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Inspirational Stamps Teach History of Civil Rights

January 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
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11725_A(Family Features)  The influence of family can be a powerful thing. When asked who inspired her as a child, Rosa Parks, an extraordinary American activist, answered, “My family, I would say, my mother, and my maternal grandparents. I grew up with them.”

 

On December 1, 1955, Parks was arrested in Montgomery, Alabama, for refusing to give up her seat on a municipal bus to a white man. Her arrest sparked a boycott of the Montgomery bus system that lasted longer than a year, posing an ultimately successful challenge to racial segregation and inspiring others to similar action.

 

Rosa Parks’ lifelong dedication to civil rights has influenced generations of Americans. The U.S. Postal Service wants its 2013 Civil Rights set of stamps to continue to educate and inspire. It released the Rosa Parks Forever® Stamp this year, along with a stamp commemorating the day 50 years ago when nearly a quarter of a million people came together in Washington, DC, to participate in the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. A third stamp in the Civil Rights set celebrates the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation on Jan. 1, 1863, by President Abraham Lincoln.

 

Parents looking for ways to teach their children about historic American events like these can turn to stamps for fun, interactive ways to discuss national milestones and iconic figures with their children outside the classroom. Since 1893, the U.S. Postal Service has issued limited-edition stamps that honor prominent people, places, icons and events of contemporary American life. These miniature works of art serve as excellent resources for teaching about our country and our culture in a new and exciting way that reaches beyond a textbook.

 

In addition, the U.S. Postal Service has developed a worksheet to help guide exploration into civil rights and equality. The worksheet features a “how to” guide for making a family tree, as well as a coloring sheet and exercise that empowers children to think about what equality means to them. Download the worksheet and find other resources at http://blog-stampofapproval.com.

 

Educators will want to explore the U.S. Postal Service’s Community Connection website, found at www.uspsconnection.com, which brings the history and heritage of the Postal Service’s 238 years into elementary grade classrooms, using stamps as a catalyst to spark conversations and learning opportunities for students.

 

Twelve civil rights pioneers, including Mary Church Terrell and Mary White Ovington, have also been honored in the past with their own postage stamp. Every year the Postal Service commemorates notable leaders and cultural milestones through other stamp collections, such as the Black Heritage series and the American Treasures series.

 

Photos courtesy of Daniel Afzal/United States Postal Service

Ways Senior Citizens Can Keep Young by Charice Louise

April 19, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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No one wants to grow old before his or her time. There are some things senior  citizens can do that will keep them looking and feeling younger. Consider these  seven ways seniors can stay young.

Geriatric Massage is one of the best things senior citizens can do for  themselves. The massage of the muscles improves blood circulation by moving  blood cells that may have become trapped in the capillaries. The massage  provides relief for stiff and sore muscles resulting in the person feeling  better. As muscles are released, the individual has more freedom of movement  resulting in an improved posture. Many seniors report fewer problems with  insomnia or other sleep problems after a massage.

Senior citizens soon learn that eating healthy is in their best interest. A  healthy diet provides the needed fiber to keep the individual regular and fight  the discomfort of constipation. Eating healthy food provides the body with  antioxidants to fight disease and can prevent health problems. The senior who  selects healthy foods is more likely to maintain a healthy weight, one of the  keys to living a more active life with fewer health problems.

There is a tendency of some seniors to withdraw into their own homes and  avoid socializing with others. However, you need to socialize in order to stay  young. If you have hobbies that you love, now is the best time in life to  partake in them. Make an effort to remain in touch with friends and family. The  banter of conversations with those outside your own home is necessary to keep  your mental functions sharp.

Exercise has many positive benefits for the senior citizen. In addition to  making the person look younger and fit, exercise can improve flexibility and  increase mobility. A workout releases endorphins, chemicals that help to improve  the overall mood. The person who is in shape is less likely to experience falls,  which can lead to broken bones.

Retirement can be a joyous time; however, it is easy to begin to feel that  your existence on earth is no longer making a difference. Seniors that get  involved stay younger by knowing that their presence matters. Many volunteer  organizations need help. Become a grandma or grandpa volunteer at local schools.  Volunteer at a hospital. Use your time to benefit your church, synagogue or  other house of worship.

Use your brain to keep young. Get a library card and read on a regular basis.  Enroll in a community college course to learn something new. Keep your brain  challenged using crosswords, puzzles and games.

Use meditation to reduce stress on a daily basis. Use relaxing exercises such  as tai chi or yoga (often available at your local Y) to reduce your stress  load.

Massage Envy Spa Valencia, CA is Valencia’s most affordable spa. Visit them  online today at http://www.massageenvy.com/clinics/CA/Valencia.aspx, or visit  their blog at http://expertmassagetherapy.com/valencia/.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Charice_Louise

 

Gift Ideas For Senior Citizens Perplexing You? 5 Tips to Finding the Perfect Gift For Baby Boomers by Diane Carbo

April 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Gift ideas for senior citizens can be perplexing. Not to worry, I have  5 tips to help you find the perfect gift for seniors citizens in your life. Many  gift givers have the perception that as we age, we have accumulated everything  we need in life. In some case that may be so, but, just because we are getting  older, does not mean we don’t enjoy or appreciate a meaningful and well thought  out gift.

Tip #1 As we age, our needs change. Our thoughts focus on our past, what we  accomplished, what we wanted to do, but postponed due to life’s responsibilities  that came our way. Many fondly recall the dreams, plans and hopes of their  youth. There are many that have things in their life that they miss or wish they  had a chance to do. Now, because of their age, they think that this is no longer  a possibility. Trust me, there is a gift giving idea in those postponed dreams  and plans. And all you have to do is discover what they are.

Tip # 2 Every aging senior has different personalities, lifestyles,  interests, financial and health situations. This should be considered when  exploring gift giving options.

Take time to consider the senior adult for whom you want to choose the  perfect gift.

Are they an active senior, with lots of ability to get around independently?  Are they involved in church, community or group activities? Do they live  alone? Do they have limited access to social functions or activities due to  illness or inability to drive? What keeps them from getting out an about?   Do they have hobbies or outside interests? Have they had a change in  their physical or mental abilities that has affected their lifestyle?  Are  they able to take care of their home environment, yard or pets?  Is their  financial situation a problem or is money never a concern?  Are they an  individual that is open to trying new things? Or are they an individual set in  their ways?

More Gift Ideas for Senior Citizens Perplexing You? 5 Tips to  Finding the Perfect Gift for Baby Boomers…

Tip #3 To accomplish the goal of finding the perfect gift for the aging  senior in your life will take a little thought and exploration on your part.  Take time in your everyday conversations to ask questions about the past and the  present interests. Make this a part of your regular conversation. Gift ideas  will present themselves. Don’t hesitate to ask “Is there any thing that you  wished you had done?”  “Is there any thing that you miss doing or would like  to do some day?”  “Have you ever considered ________(this may be dancing  lessons, painting, doing wood working, trying a computer etc) ?”

Tip # 4 If you have done your exploration, you should have come up with some  great gift ideas. Or maybe you still feel stuck on finding the perfect gift. Now  it is time to be creative. If you have assessed the aging senior’s situation,  you can determine what is important to them. Would they benefit from some  special one on one time with you? Spending uninterrupted and unrushed time,  to do something that your aging senior will enjoy, not only will be appreciated,  but will have the benefit of creating a memory for you and your aging senior.   If they are an active senior, they may be open to trying something new and  different. You may want to plan a trip or activity that would be fun. Don’t  forget that learning is a lifelong activity. Check out the local colleges,  YMCA’s and online courses that may be of interest to your aging senior. You may  be able to introduce a new hobby or activity that will improve or maintain mind  and physical fitness.

Tip #5 Do not discount home made gifts or projects. Plan a family project  where the entire family can get involved. You may want to create a family tree,  organize family pictures. Create a slide show with old family pictures and have  your senior incorporate family stories behind those pictures. Or create a video  of your aging senior talk about the family history. This could be an on going  project with a planned family debut. Plan a party and ‘red carpet’ event for the  entire family to view.

Finding gift ideas for seniors can give you an opportunity to learn  and create a stronger bond between you. Finding a gift for baby boomers is  giving something needed, something wanted or something they have longed for, but  never expressed. Given with lots of love, will make it the “perfect”  gift.

Diane Carbo Registered Nurse has more than thirty five years in the nursing  field. Her experience as a geriatric care manager, makes her uniquely qualified  to help those who want to live out their lives in their own homes. Diane has  developed a web site to make people aware of issues and options. You will find  the answers to many of your questions as well as helpful information that will  be continually updated. Please visit http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com/gift-ideas-for-senior-citizens.html for more information on gifting baby boomers and senior adults. Sign up for The  Caring Advocate Ezine her free newlsetter and receive a complimentary  copy of the Home Health Care Planning Guide.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

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Hearing Loss in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Many senior citizens are affected by some hearing problems. If left  untreated, any extent of hearing loss may worsen over time. It is important that  senior citizens with difficulty hearing consult their doctor. Companions or  caregivers who notice a senior citizen is experiencing trouble hearing should  facilitate and encourage the senior to seek medical attention. Knowing the  symptoms and taking appropriate treatment measures can help stop and, in some  cases, even reverse hearing degradation.

Hearing is very important for daily functioning so problems with hearing are  quite serious and should be addressed as soon as possible. Senior citizens who  experience hearing problems may feel isolated or embarrassed as a result. Still,  if you find that you have trouble hearing, talk to your doctor about the many  treatment options available.

Symptoms

Senior citizens who have hearing loss often complain of:

  • Having trouble hearing on the phone
  • Difficulty with following conversations, especially when multiple people are  talking
  • Needing to have volume levels of electronics so high that others notice and  complain
  • Difficulty hearing things over background noise
  • Sensing that people always seem to mumble
  • Cannot understand when women or children speak to  you

Diagnosis

 

If a doctor finds that you have hearing loss, they may refer you to an  otolaryngologist who specializes in the ear, nose, and throat. After this doctor  conducts diagnostic tests, they may refer you to an audiologist who is trained  to measure hearing function. Audiologists can test your hearing for certain  pitches and loudness levels in order to find if a hearing aid is needed. These  tests are painless.

Hearing loss is caused by degeneration of nerves with age, one of the reasons  it is prevalent among senior citizens. Other common contributions to hearing  loss are earwax build-up, exposure to very loud noises over long periods of  time, viral and bacterial infections, heart conditions, head injuries, tumors,  medications, and heredity.

Types of Hearing Loss

Some different types of hearing loss include:

Presbycusis: This is age-related hearing loss. Senior citizens  affected by this condition can either have a hard time hearing or have low  tolerance for loud noises. It can be caused by damage to the inner ear known as  sensorineural hearing loss.

Tinnitus: This condition is characterized by hearing ringing, roaring,  or some other continuous noise in the ears. It can be caused by exposure to loud  noises, hearing loss, medications, other health problems, allergies, and  conditions of the heart and blood vessels. The source of noise caused by  tinnitus is unclear and varies in how long it affects the sufferer. Senior  citizens can treat the condition by either using a hearing aid to make other  sounds louder or using a masker that makes tinnitus noise less noticeable.  Others use music to drown out the extra noise. Avoiding smoking, alcohol, and  loud noises can decrease the effects of tinnitus.

Conductive hearing loss: This is caused by blockage between eardrum  and the inner ear. This can be caused by ear wax build-up, fluid in the middle  ear, abnormal bone growth, punctured ear drum, or ear infections. For ear wax  blockage specifically, it is suggested that sufferers use mild treatments like  mineral oil, baby oil, glycerin, or commercial ear drops to soften ear wax. If  you think the eardrum may be damaged, you should contact a doctor.

Treatment

Senior citizens who suffer from hearing loss have many options for treatment  and alleviating symptoms of decreased hearing functioning. These include:

Hearing aids: these are small devices placed on the ear that make  certain noises louder. Audiologists can help find the right hearing aid for you  and may allow you to test it in a trial period. Pick a hearing aid manufacturer  who will work with you while you adjust to wearing the product, and be sure that  you are aware of how to maintain a hearing aid, such as replacing batteries and  how to use it properly.

Assistive / Adaptive devices: There are a variety of products that fit  within this category like:

  • Telephone amplifying device: can be a receiver or entire phone that makes  phone conversations louder
  • TV and radio listening systems: avoids having to turn the volume up on  regular devices
  • Assistive listening systems: these are sometimes available in public venues  like theaters, churches, synagogues, and meeting places
  • Alerts: allow for signals that replace doorbells, smoke detectors, and alarm  clocks in order for the hearing impaired to hear them properly. These usually  employ vibrations or flashing lights to replace noise.

Cochlear  implants: If hearing loss is severe, a small electronic device can be placed  under the skin, behind the ear. It allows sound to bypass the malfunctioning  part of the ear and send signals directly to the brain. This process is not  helpful for all cases of hearing loss or deafness.

 

Tips for Senior Citizens

For senior citizens affected by hearing loss, here are some helpful hints for  communication:

  • Let people know you have trouble hearing them
  • Ask people to face you, talk slower, or ask them to speak without  shouting
  • Pay attention to facial expressions and gestures
  • Let people know when you don’t understand them
  • Ask people to reword things for you when you don’t  understand

Tips for Caregivers

 

Elder caregivers taking care of senior citizens who suffer from hearing loss  can use these helpful hints when speaking to their patients:

  • Face the person and talk clearly
  • Speak at a normal speed and do not cover the mouth
  • Stand in good lighting and avoid background noises
  • Use facial expressions and physical gestures
  • Repeat yourself if necessary
  • Keep a hearing impaired person involved in a conversation rather than  talking to others  about the individual while in their presence
  • Be patient,positive and relaxed during the interaction
  • Ask how you can help them understand you

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects  caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for  families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking  employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

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Social Services and Education Programs

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

March calendar of social services and education programs for individuals, caregivers, and family members impacted by the diseases we treat.  All of these programs are open to the community and are offered free of charge.

 

Lending Library (4th Floor)

Featuring hundreds of books, videos and brochures for patients, families and the community-at-large.  Open to the public Monday – Thursday, 10 am – 2 pm.  Receive a free tote bag when you check out a book.

 

Healthy Living: Up2Me

New 6 week session begins Mar 29, 12:30 pm – 3:00 pm

Join us for this proven six-week program designed to help caregivers and individuals with chronic diseases set goals and develop skills for success.  Free and open to the public, advance registration is required.  Contact Susan, 483-6055, solorzs@ccf.org.

 

Lunch & Learn

 

Wednesdays, 12 noon – 1 pm

888 W. Bonneville Avenue, Las Vegas

Bring your lunch, drink & dessert are provided; open to the public.

 

Mar 6: Brain Stimulation to Improve Movement, Brach Poston, PhD, Project Scientist, Cleveland Clinic

 

Gain an understanding of non-invasive brain stimulation techniques shown to improve the motor skills of individuals with Parkinson’s Disease as well as in older adults.  Learn about current Cleveland Clinic projects using these techniques along with their future therapeutic potential.

 

Mar 13: In Case of Emergency, Rodney Anderson, MHA, Department Supervisor, Cleveland Clinic

 

Learn tips and strategies to prepare for emergency situations and to keep you and your loved ones safe.

 

Mar 20: Healthy Meal Ideas, Master Chef Gustav Mauler, Spiedini

 

Answer the age-old question, “what’s for dinner” with quick, simple, and nutritious meal ideas.  Recipes and samples will be provided.

 

Mar 27: Interior Design – Supporting Daily Activities, Attila Lawrence, Professor, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

 

Discover inspiring ideas for the design of interior spaces to improve the quality of independent living for individuals and caregivers.

 

Cleveland Museum of Art Series

 

Dynamic conversations about art through videoconferencing.

 

All art education programs are held at the LouRuvoCenter for Brain Health Library, 888 W. Bonneville Avenue, Las Vegas; open to the public.

 

America’s Story through Art: America Emerging; 1700s

Mar 5, 11:00 am – 12:00 noon

America Emerging is a discussion of the 1700s.  This program includes the developing American identity, folk art, the influence of the Age of Reason, the effect of the mercantilist economy, and underlying causes of the Revolution.

 

America’s Story through Art: America Expanding; 1801 – 1861

Mar 19, 11:00 am – 12:00 noon

Art in the first half of the 19th century was a reflection of American values, identity, and political culture.  America Expanding explores frontier life, the results and impact of westward expansion, landscape painting, Jacksonian democracy, and genre art.

 

Contact Susan Solorzano, 483-6055 or solorzs@ccf.org for additional information.

 

Support Groups

 

MEMORY LOSS SUPPORT GROUP

Wednesdays, 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Meetings are held weekly for adult members who provide care for loved ones with memory loss.  Contact Donna, 483-6035, municd@ccf.org.

 

PARKINSON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP

Mar 12, 12:00 noon – 1:00 pm

(Held the 2nd Tuesday of every month)

 

Separate groups for early stage individuals and adult family members.

 

Contact Jennifer, 483-6036, gayanj@ccf.org.

 

HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP

Mar 26, 12:00 noon – 1:00 pm

(Held the 4th Tuesday of every month)

 

Separate groups for gene-positive individuals (asymptomatic and early stage) and adult family members.

 

Contact Jenna, 483-6054, cliffoj@ccf.org.

 

 

 

 

 

Social Services

LouRuvoCenter for Brain Health

Cleveland Clinic |  888 W Bonneville Ave  |  Las Vegas, NV89106

Desk: (702) 331-7042  |  Fax: (702) 260-9797 |  E-mail: louruvosocialserv@ccf.org

Connect:  www.keepmemoryalive.org

Ophthalmologists Consider Five Tests and Treatments that Would Benefit from Doctor-Patient Conversations

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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American Academy of Ophthalmology Joins Choosing Wisely® Campaign to Advance Quality Eye Care and Promote Health Care Savings

The American Academy of Ophthalmology today announced it is participating in the Choosing Wisely® campaign, a national initiative of the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation to encourage conversations between patients and their doctors about treatment options and efficient use of health care dollars. The Academy is one of 17 organizations joining Choosing Wisely today – representing more than 350,000 physicians, nurses, pathologists, radiologists and other health care professionals – to release lists of commonly performed tests, procedures and treatments that patients and physicians should discuss.

The United States spends more on health care than many other industrialized nations, yet often does not achieve better health outcomes. This may be explained in part by an overuse of unnecessary and duplicative medical tests. Choosing Wisely, which promotes best practices and better management of health care resources, complements physicians’ efforts to use evidence-based medicine to meet patients’ needs.

To ensure that the best care options are considered for ophthalmic patients, the Academy has identified five common tests and treatments that ophthalmologists and patients should discuss:

  1. Preoperative Medical Tests: Don’t perform preoperative medical tests – such as an electrocardiogram or blood glucose test – prior to eye surgery unless there are specific signs indicating a need for them.
  2. Imaging Tests: Don’t routinely order imaging tests when there are no symptoms or signs of significant eye disease.
  3. Antibiotics for Pink Eye: Don’t prescribe antibiotics for pink eye that is caused by an adenovirus.
  4. Antibiotics for Eye Injections: Don’t routinely provide antibiotics before or after injections into the vitreous cavity of the eye.
  5. Punctal Plugs for Dry Eye: Don’t treat dry eye by inserting punctual plugs before attempting other options, such as medical treatments with artificial tears, lubricants and compresses.

“Some experts estimate that up to 30 percent of health care delivered in the U.S. may be unnecessary or duplicative,” said David W. Parke II, M.D., CEO of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. “Not only does this represent significant waste, but it also underscores patients’ unnecessary exposure to risks associated with any test or procedure. The American Academy of Ophthalmology is participating in Choosing Wisely as a way to support evidence-based medicine and promote greater patient involvement in their eye care. By increasing conversations between ophthalmologists and those they treat, we can better guarantee that patients receive the right eye care at the right time.”

The Academy’s health policy committee led the development of the list of five tests and treatments with input from members and ophthalmic subspecialty societies. Numerous recommendations and supporting evidence were researched and reviewed under the leadership of William L. Rich III, M.D., the Academy’s medical director of health policy.

“In medicine, more isn’t necessarily better,” said Dr. Rich. “Conversations around the five tests and treatments identified by the American Academy of Ophthalmology can reduce the potential for over-treating our patients. We will continue our work to identify treatments that could benefit from better conversations between ophthalmologists and their patients.”

To date, twenty-five specialty societies have released lists through Choosing Wisely. The lists released today will be promoted nationwide through the Choosing Wisely campaign’s consumer partners, including Consumer Reports, AARP, Wikipedia and the National Business Coalition on Health.

The Academy’s participation in the Choosing Wisely campaign is one component of its ongoing efforts to promote responsible use of health care resources, without sacrificing quality of care. The Academy also provides a wide variety of educational programs, products and services to ophthalmologists — medical doctors specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye disease and conditions — and the patients they serve in order to improve patient care. The organization’s EyeSmart® program features the most trustworthy and medically accurate consumer information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries.

To learn more about Choosing Wisely and to view the complete lists and details about the recommendations, visit www.ChoosingWisely.org. To learn how patients can start conversations about the five ophthalmic tests and treatments above, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons — Eye M.D.s— with nearly 32,000 members worldwide.  Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org  The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trusted and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org  to learn more.

About the ABIM Foundation
The mission of the ABIM Foundation is to advance medical professionalism to improve the health care system. We achieve this by collaborating with physicians and physician leaders, medical trainees, health care delivery systems, payers, policy makers, consumer organizations and patients to foster a shared understanding of professionalism and how they can adopt the tenets of professionalism in practice. To learn more about the ABIM Foundation, visit www.abimfoundation.org, read our blog blog.abimfoundation.org, connect with us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.

About Choosing Wisely
First announced in December 2011, Choosing Wisely is part of a multi-year effort led by the ABIM Foundation to support and engage physicians in being better stewards of finite health care resources. Participating specialty societies are working with the ABIM Foundation and Consumer Reports to share the lists widely with their members and convene discussions about the physician’s role in helping patients make wise choices. Learn more at www.ChoosingWisely.org.

What is noise-induced hearing loss?

February 16, 2013 by · Comments Off on What is noise-induced hearing loss?
Filed under: Articles 

Tips on how to prevent hearing loss and maintain good hearing

Noise-induced hearing loss is the most common cause of hearing loss. It is often permanent, but preventable! The National Institute of Health reports that 10 million Americans have already suffered hearing damage from loud sounds. In addition, another 30 million are exposed to dangerous levels of noise each day.

We live in a very noisy world. Here are some facts regarding the loudness of sounds, and the amount of time most people can be around it before hearing loss occurs:

Blender = 90 dB Damage to hearing begins after 2 hours
Stereo / Headphones = 100 dB Damage to hearing begins after just 15 minutes
Shotgun = 160 dB Damage to hearing: immediately

Safe levels of everyday sounds:
Whisper = 30 dB
Conversations = 60 dB

Here are some ideas to reduce ear damage from noise exposure:
1. Be aware of noises that are ‘too loud’, ‘too close’ or ‘last too long’.
2. Use hearing protection when exposed to dangerous levels of sound. This includes at work, or at home such as when using power tools or listening to music.
3. Turn the volume on the electronic device down. Good rule of thumb: “60/60”. Listen at 60% volume for no more than 60 minutes at a time.
4. Watch for signs of hearing loss such as ringing in the ears, trouble understanding speech, and a blocked feeing in the ears. You may notice more problem hearing and understanding in noise.
Contact hi HealthInnovations to schedule a hearing test 1-855-523-9355 with Clarissa Jones M.S., FAAA.

No more “empty nest”: middle-aged adults face family pressure on both sides

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

The “empty nest” of past generations, in which the kids are grown up and middle-aged adults have more time to themselves, has been replaced in the United States by a nest that’s full – kids who can’t leave, can’t find a job and aging parents who need more help than ever before.

According to a new study by researchers at Oregon State University, what was once a life stage of new freedoms, options and opportunities has largely disappeared.

An economic recession and tough job market has made it hard on young adults to start their careers and families. At the same time, many older people are living longer, which adds new and unanticipated needs that their children often must step up to assist with.
The end result, researchers suggest, are “empty nest” plans that often have to be put on hold, and a mixed bag of emotions, ranging from joy and “happy-to-help” to uncertainty, frustration and exhaustion.

“We mostly found very positive feelings about adults helping their children in the emerging adulthood stage of life, from around ages 18 to 30,” said Karen Hooker, director of the OSU Center for Healthy Aging Research.

“Feelings about helping parents weren’t so much negative as just filled with more angst and uncertainty,” Hooker said. “As a society we still don’t socialize people to expect to be taking on a parent-caring role, even though most of us will at some point in our lives. The average middle-aged couple has more parents than children.”

The findings of this research were just published in the Journal of Aging Studies, and were based on data from six focus groups during 2009-10. It was one of the first studies of its type to look at how middle-aged adults actually feel about these changing trends.
Various social, economic, and cultural forces have combined to radically challenge the traditional concept of an empty nest, the scientists said. The recession that began in 2008 yielded record unemployment, substantial stock market losses, lower home values and increased demand for higher levels of education.

Around the same time, advances in health care and life expectancy have made it possible for many adults to live far longer than they used to – although not always in good health, and often needing extensive care or assistance.

This study concluded that most middle-aged parents with young adult children are fairly happy to help them out, and they understand that getting started in life is simply more difficult now. Some research has suggested that age 25 is the new 22; that substantially more parents now don’t even expect their kids to be financially independent in their early 20s, and don’t mind helping them through some difficult times.

But the response to helping adult parents who, at the same time, need increasing amounts of assistance is not as uniformly positive, the study found – it can be seen as both a joy and a burden, and in any case was not something most middle-aged adults anticipated.

“With the kids, it’s easy,” is a general purpose reaction. With aging parents, it isn’t.

“My grandparents died younger, so my parents didn’t cope with another generation,” one study participant said.

Many middle-aged people said it was difficult to make any plans, due to disruptions and uncertainty about a parent’s health at any point in time. And most said they we’re willing to help their aging parents, but a sense of being time-starved was a frequent theme.
“It brings my heart joy to be able to provide for my mom this way,” one study participant said. “There are times when it’s a burden and I feel resentful.”

The dual demands of children still transitioning to independence, and aging parents who need increasing amounts of care is causing many of the study participants to re-evaluate their own lives. Some say they want to make better plans for their future so they don’t pose such a burden to their children, and begin researching long-term care insurance. Soul-searching is apparent.

“I don’t care if I get old,” a participant said. “I just don’t want to become debilitated. So I would rather have a shorter life and a healthy life than a long life like my mom, where she doesn’t have a life. She doesn’t have memories. Our memories are what make us who we are.”

An increasing awareness of the challenges produced by these new life stages may cause more individuals to anticipate their own needs, make more concrete plans for the future, reduce ambivalent approaches and have more conversations with families about their own late-life care, the researchers said in their study.
About the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences: The College creates connections in teaching, research and community outreach while advancing knowledge, policies and practices that improve population health in communities across Oregon and beyond.

Healthy Aging: Up2Me

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Healthy Aging: Up2Me – January 18, 12:30 – 3:00 PM
Join us for this proven six week program helping caregivers and individuals with chronic diseases set goals and develop skills for success. Free and open to the public, advance registration required. Contact Susan, 483-6023, hirschs2@ccf.org

Lunch & Learn
Wednesdays, 12 noon – 1 pm
888 W. Bonneville Avenue, Las Vegas
Bring your lunch, drink & dessert provided; open to the public

Jan 9: Yoga for Everyone!
Marilyn Kovach and Sandy Rickards
Yoga can exercise our body, mind and spirit. Learn simple techniques that can be used to promote increased flexibility and provide a break from everyday stresses.

Jan 16: Understanding Complementary Therapies
Lisa Browder, RA, ICA, CR, Complementary Therapies Manager, Nathan Adelson Hospice
Increase your understanding of techniques that can be used to promote health and wellbeing.

Jan 23: Getting Your Legal and Financial Ducks in a Row
Kim Boyer, Certified Elder Law Attorney
This presentation will provide an overview of common legal documents such as durable power of attorney, wills and trusts as well as benefits programs to help cover the cost of care.

Jan 30: Super Aging – The Science Behind Successful Brains
Sarah Banks, PhD, Neuropsychologist, Cleveland Clinic
Most people experience some cognitive decline with age, it’s normal. But others show no real decline: What makes these superagers different?

Cleveland Museum of Art Series
Dynamic conversations about art through videoconferencing
All art education programs are held at the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health Library, 888 W. Bonneville Avenue and open to the public.

L’Art de L’Afrique
January 15, 11:00 – 12:00 Noon
Explore the rich history and traditional arts of former French colonies including Mali, The Democratic Republic of Congo and The Cote d’Ivoire. Styles, materials, techniques and functions of art works will be discussed.

Contact Susan Hirsch, 483-6023 or hirschs2@ccf.org for additional information.
Support Groups
MEMORY LOSS SUPPORT GROUP
Wednesdays, 1 pm-2:30 pm
Meetings are held weekly for adult members who provide care for loved ones with memory loss.
Contact: Donna Munic-Miller 483-6035, municd@ccf.org
PARKINSON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP: January 8, 12 noon -1 pm
(Held the 2nd Tuesday of every month)
Separate groups for early stage individuals and adult family members.
Contact: Jennifer 483-6036, gayanj@ccf.org

HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP: January 22, 12 noon -1 pm
(Held the 4th Tuesday of every month)
Separate groups for gene positive individuals (asymptomatic and early stage) and adult family members.
Contact: Jenna 483-6054, clifforj@ccf.org

Valentine Feature: 3 Surefire Tips to Keep the Sizzle in Your Relationship

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Falling in love is magical, but staying in love can feel like the impossible dream!

This Valentine’s Day rekindle the fire in your romance with three easy tips offered by Deanna Brann, PhD, Huffington Post Wedding blogger and author of Reluctantly Related: Secrets To Getting Along With Your Mother-in-Law or Daughter-in-Law:

1. Schedule at least two date nights a month. Once a week would be better, but start with two times a month and work your way up to once a week. Insist on two important ground rules for date night: No smartphones or tablets and no conversations about kids or work (unless work is part of your goal setting, which we’ll get to in a moment). Find other things to talk about—get to know each other all over again. Neither of you are exactly the same person the other first fell in love with. You’ve both grown and matured. So allow your partner to be part of your personal evolution and allow yourself to be part of his.

2. Discuss your deepest desires by establishing short-term and long-range goals as individuals, as a couple, and as a family. Once a year, take some time away from all your other responsibilities so you and your spouse can talk about these different goals, the steps you’ll need to take to make them happen, and how you can help each other achieve them. Afterall, it’s easier to reach your goals if you support each other—and if you make sure you’re not unwittingly working against each other, as well. But more importantly, opening up to one another about what you most want in life can be a very emotionally intimate experience. So go for it! Don’t hold back.

3. Establish a monthly desire debriefing. Sit down together (maybe over a nice dinner out) and talk about the headway you’re making toward achieving all these goals. Is there something your spouse could help you with that would make reaching your goals easier? Is there something you could help him with? Do you need to re-evaluate your goals? What are each of you feeling good about in this process? Checking in once a month increases the likelihood that you’ll reach your goals, and it ensures you’ll be regularly connecting at a deep and meaningful level. It certainly trumps talking about your toddler’s penchant for putting peas up his nose. Trust me on this.

For more tips on improving your relationship with your partner, or your in-laws, I would be happy to send you a review copy of Reluctantly Related. Dr. Brann is available for interviews and expert commentary, and would be happy to write a guest article. Additional information about Dr. Brann is posted below for your convenience.

Sincerely,
Lynn

Contact: Lynn Coppotelli
856-489-8654 x 312
Lynn@SmithPublicity.com
…………………………………………
Deanna Brann, Ph.D., is a leading expert in the field of mother-in-law/daughter-in-law relationships. She has over 25 years experience as a clinical psychotherapist and ran her own private practice for more than 18 years. Based in Knoxville, TN, Dr. Brann is a sought after speaker, author and seminar leader. She is also the author of Mothers-in-Law and Daughters-in-Law Say the Darndest Things.
Website: www.drdeannabrann.com
Reluctantly Related is available on Net Galley, www.amazon.com and through www.drdeannabrann.com
Review Copies Available Upon Request

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!