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The Aging Process: Can It Be Reversed?

June 6, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Aging Process: Can It Be Reversed?
Filed under: General 

With regard to fitness, for many years, I have been outspoken about my support of sports and strength training as good alternatives to redundant exercises like treadmill workouts. Steve Holman, editor-in-chief of Iron Man Magazine, has taken that idea to the extreme with a new body shaping program designed to slow down and even reverse the aging process. But he’s not the only one interested in the concept of aging.

You may also be familiar with the Real Age Program, or with one of its founders, Dr. Mehmet Oz. Real Age asserts that your actual age is often not in synch with the biological condition of your body. Based on your level of conditioning and diet and other factors, your body may be aging at an accelerated rate. Real Age calculates your age based on your body’s condition and compares it your chronological age. The goal is to improve the body so its actual “real age” is at or below one’s biological age. To me, that is the basis for Holman’s approach: return the body to the youthful condition that it was in before declining fitness and other factors accelerated the aging process.

According to Steve Holman, after we reach the age of 40, our bodies start aging at a faster rate than they had to that point. Studies have shown that without the proper nutrients and exercise, our bodies are aging about 6 months extra for every year that passes! So, let’s say you’re 40. By the time you reach 50, you will look and feel 55. By the time you reach 60, you will look and feel 70 years old! I don’t know about you but that kind of aging does not appeal to me a whole lot.

Did you ever notice that the folks who stay the most physically active seem to be aging more slowly than others who don’t? In my mind, I picture a 63-year old woman gardening while her 65-year-old husband is chopping wood nearby and they both look like they’re in their 50s. Hmm… maybe that was a scene from a 1940s movie but I think it makes the point. They kept active with muscle taxing activities and no doubt felt and looked younger because of it. Steve Holman says that 90% of people over the age of 35 lose enough muscle every year to burn off an additional 4 pounds of body fat. The aging process really starts to catch up with us at that point. Muscle gives shape and strength to our bodies. As we know, when you lose muscle mass, you gain fat, even if the calories you take in stay the same. We don’t feel or look as good. Then we get depressed because we don’t feel and look as good. Then we give up on retaining our youth and it’s all downhill from there. Wow. That was depressing, huh?

Fear not! That doesn’t have to happen.

Both the folks at Real Age and Steve Holman insist that all of this accelerated aging is reversible. According to them, there are specific ways to move and eat that will slow down the rapid aging process to the point where you’re aging less than a year for every year. That means we can look younger in a few years than we do now? Now that is an aging plan we could get behind, right?

Not so fast. Are there drugs, supplements or expensive supplies to buy? No. Just food choices and targeted short-duration exercises are involved. Steve Holman says his years as a fitness magazine editor have allowed him to pick up tips, tricks and strategies from anti-aging experts over the years. And they don’t involve cycling classes or elliptical machines.

According to Steve, to get started, there are 5 rules one must absolutely follow if he or she wants to “slow the aging process, reclaim your health and achieve your ideal body”:

Forget low-fat diets. They lead to sugar addiction and we all know what that causes – fat storage!
Work out less. Resistance training done the right way burns fat and is a great cardiovascular workout, as well. Sports that tax muscles over the entire body can be effective, as well.
Drink water. Water renews your skin, helps burn fat, suppresses hunger and allows your kidneys to operate under less strain which allows your liver to burn fat like it’s supposed to.
Stop endless cardio workouts. Cardiovascular conditioning can be gained with far less time and effort. New studies are showing that long-duration exercise accelerate the aging process by increasing free radicals. These free radicals are scavengers that prey on your body’s essential nutrients and tissues.
Don’t blame your age for all your fitness issues. Studies have shown that men and women of every age, even those in their 90s, were able to gain muscle tone in just a matter of weeks of simple weight training.
Well, those are good guidelines to use to begin combating the aging process. There’s an old saying that goes something like, “I want to die as young as possible at as old an age as possible” (or something like that). I do follow the 5 steps already, though I would admit to not doing enough of #2. How about you? I have been told I look younger than I really am and that’s nice. Now if only I could reverse the aging process so I would feel younger…

Hi. This is Mike. As I mentioned, playing sports can give you a great full body workout and help reverse the aging process. If you are just getting started or getting restarted after a layoff, we can help you with information about supplies and equipment at our site: [http://www.roundballgames.com/sample-page]. Or read our blog @ [http://www.roundballgames.com]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Michael_Piccoli/1556773

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How Old Are You Really? Biological Age

May 29, 2016 by · Comments Off on How Old Are You Really? Biological Age
Filed under: General 

People have always been interested in being “forever young” and today’s society is no different. We want to resist the ageing process.

The speed at which we are ageing can be measured – its called biological age, or how old your body really is.

The area of study which is now called longevity, and was once called anti aging, is hugely popular in the states.

It’s something I’m very interested in, and see it as a big part of the future for myself and my clients.

Your chronological age is how old you actually are.

Biological age is the age of your body at the cellular level.

Today we will look into how you can establish, what your biological age is and how you can improve it.

There are a few longevity factors in the list which surprised me!

(Deep question alert!)

What is the purpose of life? I don’t mean any deep seated stuff, like procreation.

I just mean, what is most people’s AIM in life. What do they want to get out of their time on earth?

Firstly and most importantly, people want to be happy. Easier said than done.

Happiness is a state of mind. It’s a feeling.

Ask someone with a big goal (like building a successful business or losing more than three stone).

“What will reaching your goal do for you?”

Often they will say something like “When I get there I will feel happy”, or “satisfied with myself”, or they say “I will feel proud”.

“I will have more energy”.

“I won’t be afraid of trying new clothes on or going out with friends”.

“I don’t want to feel like a slave to food”

“I don’t want to be scared to look in the mirror or get on the scales”.

Life is all about feelings.

People spend their entire lives in search of feelings! (mostly happiness, contentment, satisfaction and love)

How people actually reach this state of “happiness” is different for us all.

Most people I know AIM for a decent job (or business) with decent money.

All with the ultimate goal of having a good retirement.

I hear people say “When I finish work, I’m going to do this or I’m going to… (insert goal)”.

The point here being, if being happy and having a nice retirement is people’s main goal in life, then keeping your body fit and healthy surely must be part of your plan.

I know of a very wealthy man who got cancer and passed away just before his retirement, I’m sure that was not part of the master plan, he had built his business up so he could sell it and have a nice retirement (as most business people do).

He didn’t make it and didn’t get to “cash out”.

Many people don’t make it to retirement because their “plan” is messed up from the start.

Without sounding depressing we only get one shot remember.

This is NOT a rehearsal.

A lot of people get to retirement age and their body is wrecked!

This stops them from being able to enjoy their time off as much. Living life with lots of restrictions. “I can’t go there because of the steep hill”, or “I can’t do that because of my back or my knees”.

After working hard for 40-50 years – to give yourself a good pension and retirement, this is the last thing that anyone wants.

Peoples bodies are like cars.

On one hand you have new cars with high mileage that are not well serviced.

On the other hand you have old cars with low mileage that have been well looked after.

I want YOU to be like a well looked after old car, with low mileage when you get to your retirement.

I know some people, that slog away and get to the age of 40, and feel and look like they’re 50 or 60!

I also know many people who hit retirement age and feel like a 40 year old, and can keep on working and exercising for another 20 years!

This is all dependent on how we live our lives, obviously there are things such as injuries, diseases and other bad things which can impact our lives negatively through no fault of our own but on the whole we are in control of our own health.

What affects our longevity?

Scientists agree that these factors all affect your longevity in some way, big or small. (this is not a definitive list)

Muscle size and strength
Level of education
How pro active you are with going to see the doctor if needed
The amount of friends you can rely on, and love in your life
Your diet
Blood pressure
Your upper body strength
If you enjoy your work or not
Weather you smoke/drink alcohol or not, and the amount
If you exercise or not

Most of us shorten our lives and ultimately kill ourselves, through our bad habits and lifestyle choices, whatever they may be.

As you would of guessed, it is possible to slow down the onset of ageing and even reverse it to some extent.

I must say, that there is nothing wrong with ageing, it is inevitable. It is something we should be proud of, a chance to show our wisdom to the younger generation.

This article is just to show you how you can SLOW the ageing process with ease and actually enjoy it.

The Ageing Process

As we get older our bodies start to slow down and stop being able to function as well, sadly there is no getting away from this.

BUT through healthy living and making the right choices day in day out we can delay our body slowing down by years!

Just think how much more you will be able to enjoy your retirement if you feel like a 40 year old? and can spend it with the people you love.

Compare this to how much you will enjoy it if you can barely walk up a flight of stairs without having tired legs and being short of breath.

Your chronological age doesn’t have to be the same, or worse, than your physiological age.

How to slow the effects of ageing

The list above obviously helps you but here are a few more ideas for you to beat the clock.

When some people think anti aging, I’m sure some of you may think of things like anti wrinkle creams and lotions, hair dying products, botox and maybe even plastic surgery.

That does kind of sum up some of the western world that these are the steps that the majority of people (plastic surgery being an extreme example) will take to make them look younger, rather than eating healthily and exercising.

Aging leads to loss of muscle mass, loss of mental function, low mobility and a lack of energy, and as you know the cosmetic type anti aging steps I mentioned won’t help any of these.

Top tips to delay ageing naturally:

Enjoy the Outdoors – Don’t spend all of your time cooped up indoors behind the computer or watching TV. There are plenty of things to do and see outside, especially on a nice day I can’t think of anything better than going for a walk with the family down the park or beach. Sunlight also is a natural source of Vitamin D.

Yoga & Meditation – I would say that this is one of the most important strategies in staying young. I started to do this myself and it honestly makes me feel great. Yoga and meditation can help you relax and lower your stress levels (linked with aging) dramatically. It can also help you to see things a lot clearer.

Yoga is also great for your flexibility, the more flexible and supple you are the less chance you have in the future of suffering falls and lack of mobility.

Socialise – Loneliness can be a real killer. Socialise as much as possible with your friends and family. Get out there and do things, go to the cinema, concerts, attend an evening class (the more mentally stimulating the better).

Stay Strong & Active – You have to keep moving or your body will come to a standstill. Taking part in regular exercise is absolutely vital. Regular strength training is extremely important.

Losing muscle mass is something you want to avoid or at least delay for as long as possible so strength training will help this as well as keeping your bones strong, this will lower your chances of osteoporosis.

Nutrition

I believe food is medicine, many of the effects you get from modern day medicine you can get from eating the right foods.

Nutrition influences biochemistry. Biochemistry influences everything at a cellular level.

If you eat well there should be no need for some medications.

If you spend your whole life eating fresh, natural whole foods and stay active then it will also show. You will most likely be lean, mobile, disease free and full of energy, a rarity these days.

You should aim to eat a diet containing lots of quality fats and protein’s (the bodies building materials) which will help you to maintain your muscle stores. Also protein boosts the production of HGH in your body, HGH (Human growth Hormone) is your body’s natural ‘fountain of youth’.

As you age the production of this hormone slows down greatly, regular strength exercise (lifting, pushing and pulling heavy stuff) and quality protein keeps the production of this hormone going!

Eat plenty of antioxidant rich foods – Antioxidants which are found in colourful fruit and vegetables help to reduce the damage caused by free radicals in your system.

Free radicals can speed up the onset of ageing; they are unstable electrons (O1 molecules)which are produced during metabolism. They damage the cell nucleus and the mitochondria.

Free radicals bounce around inside your cells like a pin ball, causing damage every time they hit something. They cause absolute havoc.

Antioxidants provide the free radical with the extra O1 molecule they need to become stable O2 molecules.

Good quality natural foods are the best way to combat these harmful free radicals. Natural organic foods are packed with antioxidants which neutralise the free radicals before they cause too much damage.

Eat Omega 3s – They fight inflammation, improve the appearance of your skin and aid brain function. Three vital things that we need as we age. So make sure you get as many omega 3s into your system as you can, the best source is fresh fish, if not a fish oil supplement will do.

Lower Sugar Intake – Aim to cut out any excess sugar that you eat, excess sugars can modify essential proteins in our body which can lead to wrinkles and energy loss.

Look after your skin through good food and lots of water – Eating foods containing vitamin A (sweet potatoes, broccoli, spinach, asparagus and carrots), Vitamin C (red peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, strawberries, oranges, kiwi and pineapple) and Vitamin E (nuts, seeds and spinach) are a great way of helping your skin look healthy.

Stop smoking and limit alcohol intake – There are few things that age you faster than smoking and drinking alcohol every day so cut out smoking and do as much as you can to drink less.

Lower Stress Levels – This is another big one, I just mentioned that there are few things that age you faster than smoking and alcohol; well I think stress is one of them.

Being constantly stressed will ruin your mood, energy levels, social interaction as well as causing so many health problems.

As I mentioned above, I have found deep breathing techniques, yoga and meditation really important and a great way of combating stress.

Let’s be realistic the big medical and health companies aren’t going to promote anti aging through the things I just said, they are going to promote it through new miracle pills, lotions and creams, there is a lot of money to be made from it so they will keep on doing it.

The people who buy these products don’t have to alter their lifestyle one little bit so it suits them which is why it is so popular.

We ultimately reap our rewards in our retirement, if you have invested some time and effort into your “health & fitness account”, you will reap the rewards.

If you haven’t then you won’t!

You can actually measure your biological age online with a biological age calculator.

If all of the things I have mentioned above didn’t require effort or commitment then everyone would be running around into their 90s and later!!

But unfortunately we don’t, we die much younger than that.

Depending on what stats you use, in 2010, UK men were reported to live on average until about 77 or 78, and women on average live until 82 or 83 years old.

Do it naturally and do it right.

Let me know your thoughts on this topic, comment below, I really want to know what you think.

Thanks for reading, take care,

Richard

If you would like to receive weekly health and fitness updates on the top news in the industry along with several free gifts then follow this link: http://richard-clarke.co.uk/

Just enter your email address in the box on the right to receive a free 3 Day Detox Plan, an Easy Weight Loss Diet Sheet plus some free, easy to do, exercise routines.

There are also many easy to read helpful articles and information which can inspire you to reach your fitness and exercise goals FASTER!

Thanks for reading.

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Aging Is a Treatable Disease

May 22, 2016 by · Comments Off on Aging Is a Treatable Disease
Filed under: General 

Live Healthy – Look Marvelous – Live Longer

There are actions you can, and should take today to dramatically improve your health, your appearance and your longevity. You can control 70% of the factors affecting your longevity; only 30% are controlled by genetics until very late in life when genetics become more controlling

Almost all of the effects of aging and the common diseases that come with aging are treatable, to at least some extent. The key is early detection and early treatment.

Our understanding of the aging process is advancing rapidly. Some scientists believe that the first immortal human may be living today.

In 1786, life expectancy was 24 years. Better diets and some medical innovations allowed it to double to 48 years in the next 100 years.

Modern medicine has now increased life expectancy to over 76 years. Future medicine promises to increase it to over 100 years during our lifetime.

“Over half the baby boomers here in America are going to see their hundredth birthday and beyond in excellent health.” says Dr. Ronald Klatz of the American Academy of Anti-Aging. “We’re looking at life spans for the baby boomers and the generation after the baby boomers of 120 to 150 years of age.”

The key to Live Healthy – Look Marvelous – Live Longer is to delay the diseases of aging so that when they do occur, it is very late in your life.

The causes of aging are finally being understood. There are actions you can take today to take advantage of the recent medical developments. Dr. Rudman ran a series of tests on aging people and demonstrated that the effects of aging could be slowed and even reversed. He concluded: “The overall deterioration of the body that comes with growing old is not inevitable.”

The Causes of Aging

Almost all life on earth blossoms with youth, until it has reproduced and passed its genes on to the next generation. After that, the flowers wilt and die, and we humans began to age. Yes, we begin to age while we are still in our 20’s.

We age because the products of our metabolism, I.e., the “ashes” from the oxidation processes that produce energy in our cells, accumulate faster then our endocrine system can remove them. This is because most of the cleansing hormones that surged through our youthful bodies begin to decrease as we begin to age. Some of these more critical hormones have decreased by about 10 to 30% as we enter our 30’s. The decreases become ever more dramatic as we enter successive decades of life. Most of our hormones have decreased by over 50% and some have been reduced to near zero as we enter our 70’s. So we age. Our muscles and bones weaken; our reaction time slows; we lose our agility; all combine to make us more susceptible to accidents. Our immune system weakens and makes us more susceptible to disease. And we die.

The Death Clock

Dr. Hayflick has shown that we have another cause of aging. He has shown that we have a built-in death date of about 120 years, if diseases or accidents do not get us earlier. The point at which our cells have divided a fixed number of times sets this death date. It has been termed the “Hayflick limit.”

Our cells divide to produce new cells to replace the old cells damaged by metabolic ash build-up, free radicals, toxins, and other wear and tear mechanisms. As the cells divide, the chromosomes split to provide chromosomes for the new cells. When the chromosomes split, they lose part of their telomeres – the genes at their ends that keep the chromosomes organized. After a certain number of splits, the telomeres wear away and become too short to keep the chromosome organized and therefore the cell dies without being able to replace itself.

You can think of telomeres as analogous to the plastic bands on the ends of shoelaces. Telomeres hold the important DNA code intact, preventing it from fraying as the molecules replicate over time.

Resetting the Death Clock

But tests over the past few years have shown that the “Hayflick limit” can be extended by the use of an enzyme that causes the “organizing genes” at the ends of the chromosomes (the telomeres) to re-grow. This enzyme is called telomerase.

Telomerase treatments on human cells in the laboratory have indicated that telomerase can make human cells immortal. Doctors and researchers involved in these treatments are reporting that it is their belief that death is not inevitable.

Telomerase is actually an enzyme (a catalytic protein) that is able to arrest or reverse the telomere shortening process. The body produces telomerase when we are embryos in the womb to accommodate the very rapid growth of the embryo. But, unfortunately our bodies do not produce telomerase after birth except possibly for the creation of sperm.

So for humans to extend life we must do two things: first, eliminate the oxidants and toxins in our foods and environment; and find a dietary or pharmaceutical method for increasing and preserving the length of our cells’ telomeres.

Promising Anti-Aging Research

There are many ongoing projects that promise to solve our problems of aging. One is from a team of South Korean scientists. They report that they have created a newly-synthesized molecule, named CGK733 that can make cells younger.

“All cells face an inevitable death as they age. On this path, cells became lethargic and in the end stop dividing but we witnessed that CGK733 can block the process,” Prof. Kim Tae-kook reported. He further stated: “We also found the synthetic compound can reverse aging, by revitalizing already-lethargic cells. Theoretically, this can give youth to the elderly via rejuvenating cells.”

Kim expects that the CGK733-empowered drugs that keep cells youthful far beyond their normal life span would be commercialized in less than 10 years.

Researchers at The Wistar Institute have defined a key target of an evolutionarily conserved protein that regulates the process of aging. The study provides fundamental knowledge about key mechanisms of aging that could point toward new anti-aging strategies and cancer therapies.

Aging saps our strength and ability to enjoy life, cripples us, and eventually kills us. Tens of millions die from age-related conditions each and every year. Comparatively few people know that degenerative aging can be slowed with diet and lifestyle choices, medicines and nutracuetials.

Comparatively few people are aware of the many serious scientific efforts, presently underway, aimed at understanding and intervening in the aging process – in order to one day reverse its effects.

Your objective should be to have a healthy life and continue to live long enough to take advantage of all the medical advances and technologies now in development.

Our health is determined by our genetics, our diets, and our past and current lifestyles. You can now optimize your current and future health by defining and taking medications, vitamins, and other supplements and treatments tailored to your specific health needs. The program to do this recognizes the validity of three basic themes:

  • The Future of Medicine is in Personal Tailoring
  • Preventative Medicine is Key
  • Aging is a Treatable Disease.

Your Anti-Aging Longevity Plan

It is strongly recommended that you get familiar with the latest anti-aging information and develop your personal Longevity Plan. The key to longer life is to detect any health issues as early as possible and take advantage of the available technology to address them. Time really is of the essence.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5073181

Take a Number: Five Ways to Look at Age

April 24, 2016 by · Comments Off on Take a Number: Five Ways to Look at Age
Filed under: General 

One for the Ages

Satchel Paige was a great baseball pitcher, one of the greatest of all time. He was an African-American and, due to the racial discrimination of the time, most of his outstanding career was not spent in the (white) major leagues. However, after the historic breakthrough by the courageous and talented Jackie Robinson (Mr. Paige’s junior by about 14 years), Satchel Paige pitched in the major leagues for a number of years. In fact, he was still able to get major league batters out at the age of 60! (Mr. Paige’s age at his retirement from baseball is not known for certain because no one, probably including Mr. Paige himself, knew his exact year of birth; some thought he was older than 60). Mr. Paige revealed a mind as sharp as the break on his curve ball when he asked this profound question for the ages:

“How old would you be if you did not know how old you are?”

These writings are dedicated to the memory of Satchel Paige and to all the so-called “over-the-hill” guys and gals in every sport and in every area of life, from Churchill and Reagan in politics to Jessica Tandy in acting and Paul McCartney in fatherhood. They and many like them in the past and present will be joined by many more in the future who are not really “over the hill” because they are too busy taking the hill.

Five Ways to Look at Age

Chronological Age

The most common way to look at age is the Chronological. This is the one that everyone is familiar with. It is simply the time that has passed since your date of birth to today. It is the one that governments and insurance companies require of you and that your Doctor knows, even if your boy friend doesn’t. It is a unidimensional measure because it considers only time. It is uniform because everybody who is 48 years, 6 months, and 3 weeks old is exactly that, chronologically. People who view age only from the chronological perspective are somewhere between dumb and dumber.

True Age

True Age is another and better way to look at your age. True age is basically what a measurement of all the biomarkers of aging would reveal about you. Here’s four points about true age. One, if a well-trained physician did NOT know how old you are but reviewed a print-out of your biomarkers, she or he could accurately estimate your true age. Two, your true age is not uniform but varies by individual: you can be younger or older than your chronological age. Three, true age is multidimensional rather than confined to time. Four, absolutely nothing can be done about chronological age because it is fixed, but a great deal can be done about true age.

Appearance Age

Appearance Age is the age you appear to be to others. It no doubt has some relationship to both chronological age and true age. Yet it is different. This is because it is heavily influenced by a number of factors outside the scope of biomarker measurement, not the least of which is attitude. We all know people that appear to be quite a bit younger or older than their chronological age. But the only scientific way to measure a person’s appearance age would be to have a representative sample of the population observe a person for at least a few minutes. A quick glance is not sufficient because appearance age includes factors such as movement of the body and alertness, not just a frozen face. Then the estimates from all members of the representative sample would be gathered, simple statistical measures applied, and Voila! You have the person’s appearance age. Of course, unless we are part of a study, none of us will ever get this scientific about it. We will just have to rely on random comments from friends, family, and nice or mean strangers to estimate our appearance age; and usually it’s a pretty good estimate.

NEAT Age

A new way to look at age, which occurred to me awhile back, is what I call one’s N.E.A.T. age. This is simply one’s time left on the planet from right Now to the time of death. This age is unknowable by readers or anyone, except those committed to imminent suicide (and these poor folks are no more likely to take the short time remaining to do age calculations than they are to be caught dead reading an article about lively longevity). The best we can do is make a calculated estimate based on what we know about the general population and factor in any pluses or minuses that apply to us individually.

The N in NEAT of course stands for Now since the calculation is from the present, today, right now. E is for Elusive because I believe moments of time are elusive. As we humans try to hold or capture a moment of time it eludes us because the next moment is here, and then the next. Time and life are a flow.

The A in NEAT is for Allotted. Everyone who has ever lived has only so much time to live. Some have short lives, some have long lives, and some have lives neither particularly long nor short. But human life is finite and almost certainly will remain finite into the distant future if not forever. We do not need to take sides in the age-old debate about whether or not our allotted time is predestined by God in order to recognize that the amount is finite.

Of course, T is for Time. Time remaining is what it is all about. As has been oft noted: a millionaire on his death bed would gladly exchange his riches for a little more time, say one more day of healthy living.

So one’s NEAT age is one’s Now Elusive Allotted Time. It is a concept that provides a different perspective on aging and on life. For example, let’s suppose there was a 30-year old person named Terry and a 60-year old person named Sydney living in the same town in 1960. Conventional wisdom and simple arithmetic agree that Sydney was twice as old as Terry at that time. Such wisdom carries the (usually) unstated assumption that Terry is about 30 years further from the grave than Sydney. Statistically, this is difficult to argue with. But statistics are oft off for an individual and sometimes by a wide margin.

Let’s suppose that Terry had a lifetime of very bad health habits and, never having had the opportunity to read my writings, continued the very bad habits. Poor Terry expired a little shy of 40. (The same fate could have befallen Terry due to a dreaded disease or tragic accident.) Sydney, on the other hand, decided at some point to lead a health-conscious life. Sydney made good choices and stuck with them. Sydney enjoyed basically good health beyond age 100 before passing on. When Sydney was 60 and Terry was 30, Sydney had a NEAT age of 40+ and Terry had a NEAT age just under 10. So way back in 1960, who was younger: the one with less than a decade of life left, or the one with more than four decades of vibrant life left? One of the neat things about the NEAT age is that the bigger this age number the better.

Ideal Age

The fifth and final way that we will look at age is one’s Ideal Age. Your ideal age is your age of choice, your preferred age. The concept of ideal age brings us back to Satchel Paige’s question:

How old would you be if you did not know how old you are?

In a sense, perhaps most of us do NOT know how old we are anyhow. Sure we know our chronological age, and some of us have a rough gauge of our appearance age. But few of us know our true age, and none of us knows our NEAT age. So it should not be so difficult to put chronological age aside for a few moments and answer Mr. Paige’s question.

Before leaping to an answer like 21, keep in my mind that successful living usually involves a combination of physical vigor, mental acuity, and wisdom. Personally, my ideal age is 37; thus even at my next birthday I will still be one year younger than all the women over 40.

What about you? What’s your number? What’s your ideal age? The way my anti-aging program works for you is that after reflection you establish your ideal age. Then we work with all the tools and techniques of the program to bring your true age into ever closer alignment with your ideal age. There is a balance to be struck. A 90-year old reader shooting for an ideal age of 19 is setting up way too much of a challenge and thus is setting up for failure. A 50-year old reader settling for an ideal age of 45 is not challenging herself or himself enough.

Take a number.

Satchel Paige was the impetus for me to write the close to this article:

When it comes to matters of age,

It is best to take a page out of Paige,

And move forward with grace,

Paying no mind to this myth of the human race.

Gary Patrick is a certified anti-aging professional (Giovane Medical Services). He is also an author, hypnotist, personal trainer, and speaker. Free stuff is available for a limited time at his web site: [http://rapidresults.biz]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Gary_Patrick/18668

Holiday Season Is Perfect Time to “Talk Turkey” about End-of-Life Care Wishes

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Compassion & Choices Provides Tips to Families to Discuss Issue Everyone Will Face

The upcoming holiday season is the perfect time to “talk turkey over turkey” with your family about an important issue we all will face: our wishes for end-of-life care. It is the key message in the featured holiday story of the fall 2013 issue of Compassion & Choices Magazine.

Fewer than half of Americans over age 40 have completed an advance directive outlining what medical treatments they would want if they couldn’t communicate, according to a poll by the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Ironically, more than half of the Americans over 40 in the survey have already been caregivers for a sick relative or friend.

Compassion & Choices’ End-of-Life Consultation (EOLC) program has provided confidential, personal support for thousands of people over the last 20 years. People call our toll-free number (800-247-7421) specifically about end-of-life planning, such as preparation of advance directives.

“Everyone wants to die peacefully and with dignity. But it takes more than hope to achieve this end-of-life outcome,” said Compassion & Choices President Barbara Coombs Lee, who was an ER and ICU nurse and physician assistant for 25 years. “Making and communicating end-of-life plans is absolutely necessary to ensure we get the treatment we want – and to avoid treatment we don’t want. This step is especially important to prepare for a time we may be unable to speak for ourselves.”

How do families start this uncomfortable conversation? After many attempts to engage her family, one Compassion & Choices client set her Thanksgiving table with advance directive forms at every place setting and announced: “Nobody gets dinner until these are filled out.”

That tough-turkey tactic may not work for everyone. The best approach is the one that suits you and your family. While it’s important to fill out this paperwork, it’s essential is to get the conversation going.

“Talking Turkey Over Turkey” tips include:

  • “Appetizers” that could lead the way to a satisfying dialogue;
  • Four key questions your conversation should cover; and
  • Free tools you need to guide your conversation and document the results.

For more information, visit www.compassionandchoices.org/what-we-do/advance-planning, or call 800-247-7421 to speak to a Compassion & Choices’ consultant or to request information.

With over 30 local groups and 40,000 members and supporters throughout the United States, Compassion & Choices leads the end-of-life choice movement. We support, educate and advocate. Learn more at: www.compassionandchoices.org.

Contact: Sean Crowley, 202-495-8520-c, scrowley@compassionandchoices.org

The Benefits of Medicare Advantage

October 31, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Dr. Amir Bacchus

The annual election period during which seniors can enroll in Medicare Advantage plans began on Oct. 15 and ends Dec. 7.  During this open enrollment period, many of Nevada’s senior citizens will assess their health care needs and weigh their options carefully to determine whether a Medicare Advantage plan is right for them.

As a physician and the chief medical officer of HealthCare Partners Medical Group, I have a great deal of knowledge and experience related to Medicare Advantage plans, and I urge seniors to make informed decisions this fall.

Medicare Advantage plans can be an excellent choice for seniors without private supplemental insurance, as many offer improved access to coordinated care and protection against high out-of-pocket expenses. Medicare Advantage is an alternative to what is known as Medicare Fee-For-Service or “original Medicare.”  Medicare Advantage plans typically provide prescription drug coverage and eliminate the need to purchase a Medigap policy. The premiums tend to be lower than you would pay by purchasing original Medicare, Part D (prescription drug coverage) and Medigap separately.

When comparing Medicare Advantage plans, it is essential to consider the costs, benefits and health care provider choices within each available plan. You should take time to learn about the “in-network” providers associated with the health insurance plan.  It is important to know whether the providers have a reputation for offering high-quality, coordinate care and if they have a large enough network to meet your health care needs.  Finally, you should also consider access to the primary care physicians, specialists and other providers you use on a regular basis under each plan. Consistency of care has numerous benefits, especially for those who feel comfortable with their current health care providers.

When considering your coverage options this fall, pick the plan that works best for you. It’s a big decision, and I hope seniors explore their options during this year’s enrollment period.

Dr. Amir Bacchus is the chief medical officer and co-founder of HealthCare Partners Medical Group.  Bacchus received his M.D. from Wayne State University School of Medicine in 1993 and is a diplomat of the American Board of Internal Medicine.

 

 

Medicare Annual Open Enrollment Changes Are Expected, Allsup Explains

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Medicare Annual Open Enrollment Changes Are Expected, Allsup Explains

New Medicare plan options for 2014 will be available Oct. 15, but Health Insurance Marketplace enrollment could confuse beneficiaries 

There are only a few weeks before the Medicare annual open enrollment period begins Oct. 15. This year’s Medicare season crosses calendars with the rollout of the Health Insurance Marketplace, so it’s important Medicare-eligible beneficiaries understand the differences between the two government programs, according to Allsup, a nationwide provider of Medicare plan selection services.

During the Medicare annual enrollment period, Oct. 15 to Dec. 7, all Medicare beneficiaries have the option to change their Medicare plans for the coming year to better match their needs. This includes anyone using original Medicare, Medicare Advantage or Part D prescription drug plans.

“Because the federal and state-run health insurance exchanges open for business just two weeks prior to Medicare enrollment, some people may be confused,” said Paula Muschler, manager of the Allsup Medicare Advisor®, a Medicare plan selection service offering personalized help that includes customized research and enrollment assistance.

“Medicare beneficiaries may falsely think they need to enroll in an exchange plan to avoid penalties. Or, they may be so flustered that they don’t carefully evaluate their Medicare plan options for 2014, which could be detrimental if their plan or their needs have changed,” Muschler said.

Another potential area of confusion is for those individuals turning 65 during Medicare annual enrollment. “Because some seniors become Medicare eligible during this time period, they need to look at their Medicare selections for coverage that takes them through year-end 2013, as well as coverage that will begin Jan. 1, 2014,” Muschler said. “These first-time enrollees can benefit from the help of a Medicare specialist like Allsup when it comes to navigating their Medicare plan decisions.”

What to Expect: Medicare Coverage 2014

Nearly 50 million people are enrolled in Medicare. Each year, annual open enrollment brings with it changes that can affect their Medicare plan selections.

Following are factors to keep in mind for 2014 coverage:

Medicare is not part of the Health Insurance Marketplace. Anyone with Medicare is considered covered and won’t face penalties for being uninsured under provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Medicare annual open enrollment runs Oct. 15 to Dec. 7. (Note: Health Insurance Marketplace enrollment is from Oct. 1, 2013, through March 31, 2014, according to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS).)

Medicare recipients reaching the drug donut hole will benefit from lower costs. The gap in prescription drug coverage starts when someone reaches the initial coverage limit, estimated at $2,850 in 2014. It ends when they have spent $4,550, when catastrophic coverage begins. (These are reductions of $120 and $200, respectively, from 2013.) During the donut hole, all costs are covered by individuals out of their own pocket. In 2014, those who reach the donut hole can receive a 52.5 percent discount on brand-name drugs and 28 percent discount on generic drugs (an increase from 21 percent in 2013).

Under catastrophic coverage, they are responsible for a co-pay of $2.55 for generic or preferred multisource drugs (down from $2.65 in 2013) with a retail price up to $51 and $6.35 for all other drugs (down from $6.60 in 2013) with a retail price up to $127. For 2014, however, beneficiaries are responsible for a 5 percent cost-sharing fee for drugs over those retail prices.

Medicare Part B premium changes are expected. In each of the past three years, Part B premiums have increased. The 2013 monthly premium for Medicare Part B (medical insurance) was $104.90, an increase from $99.90 in 2012. In addition, because Part B premiums are based on the beneficiary’s income and those income levels are frozen at 2010 levels, more individuals could see their premiums change. Information on the standard Part B premium for 2014 should be available by the time Medicare annual open enrollment begins Oct. 15.

Prescription drug Part D plans will see slight changes in deductible and premiums. The Part D initial deductible decreases by $15 to $310. HHS also recently reported the Part D monthly premiums will remain relatively stable, at $31 for a basic prescription drug plan in 2014. This is close to the reported average premium of $30 for the past three years (2011-13). Part D premiums are subject to the same income-based thresholds as Part B.

Changes anticipated for Medicare Advantage plans. Not all plans change every year, but common changes include costs, such as premiums, deductibles and co-pays, and changes to covered procedures, tests, medical facilities and other provisions. Some plans may be eliminated, which means beneficiaries will need to select a new plan or default to original Medicare Part B. Enrollment in Medicare Advantage plans continues to grow with 14.4 million people enrolled, an increase of more than 1 million from 2012, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Most Medicare participants will receive their Annual Notice of Change (ANOC) and Evidence of Coverage (EO) from their current Medicare Advantage and Part D providers by Sept. 30, according to Muschler. “It’s crucial people review materials as soon as they receive them and asses their current healthcare needs,” she said.

“Healthcare costs are a critical line item in most people’s budget, and especially so for seniors and people with disabilities,” Muschler added. “Believing your current plan will continue to cover your needs in the same way can lead to unexpected and costly surprises.”

Medicare specialists such as Allsup are available to help consumers and their family members review Medicare plans and choices for 2014 coverage, Muschler added.

“For many people, this can be a time-consuming, confusing and complex evaluation process, especially when comparing Part D plans or Medicare Advantage plans,” Muschler said. “Many Medicare beneficiaries are pleased to find out there are Medicare specialists like Allsup who look at the comparative details of the plans, and then provide them the assistance they need to make choices that suit their needs and budget in the coming year.”

The Allsup Medicare Advisor is an affordable, flat-fee based service for Medicare-eligible individuals.

For an evaluation of Medicare options, call an Allsup Medicare Advisor specialist at (866) 521-7655 or visit Medicare.Allsup.com to learn more about the service.

The Allsup Medicare Advisor also has features that help financial advisors guide their clients to the Medicare plans that match their specific lifestyles and healthcare needs. Employers also use Allsup Medicare Advisor for their employees who are retiring and transitioning to Medicare. For more information, go to FinancialAdvisor.Allsup.com, or call (888) 220-9678.
ABOUT ALLSUP

Allsup is a nationwide provider of Social Security disability, veterans disability appeal, Medicare and Medicare Secondary Payer compliance services for individuals, employers and insurance carriers. Allsup professionals deliver specialized services supporting people with disabilities and seniors so they may lead lives that are as financially secure and as healthy as possible. Founded in 1984, the company is based in Belleville, Ill., near St. Louis. For more information, go to http://www.Allsup.com or visit Allsup on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/Allsupinc.

The information provided is not intended as a substitute for legal or other professional services. Legal or other expert assistance should be sought before making any decision that may affect your situation.

# # #

Contact:
Rebecca Ray, (800) 854-1418, ext. 65065, r.ray@allsupinc.com
Mary Jung, (773) 429-0940, mtjung@msn.com

Starting a Home Based Business – Senior Citizens Require Supplemental Income by Jed Tooke

September 6, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Expert Author Jed Tooke

The need to have extra earnings is felt more when one retires. It is for this reason that many people become interested in the idea of starting a home based business to increase their income. It is seen that generally younger people are preferred for work over older workers because of the mistaken belief that senior citizens will not be able to perform the work effectively.

Because of an economic downturn, many corporations are forcing employees to retire or they are being laid off, even before they attain retirement age. Now, there is an option in the form of a home business venture for these senior citizens.

One of the best choices available for those who have retired is starting a home business on the Internet. This option will provide these senior citizen retirees an opportunity to make much needed extra income.

This article will guide those who are exploring avenues to earn extra money to supplement their pension.

Learn basic computer skills:

One of the most basic requirements to start your home venture is to have a high-tech computer along with dependable Internet connection. After this, you need to train yourself in basic computer skills.

If you are not able to acquire the computer expertise, you need not dampen your spirits because there are plenty of free computer tutorial websites on the Internet. You can receive excellent guidance from any of these sites and train yourself rather well. Let learning be the ongoing process. Ensure that you keep yourself abreast of the latest developments.

There are lots of changes taking place on the Internet and Information Technology. A sound knowledge of operating your computer will be a big advantage when starting a home business.

Accepting the challenge:

You need to ask yourself if you will be able to take care of your business venture efficiently. Do you have it in you to own and operate your enterprise successfully? You should understand that you will be required to put in a lot of hard work. Also, you should have the patience of a saint. The strength of mind, enthusiasm and discipline will be the added advantage.

Perform diligent research on the Internet. You will find that there are lots of network marketing companies. Find yourself one such company with a good track record and you may consider accepting their offer of a home business opportunity.

Benefits galore:

There are several benefits for setting up a home venture. You can claim tax benefits extended by the IRS to entrepreneurs and all legitimate businesses. Similarly, you can claim deductions for making payments for rent or mortgage and utility bills. It is possible to get a healthy reimbursement for buying computers and other equipment for your home office.

One of the best benefits for running a business venture from home is that you are your own boss and decide your own paycheck. Your home venture gives you the opportunity to remain close to your family while you are working from the comfort of your home.

However, it will be in your best interest to check out everything thoroughly about a company before starting a home based business.

Learn the real truth about starting a home based business [http://homebasedbusinessteam.com/03/starting-a-home-based-business-3/] working with a team. Discover how working with a team in building your own business that yields residual income leading to independence and financial freedom.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jed_Tooke

Senior Citizen Information – The Social Security Funding Problem by Glen Jensen

September 2, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The Baby Boomer generation will begin taking early retirement in 2008. In 2011 they will approach the traditional retirement age of 65. As more and more Baby Boomers retire they will put a tremendous strain on the Social Security system. So far, no significant changes have been implemented to lessen the impact Baby Boomers will have on the Social Security system. The longer any action is delayed the more drastic the changes will be. Will these changes affect you? If you were born between 1946 and 1964, then you are officially a Baby Boomer and will probably be impacted by the Social Security funding problem.

The current and projected future financial status of the Governments’ trust funds is presented in the “The 2007 Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance and Federal Disability Insurance Trust Funds (OASDI).” The good news is that the Social Security Administration (SSA) states that there are no plans to reduce benefits for current retirees. In fact, benefits for current retirees are scheduled to continue growing with inflation. However, the 2007 OASDI Trustees Report also states, “Social Security’s combined trust funds are projected to allow full payment of scheduled benefits until they become exhausted in 2041. This means that unless changes are made soon, benefits for all retirees could be cut by 26 percent in 2040 and continue to be reduced every year thereafter. If you are “younger” senior citizen or a want to-be senior citizen, this is not good news

The Trustees of Social Security, the Comptroller General of the United States and the Chairman of the Federal Reserve Board have said, the sooner we address the problem, the smaller and less abrupt the changes will be. The independent, bipartisan Social Security Advisory Board has also said: “As time goes by, the size of the Social Security problem grows, and the choices available to fix it become more limited.” Addressing the problem now will allow today’s younger workers planning for their retirement to have a better assurance of the future of Social Security. The problem has not been addressed as of 2007.

If Social Security is not changed we have a limited number of options in the future. The options are to increase payroll taxes, reduce the benefits of today’s younger workers or borrow from the general fund. Social Security’s Trustees state, “If no action were taken until the combined trust funds become exhausted in 2040, much larger changes would be required. For example, payroll taxes could be raised to finance scheduled benefits fully in every year starting in 2040. In this case, the payroll tax would be increased to 16.65 percent at the point of trust fund exhaustion in 2040 and continue rising to 17.78 percent in 2080. Similarly, benefits could be reduced to the level that is payable with scheduled tax rates in every year beginning in 2040. Under this scenario, benefits would be reduced 26 percent at the point of trust fund exhaustion in 2040, with reductions reaching 30 percent in 2080.”

Social Security was never meant to be the sole source of income in retirement and that especially applies to the Baby Boomer generation. It is often said that a comfortable retirement is based on a “three-legged stool” of Social Security, pensions and savings. American workers should be saving for their retirement on a personal basis and through employer-sponsored or other retirement plans. If a Baby Boomer is not preparing for retirement with a pension and/or savings to supplement their Social Security benefits, they will have to delay retirement or continue working part-time.

Glen Jensen is a writer for [http://www.SeniorCitizenDirectory.com] which is a site that provides Senior Citizen Information.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Glen_Jensen

Life Insurance Schemes Aimed At Senior Citizens by Bobby E Richardson

August 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Expert Author Bobby E Richardson

I remember reading a news post once about a man in Florida that was arrested in a Life Insurance scam. It had been estimated that he had stolen millions in Life Insurance money from our senior citizens. Just thinking about the story infuriates me, and inspired me to give a few pointers out to seniors considering the purchase of a policy.

One of the craziest facts about the story aside from the stolen money is that he worked in a large financial group. I know that a scam can happen in any business structure but I was expecting it to be a door to door insurance salesman. When I say that, it’s not to take shots at those type of salesman; I used to be one, but those were my expectations.

First let’s take a look at a few of the reasons why seniors would need Life Insurance, and then how they can make sure they don’t get taken advantage of from a few idiots who call themselves salesmen.

There are several factors that could bring about concerns for seniors to leave money behind to loved ones.It is a way for them to cover final expenses for a proper burial and not leave the responsibility to loved ones, they can leave a lump sum of money to heirs that will be tax-free upon receipt, they could be raising grand babies that will need financial assistance, or it could be to just make sure money is in place to cover excess debts if they were to suddenly pass on.

The only drawback to getting Life Insurance as a senior is that finding a low costing policy is not impossible but it can be difficult.The best thing you can do is see if a trusted family member or friend knows an insurance agent or you can spend some time reading to learn about life insurance yourself.Then, go to a few websites or call around to shop to some of the agencies.

There are a few companies that will not allow seniors to purchase a term policy. With those companies the cut off age is usually about 65 and up. With the companies that do allow it, it will be more expensive.

9 times out of 10 seniors will be required to accept a whole life policy. Seniors should keep in mind that in order for them to pay off a whole life policy, the contract has to be maintained for 10 years.This time commitment does vary with a few of the insurance companies.

Here is a few question seniors should ask when considering a Life Insurance policy:

Does the company require a medical exam?

Are monthly premiums locked in for the life of the policy or will they increase with time?

Can I continually renew the policy for the life of the contract?

What are the specific renewal requirements?

Can the monthly premiums be waived in the event of disability or injury that limits my income?

When will the beneficiary receive the death benefit? (Some policies require the insured to be alive for 3 years before the beneficiaries received the face amount. If the insured dies earlier than the requirement, they will receive all of the premiums paid into the policy plus 10% interest, which is still better than putting the money into a bank account that wouldn’t give as much interest.)

Seniors just need to make they plan and effectively select a good policy, to give themselves that peace of mind in knowing that their loved ones will be protected financially in the event of their death. It’s sick to know that there are scam artist out there that will take advantage of those good intentions. But I do want to point out the fact that there are many good insurance brokers who will sincerely help people with finding the best policy to fit their families needs and more importantly their budget.

It is my pleasure to help Americans enjoy their retirement years with financial security. I care about providing products that protect you and your family. I am committed to ensuring peace of mind for your retirement future. My commitment to unsurpassed service and strong contract owner benefits has allowed me to experience consistent growth within my industry. I’m the one to offer you diverse financial planning choices for your retirement dollars.

We represent over a dozen of the nation’s top rated life insurance and annuity providers. We’ll provide you with information and pricing on every service available at your location and let you choose. No more high-pressure, heavily biased sales pitches from pushy insurance salespeople.

Life’s Protection

Bobby E Richardson

Phone: (386) 308-9626

Fax: (407) 210-1602

bobby.richardson@lifesprotection.com

[http://www.lifesprotection.com]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Bobby_E_Richardson

A Senior Citizen In Juvenile Hall by Eva Fry

August 9, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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It was my first time speaking at Juvenile Hall, I was terrified! I had seen enough movies to know I didn’t want to be there. As I hurried through the metal detectors, and pushed through the big metal doors, my heart was pounding and I was filled with fear. I wondered if I would get out of this place alive.

I passed the holding tanks, rooms with big windows containing kids who had just been arrested. In there were kids pacing, fighting addictions, fearfully waiting to be assigned to a unit. Some kids were right at home. They knew this place! They had been there before.

When I stepped into the inner sanctum I heard sounds that confirmed my fears. Angry kids were screaming, using profane language. I heard loud pounding on the doors, which dotted the narrow hallways. Juvenile inmates were communicating through the thick cement walls. As I scurried along, I saw empty eyes piercing out at me through the small, eye level windows of their rooms. I passed through more metal doors and hallways, until I came to the unit I was to speak in. Inside sat fifty young men, of all nationalities. I knew from their varying hair color. Their backs were toward me. They were juveniles from the age of 15 to 17.

As I slowly walked to the front of the room, I made sure there was a guard on either side, in case one of them grabbed me. I took a deep breath and turned toward them. My heart stopped! I was shocked! They were just kids! I expected them to look like criminals, but they looked like they could be one of my nine grandkids.

Although some did appear tough, and others rough, there was something about them that touched me. At that moment, my life changed! A still small voice inside me said, “you must try to help them!”

Thus began my continuing, nine-year mission, to help kids who are in trouble with the law. These are my kids. “The Forgotten Kid.” The children we think we can lock up, throw away the key, and forget. The ones who learned most of the bad things they have done, from us, the older generation. They are kids, paying the price for the sins of society. Our scapegoats

There are up to 600 kids locked up, in this facility, at any time. The Hall houses kids from the age of 10 to 18, although I saw a nine-year and ten-year-old carrying blankets and pillows. Were they going camping?
No! They were headed to their rooms, to be locked up, for armed robbery.

BE A WINNER IN LIFE IS MY PROGRAM. I help the kids believe they can still be WINNERS. I teach them they have potential to do amazing things with their life. In fact, I believe God sent them to this earth to do good with their lives. I tell them each one is a genius, in their own way, and can do something better than anyone else can do. They must find their genius. They must go to school, obey the law, obey their parents, be honest and work hard. My goal is to share with them the same truths I taught my kids: the basic truths of right and wrong.

I hope to support the parents who are good parents, but their kids got on the wrong track. I try to teach the ones with bad parents, or no parents, values they were never taught: basic principals of good and bad.

How did I start speaking at Juvenile Hall? It began a long time ago, when I was a little girl, the daughter of an alcoholic father who emotionally damaged my mother and us kids. I grew up in circumstances similar to some of these young wards.

I speak to them because I would have loved to have had someone, who cared, talk to me when I was young.

Some of these kids, like me, are the off spring of parents who didn’t care how their actions affected their kids. We were from homes full of contention caused by parents with addictions. Sick parents who were unable to control their own lives, let alone parent a child. So-called parents, who lived in their own hell and created havoc in the lives of their children. Parents who abandoned their kids.

When I talk to the kids, I relate to the ones who hope to fix their parents, and those who must care for their siblings. I relate because I remember pouring my Dad’s alcohol down the drain, thinking it would fix our problems but instead, I got myself into lots of trouble. I remember taking money from my Dad’s pocket, after he passed out, to give to my Mom. Money for food.

I remember the day I realized that whatever I did at home would change nothing. I would never have the loving family I longed for. Like many of these kids, I turned to friends for the family I needed. Like them, they were usually the wrong kids of friends, peers who were doing bad things. I remember drinking alcohol, even though I hated it, so I could fit in.

I hear my same story, over and over again, at Juvenile Hall.

To help them I share a profound truth, which I discovered in my young life. “Bad things happen for a reason!”

My bad thing: after a wasted life, at the age of 57, my Dad died an alcoholic. His drink of choice was 100% over proof rum. The good thing: My Dad’s death led to me realize I didn’t want to end up like him, or give my kids the life he gave me. I eventually made a commitment to stop drinking and change my life. Thankfully I was young and not an alcoholic, like my Father and Grandfather.

My commitment worked! I share with them how wonderfully my life has turned out, because of one small choice. I used my Dad’s mistakes to choose a better life for myself. I now have the life I dreamed about. My husband and I have been happily married for 45 years and with our children and grandchildren, are a close knit, happy, non-drinking family.

I tell them, “you can turn the bad things which have happened in your life into motivation for a better life too.” I help them believe they still have time to change.

Another reason I speak at Juvenile Hall is because I was a victim of a drunk driver. At the age of 17, the car I was riding in was hit head-on by a drunk driver. My head went through the windshield. My nose and part of my ear was torn off. Thankfully doctors put me back together, but I came to realize the terrible carnage alcohol could cause. I’ve had a mission all my life to teach the evils of alcohol use. I was a speaker for Mother’s Against Drunk Driving for several years. In fact, they were the ones who first sent me to speak at Juvenile Hall.

I teach the kids to abstain from alcohol and drugs. I have commitment cards, which I encourage them to sign and honor. I know if I can help them make a commitment not to drink alcohol, or use drugs; they will have a better chance at changing their lives and reaching their potential. They don’t need alcohol or drugs in their life. Most of the kids are locked up because of their first drink of alcohol, which lead to drug use and criminal behavior.

One of the questions people always ask me is “what is it like to talk to young criminals? Do they listen to you?”

My answer is, “at first it took a little time to know what to say and how to say it, so they would accept me. It took me time to overcome my fear of knowing how to communicate with them and have them accept me.”

One night, one of them asked, “why do you come to Juvenile Hall?” I answered, “why do you think?” His response, “for the money!” I replied, “no one pays me, in fact the first time I spoke, someone stole the hub caps from my car.” His mouth fell open and then he really listened to my program.

I’m happy to say I do very well with them! The kids are very attentive. They know I care. I don’t judge them. In most cases, I don’t know what their crime is. I don’t want to know. I tell them that what they have done is wrong and they must pay the price. On the other hand, I hope to stop them from getting deeper into crime. If I can stop them from hurting someone in the future, I feel my time is worthwhile.

I know I won’t get through to all of them, but I hope to plant seeds, which may take root someday when they have choices to make. My dream is to save as many as I can.

It is very gratifying when I feel I have gotten through to them and when they thank me. One boy said. “You told me bad things happen for a reason. Your right!” I never would have gotten an education if I hadn’t come to Juvenile Hall. I just got my GED. I applied to a college and was accepted. I will be going to school to be come an engineer when I get out.”

I am happy when I feel I have helped them look at life in a more positive way.

I try to help them turn their mistakes and bad experiences into something good. My greatest success is that I encourage the kids at Juvenile Hall to write letters to save other kids from the consequences they are experiencing. They have written incredible letters. Their letters have great impact on other kids because they come from their peers. My latest book “Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids contain the letters.

Here are inserts from some of the letters:

Addiction controlled my life. Don’t let it control you! I wish for all you guys to be safe, and I pray for you kids that don’t know what life is really about, because after that second when you make the bad decision, it goes down hill from there. Only you can change your future. I hope you all understand that there’s a number in prison with your name on it, if you don’t change. Now’s the time to change. Not later. Not when you get out, but now! If you don’t change now you never will.

Gang banging was my worst thing I ever gotten into. If I could take it back, I would. I repeated my Dad’s cycle.

Now I sit here in a one-room cell, facing 25 years to life. I want you to look around and see what kind of situation you’re in. Open you eyes and your minds and soak as much education as you can. I’m 17 years old in a couple of weeks. I will be graduating from high school (in Juvenile Hall). Education is the key to life.

I’m in the Hall, Unit 800. Why? Because I committed a sin while I was on drugs. At the age of 13, I started using drugs because my best friend was asking me to try some. At the age of 16, my charges are DUI, evading a peace officer, driving at an unsafe speed with no license, a firearm in the car and 187 murder.

All the violence that is going on in our community is not solving nothing. The only thing it’s doing is killing us off, one by one. Before you know it the human race will be extinct. Because we are the last of the dying breed. I’m only telling you this so you guys can make the right decision. Your homies probably say they are down for you, but they be faking, and that’s real. The only people that’s going to stick by you is your mama and your family. I seen too much in my life young homies and it’s not what you are thinking. I lost my little homie and that really hit me. All that was on my mind was retaliation but when I thought about it, I knew it wouldn’t bring him back so I thought of another game plan. I prayed!

Eva, I want to thank you for all the help that you have given me. All the little words you’ve spoken in your groups have helped me so much along the way. I have changed in ways that people wouldn’t believe. I have done a whole 360. Without the help of you, I see the change being 100% more difficult. I wish my family was around to see my new life.

As you can see, my experience with my kids, at Juvenile Hall, has been emotionally rewarding and very satisfying to me. These kids give my life meaning. I feel I am making a difference.

I continue to try to help kids. I have written a book called “BE A WINNER IN LIFE”, which I hope to get into the hands of every child in Juvenile Hall’s, all over the country. Also, I want to get it into the hands of parents. I hope to get to kids before they are locked up.

Yes I’m a grateful to be a senior citizen at Juvenile Hall! I’m grateful my senior years have value and that I am doing something with my time, which is worthwhile.

I now know that every senior citizen can use the wisdom they have gained throughout their life to make a difference. We can all do something. I encourage you to find a way to help a child. Our kids need you!

Eva Fry is an author, singer/songwriter and motivational speaker. She had a ten year volunteer program at Juvenile Hall called “Be a Winner in Life” She has three books “You Must Have a Dream” for seniors, “Be a Winner in Life” for kids, troubled kids and their parents, and Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids” – for all kinds, especially those who are locked up and to help kids from being locked up. She started writing and songwriting at the age of 60. Her goal is to encourage seniors to reach their potential and help kids do the same. She has many free articles on her web site to help young and old. She has six CD’s which are spiritually based and inspire young and old. She is avilable as a speaker or performer. Her work is available on her web site Eva Fry – eva@evafry.com http://www.evafry.com ( She has many free articles on her web site)

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eva_Fry

Senior Citizen Assisted Living Can Help Baby Boomers Keep Their Independence by Susan Elizabeth

August 2, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Elderly-Couple-Walks-Retirement

Reaching your golden years is a great accomplishment. It is in fact one of the best things about living in the times that we do. There are so many opportunities and activities available now that did not exist previously, that it is almost impossible to take advantage of them all.

Senior citizen assisted living is one of those ideas that has come of age in a time when there are more people than ever who are retiring. The baby boomer group is the largest demographic group on the planet and many of them are reaching retirement age right now.

This has created a need for all manners of senior retirement arrangements that range all the way from complete and total care, kind of like the nursing homes used to be, through senior assisted living facilities which help seniors maintain all the independence they can for as long as is possible, to active adult retirement communities where often the primary focus is one golf or some other sport.

This range of choices is absolutely unprecedented in our society. Not only that, but with the touch of a few buttons on the computer keyboard, the internet springs to life and brings you tons of information about all these various living arrangements so you can decide exactly what kind of facility you need.

Assisted living facilities do a great job of tailoring specific service plans for their residents. This means that each person gets the care they need on an individual planned out basis. The goal is to not change the senior person’s lifetime of habits or lifestyle but still make it possible for them to receive the care they need to live a great and fulfilling life.

There are many of these facilities in many locations and each of them is a little different in what they have to offer their residents. The types and levels of services offered can be quite different one state to another, and because the industry is overseen more by the individual states rather than the federal government, it is important to make sure that the kind of care you need is available in an assisted living facility in the state that you are thinking of living in.

It is not that any of the care is worse in some states than in others, it’s just that the laws and regulations are a bit different. But as fare as getting the help you might need when you are living in a senior citizen assisted living community, all of them deliver exactly what you need. And not more than you need.

The goal is always is keep the most amount of independence possible and in the retirement community world, the assisted living facilities do the best job overall of juggling between providing care and maintaining independence.

Susan is a full fledged baby boomer and avid internet researcher who writes about active retirement communities and other baby boomer topics on her site at www.second50years.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Susan_Elizabeth

Convenience and Product Selection Encourage More People to Manage Incontinence Online, Parentgiving.com Survey Reveals

July 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Convenience and Product Selection Encourage More People to Manage Incontinence Online, Parentgiving.com Survey Reveals

For the first time in its five-year history, the senior wellness site Parentgiving.com conducted an opinion survey on incontinence, reaching out to nearly 5,000 of its customers who shop for self-care products in this category. The focus was to learn how people best cope with incontinence and if a greater awareness about it as a medical issue has erased its stigma and prompted more people to talk to their doctors about treatment. Respondents were also asked to share both their frustrations and their strategies for maintaining quality of life.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130724/PH51806LOGO)

Results show that progress is being made. Slightly over 70 percent have talked to their healthcare provider about incontinence—many of them are taking or have tried medications, and a few have had surgical procedures.

But nearly 30 percent of respondents have still not sought medical attention. Reasons are varied. A few people still feel too embarrassed to bring it up, even in front of a doctor, while some assume it’s just a normal part of old age (it’s not!) or don’t know that there are treatments that might help. Others say they have more life-threatening medical issues, from diabetes to stroke recovery, that take precedence when they’re at the doctor’s office. For a few, the possibility of yet another medication to add to their existing regimen would be financially out of the question.

More Key Points From the Parentgiving Survey

* Fear of accidents is the top concern.
Two-thirds of respondents ranked this as their number one worry. The lack of product selection came in second at 21%. People want more product choices, which will, in turn, help them feel more secure about avoiding accidents.

* Online is the way people want to buy products.
Nearly 46% buy products online where they can get the widest selection and have anonymity.

* Absorbency is the key feature in choosing products.
An overwhelming 81% ranked this first. Information on a product’s absorbency should be front and center on product descriptions, say the respondents. Comfort ranked second and the ability to buy a product online ranked a strong third at 36%, above both cost and anatomical design of items.

* Many people are satisfied with their incontinence products. In fact, 40% are very satisfied. However 44% are only somewhat satisfied—there’s room for better education about products to help people find those that are more effective for them and the respondents had numerous suggestions for incontinence product manufacturers to improve styles.

For complete survey results, go to http://www.parentgiving.com/elder-care/incontinence-survey-results/. There is also a companion article, “Survey Says: 50 Top Strategies for Managing Incontinence,” featuring respondents’ experiences and suggestions at http://www.parentgiving.com/elder-care/survey-says-50-top-strategies-for-managing-incontinence/. For more information, please contact Julie Davis, Chief Content Officer at 203-984-4424 or email.

About Parentgiving. Parentgiving.com is the online destination dedicated to the health and wellness needs of seniors and their caregivers. A comprehensive website, Parentgiving offers hundreds of informative articles on eldercare, plus Q&As with experts on healthy aging. The Parentgiving Store sells find thousands of products from medical supplies to practical tools for the activities of daily living. Everything can be ordered by phone or online with fast shipping right to the senior. For more information please visit www.Parentgiving.com or follow us on Twitter.

Senior Citizen Housing Choices Are Ready For Today’s Baby Boomer Retirees by Susan Elizabeth

July 3, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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When it comes time to retire from work, there are some significant choices that you will need to make. One of them is whether you will continue to get up at the same time in the morning as when you had to go to work. Most people opt to not get up as early, but some still like doing that because it is such a habit.

Another choice is about where you want to live after retirement. It isn’t like anyone is saying you have to leave your house if you don’t want to, but many people think that finding an alternative kind of senior citizen housing is more appropriate than where they currently live.

There are so many baby boomers who are retiring right now, that there has been kind of a boom in the amount of places available for seniors to live in. There are a great amount of active retirement communities and assisted living facilities and even more and more nursing homes for people who need a lot of extra help.

But as far as where you are supposed to live, that is something that is completely up to the individual. And that kind of choice is one of the big characteristics of baby boomers; expecting to have a large amount of choice over their lives. That idea of being in charge of your own life certainly has not changed appreciably in any way since back when the boomers were in college.

In general, there are three choices in senior housing. These are identified by the amount of extra nursing and personal care that the residents require throughout the day. The active senior communities are where the folks live who need the least amount of extra personal care during the day. These are often based around sports like golf or tennis and have very active people living there.

The nursing home setups are where the people live who need the most extra assistance. These are staffed by nurses and doctors 24 hours a day and the people who live there need the most amount of extra care during the day.

In the middle are the assisted living facilities where people who need just a small amount of extra personal or nursing care live. This can be a place like a senior apartment complex or an entire community full of small homes where the residents live.

But no matter what amount of extra assistance a person needs after retirement, the internet can certainly help you find the best senior citizen housing option for you and your particular situation.

Susan is a full fledged baby boomer and avid internet researcher who writes about senior retirement communities and other baby boomer topics on her site at www.second50years.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Susan_Elizabeth

 

Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads

June 5, 2013 by · Comments Off on Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads
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Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads

BOSTON, May 2, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Mother’s and Father’s Day celebrations are approaching, yet millions of adult children care for parents year round while on the brink of burnout.  Catapulted into the accidental caregiver role without warning, stressed-out kids are doing their best to hold life together when everything seems to be falling apart.

Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom issues a timely warning. “You must seek support as a caregiver.  The life you save may be your own.”

Bloom offers practical coping strategies to help family caregivers recharge their energy and avoid burnout during a free monthly Caregiving Power Hour.  During these tele-sessions, caregivers get tactical solutions to get through the week ahead.  Bloom wants to inspire and train caregivers to provide quality support for their loved ones while fully living their own lives.

“It’s coaching, community, and caring in the gift of an hour of sacred time that can really make a difference,” Bloom says.

Bloom knows the stressful caregiving journey well.  He served as the primary, live-in caregiver for his parents during their final years.  His father passed away in 2009 and, after a courageous battle with cancer, Bloom’s mother passed away in his loving arms on Mother’s Day 2012.

“Caregivers put the well-being of loved ones first which can mean putting their own needs and plans on the back burner.  The regret for career or life enhancing opportunities not taken can be a bitter pill to swallow,” Bloom says.

He honors the legacy of his parents by sharing key steps along the roadmap to caregiving without regret.

  1. Release Crisis Mode. Stop being a victim to circumstances so you feel stronger and become laser-focused to meet your family’s needs.  Supporting loved ones through medical challenges is overwhelming and scary.  When you become aware that feeling like a victim or in a state of crisis is a mindset, you can successfully shift back into taking control and positive action.
  2. Overcome Conflict.  Communicate and cope with calm and clarity. Otherwise, you will crash while riding the emotional roller coaster associated with disability or disease. Mastering your own trigger points for anger and frustration will lead you to deal effectively with the most challenging people and circumstances in your life.
  3. Achieve Buy-In. Motivate others to contribute based upon their individual abilities, preferences, and talents so your loved one receives the most satisfying support possible.  Giving others choices for how they can serve will foster their desire to gladly help on a regular basis.
  4. Deliver Greatness and Compassion in Equal Doses.  Become the inspiring caregiver that people cheer for and gladly support in meaningful ways.  Let your compassion shine through in all actions as you support your loved one.  Devote equal time for self-care so you have the energy to let your best shine through even during tough times.
  5. Magnetize and Motivate Talent. Create an atmosphere that attracts and retains the best people to join your loved one’s care team and experience brilliant performance.  Stay positive and open to the opinions of others so you can facilitate options for the best care and support.
  6. Access Intuition.  Trust your instincts and let your care and dedication guide your decisions.  Share any concerns and questions with key support professionals.  It is better to explore a concern that proves to be okay rather than ignore something that could be life threatening.
  7. Put Chocolate in Your Pill Box.  Find ways to fuel your soul so you can thrive during the caregiver journey and develop the passion and purpose for your life beyond caregiving.  Dose yourself regularly to avoid burnout while creating enduring satisfaction and success.

About Certified Professional Coach and Energy Leadership™ Master Practitioner A. Michael Bloom

Since 2011, A. Michael Bloom has revitalized the careers of hundreds of family and professional caregivers with practical, tactical soul-saving coping strategies that support them in saving lives – including their own.  An in-demand New England speaker, workshop leader, and coach, Bloom has influenced hundreds of caregivers to follow a roadmap to avoid burnout and recharge their caregiving energy.  The author of the forthcoming book, The Accidental Caregivers Survival Guide: Your Roadmap to Caregiving Without Regret, Bloom welcomes media interviews, speaking engagements, and the opportunity to inspire caregivers around the world via his monthly Caregiving Power Hours.  Learn more at http://www.bloomforcoach.com/powerhour/.

Health Insurance for Senior Citizens – How to Get the Best Rate by Brian Stevens

May 31, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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As a senior citizen, you may find yourself in a health insurance crisis – no longer covered by an employer’s health insurance policy but needing health insurance more than you ever did before. Of course, Medicare covers some of your medical expenses, but how can you get the best rate on health insurance to cover the gaps Medicare leaves?

What Medicare Covers

Once you are 65 years old, you’re eligible to enroll in Medicare. Medicare can include several programs:

* Medicare Part A, which helps cover inpatient hospital care, nursing home care, hospice care, and some home health care. Most people pay for this coverage through taxes, so they do not pay a deductible or monthly premium.

* Medicare Part B, which helps cover doctors’ services, outpatient hospital care, medical equipment, physical and occupational therapy and some home health care. Most people pay an annual deductible and a monthly premium for this health plan.

* Medicare Part C, Medicare Advantage Plan, which offers you more choices among health plans and extends your benefits.

* Medicare Part D, prescription drug coverage.

In addition, you may need MediGap coverage, which is health insurance that covers what Medicare does not.

Affordable Health Insurance for Senior Citizens

As you can see, health insurance for senior citizens can be confusing. Fortunately, insurance comparison websites can help you gain a clear picture of what health insurance you need, as well as help you find that insurance at a reasonable rate.

All you need to do is go to an insurance comparison website and complete a simple form with information about yourself and your insurance needs. Once you submit the form, you will soon receive quotes for affordable health insurance from multiple A-rated insurance companies. And at the best insurance comparison websites, insurance professionals are standing by to talk with you and answer any health insurance questions you have. (See link below.)

Visit http://www.LowerRateQuotes.com/health-insurance.html or click on the following link to get health insurance quotes for senior citizens from top-rated companies and see how much you can save. You can also get more insurance tips there.

The authors, Brian Stevens and Stacey Schifferdecker, have spent 30 years in the insurance and finance industries, and have written a number of articles on health insurance for senior citizens.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Brian_Stevens

What You Need to Know About Senior Citizens Travel by Mansi Aggarwal

May 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Are you drained of sitting at home, doing babysitting of your grandchildren? Have your dreams to explore the world not turned to reality? Are your eyes longing to capture the grandeur of the world around you? If yes, don’t detain yourself from discovering the world. Your age should not be an impediment in living your life to the fullest.

When it comes to traveling, horde of choices are available for the senior citizens too.

From opting a perfect destination that lives up to their tastes to the mode to travel and the place to cuddle, all lie at their discretion.

· The destination

For those who enjoy basking in glory of the sun at the beaches, locations like Hawaii Islands, Bahamas and the like are ideal holiday spots. The connoisseurs of art and architecture can move to the cities like Barcelona, New Orleans etc. that are swarming with the masterpieces of eminent painters and architects. Evergreen places like Switzerland, Germany and so forth are never meant to be overlooked.

· The Decisive Factor

The determination of a destination is directly proportional to factors like budget, mode to transport, the climatic conditions and the food.

Most of the senior citizens prefer and desire to travel according to their pockets. Since the youth bids goodbye at this age, the potential to earn more takes a backseat. The expenditure is by and large made from the savings that mushroom a little. Keeping in mind the state of affairs of senior citizens, numerous travel agencies offer discount packages that can be availed in the peak as well as the off season.

If you propose to make a trip within the periphery of your country, the costs incurred will be significantly minimized. For instance, you can accomplish your destination by traveling via a bus, a rented car or a train. The fare will be relatively low as compared to outlay on air tickets. But bear in mind that money is not prior to life. If the distance is a bit too long and you haven’t got the muscle to sit for long (in a train or bus) take a flight. Your health always precedes your wealth.

A majestic feel of heaven on earth is readily available on the deck of a cruise in a cruise voyage. There are several cruises that can serve you with the best of all amenities, all you have to do is discuss with your travel agent and search online about it.

At this age you should not excuse food as a crucial factor in determining the venue. A little search on the Internet and your travel agent can familiarize you with the cuisine, tastes of people and the luxury plus the budget restaurants at the place you propose to go. Also if you have a petite idea about the cuisine of the place, you can ask the locals the place they throng to gratify their hunger. This definitely will correspond to your pocket.

Try to leave the home when the weather conditions are adverse there and positive and enjoyable. It is always prudent to make an assessment of the climatic conditions beforehand and plan your trip accordingly.

· Some crucial tips

1. The senior citizens and students should be extra vigilant in carrying cash. Avoid moving with lot of cash. Take your credit card along. This safeguards you against uninvited perils.

2. Carry a mobile phone. If that is unaffordable, leave your complete itinerary and all the contact numbers (of the hotel, villa, apartment etc.) with your children.

3. Pack the clothes with your all your essential and even not so significant medicines.

4. Last but not the least, if on the cards get all the reservations done in advance for at this age you should excuse yourself from the last minute anxiety and stress.

Things can be easy in life, all one needs is a little planning and prudence.

Mansi aggarwal writes senior citizens travel topics. Learn more at http://www.seniortravelcentral.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mansi_Aggarwal

Senior Citizens – Victims No More by Chris Bruno

May 28, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Violent crime against senior citizens used to be unthinkable. It was rare that a street thug would target an elderly person; however criminals of today have a totally different mindset. They prey upon those they perceive to be weak and an easy target and who will offer the least resistance. In the mind of a street thug, seniors fit this category. This alone is why you need to become informed, and do whatever you can to keep yourself from becoming a victim.

Oftentimes senior citizens are led to believe that they have somehow lost the ability to defend themselves against criminals and crime in general. This belief is totally false and in fact there are many quick and easy things seniors can do to defend themselves.

The first thing you should do is find a senior self defense class in your area. Many organizations provide these free of charge. Check with your local police department, YMCA or seniors club in your area. Many community organizations offer these classes free of charge.

Many seniors are opposed to carrying weapons of any kind. This is a thought process that needs to change. Pepper spray or a stun gun are ideal choices and offer a level of protection that will not only boost your confidence but actually allow you to survive an assault by temporarily incapacitating your attacker. Each of these weapons are extremely easy to operate and take just a few minutes to learn.

Because many seniors are so opposed to carrying something such as pepper spray, if you do use it, the attacker will be caught off guard and the element of surprise will buy you the critical time you need to get to a safe location and notify the police. The effects of either weapon are temporary and will not cause permanent injury.

If you are not willing to carry a traditional weapon consider using a cane if you have one. Swing the cane in an “X” pattern, targeting the knees, elbows and other bony parts of the attackers’ body. These strikes will be effective but in very temporary way. They will probably only distract an attacker, so a secondary plan is definitely needed. I would suggest a Personal Alarm. They are a very small discreet device that you can carry in a pocket, purse or on your belt that when activated sound a very loud ear piercing noise which causes your attacker to flee and forget about attacking you. Many alarms are equipped with flashing strobe lights and a few even contain hidden pepper spray giving you the best of both worlds.

Of course, the best way to defend yourself is to not allow yourself to become a victim in the first place. I know this may sound like an obvious statement but simply by adhering to a few easy to follow best practices you can greatly lower your chances of becoming a victim. When you are going out, try and keep jewelry hidden or simply wear it discreetly. Do not carry large amounts of cash. Remain aware of what is going on around you. If you see or even sense something bad, adjust your actions accordingly. Changing the direction you are walking is far easier than recovering from injuries you sustain in an attack.

Senior safety at home is a whole different ballgame but equally as important. Do not keep large sums of money at home. Consider using a debit card and having any monthly payments due you directly deposited into a bank account.

Do not divulge any personal information over the phone or in person. DO NOT withdraw any money from a bank account unless you are absolutely sure you know who you are giving it to. There are a huge number of scams out there and many target seniors. In fact many seniors are scammed out of their life savings simply because they felt sorry for someone or had their emotions preyed upon. If something seems too good to be true, it most definitely is.

When it comes to defending yourself, anyone can improve their abilities. All it takes is the desire to take a stand, educate yourself, and practice some of the techniques mentioned here. With your new found confidence and some practice you will already have done a great deal to lessen your chances of becoming a victim.

Chris Bruno is a retired police officer and contributing author to Safety Products Depot. His certification as a Pepper Spray [http://www.safetyproductsdepot.com/pepper-spray.html] Instructor gives him unique insight into the effectiveness of this defensive weapon. Chris is offering you a 10% discount off any purchase at [http://www.safetyproductsdepot.com] Visit the site now to claim your discount coupon.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Chris_Bruno

Death is Not My Next Goal – More Advice For Senior Citizens by Jerry Elrod

May 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Aging is a phenomenon which introduces all kinds of subjects and issues we  would rather leave alone. Many senior citizens (and others) are timid and  reluctant to broach the subject of death, being ready for it, making necessary  practical plans and decisions and even admitting to its very likelihood.

Death, however, will happen to each of us, whether we admit, like it, deal  with it or not. Thus, the question, why the hesitance? Discussing death does not  speed its coming, nor prevent its happening.

Recent studies have shown that in the United States male longevity for a 70  year old male today will likely extend to 83.2 years. A female, aged 70, will  likely live to 85.8. These statistics come from the Center for Disease Control  and Prevention.

Depending on where you are on that scale, the news may be either good or not  so good. There is a story making the rounds of a person who said, “I wouldn’t  want to live to be 90,” to which his listening friend allowed: “You must not be  89.”

Dear Seniors, do not make Death your next goal, but remember, Denial is not a  river in Egypt. There is room for some in-between choices here, in-between  denial and talking openly and comfortably about death. If you don’t talk about  it, or if you try to ignore its reality, you just create more problems. You make  it something like the huge elephant in the room. Something unknown that is to be  feared. It’s not an elephant… it’s just death, something that will happen to  each of us. And talking about it doesn’t make it happen sooner. Most of us  simply are not in control of when or how we die.

In order for Death to be removed from your list of life goals, it is not  necessary to pretend it isn’t going to happen to you.

In addition to the practical issues of seeing a doctor and participating in  appropriate care disciplines, there are other dynamics surrounding the “D” issue  that need our attention.

  1. Spend time with your significant other and/or family looking at the issues  surrounding death and how they will be managed as necessity and wise assessment  of conditions indicate.
  2. Lay it all out. Do not skirt issues. Be courageous in opening those matters  about which some will find discomfort and even embarrassment. Dealing with it  now is better than delaying. Delay will create considerably more discomfort and  likely more disagreement within the family.
  3. Go so far as to talk about what a memorial or funeral service would look  like. Put it down in a record. Date it. Change it if necessary.
  4. Open up issues like traditional burial or cremation and scattering of ashes.  Deal with economic issues.
  5. If more comfortable, invite a professional, a pastor or other who would not  impose judgment, but allow for wide ranging issues to be exposed and  addressed.
  6. Maybe, make a group list of the issues that really would be helpful to  discuss. Have Kleenex handy for those who will, naturally, have some emotional  moments.
  7. If/when some anecdotal stories are told, have someone write them down for  recall when the time comes for a celebration of life.
  8. While death is not our next goal, this exercise will begin to put it in its  place.

 

Remember the maximum life expectancy in Sweden in the 1860’s was 101. It is  now 108. And, by the way, 70% of the increase is attributed to death rates above  70. Given optimal genes and good medical care, no one, so far, has lived beyond  123. The good news is you and I have about a 1 in 2 billion chance to live to  120.

Death is not a goal, There is an old song which Virginia slaves used to sing  at funerals: “Come down, death, right easy.” For let that be our song, senior  citizens and all.

Article provided by Dr. Jerry D. Elrod. Dr Elrod, and his wife, Dr Sharon  Shaw Elrod, manage Senior Citizen Journal online. For information on retirement,  Baby Boomers and everything related to Seniors, please visit my blog at http://www.seniorcitizenjournal.com/. Links to  other Senior Citizen Journal pages can be found on the blog.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jerry_Elrod

 

Need Self Defense for Senior Citizens? Buy Personal Alarms by Carl Vouer

April 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Human beings are the most dangerous creature ever to walk the Earth. I am not  saying all humans are bad; in fact I like to think that the vast majority of us  are caring, thoughtful, non-violent creatures that pose a threat to absolutely  no one. However, I am not so naive that I don’t realize the fact that there are  those of us out there that truly live without a conscience and have no trouble  nor lose no sleep over hurting others for their own personal gain. What really  concerns me is that these bad people I speak of are not always entirely  unintelligent and because of this they are going to choose targets they feel  will give the least resistance. These bad guys (and gals) are going to take  advantage of people they consider to be of inferior strength when choosing  someone to mug and you know who oftentimes fits that bill? Senior citizens.

Time unfortunately slows us all down and as a result our growing senior  population is finding themselves the target of more and more wrong doings. This  is something that should concern each and every senior citizen and why every  senior should have a means of defending themselves in the unfortunate event of  an attack. The options for defending one’s self are relatively vast but the one  that makes the most sense for senior citizens, in my opinion, is personal  alarms. Personal alarms are ideal for seniors because they are completely safe  to use, unlike a firearm, self-defense baton, pepper spray, stun gun or any of  the other most popular choices available when discussing self-defense.

A personal alarm does not work by incapacitating an attacker but by hopefully  scaring them away with the fear of being apprehended. You see a criminal will  not have a very successful criminal career if that criminal is not afraid of  being caught and a great way for a criminal to be caught is for people to be  watching when he or she commits a crime. And what is a great way to draw  people’s attention? How about with a 130 decibel shriek from a personal alarm?  That will usually do the trick and when an attacker hears that shriek he or she  knows darn well that anybody in the nearby vicinity heard it as well and will be  looking his way immediately. I think chances are pretty good that the second a  senior citizen sets a personal alarm off that the majority of criminals will  turn tail and run from the scene.

So if you are a senior citizen or anyone that wants to add a very effective  measure of safety please consider buying a personal alarm.

Stay Safe,

Carl Vouer

To see more items of self defense for seniors or to buy personal alarms please visit us online

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Carl_Vouer

 

Finding Cheap Senior Travel For Senior Citizens On The Go by Bruce A. Hoover

April 27, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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More and more senior citizens are rediscovering their youth by planning  vacations. Many choose to revisit locations that bring back old memories, such  as revisiting their hometowns, yet many others are stepping it up and taking  their trips to places that are more exotic. Having worked their whole lives and  getting a bit bored with the television and armchair routine, many seniors are  ready to get out-of-town and escape being home bound. Taking these vacations has  been found to be a major asset to their lives. They get to get out and enjoy  life without the hassles that working people face. Therefore, with no deadlines,  and no jobs to return to, seniors are able to have the time of their lives  without the stress that comes with being a full-time employee.

Many seniors are on a tight budget, so the ones who are computer savvy are  turning to the internet to discover cheap senior travel. This is not only great  for them, but the travel agencies, hotels, resorts, and other popular vacation  spots as well. Many discover it is easier and cheaper to book mode of  transportation, hotels and activities in advance. With senior discounts  available worldwide, more are able to visit places they may not have been able  to afford without them. In today’s society, there are many modes of travel, one  can choose flying, cruising, riding a train or road trips in RVs. With so many  choices available, seniors can have a lot of fun deciding and planning their  vacation. Being able to access a wealth of information on the internet helps  them to discover their destinations and plan activities they may not have been  aware of otherwise.

Many find it therapeutic to be able to make decisions and plan activities.  Whether they plan their vacation, or a travel agency does, they are left with  the excitement of their upcoming trip. While many seniors can plan activities  that are physically demanding, others are not so fortunate and have to resort to  planning their trips in places that cater to disabilities. There are more and  more vacation hot spots that are gearing up for seniors and others with  disabilities so finding a great place to visit is not as difficult now for those  with special needs. Some vacation resorts even have fun activities to entertain  those who are unable to get out and participate in activities that are  physically demanding.

It is unfortunate but retirement can make a senior citizen feel as if their  sense of independence is withering away. So, with all of the options available  to those planning vacations, senior citizens are more able to do things they  normally wouldn’t do; and are finding that their sense of independence can  return while they plan and enjoy their travels. Many are even planning vacations  with their families, which makes their travels more memorable for them as well  as their families. In some cases, these vacations are the only time they get to  spend a lot of time together. Some only see family on holidays so being able to  have family together in an exciting place is enticing more and more seniors to  planning travels all around the world. In today’s fast-paced society, even those  that are retired get caught up in the rat race so these vacations are a great  escape for seniors more so now than ever.

Next, by reading this you have come across a number of ways to find cheap senior travel. Click here for more senior citizens travel ideas!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Bruce_A._Hoover

 

Boston-Area Over 55 Community Publishes Free Senior Living Guide

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Boston-Area Over 55 Community Publishes Free Senior Living Guide

Resource Helps Active Adults Untangle Their Senior Living Options
South Weymouth, MA — Mar 26, 2013 / (http://www.myprgenie.com) — The decision to move — whether to an over 55 community or other option — can be challenging. There are a lot of decisions to make. Sometimes, the choices available can seem confusing.
Fairing Way has created a free Senior Living Guide [www.FairingWay.org/LiveConfident] to help transitioning active adults make their decision with confidence. The guide explains:

  • The types of retirement living options and senior housing choices available — and most importantly, which works for you
  • How to set your priorities
  • Common financial considerations
  • The nine questions you must ask before you move
  • When and how to involve your family in the process
  • And much more!

The guide is available as a PDF on Fairing Way’s website. Active adults can download the free guide at www.FairingWay.org/LiveConfident.
While the Fairing Way Senior Living Guide does highlight a few area resources, the resource is not specific to the Boston market.
“Active adults everywhere are struggling with the same questions,” said Fairing Way Executive Director Joyce Haglund. “What options are available to me, or to my parents? What is right for our needs and desires? The Fairing Way Senior Living Guide helps those over 55 make the choice that’s best for them.”
Fairing Way is the Boston area’s newest over 55 community, located within the new SouthField live-work-play development. Sponsored and developed by established, local, not-for-profit leaders in senior living, Fairing Way offers distinctive apartments with flexible services in an intergenerational setting. Download the senior housing guide for free at http://www.FairingWay.org/LiveConfident.

Landscape Seniority: Safe & Efficient Tools for Senior Gardening and Lawn Care

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

One is never too old to enjoy the great outdoors by tending to the garden or mowing the lawn. Your golden years aren’t the time to delegate tasks to others or relinquish landscaping. Plenty of tools exist to make gardening and landscaping a breeze. With the appropriate ergonomic tools and judicious decision-making, you can safely continue your outdoor housekeeping for years to come.

Lawn Care

It may be tempting to give the kid next door a few bucks to mow your lawn, but why not do it yourself? You’ll continue to gain strength and endurance as well as a sense of satisfaction after a freshly mowed lawn. Seniors should consider a mower that’s easy to operate and one that poses little risk. For example, seniors can comfortably sit down on zero-turn mowers and cut the lawn at a swift pace. They can turn on a dime by rotating 180 degrees around its own axis and are adept at swerving around lawn obstacles. Another shrewd choice is the push reel mower, powered by nothing but your own body. These are the simplest mowers one can buy. Speaking of buying, they’re also the least expensive. It’s true that they may take the most effort, but reel mowers require the least maintenance, and they’re the safest by far.

Low-Maintenance Grass

Your lawn needn’t be full of attention-starved grass that requires consistent and frequent work. TreeHugger.com suggests a number of grass types that need little maintenance and water. Zoysia grass, Bermuda grass, St. Augustine grass, buffalo grass and fescue are convenient choices that will grow on despite neglect.

Ergonomic Gardening

Ergonomics is the science of maximizing the efficiency of equipment by reducing discomfort and fatigue for the user. When it comes to seniors and gardening, ergonomic tools are a godsend.

Self-Watering Container – The EarthBox, or a similar self-made self-watering container, provides an incredibly simple solution to growing plants. As its name suggests, this container waters automatically by way of a water reservoir. The EarthBox’s fertilizer strips gives plants the exact nutrients they need without any work on your part.

Radius Shovel – TreeHugger.com suggests the Radius shovel for gardening use. This ergonomic shovel is built with a lightweight fiberglass handle suitable for arthritic gardeners. A sharp and heavy blade easily cuts into the most compacted of soil.

Landscaper’s Wagon – Wheels make everything easier. Plop your heavy pots, plants and gardening materials in the wagon to easily cart off to your garden. Its pneumatic tires traverse the harshest terrain. Plus, the wagon’s sides fold down and form a flatbed.

Garden Kneeler – The garden kneeler cushions your knees during your gardening. The two side handles enable you to raise and lower yourself without back strain. When flipping the eight pound garden kneeler over, it takes on a second function as a comfortable bench.

Top Five Tips To Save Your Vision: EyeCare America Encourages Prevention and Early Detection

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Many people take their vision for granted, but what if you lost your peripheral vision, developed a black spot in the center of your visual field, or even went blind altogether?  For more than 4.2 million Americans living with serious vision loss or blindness,  these and other vision challenges can make it difficult to enjoy life’s simple pleasures such as reading, playing cards, or watching grandchildren grow. Vision loss can also make it difficult to live independently, work, or drive. That’s why it is so important to prevent eye disease and vision loss whenever possible.

Often, preventive care and lifestyle choices can help keep your vision healthy. Ophthalmologists – eye physicians and surgeons – encourage seniors to follow these top five tips to safeguard vision:

  1. Get an eye exam. To protect healthy vision, seniors age 65 and older should have a dilated eye exam every 1-2 years, or as recommended by their ophthalmologist. Visit www.eyecareamerica.org to find out if you or a loved one qualifies for an eye exam at no out-of-pocket cost with one of EyeCare America’s volunteer ophthalmologists.
  2. Know your family history. Eye diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma can run in families, so it’s important to know your family’s history of eye disease and talk to your ophthalmologist about any possible genetic risk factors.
  3. Don’t smoke. Tobacco smoking is directly linked to many adverse health effects, including cataracts and AMD. Studies show that current smokers and ex-smokers are more likely to develop AMD than people who have never smoked.
  4. Eat right. A variety of vegetables, especially leafy green ones, are an important part of an eye-healthy diet. Researchers have found people on diets with higher levels of vitamins C and E, zinc, lutein, zeaxanthin, omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA are less likely to develop early and advanced AMD. For delicious recipes that incorporate these essential nutrients, EyeCare America offers a free, downloadable cookbook, called Feast Your Eyes on This.
  5. Protect your eyes from injuries. An estimated 2.5 million eye injuries occur in the U.S. each year, so it is critical to wear proper eye protection to prevent eye injuries, especially during home projects like gardening and cleaning. Eye injuries can also be prevented by securing loose rugs, railings, or other hazards that could cause falls or slips.

Seniors age 65 and older are at the greatest risk for eye disease and vision loss, and because diseases like AMD and glaucoma often have no early symptoms, comprehensive eye exams are especially important. EyeCare America provides care at no out-of-pocket cost to seniors age 65 and older through its corps of volunteer ophthalmologists across the U.S. and Puerto Rico.

EyeCare America is designed for people who:

  • Are U.S. citizens or legal residents;
  • Are age 65 and older;
  • Have not seen an ophthalmologist in three or more years; and,
  • Do not receive eye care through an HMO or the VA.

To see if you or a loved one age 65 or older is eligible, visit www.eyecareamerica.org. EyeCare America is co-sponsored by the Knights Templar Eye Foundation, Inc., with additional support provided by Alcon. The program is endorsed by state and subspecialty ophthalmological societies.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. Since its inception, EyeCare America has helped more than 1.7 million people.  More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

Ophthalmologists Consider Five Tests and Treatments that Would Benefit from Doctor-Patient Conversations

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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American Academy of Ophthalmology Joins Choosing Wisely® Campaign to Advance Quality Eye Care and Promote Health Care Savings

The American Academy of Ophthalmology today announced it is participating in the Choosing Wisely® campaign, a national initiative of the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation to encourage conversations between patients and their doctors about treatment options and efficient use of health care dollars. The Academy is one of 17 organizations joining Choosing Wisely today – representing more than 350,000 physicians, nurses, pathologists, radiologists and other health care professionals – to release lists of commonly performed tests, procedures and treatments that patients and physicians should discuss.

The United States spends more on health care than many other industrialized nations, yet often does not achieve better health outcomes. This may be explained in part by an overuse of unnecessary and duplicative medical tests. Choosing Wisely, which promotes best practices and better management of health care resources, complements physicians’ efforts to use evidence-based medicine to meet patients’ needs.

To ensure that the best care options are considered for ophthalmic patients, the Academy has identified five common tests and treatments that ophthalmologists and patients should discuss:

  1. Preoperative Medical Tests: Don’t perform preoperative medical tests – such as an electrocardiogram or blood glucose test – prior to eye surgery unless there are specific signs indicating a need for them.
  2. Imaging Tests: Don’t routinely order imaging tests when there are no symptoms or signs of significant eye disease.
  3. Antibiotics for Pink Eye: Don’t prescribe antibiotics for pink eye that is caused by an adenovirus.
  4. Antibiotics for Eye Injections: Don’t routinely provide antibiotics before or after injections into the vitreous cavity of the eye.
  5. Punctal Plugs for Dry Eye: Don’t treat dry eye by inserting punctual plugs before attempting other options, such as medical treatments with artificial tears, lubricants and compresses.

“Some experts estimate that up to 30 percent of health care delivered in the U.S. may be unnecessary or duplicative,” said David W. Parke II, M.D., CEO of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. “Not only does this represent significant waste, but it also underscores patients’ unnecessary exposure to risks associated with any test or procedure. The American Academy of Ophthalmology is participating in Choosing Wisely as a way to support evidence-based medicine and promote greater patient involvement in their eye care. By increasing conversations between ophthalmologists and those they treat, we can better guarantee that patients receive the right eye care at the right time.”

The Academy’s health policy committee led the development of the list of five tests and treatments with input from members and ophthalmic subspecialty societies. Numerous recommendations and supporting evidence were researched and reviewed under the leadership of William L. Rich III, M.D., the Academy’s medical director of health policy.

“In medicine, more isn’t necessarily better,” said Dr. Rich. “Conversations around the five tests and treatments identified by the American Academy of Ophthalmology can reduce the potential for over-treating our patients. We will continue our work to identify treatments that could benefit from better conversations between ophthalmologists and their patients.”

To date, twenty-five specialty societies have released lists through Choosing Wisely. The lists released today will be promoted nationwide through the Choosing Wisely campaign’s consumer partners, including Consumer Reports, AARP, Wikipedia and the National Business Coalition on Health.

The Academy’s participation in the Choosing Wisely campaign is one component of its ongoing efforts to promote responsible use of health care resources, without sacrificing quality of care. The Academy also provides a wide variety of educational programs, products and services to ophthalmologists — medical doctors specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye disease and conditions — and the patients they serve in order to improve patient care. The organization’s EyeSmart® program features the most trustworthy and medically accurate consumer information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries.

To learn more about Choosing Wisely and to view the complete lists and details about the recommendations, visit www.ChoosingWisely.org. To learn how patients can start conversations about the five ophthalmic tests and treatments above, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons — Eye M.D.s— with nearly 32,000 members worldwide.  Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org  The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trusted and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org  to learn more.

About the ABIM Foundation
The mission of the ABIM Foundation is to advance medical professionalism to improve the health care system. We achieve this by collaborating with physicians and physician leaders, medical trainees, health care delivery systems, payers, policy makers, consumer organizations and patients to foster a shared understanding of professionalism and how they can adopt the tenets of professionalism in practice. To learn more about the ABIM Foundation, visit www.abimfoundation.org, read our blog blog.abimfoundation.org, connect with us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.

About Choosing Wisely
First announced in December 2011, Choosing Wisely is part of a multi-year effort led by the ABIM Foundation to support and engage physicians in being better stewards of finite health care resources. Participating specialty societies are working with the ABIM Foundation and Consumer Reports to share the lists widely with their members and convene discussions about the physician’s role in helping patients make wise choices. Learn more at www.ChoosingWisely.org.

City Of Las Vegas Presents Musical Theatre And Concerts Feb. 15-17

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Enjoy Rainbow Company’s “Across The Truckee” At The Historic Fifth Street School

The city of Las Vegas offers family entertainment options Feb. 15-17. The Rainbow Company Youth Theatre’s upcoming production of “Across The Truckee” combines musical theatre, Nevada history and audience participation in a “one-of-a-kind” experience that is bound to please audiences of all ages. “Across the Truckee” is the latest original chapter in the company’s on-going “Nevada Series.” Each year a play with music is developed that highlights Nevada’s exciting history and colorful characters. This season, four of Nevada’s most unusual historic figures are included: Eilley Oram, known as “The Washoe Seeress”; Henry T. Comstock, of Comstock Lode fame; Timothy H. O’Sullivan, ground-breaking photographer of the Civil War; and Adolph Sutro, known as the “the king of the Comstock.” The ending of the play may vary from performance to performance, since the audience will participate with choices! The show will be performed Feb. 15-17 at the Historic Fifth Street School, located at 401 S. Fourth St. Showtimes are 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, with additional 2 p.m. shows Saturday and Sunday. Ticket prices are $7 for adults, $5 for teens/seniors/military and $3 for children ages 12 and younger. For tickets and information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-6553 or 229-6383.

Bring your lunch at noon Friday, Feb. 15, to enjoy the latest installment of the city of Las Vegas’ Downtown Cultural Series of free concerts at the Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse Jury Assembly Room at 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South. Open to the public, the hour-long concert will feature the Emanuel Schmidt Quartet, led by guitarist Emanuel Schmidt. Swiss-born Schmidt earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Music Performance at the Wesley Institute in Sydney, Australia, as well as a doctorate in Communication Processes in Jazz Performance from the Sydney Conservatorium of Music. A versatile musician, he plays drums, keyboards, bass and guitar, and composes/arranges music for a full orchestra. For more information on the artist, go online to http://emanuelschmidt.com/ or call (702) 229-3515 for more details.

Tickets are on sale now for the 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, Guy Davis concert at the Charleston Heights Arts Center, located at 800 S. Brush St. Davis is a musician, composer, actor, director and writer. But most importantly, Davis is a bluesman. The blues permeates every corner of Davis’ creativity. Throughout his career, he has dedicated himself to reviving the traditions of acoustic blues and bringing them to as many ears as possible through the material of the great blues masters, along with African-American stories and his own original songs, stories and performance pieces. For more information on Davis, visit www.guydavis.com/. Priced at $10 in advance and $15 on event day, tickets are available online at www.artslasvegas.org or by calling (702) 229-6383.

City Of Las Vegas Offers Weekend Concerts Feb. 22-23

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Music Aficionados Have Multiple Concert Choices

Everyone is invited to share an evening with the legend¬ary singer/songwriter Peter Yarrow Friday, Feb. 22, starting at 8 p.m. at the Historic Fifth Street School, located at 401 S. Fourth St. A member of the renowned folk-rock group “Peter, Paul and Mary,” Yarrow will look back over his career, telling stories and singing some of the many hits that won Peter, Paul and Mary worldwide acclaim. For more information on the artist, visit http://peteryarrow.net/.

Tickets, priced at $10 in advance and $15 on event day, are available at www.artslasvegas.org or by calling (702) 229-3515. Limited free parking is available at the Historic Fifth Street School. Metered parking is available across the street in parking lots both directly south and west of the school.

Audiences of all ages will enjoy a classical music concert by Walt Boenig’s Dynamic Trombone Quartet Saturday, Feb. 23, beginning at 2 p.m. at the Charleston Heights Arts Center, located at 800 S. Brush St. Tickets are free but require a reservation. For more information on the entertainers, visit www.waltboenigbigband.com/bio.html. For more information or to reserve tickets, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-6383.

The Jester Hairston Music Association, Inc. and community youth will present “Why Do We Sing – The Evolution of African-American Music” Saturday, Feb. 23, beginning at 3 p.m. at the West Las Vegas Library Theatre, located at 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd. The historical music genres of jazz, spirituals and gospel will be explored and performed at this festive occasion. Admission is free, but tickets are required and may be picked up in advance at the West Las Vegas Arts Center, located next door at 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd. Call (702) 229-4800 for tickets and information. For more information on the performers, visit www.facebook.com/pages/Jester-Hairston-Music-Association/165817596783533?sk=info. The program is cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District.

Community Partners for Better Health 8th Annual Choose and Move Festival

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

Community Partners for Better Health (CPBH) is hosting the 8th Annual Choose and Move Festival on Saturday, September 8, 2012, from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., at the Doolittle Community Center, 1950 North J Street, Las Vegas, Nevada. We invite you to join us as an exhibitor at this educational, interactive, and fun event. The festival has proven to be a very popular event for health care providers, health care agencies and Southern Nevada residents. With more than 200 participants last year, we anticipate new additions will draw over 300 people to the event.

The festival encourages our community to adopt healthier lifestyles especially when it comes to regular physical activity and selecting more nutritious foods. Festival planners include the Southern Nevada Health District, City of North Las Vegas, Governor’s Office for Consumer Health Assistance, Clark County Fire Department, 100 Black Men-Las Vegas Chapter, Las Vegas Metro Police Department, American Lung Association, HealthInsight, Nathan Adelson Hospice and numerous other community stakeholders. The festival will feature a variety of free and low-cost health screenings, healthy food demonstrations and information, and free physical activity classes including African dance, belly dance, Latin dance, hula, and Zumba. Additionally, we are working with Jump for Joy Foundation to offer physical activities for our younger attendees.

Attached you will find an exhibitor registration form. We truly appreciate your consideration to participate in the event. We believe that you will find involvement beneficial to your organization’s mission and to the community you serve. You are a valuable resource in helping our community citizens live healthy lives and make positive health choices. The planning committee is developing a strategy to engage attendees more fully with vendors. Look for more on this in July.

If you have questions, please call Community Partners for Better Health, at 702- 256-2724 or Jackie Knudsen, Choose & Move Co-Chairman at 702-755-9035 or email: jacqueline.knudsen@emeritus.com

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 Senior Special Events

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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City Of Las Vegas October 2012 Senior Special Events

Las Vegas Residents Invited To Celebrations, Luncheons & Activities At City Centers

The city of Las Vegas active adult and senior centers offer exercise, fitness, craft, arts, dance, music and computer classes; cards; games; discussion and social groups; luncheons; sports; and special events Monday through Friday to residents age 50 and better. Many of these activities contribute to wellness and a healthy lifestyle. A listing of classes and activities is published in the Beyond the Neon Leisure Guide, available in the centers and online at www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. All activities are subject to change. Most activities require $2 annual membership to city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all senior and active adult centers.

Golf Lessons (ages 50+)
Mondays at 9 a.m. or 10:15 a.m. Registration for October sessions begins Sept. 17.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Bring in a couple of clubs that you need to work on.

Oktoberfest Brunch (ages 50+)
Thursday, Oct. 4, 10 a.m. Registration open Sept. 3-28.
Cost: $3.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.
Celebrate Oktoberfest with some Bavarian brunch delicacies!

Breakfast Nook (ages 50+)
Friday, Oct. 5, 8:30 a.m.
Cost: $3, includes French toast casserole, sausage, fruit, coffee and juice.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Flu & Pneumonia Shots (all ages)
Tuesday, Oct. 9, 9 a.m. to noon.
Cost: Call for information. Various insurances accepted.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Southern Nevada Health District staff will administer flu and pneumonia vaccinations. Call 759-0850 for more information on pricing and which insurances will be accepted.

Chili Cook-off
Wednesday, Oct. 10, noon.
Cost: Free to enter; $2 to taste.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Make your best chili to enter in the annual chili cook-off. Prizes will be awarded to the winner. Salad and cornbread provided for those who taste and help judge the best chili!
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Helping You Understand Your Medicare Benefits and Options (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct., 16, 10 a.m. Registration opens Sept. 17.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Receive information to help you make your best Medicare choices.

Flu Shots (all ages)
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 10 a.m. to noon.
Cost: Call for information.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Southern Nevada Health District will provide annual flu shots. A list of accepted insurances will be available closer to the date of the clinic. Please call to be put on the reservation list.

Annual Texas Hold’em Poker Tournament (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 12:30 p.m.
Cost: $4.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Prepare for this fun tournament by joining the Thursday class at 1 p.m. or playing in the weekly games on Tuesdays and Fridays at 12:30 p.m. Enjoy hot and cold refreshments. Top three winners will receive a prize basket!

Getting Paid to Talk (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 1 to 3:30 p.m. Must be registered by Oct. 5.
Cost: $15.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.
This exciting workshop will teach you how to get paid to talk – by reading for audio books, animated shows and more. The field is wide open. Learn how to market yourself, where to go to find voice-over jobs, how to do voice-overs, etc.

World Food Day Luncheon (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Oct. 17, 11:30 a.m. Registration open Sept. 3-Oct. 12.
Cost: $5.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.
Give back to our community in honor of World Food Day. Bring a non-perishable food item with you and enjoy a delicious lunch. Feel good, doing good!

Oktoberfest Luncheon (ages 50+)
Thursday, Oct. 18, 11:30 p.m.
Cost: $5.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Celebrate the rich heritage of the German people with bratwurst, sauerkraut and a great party!

Flu and Pneumonia Shots (all ages)
Tuesday, Oct. 23, 9 to 11 a.m.
Call the beginning of October for pricing.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Southern Nevada Health District staff will administer flu and pneumonia vaccinations for a fee. Pneumonia vaccination is recommended for adults age 65 and older. For more information on flu vaccines, go online to www.southernnevadahealthdistrict.org/immunizations/flu-shots.php.
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Cooking Club: What Can You Make from a Pumpkin? (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 23, 11 a.m.
Cost: $5.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Lillian’s Fashion Divas (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Oct. 24, 11:00 a.m. for fashion show; brunch immediately following.
Fashion show is free and open to the public. Brunch cost: $3. R.S.V.P. by Oct. 17 for brunch.
West Las Vegas Library Theatre for fashion show, 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd.
Doolittle Senior Center for brunch, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Active adults from Doolittle Senior Center present fashions created in the master seamstress classes. They will showcase fall fashions, including casual wear, evening wear and Sunday’s best. The event is presented by the Doolittle Senior Center and hosted by the city of Las Vegas and Las Vegas-Clark County Library District. Call 229-6125 for more information.

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Seniors Citizens are a high priority in Washoe County

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Seniors Citizens are a high priority in Washoe County

Washoe County is experiencing a rapid demographic shift because of the aging of the “baby boom” generation. Like every community in America, we are evaluating how to provide services to the most vulnerable seniors.
 After an April 2, 2012 presentation by Washoe County Senior Services WCSS), the Joint Meeting of the Board of County Commissioners, Reno City Council, Sparks City Council and Washoe County School District Board of Trustees requested that the Department prepare a report on the cost and benefit of increased funding.
 The Department offers both a $1.2 million and $2.4 million option.
 Please ask your elected officials, in-person, by letter or e-mail, and in testimony at public hearings to support the proposal. The following is a summary:

Washoe County, like all of the United States, is seeing the “Baby Boomers” turn 60 in unprecedented numbers. This demographic shift is having a dramatic impact on seniors, families and our community.
 The senior population is growing faster than any other segment of the Washoe County community; 25% are now over 55, with the age group 55-64 years absorbing 27.3% of all County population growth over the last decade.
Washoe County Senior Services (WCSS) is not able to meet the needs of the rapidly growing number of vulnerable seniors.
 Today, Washoe County Senior Services assists only 8% of the more than 71,000 County residents over the age of 60. We are forecast to have as many as 93,000 over 60 by 2016.
 The Washoe County Senior Center, 9th and Sutro, is 34 years old, and over half of its Meals on Wheels delivery vehicles are over 10 years old.
 In 1985, when voters approved the $.01 Senior Citizens ad valorem Fund in perpetuity, it was believed to be adequate for all future facility, program and service needs. Because of increasing costs, the addition of essential programs and above all, population growth, this is no longer true.
 Almost all Washoe County Senior Services programs have a waiting list.
Washoe County Senior Services helps “Bend the Curve” of health and long term care costs by keeping seniors active, involved and independent.
 Planning to prepare the community for an aging society; leverage new resources.
 Senior Centers operated in partnership with cities and GID that provide classes, activities and events; volunteer opportunities.
 Congregate Meals at 8 locations in senior centers and public housing.
 Outreach and early intervention programs to connect seniors to services as early as possible.
 “Help Line” – Aging and Disability Resource Center – provides information, advice and counseling about health and long term care.
 Social Services, including case management, nursing, Home Delivered Meals and in-home care for the most vulnerable.
 Senior Law for legal matters including advance directives, public benefits appeals, elder law, and housing counseling.
 DayBreak Adult Day is an alternate to nursing home care.
Seniors and their families need help managing the maze of services and choices; many seniors are not able to pay for the services they need
 Almost every Washoe County family will be faced with providing care for aging parents and relatives. Most are not prepared.
 In a 2006 Washoe County needs assessment, only 34% of all seniors said that they could afford to pay for their own care.
WCSS low cost supportive services reduce public expenses by keeping people healthier, longer, supporting independent living in their homes and by delaying or preventing institutionalization. The additional funding would provide services and reduce other costs:
 Congregate Meal sites and Senior Centers
• 20% of the 2,100 seniors report that it is their only meal of the day.
• Site managers, which were eliminated in previous budget cuts, would be restored for all meal sites.
• Provide clerical and social work support for senior centers.
 WCSS “Help Line” provides counseling on long term care and health care options, empowering seniors to make an informed choice on decisions that affect their entire family.
• Expert information, advice and counseling would be available to an additional 5,500 seniors and family members per year.
 Case management and visiting nurse
• An additional 350 seniors would receive medication management, help with medical professionals and an in-home nursing assessment.
• An additional 600 seniors would be assisted by a case manager to coordinate care and arrange for services.
• An additional 400 low-income seniors would get in-home services, such as home care, personal care and escorted transportation that are not available elsewhere.
 Home Delivered Meals provides 1/3 of the USDA Recommended Daily Allowance to homebound seniors, who cannot prepare their own meals.
• Today, 175 (37%) of WCSS current HDM case load need assistance in 2 or more Activities of Daily Living (ADLs – bathing, dressing, eating, toileting, etc.) and receive additional case management, nursing and in-home care. They have received services for at least one year.
• New funding would serve an additional 300 homebound seniors per year; provide an additional 70,000 meals per year, for a total of 180,000.
• Additional funding would help an additional 400 high risk clients
 Senior Law: Provide legal services to an additional 400 people.
 DayBreak Adult Day Health: An additional 10 low-income seniors will get services.
• The annual cost for a DayBreak client is $11,000. Nevada Medicaid Nursing Home cost for the same senior is about $59,000 per year; an annual savings of $48,000 per year, and total potential annual savings of $3.48 million.

Senior Living – An Ideal Place for Retired Seniors (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Everyone wants to live in peace and happiness even in old age, and senior living options are available for these people. In such a fast-paced world, children usually don’t have time to take care of their ageing parents. If they look for some retirement options, however, things could be easier. For all retired people, retirement communities are a great place to spend their lives in happiness and contentment. For most seniors, independence comes with a lot of difficulties, but for those who find it tough to accomplish their daily chores there are assisted living homes. When people get older and their children are unable to take care of them, there are a variety of senior living options.

Most seniors resist frequent change, so selecting a retirement community has to be done with great care. Most of the assisted living homes are set up so that the residents of the facility can have a better quality of life than they would experience in their traditional homes. It has often being observed that when it comes to elder care, the most important thing is to get exercise and have activities that enhance their lives and promote longevity. Improving the quality of life through senior living is a very real possibility, and this is the top goal of the assisted living homes. These facilities are there for all senior citizens, whether they are retired or not and whether they need assistance or not. After retirement, a lot of people tend to stop taking care of themselves as well and try to keep living on their own, but this stage of life ought to be the most enjoyable one. If you want to enjoy your life, then check into the best retirement community.

For retired people, there are a number of senior living options that can be chosen depending on the needs of the individual. The two main choices after retirement are living with family or moving to a retirement community. The choice of these senior homes depends on the overall health, independence, and mobility. If the aged person does not like going very far, then assisted living homes that are located near shopping areas would be best. As we get older, we try to find activities that will keep us engaged and happy. A lot of senior living facilities organize events for elderly people to share their thoughts.

Active seniors who are independent in their daily lives can opt for a regular retirement community which serves their individual needs. Senior citizens need to understand that staying in senior living is not a social stigma, but is a way to enjoy retired life to the fullest without being dependent on anyone. The ideal place for retired people among all the senior living options is the retirement community because it really caters to the needs of retired people.

Horizon Bay’s retirement communities, Active Adult Communities communities and Assisted Living Community redefine life for seniors where they are respected as individuals and encouraged to live life more meaningfully.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Thilo_Best

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5024874

Nevada-Senior-Guide Jitterbug Phone

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Leisure 

www.jitterbugdirect.com

NSG_NovDecJan_2013-14_Web06

Want a cell phone that’s just a phone? Your choice is simple.

All New Jitterbug Plus

  • Plans from $14.99/month
  • No long term contract
  • Easy to see
  • Simple to use

Staying connected is easy with my Jitterbug®!

All my friends — and my kids — have new cell phones. They carry them around with them all day, like mini computers, with little tiny keyboards  and hundreds of programs which are supposed to make their life easier.

Trouble is…people my age can’t use them. The keyboards are too small, the displays are hard to see, and the phones are so complicated that my friends end up borrowing my Jitterbug when they need to make a call.

I don’t mind. I just got a new phone too…the new Jitterbug Plus. Now I have all the things I loved about my old Jitterbug phone along with some great new features that make it even better!

They made it even better…without making it harder to use.

My new Jitterbug phone still has the bright screen and big buttons that make it easy to use. And it still has a dial tone so I know when I make a call.

I love the new amplified speaker. I can enjoy a conversation without struggling to make out every word. Even my friends that talk so quietly you’d think they’re whispering come through loud and clear.

The new camera is a convenient addition that I didn’t think I’d use at first. It helps me remember things I see that are interesting and I can share them with a touch of a button. Sure beats carrying around a separate camera everywhere like I’m a tourist.

Best of all, the new battery seems like it lasts forever! My friends are constantly looking to plug their phones in to recharge their batteries. I can go for days or even a couple of weeks without plugging it in.

Frequently Asked Questions

 

What are the dimensions of the Jitterbug phone?

The Jitterbug phone weighs 3.76 ounces. When the phone is closed, the dimensions are: 3.9″ long x 2″ wide x 0.8″ deep.

 

What type of battery does the Jitterbug phone use?

The Jitterbug phone uses a lithium ion rechargeable cell phone battery, which requires recharging.

 

What makes the Jitterbug Phone different from other cell phones?

The Jitterbug phone offers a standard keypad with large, backlit buttons that are easier to see. The Jitterbug phone is extremely intuitive. The lower part of the display screen is what we call the “Command Area.” This is where we ask what you want to do. Let’s say you are in your phone list and your first contact is highlighted. In the Command Area you will see the question, “Call?” You simply press the “Yes” key or the “No” key. The same is true when you want to activate features like the Speakerphone. Plus, there’s a built-in tutorial, in case you need more assistance.

 

What features does the Jitterbug have for people who have difficulty hearing?

The volume adjusts from low to super-high, and has a Speakerphone option that appears when you move through the volume choices. The volume can also be adjusted while you are on the call. The Jitterbug Plus also is hearing aid compatible, with a M4/T4 rating.

 

Other than the Speakerphone, does the Jitterbug offer any other hands-free features?

Yes. Jitterbug phones are enabled with a Voice Dial feature, which makes it possible to dial contacts or numbers simply by saying the name or number aloud – no preprogramming is required.

 

Do Jitterbug phones have features for people who are visually impaired?

Yes. The Jitterbug has a sharp color screen with menus, messages, and Yes/No questions displayed in larger-than-average lettering. In addition, clear, backlit keys make it easy to use the phone in all light levels.

 

Is roaming and long distance included?

You will be charged a flat rate per minute. All of the per-minute rates include long distance and roaming charges.

 

What is the coverage area for the GreatCall service?

GreatCall covers most of the U.S. where cellular service is available from the major carriers. If you do not have coverage with one of the major carriers in your area, then you may not have access to GreatCall coverage. If you are not sure that you will have coverage in your area then contact Jitterbug customer service and we will check for you.

 

Can I see the Jitterbug before I buy it?

The Jitterbug phone is offered exclusively through telephone ordering and our secure website. We do offer a thirty day trial period and money back guarantee on the phone if you are not completely satisfied, provided you have used fewer than 30 minutes of talk time. You will still be responsible through that date for the new service and any charges associated with it.

 

What if my Jitterbug phone does not work in my area? Can I return it?

All Jitterbug phones come with a thirty-day money-back guarantee on the phone, however you must have used fewer than 30 minutes of talk time. You will still be responsible through that date for the new service and any charges associated with it.

 

Will I be charged for calls to 911?

No. All calls to 911 are free.

 

Will I be charged for calls to the Jitterbug operator?

Calls to our operators are equal to 5 minutes of talk time per connection, plus talk time used during the operator connect call. You can use your free minutes or service pack minutes to cover these charges.

 

Will the Jitterbug phone accept incoming calls?

Yes, the Jitterbug phone accepts incoming calls.

 

Do the Jitterbug phones offer GPS tracking?

No, not at this time.

 

How do I return my Jitterbug phone?

To return your Jitterbug phone for any reason, you must contact the GreatCall Customer Service department to receive a Return Authorization. The Customer Service Representative will tell you how to return the phone.

Get your new Jitterbug Plus today and save!

  • For a limited time, save $20 on your new Jitterbug phone
  • Free Car Charger valued at $24.99 when you order today!
  • 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed
  • Get 200 anytime minutes For Life with our Basic 19 Plan for only $19.99/month — DOUBLE the normal 100 minutes for a limited time only.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Nevada Aging and Disability Services Division

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

http://www.nvaging.net/

The Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD) in the State of Nevada, Department of Health and Human Services, represents Nevadans aged 60 years and older and those with disabilities.

Mission Statement The Aging and Disability Services Division provides leadership and advocacy in the planning, development and delivery of a high quality, comprehensive support service system across the lifespan. This allows all of Nevada’s elders, adults and children with disabilities or special health care needs to live independent, meaningful, and dignified lives in the most integrated setting appropriate to their needs. Developmental Services

State of Nevada Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD)

Programs/Services

 

Advocate for Elders

Advocacy, assistance, information and referral to frail seniors, who are 60 years of age or older, primarily homebound and living in the community, and their caregivers.

Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs)

Provides citizen-centered “one-stop” entry points into the long-term support system. Serves individuals in need of long-term support, caregivers, and those planning for future long-term support needs.

Assisted Living (AL) Waiver

Assisted living supportive services to eligible individuals in a residential facility as an alternative to nursing home placement.

 

Community Options Program for the Elderly (COPE)

Non-medical services to older persons to help them maintain independence in their own homes as an alternative to nursing home placement. Similar to the HCBW Program.

 

Disability Rx (External link) Assistance with the cost of prescription medicines to qualified individuals with disabilities.

 

Disability Services (External link)The Office of Disability Services provides resources at the community level which promote equal opportunity and life choices for people with disabilities through which they may positively contribute to Nevada.

Elder Protective Services (EPS)

For persons 60 years old and older who may experience abuse, neglect, exploitation, or isolation.

 

Grants

Information for current and/or prospective grantees.

 

Home and Community Based Waiver (HCBW formerly CHIP)

Non-medical services to older persons to help them maintain independence in their own homes as an alternative to nursing home placement.

 

Homemaker Program

General housekeeping, limited meal preparation, shopping, laundering, errands, standby assistance with bathing, and home management services.

 

IDEA Part C Office

Provides oversight of Part C (early intervention services) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Addresses issues and problems faced by residents in long term care facilities, which includes residential facilities for groups.

 

Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)

The goal of the SMP program is to empower seniors to prevent Medicare/health care fraud through outreach and education.

 

Senior Rx

Nevada’s plan to provide Nevada seniors relief from the high cost of prescription medicine.

 

Senior Tax Assistance/Rent Rebate Program

This program is no longer available.

 

State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP)

Medicare Counseling Information

Counseling and assistance to Medicare Beneficiaries in Nevada, utilizing a statewide network of volunteers.

 

Taxi Assistance Program (TAP)

Discounted taxicab fares to seniors and persons with disabilities in Clark County. (Washoe County also has a program of this type.

 

 

Waiver for the Elderly in Adult Residential Care (WEARC)

Non-medical services in a group care setting to offer individuals a less expensive alternative of supervised care in a residential setting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide The Bridge – Las Vegas

www.thebridgeatparadisevalley.com

The Bridge

The Bridge of Paradise ValleyRetirement when you want it. Assistance when you need it.Imagine living in a beautiful, peaceful environment, surrounded by friends and activities.

Enjoy an enriching retirement at The Bridge at Paradise Valley

Our community facilities are specifically designed to encourage seniors to live their retirement years as actively and as independently as possible. Assisted Living at The Bridge at Paradise Valley allows seniors to live carefree lifestyles – because we take care of the details! Our services include restaurant-style dining, housekeeping, and apartment maintenance. We are committed to making The Bridge at Paradise Valley a place you will love to call home right here in Las Vegas Nevada!

The Bridge at Paradise Valley features the finest in Assisted Living. With stunning surroundings, outstanding services and an abundance of amenities, our residents are proud to call The Bridge at Paradise Valley home. Independent Living combines community living with the privacy of your own apartment, and Assisted Living offers the same amenities in addition to personalized services. From a dynamic activities schedule to our hospitable staff, our goal is to promote an active, carefree lifestyle.

Our residents enjoy restaurant-style dining, housekeeping services, scheduled transportation, apartment  maintenance and a full calendar of recreational and wellness activities as part of a convenient,  month-to-month lease.  And, from live  entertainment to themed parties and local outings, our events are catered to seniors.

We welcome the opportunity to introduce you to our services  and to show you how The Bridge at Paradise Valley offers a rejuvenating retirement  lifestyle.

The Bridge at Paradise Valley is part of the Century Park family of senior living communities. Headquartered in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Century Park manages senior retirement properties located throughout the   United States.

Discover The Bridge at Paradise Valley

Life at The Bridge at Paradise Valley offers opportunities and advantages that seniors in the Las Vegas region have come to love and want to keep as part of their active lifestyle.

Las Vegas, Nevada, is more than just bright lights and luxury resorts. It is a great place to live. Located at the southern tip of the Sierra Nevadas, Las Vegas was founded by Mormon missionaries in 1902. World class shopping, dining, and entertainment are all easily accessible from The Bridge at Paradise Valley.

There are plenty of activities available to the Assisted Living residents at The Bridge at Paradise Valley. Some of the weekly choices include Bingo, card games, and Wii games. However, there is always time for relaxation, and The Bridge at Paradise Valley’s park-like grounds – which include a gazebo and a picnic area – are the perfect place for a leisurely visit with family or friends.

Senior Care Facility located in Las Vegas Nevada

Outstanding Retirement Services and Amenities

At The Bridge at Paradise Valley, you will discover a truly unique way to live.  We specialize in combining elegant amenities with the comforts of home.  Our outstanding services are offered in an inviting atmosphere where caring, professional staff lavish you with attention while respecting your individuality and privacy.

Facilities

  • Several apartment floor plans to choose from
  • Community dining room
  • Wellness center
  • Cozy lounge with fireplace
  • Beauty salon and barber shop
  • Gift shop
  • Ice cream parlor
  • Library

Services

  • Delicious restaurant-style dining three times each day planned by a registered dietician
  • Daily living assistance including bathing, dressing, and medication management
  • Transportation throughout the week
  • Housekeeping service

Activities

  • Wii games
  • Bingo
  • Restaurant outings
  • Exercise classes
  • Afternoon socials
  • Many other social, recreational, educational programs, and cultural events

Grounds Features

  • Landscaped courtyards with gazebo and picnic area
  • Beautifully maintained grounds perfect for walking

 

 

2205 E. Harmon
L.V. NV 89119
702-369-6964


Assisted living communities offer help with non-medical aspects of daily activities in an atmosphere of separate, private living apartments that encourage independence. In addition to providing meals, transportation for medical appointments, activities and pleasure trips, assisted living provides linens and laundry service, assistance with dressing and bathing, reminders regarding medication, and assistance with eating, transferring to and from a wheelchair, toileting, etc. This group setting also provides daily social activities and entertainment for the residents.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Lakeview-Terrace-Boulder-City

www.lvterrace.com

Welcome to Lakeview Terrace of Boulder City Assisted Living Community

Boulder City Assisted Living

Lakeview Terrace of Boulder city is a close, intimate assisted living community, located in a small, friendly historic town outside of Las Vegas.  We enjoy the natural beauty of Lake Mead, the grandeur of the mountains, and the views of the big horn sheep in our front yard.  The glitz and glamour of Las Vegas is only minutes away!

Whether you are a Boomer seeking the best for your parent, a senior interested in securing your own future care, or someone who values the companionship and wisdom of elders—you have started in the right place. Our mission guides us in creating a senior services environment where elders direct their lives. We support each individual’s choices and desires to be healthy, embrace life-long learning, and experience elderhood to its fullest.

At Lakeview Terrace, we believe in the power of the team, families, and elders working together to create a real sense of community. We invite you to visit Lakeview Terrace of Boulder City to experience the joy and security we can help provide.

Boulder City, NV Senior Care Options

Lakeview Terrace of Boulder City provides a full range of exceptional senior living options. Our  community offers all of the comforts of home with the added benefit of a  team of experienced, caring professionals dedicated to providing you or  your loved one with quality service.

Senior Care Boulder City Services & Amenities

Welcome  to your new home at Lakeview Terrace of Boulder City in Boulder City, NV. As soon as you step  foot into our beautiful senior living community, you’ll  feel right at home.

Lakeview Terrace of Boulder City offers the finest senior living in Boulder City, including daily  activities, organized outings, nutritional meals, a variety of exercise  programs and much more. Our programs are individually designed for each  senior living option. Whether you are seeking specialized memory care, or a more independent or residential care style of living, we’d love to welcome you or your loved  one home at Lakeview Terrace of Boulder City.

 

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Sunrise Palms – Las Vegas

http://www.sunriseseniorliving.com/

Sunrise Palms Apartments

Sunrise Palms ApartmentsLuxury Apartments…
Affordable Rents1420 Treeline Drive
Las Vegas
702-431-2277

  • 1 & 2-Bedroom Apartment Homes
  • Gated Community
  • Free Resident Shuttle Bus Service (Shopping
    & Entertainment)
  • Emergency Pull Cords
  • Full Size Washer/Dryer in each apartment
  • Microwave & Dishwasher
  • Gas Cooking & Heating
  • Elevator Access to All Floors
  • Sparkling Swimming Pool/Relaxing Spa
  • Computer Center with high-speed internet
  • Library & Billiards
  • Exciting Planned Activities
  • Covered Parking
  • Affordable Rents. Income Restricted
  • Pets Welcome

Office Hours:
Mon-Fri 8-5, Sat 10-5

The Sunrise Difference

There’s no secret to Sunrise Senior Living’s success. Our resident-centered approach allows Sunrise seniors to maintain independence and dignity, even as their needs change.

Sunrise was founded to create senior living that champions quality of life — a mission that has helped to completely redefine senior care in the U.S. We believe that no two people are alike and that no two residents require the same service. Sunrise residents benefit from this principle through the individually tailored care delivered by our team members every day.

Our Story

Our approach to providing the best possible lifestyle for each resident has set Sunrise apart for more than 30 years, and has helped us to become an experienced and innovative provider of senior living services. The Sunrise Story shares how Founders Paul and Terry Klaassen helped transform traditional views on elder care through their belief in individualized, resident-centered care.

Rocking Chairs

The Sunrise Signature Experience

From our room layouts and interior decor to our designated care managers and community pets, Sunrise takes great care to incorporate details that enhance quality of life for seniors. Learn more about Sunrise Senior Living’s holistic approach to creating a warm and welcoming environment through the The Sunrise Signature Experience.

Sunrise Signature Dining

The Sunrise Signature Dining Program is designed for the unique nutritional needs of older adults. Our community chefs incorporate fresh, flavorful ingredients into traditional, favorite recipes and tastes from around the world. Sunrise’s Assisted Living, Independent Living, Memory Care and Short-Term Stay residents all enjoy three delicious, well-balanced meals served daily featuring a variety of menu choices and snacks available throughout the day.

To incorporate elements of Sunrise Signature Dining at home and learn the latest news on senior nutrition, visit the Sunrise Senior Eats Blog or subscribe to our RSS feed.

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!