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chronic pain | Nevada Senior Guide

Northern Nevada Medical Center Pain Management Center First Program

Sparks, NV, April 4, 2013 – Northern Nevada Medical Center’s Pain Management Program recently earned The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval™ in Low Back Pain. The program is the first in the nation to receive this certification.

This certification recognizes NNMC’s dedication to continuous compliance with The Joint Commission’s state-of-the-art standards. To achieve this prestigious certification, the hospital underwent a rigorous on-site evaluation by The Joint Commission. NNMC earned certification by proving compliance with nationally developed standards including infection prevention and control, leadership and medication management.

The Pain Management Center is co-managed by NNMC and Nevada Advanced Pain Specialists and offers a multidisciplinary approach to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic pain.

“At the Pain Management Center, our goal is to return patients to a maximum level of functioning and independence by identifying the source pain and using advanced techniques to reduce the level of pain and suffering,” said Denis Patterson, DO, Medical Director of the Pain Management Center. “We are honored that The Joint Commission has recognized our program as a center of excellence.”

The Pain Management Center works with patients to identify the source of pain, which may be a specific disc, nerve root, joint or tendon. Physicians then use innovative image-guided techniques and therapies to target the precise area of the pain.

“The Joint Commission certifications verify that NNMC’s Pain Management Center is truly a center of excellence for low back pain, and this is a major step toward maintaining excellence and continually improving the care we provide,” said Tiffany Meert, Chief Operating Officer, Northern Nevada Medical Center.

“In achieving Joint Commission certification, Northern Nevada Medical Center has demonstrated its commitment to the highest level of care for its low back pain patients,” said Jean Range, M.S., R.N., C.P.H.Q. executive director, Disease-Specific Care Certification, The Joint Commission. “Certification is a voluntary process, and I commend Northern Nevada Medical Center for successfully undertaking this challenge to elevate its standard of care and instill confidence in the community it serves.”

NNMC also has certifications in stroke, knee replacement, hip replacement and spine surgery by The Joint Commission. NNMC is also an Accredited Chest Pain Center by the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care. NNMC is the only hospital in the state with all of these distinctions.

For more information about the Pain Management Center, contact 775-284-8650

Pediatric Flatfoot – Cause for Alarm?

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Untreated Flat Feet in Children Can Result in Chronic Pain, Reduced Mobility

and an Increased Risk for Obesity

 

Parents keep a close eye on their growing children, watching for proper development and alert for any sign of a problem because small problems can have big implications. Surgeons at the Annual Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) this week are conferring with one another on Pediatric Flatfoot, a childhood condition that, if left untreated, can result in permanent deformity in adulthood. Flatfoot deformity makes mobility and exercise painful, increasing the risk of reduced cardiovascular health and obesity.

“Parents never want their child to undergo a surgical procedure,” says Mary Crawford, DPM, FACFAS, an Everett, Washington foot and ankle surgeon and conference presenter. “But uncorrected symptomatic flatfoot can lead to chronic pain and instability as the child ages into adulthood. Children will be on their feet for a long time to come. It’s vital to keep those feet healthy. A foot and ankle surgeon can help parents understand the options – surgical and non-surgical – for treating pediatric flatfoot.”

 

Not all children have symptoms, but others will complain of pain, tenderness or cramping in the foot, leg, and knee. Parents may notice an outward tilting of the heel, awkwardness or clumsiness in walking and difficulty with shoes. Pediatric flatfoot makes participating in activities more difficult, so parents should take note if their child is unable to keep up with playmates, tires easily or voluntarily withdraws from physical activities.

 

To diagnose a pediatric flatfoot, a foot and ankle surgeon examines the child’s foot in weight bearing and non-weight bearing positions, both in and out of shoes. The physician also notes how the child walks and evaluates the foot’s range of motion. In some cases, flat feet are associated with issues of the hip and knee, so the physician may examine those as well.

 

For further detailed analysis, the physician may order imaging tests such as x-ray, a CT scan, MRI or bone scan. Family history will be evaluated as well, since the presence of flatfoot disorder in the family increases the possibility of flatfoot in the child.

 

“There are different types of flatfoot deformities,” notes Crawford. “Thorough testing helps us pinpoint the causes of the flatfoot disorder and develop an appropriate treatment plan.”

 

Pediatric flatfoot can be divided into two categories, flexible and rigid. Flexible flatfoot is characterized by a normal arch when non-weight bearing, or sitting, and disappearance of the arch when standing.  There may or may not be symptoms. In the case of rigid flatfoot, however, the arch is stiff and flat when both sitting and standing. In most cases, children with rigid flatfoot display symptoms associated with the condition. In either case, flexible or rigid flatfoot, there are a variety of underlying reasons, requiring different treatments.

 

Babies often appear to have flat feet due to cramped positioning inside the womb, and the symptoms will abate with time. In other cases, the surgeon recommends stretching exercises or a soft brace for a short period. Children who do not exhibit symptoms typically do not require treatment, but will be monitored and reevaluated periodically by the foot and ankle surgeon.

 

For children who do exhibit symptoms, the physician may recommend physical therapy, shoe modifications, anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen to reduce pain and inflammation, or an orthotic device. This device fits inside the shoe and supports the structure of the foot. In some cases, surgery is the best alternative.

 

For more information on pediatric foot and ankle conditions or injuries, visit the ACFAS patient health education website, FootHealthFacts.org.

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The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of over 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons.  Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research and provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its consumer website, FootHealthFacts.org.

Lisfranc Injury: Easy to Miss, Hard to Get Over

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care 

Left untreated, this little-known foot injury can lead to serious long-term problems

 

Elite athletes like NFL quarterback Matt Schaub and wide receiver Santonio Holmes had productive seasons ended by the little-known and often overlooked Lisfranc injury, a serious foot injury that few have heard of and no one wants.  But foot and ankle surgeons at the Annual Scientific Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) this week are evaluating how to effectively diagnose and treat this injury, which can result in severe long-term complications like chronic pain, osteoarthritis and even foot deformities.

Relatively uncommon, found in only 1 of every 55,000-60,000 people annually, Lisfranc injuries occur in the midfoot – where the long bones leading up to the toes (metatarsals) connect to the bones in the arch (tarsals).  “The Lisfranc complex is a critical joint in propulsion during walking and running.  Unfortunately, injuries there are easily overlooked.  As many as thirty percent of Lisfranc injuries are missed at initial diagnosis by providers who are not foot and ankle specialists.  The long-term effects can be debilitating,” observes Cleveland, Ohio foot and ankle surgeon Mark Hardy, DPM, FACFAS, and a conference presenter.

 

Diagnosis can be difficult because the signs, even during examination and imaging, can be extremely subtle. Injuries most often occur to car accident victims where the foot is jammed into the floorboard or to athletes when the foot is planted and twisted.  Direct trauma injuries can result when a heavy object is dropped on the foot.  “Most people don’t have an appreciation of the amount of force required to disrupt the Lisfranc complex.  Whether you’re an athlete or a laborer, early and appropriate treatment is mandated,” says Hardy.

 

Lisfranc injuries can also result simply from missing the last step on the stairs; even a minor slip and fall can cause serious injury. Symptoms of a Lisfranc injury may include swelling of the foot, pain throughout the midfoot upon standing or during examination, inability to bear weight, bruising on the bottom of the foot in the arch area, and an abnormal widening of the foot, possibly signaling dislocation.

 

Lisfranc injuries fall into three categories; sprains, fractures and dislocations. Sprains typically do not require more than rest and recuperation time, as they are comparable to ankle sprains.  In a fracture, a break in a bone in the Lisfranc joint occurs. In a dislocation, the bones are forced from their normal positions. In severe cases, both fractures and dislocations occur. In fractures and dislocations, surgery is often the best option. Patients hope for a non-surgical response, but foot and ankle surgeons are well aware of the dangers associated with putting off necessary surgery.

 

“A number of factors impact the surgeon’s decision on treatment options; the patient’s age, overall health and activity level,” says Hardy. “Because of the possible long-term impact of this injury, our chief objective is ensuring a positive outlook for the future.”

 

Wires, pins and even surgical buttons can be used to stabilize the joint, both permanently and in some cases temporarily. Some promising studies have focused on the effectiveness of a minimally invasive technique that can help reduce the recuperation period.

 

“Lisfranc injuries can be successfully treated when properly diagnosed and treated in a timely manner.  If you have experienced any sort of foot trauma and symptoms appear, it’s time to see a foot and ankle surgeon,” urges Hardy. “Especially in the case of Lisfranc injuries, the earlier someone visits a foot and ankle surgeon, the greater the likelihood of a positive outcome.”

 

For more information on foot and ankle injuries and conditions, visit the ACFAS patient education website, FootHealthFacts.org.

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The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of over 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons.  Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research and provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its consumer website, FootHealthFacts.org.

National Surgical Association Comes to Las Vegas

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) is hosting its 71st Annual Scientific Conference in Las Vegas on February 11-14, 2013 at Mandalay Bay Resort & Conference Center. ACFAS is a professional society of more than 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons dedicated to promoting the art and science of foot, ankle, and related lower extremity surgery; addressing the concerns of foot and ankle surgeons; and advancing and improving standards of education and surgical skill.

This year’s conference will bring about 1,500 surgeons and 150 exhibiting companies to the city of Las Vegas and we are looking forward to the Las Vegas experience! During the conference our surgeons will discuss the latest trends and procedures in foot and ankle surgery to help improve the health and quality of life for patients. Three of those topics have been turned into consumer-aimed press releases for distribution during the conference. The three press releases, which are embargoed until the conference, include:
Smoking and Bone Healing – A Risky Combination: Smokers take nearly 50 percent longer to heal after surgery than non-smokers. For every non-smoking patient whose bones heal normally, four smokers will experience non-union, or failure of the bone to mend. Surgeons discuss ways to treat this challenging patient population.
Lisfranc Injury – Easy to Miss, Hard to Get Over: Left untreated, this little-known and often overlooked foot injury can lead to serious long-term problems like osteoarthritis, chronic pain and even foot deformities. Surgeons assess the best treatment options for this complex injury that seems to be afflicting more and more professional athletes.

Pediatric Flatfoot Deformity – A Cause for Alarm? Left untreated, pediatric flatfoot poses a serious developmental threat to children. Foot and ankle surgeons re-examine the best course of treatment for optimal long-term health.
Please contact Tracy Hulett or Melissa Matusek if you are interested in receiving advance copies of these embargoed releases, or if you are interested in setting up interviews/photo opportunities with the College’s physician media spokespeople. You can reach us by e-mail at the below addresses or by phone at 773-693-9300. You can also visit FootHealthFacts.org, the College’s patient education website for more valuable foot and ankle health information.
Thank you and we hope to see you in Vegas!
Tracy Hulett
Manager, Public Relations and Communications
tracy.hulett@acfas.org
Melissa Matusek
Director of Marketing and Public Relations
melissa.matusek@acfas.org

Helping Hands Surgical Care Announces Second Annual Charity Surgery Day

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Local nonprofit seeks qualified patients to receive medically necessary surgery at no cost

Dr. Kevin Petersen, and Kelly Petersen, co-founders of Helping Hands Surgical Care (HHSC), a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization whose mission is to fund and facilitate surgeries for uninsured Nevadans without the means to pay for medically necessary surgeries, announce the second annual Charity Surgery Day, Nov. 13, 2012. HHSC doctors will provide 10 free surgeries that day to uninsured Nevadans without the means to pay and who do not qualify for government assistance through plans such as Medicare.

Dr. Petersen, a board certified general surgeon who has practiced for more than 26 years, along with his wife, Kelly, HHSC’s unpaid executive director, launched HHSC last year to end chronic pain and suffering for Nevadans with no other options. Since the organization’s inaugural Charity Surgery Day on Nov. 15 last year, HHSC has performed 24 free surgeries for uninsured Nevadans.

HHSC is seeking patients who may qualify to receive medically necessary surgery at no cost on Charity Surgery Day. Applicants must qualify both financially and medically and are screened via an advisory panel comprised of medical professionals.

Qualified patients must have a stable, chronic, non-emergency condition that requires surgery to restore a disabled patient to normal function or to remove a potentially life threatening condition, such as hernia repair, gall bladder removal, select gynecological surgeries, select back surgeries and cataract removal. Candidates must reside in Nevada, lack medical insurance and the resources to pay for surgery. They must also be acceptable surgical candidates. To review patient eligibility requirements and apply for surgery, visit www.HelpingHandsSurgicalCare.com and click on the How to Apply link.

In addition to Petersen, doctors working with HHSC include Allan Stahl, M.D., cardiology, Michael Verni, M.D., urology; Cameron Earl, M.D., plastic surgery; Jeannie Khavkin, M.D., otolaryngology and facial plastic surgery; Yevgeniy Khavkin, M.D., spine surgery; Ronette Cyka, M.D., gynecology; and George McMickle, M.D., ophthalmology and eye surgery. Medical District Surgery Center, has once again committed to donating the use of operating rooms on Charity Surgery Day.

“This past year has been one of the most gratifying in my entire career,” said Dr. Petersen, who has personally performed several of the organization’s free surgeries over the past year. “Helping people to get back their lives, to go back to work, to restore their ability to provide for their families and to start enjoying life again, is incredibly rewarding and reminds me of the reason I practice medicine,” said Petersen. “The spirit of HHSC has caught on in the medical community, and we are grateful for the other doctors who have willingly joined our program. It is truly a team effort that takes members of the entire medical community working together to make a difference.”

While all participating doctors waive their fees, surgery isn’t free. Costs such as lab fees, anesthesia, prescription, nurses and surgical techs must still be paid.

To volunteer to provide medical services, to make a donation that covers hard costs of surgery, or to inquire about patient qualifications to receive charity surgery, call 702-242-5393 or visit www.HelpingHandsSurgicalCare.com.

About Helping Hands Surgical Care
Helping Hands Surgical Care is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization whose mission is to fund and facilitate surgeries for uninsured and underinsured individuals without the means to pay for medically necessary, quality of life surgeries. Founded by Dr. Kevin Petersen of Las Vegas, Nevada based No Insurance Surgery, Helping Hands Surgical Care values the health and well-being of each individual regardless of their ability to pay. The organization is guided by its focus on the physician-patient relationship and its dedication to transforming and improving the lives of those it serves. For more information, visit www.HelpingHandsSurgicalCare.com or call 702-242-5393.

Healthy Aging: Up2Me

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Healthy Aging: Up2Me
According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than 125 million people suffer from at least one chronic illness. If you are an adult with a chronic condition such as diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, heart disease, chronic pain or anxiety, this Healthy Aging : Up2Me workshop can help you.

It’s also important for family caregivers to avoid developing a chronic illness due to stress and neglect of their own health and well being.
• Join this FREE 2 1/2 hour workshop held each week for six weeks.
• Learn from trained volunteer leaders who have cared for those with chronic
health conditions.
• Set goals for yourself.
Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health
888 W. Bonneville Ave • Las Vegas, NV 89106
Fridays: September 28 – November 2, 2012
12:30 – 3 p.m.
Sign up with Susan Hirsch at hirschs2@ccf.org or 702-483-6023.

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!