the traditional concept of an empty nest, the scientists said. The recession that began in 2008 yielded record unemployment, substantial stock market losses, lower home values and increased demand for higher levels of education.

Around the same time, advances in health care and life expectancy have made it possible for many adults to live far longer than they used to – although not always in good health, and often needing extensive care or assistance.

This study concluded that most middle-aged parents with young adult children are fairly happy to help them out, and they understand that getting started in life is simply more difficult now. Some research has suggested that age 25 is the new 22; that substantially more parents now don’t even expect their kids to be financially independent in their early 20s, and don’t mind helping them through some difficult times.

But the response to helping adult parents who, at the same time, need increasing amounts of assistance is not as uniformly positive, the study found – it can be seen as both a joy and a burden, and in any case was not something most middle-aged adults anticipated.

“With the kids, it’s easy,” is a general purpose reaction. With aging parents, it isn’t.

“My grandparents died younger, so my parents didn’t cope with another generation,” one study participant said.

Many middle-aged people said it was difficult to make any plans, due to disruptions and uncertainty about a parent’s health at any point in time. And most said they we’re willing to help their aging parents, but a sense of being time-starved was a frequent theme.
“It brings my heart joy to be able to provide for my mom this way,” one study participant said. “There are times when it’s a burden and I feel resentful.”

The dual demands of children still transitioning to independence, and aging parents who need increasing amounts of care is causing many of the study participants to re-evaluate their own lives. Some say they want to make better plans for their future so they don’t pose such a burden to their children, and begin researching long-term care insurance. Soul-searching is apparent.

“I don’t care if I get old,” a participant said. “I just don’t want to become debilitated. So I would rather have a shorter life and a healthy life than a long life like my mom, where she doesn’t have a life. She doesn’t have memories. Our memories are what make us who we are.”

An increasing awareness of the challenges produced by these new life stages may cause more individuals to anticipate their own needs, make more concrete plans for the future, reduce ambivalent approaches and have more conversations with families about their own late-life care, the researchers said in their study.
About the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences: The College creates connections in teaching, research and community outreach while advancing knowledge, policies and practices that improve population health in communities across Oregon and beyond.

AARP Launches New YouTube Series, The Cheap Life with Jeff Yeager

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

AARP Savings Expert’s Weekly Series Helps People Get the Most for their Money
WASHINGTON, Jan. 15, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Today, AARP launched the latest in its original video series on YouTube, “The Cheap Life with Jeff Yeager,” featuring AARP savings expert Jeff Yeager. During each weekly episode, Yeager, who is also known as the “Ultimate Cheapskate,” will discuss tips and tricks on how consumers of all ages can pay less for just about everything, save for retirement, get the most for their money and up-cycle or reuse everyday items through creative repurposing.
(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20070209/NYF043LOGO)
“We know our members want programming that features fun and everyday ways to save,” said Larry Gannon, AARP Vice President of TV and Radio Programming. “‘The Cheap Life’ is one way AARP is meeting the wants and needs of our members and others—by helping them and their families save real money and live the life they want, but at a fraction of the cost.”
For the past four years, Jeff Yeager has been a popular contributor to AARP via online articles and “savings challenges,” print articles in AARP’s Bulletin and “AARP The Magazine,” AARP television series and web-only videos and a weekly blog. Past videos featuring Jeff are among the most viewed and many of his articles are among the top read articles in the money section of www.aarp.org.
“Our research shows that AARP members are using YouTube to view videos online,” Gannon said. “And through this popular interface, ‘The Cheap Life’ delivers fun and engaging ideas on how to enjoy life more by spending less. Subscribers to The Cheap Life YouTube Channel will be able to interact directly with Jeff and have their tips and savings ideas shared with a worldwide audience.”
Each three to five minute episode of “The Cheap Life” will link back to relevant articles, blog posts and other helpful tools found on www.aarp.org. Episodes may include:
The Repurposing Challenge—Encouraging viewers to find multiple uses for everyday household items;
Don’t Throw That Away!—Jeff shares one of his many favorite repurposing ideas;
Cheapskate Shout-out—Jeff acknowledges people who have embraced the “cheap life;” and,
Cheapskate Hall of Fame/Shame—Jeff identifies people who have excelled or failed at being frugal.
“The Cheap Life” is part of a customized AARP YouTube destination that streamlines the user experience and better organizes the more than 2,000 videos available for site visitors. In 2013, AARP will continue to expand its online content offerings by developing premium original programming for the AARP YouTube channel in the form of weekly series focusing on the areas of money, health and beauty, technology and travel.
Consumers can subscribe to “The Cheap Life” for free by visiting www.YouTube.com/CheapLifeChannel and becoming a registered YouTube user. The first episode, “Travel Tips for the Frugal,” can be found by visiting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zob8NFodEtw.
AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, with a membership of more than 37 million, that helps people 50+ have independence, choice and control in ways that are beneficial to them and society as a whole. AARP does not endorse candidates for public office or make contributions to either political campaigns or candidates. We produce AARP The Magazine, the definitive voice for Americans 50+ and the world’s largest-circulation magazine; AARP Bulletin, the go-to news source for the 50+ audience; www.aarp.org ; AARP VIVA, a bilingual lifestyle multimedia platform addressing the interests and needs of Hispanic Americans; and national television and radio programming including My Generation and Inside E Street. The AARP Foundation is an affiliated charity that provides security, protection, and empowerment to older persons in need with support from thousands of volunteers, donors, and sponsors. AARP has staffed offices in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Learn more at www.aarp .org .

CONTACT: David L. Allen, +1-202-434-2560, media@aarp.org

Nevada-Senior-Guide Willow Creek

www.willowcreeklv.com

Who We Are

A Little Bit of History…

Founded  in 1992, Willow Creek Association (WCA) is a not-for-profit Christian organization that exists to maximize the transformative power of the local church. Our vision is to see every local church reach its full redemptive potential — becoming an unbridled conduit for the transforming power of Jesus Christ. In  short, we provide vision, inspiration, connection, tools, training, resources, and venues for church leaders like you to learn from and support one another.

Serving Leaders Worldwide…

For nearly 20 years, the WCA has developed a respected history of excellence and innovation in serving local churches and their leaders. We’re privileged to serve alongside 7,000 Member Churches representing more than 90 denominations and training leaders in 85 countries. Over the course of a year 15,000 churches engage with our vision, training, and resources.

Bill Hybels, Chairman of the Board @BillHybels

“When God transforms the life of just one leader, that leader can transform a church. When one church is transformed, you can transform a community. And… eventually the entire world is affected with the positive, life-changing power of Jesus Christ and the restoring work of His people.” – Bill Hybels

Jim Mellado, WCA President @JimMellado

“I am passionate about what can happen when God captures the heart of a faith community and it becomes a life-transforming agent to its community and the world as He intended.” – Jim Mellado

 

Church Partnership…

Connection with an under-resourced community can change your congregation’s perspective on faith and the challenges of the worldwide Church. These relationships provide a spiritual and emotional connection for your congregation and will open doors to great serving opportunities.

Effective discipleship is hard work.

You and your ministry team may spend countless hours creating opportunities, but are people growing? How can you be sure what you are doing is truly relevant to the spiritual growth of those in your church?

The REVEAL Spiritual Life Survey uncovers the hearts of your people so God can show you new ways to help them grow. REVEAL invites your congregation to honestly answer the question, “Where are you in a relationship to God”?

Over 1,500 pastors have asked this question of more than 450,000 church members have answered.

Churches of every size and shape are beginning to see their people move toward deep love of God and genuine love for others.

Learn new ways for your people to love Him and others more…

… those who are stuck will begin moving again…

… those who are dissatisfied with find hope for their journey of faith…

…those who are growing will build spiritual momentum…

 

Personalized  Practical Resources

  • Custom  report generated by your congregation’s responses, detailed explanations and charts
  • RevealWorks, a digital tool kit to help interpret your results – includes next steps with devotionals, self-guided planning sessions for your team, and  processing tools
  • Facilitator guides  to make planning sessions more productive

Quick Start GuideThe REVEALWORKS planning process is a self-facilitated, four-step process that guides a ministry team through understanding, prioritizing and acting in response to the REVEAL Spiritual Life Survey. Each step of the process is guided by a complete kit that provides your team with everything needed to lead an effective planning workshop.

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!