NV Senior Guide – Blue Sky Memory Care LV

December 5, 2017 by · Comments Off on NV Senior Guide – Blue Sky Memory Care LV
Filed under: Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing & Memory Care, Las Vegas 

http://www.blueskymemorycarelv.com/

Blue Sky Memory Care

Blue Sky Memory Care is a family-owned memory care community that offers specialized care for individuals living with Alzheimer’s, Dementia, and other memory loss disorders. Our memory care offers residents a level of support and safety that generally exceeds that is provided in more traditional assisted living settings. In addition to offering individualized care and day-to-day personal support, memory care focuses on areas of concern that are often more prominent for those dealing with Alzheimer’s and related Dementias, such as minimizing elopement and wandering, reducing stressful situations, and reconnecting with hobbies or interests. Our memory care approach is to provide an environment that enriches the quality of life to our residents while preserving dignity and privacy.

 

Our experienced staff understands the challenges facing residents who are living with memory loss, and every aspect of our community is designed to provide a residential solution for these individuals who may have more complex care needs.

 

ADDRESS

Blue Sky Memory Care
8025 Amigo Street
Las Vegas, NV 89123

PHONE & EMAIL

725-251-6777
725-251-6413
info@blueskymemorycarelv.com

Stone Valley Alzheimer’s Special Care Center – Nevada Senior Guide

July 28, 2014 by · Comments Off on Stone Valley Alzheimer’s Special Care Center – Nevada Senior Guide
Filed under: Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing & Memory Care, Reno, Sparks 

www.jeaseniorliving.com stone-valley

At Stone Valley Alzheimer’s Special Care Center you’ll find all of the things that make life worth living – good friends, light-filled rooms with brand new furnishings, outdoor courtyards perfect for enjoying the fresh air and a caring and committed staff dedicated to bringing your loved one the best dementia and respite care in Reno.

Part of the specialized services offered at Stone Valley Alzheimer’s Special Care Center includes our Meaningful Moments® program, a philosophy specific to our community.

Using our exclusive training as a guide, caring staff members learn in great detail the life stories and memories of our residents before the time they began experiencing dementia. Information includes their likes, dislikes, personal and professional accomplishments, events and people who influenced their lives and personal preferences.

This information is then made a part of our memory care residents’ days here at Stone Valley Alzheimer’s Special Care Center, along with familiar faces and standard routines, bringing meaning to each moment they spend with us.

Stone Valley Alzheimer’s Special Care Center offers two options of affordable and fully-furnished floor plans, as well as two beautiful dining areas, nutritious and delicious meals and snacks, daily entertainment options and excursions, transportation and housecleaning and linen service, among other amenities.

When looking for the right kind of care for your loved one with Alzheimer’s or other dementia needs, look no further than Stone Valley Alzheimer’s Special Care Center.

Call us at 775-746-2200 to tour the area’s newest specialized community!

6155 Stone Valley Dr, Reno, NV 89523

EmpRes Healthcare – Nevada Senior Guide

July 15, 2014 by · Comments Off on EmpRes Healthcare – Nevada Senior Guide
Filed under: Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing & Memory Care, Carson City, Gardnerville 

http://www.empres.com/

Nurse assisting ResidentEmpRes Healthcare is a 100% employee owned western company, providing management consulting and other services to healthcare communities that offer quality long-term care and specialty healthcare services.
The EmpRes Healthcare affiliated companies operate licensed nursing homes and assisted living communities in California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon and Washington.

Philosophy

We embody a spirit and value system that encourages loyalty, honesty and a commitment to caring. From our belief that people are always the number one priority, the EmpRes Healthcare companies are committed to:

  •         Caring about our residents, families, employees, and communities
  •         Excellence in service
  •         Treating our residents, families and employees with dignity and respect at all times
  •         Sound stewardship of our financial and human resources

 

Our Commitment to Caring

Mission

The mission of EmpRes Healthcare is to assist each individual resident to achieve his or her highest desired potential.

As an employee-owned company we recognize that our people are our most valuable asset.  We honor their importance by our recognition that all employees be treated with respect and integrity at all times.

Achievement of any mission is dependent upon the financial viability of the company.  We are dedicated to provide optimal value through effective stewardship of our human and financial resources.

We take pride in our motto “Our Commitment to Caring” as a means to attain our mission.

Core Values

CARING

Customer Service:  We treat everyone we encounter as a customer and strive to deliver excellent service at each encounter.

Accountability:  We hold ourselves accountable for being stewards in all aspects of delivering customer-focused care and maintaining financial viability.

Respect:  We respect our residents; they are our purpose.  We respect our employees; they are the means to attain our mission.

Integrity:  We maintain our integrity in the pursuit of our mission.  We do not achieve results at the risk of compromising our integrity.

Nursing Excellence:  We deliver quality care to enhance and promote quality of life by striving to constantly improve resident-centered outcomes and committing to enhancing each resident’s desired potential.

Growth:  We are committed to continuous quality improvement of our clinical and financial systems, professional growth for our employees and the strategic growth and strengthening of our organizations.


 

Mountain View Health and Rehabilitation Center, 201 Koontz Lane, Carson City, NV  89701   |  775-883-3622
Testimonial:  “I love this place and the people who work here! I just plain enjoy myself here!”

Visit: mountainviewhealthandrehab.com


 

Gardnerville Health and Rehabilitation Center, 1573 Muller Parkway, Gardnerville NV  89410 | 775-782-6620
Testimonial: “I have never seen Mom look better.”

Visit: gardnervillehealthandrehab.com


 

Ormsby Post Acute Rehab, 3050 North Ormsby Blvd., Carson City  89703 | 775-841-4646
Testimonial: “I couldn’t hope for anything better than what my dad received.”

Visit: ormsbyrehab.com


 

 

 

 

Study by Harvard Medical School Researchers Examines Senior Living’s Role in Changing Health Care System

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Individuals in senior living communities require an array of health and supportive services to maintain an optimum quality of life. Often, these older adults receive fragmented care through multiple providers and payers, resulting in unnecessary health care expenditures and lower quality-of-care. To address these challenges, Brookdale is partnering with researchers at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and other senior living industry peers to establish the Assisted Living Sector Healthcare Policy Research Fund.

“This support allows us to examine what role senior living providers have in the new models of care that have emerged under health care reform,” says David Grabowski, PhD, professor of health care policy at HMS, who is leading this research study.

Grabowski and his team will examine whether providing more comprehensive, coordinated services in the senior living sector reduces the need for Medicare-paid services and Medicaid-financed nursing home services.

According to Will Clark, Brookdale’s senior vice president of strategy and brand and a member of the HMS Health Care Policy Advisory Council, society’s ability to meet the needs of an aging population is an important political, economic, clinical, and social imperative.

“Harvard’s reputation for tackling some of health care’s biggest challenges and generating meaningful insights that shape our nation’s policy is unparalleled. We are confident Dr. Grabowski and his colleagues’ research will be influential in determining the appropriate role senior living can and should play in our evolving health care system,” Clark said.

Brookdale’s goals for this effort are to create awareness for the potential senior living has to positively impact the health, well-being and overall cost of care for seniors; to identify barriers to creating more integration among senior living and the health care system; influence policy; and identify innovative models that integrate senior living with our health care system.

The initiative is funded through a cumulative contribution of $150,000 from Brookdale and eight other senior living providers — Atria Senior Living, Elmcroft Senior Living, Emeritus Senior Living, Erickson Living, HCP, Inc., Health Care REIT, Inc., Sunrise Senior Living, and Ventas, Inc. Together, these organizations hope to begin a dialogue among health care providers, policy makers, regulators, and consumers on the value of senior living and its role in creating an integrated, outcomes-driven health care system.

The study will occur in two phases. The first phase will consist of analyzing the role of assisted living in new payment-delivery models and presenting a conceptual model of how an integrated model might work, as well as the opportunities and challenges associated with such an approach. Building on the results of the first phase, the second phase of the project will consist of primary data work and potentially the development of a pilot program.

For additional information about the study, contact David Cameron, HarvardMedicalSchool’s director of science communications, at 617-432-0441 or david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu.

For more information about Brookdale, visit www.brookdale.com.

Brookdale Senior Living Inc. is a leading owner and operator of senior living communities throughout the United States.  The Company is committed to providing senior living solutions within properties that are designed, purpose-built and operated with the highest-quality service, care and living accommodations for residents.  Currently, Brookdale operates independent living, assisted living, and dementia-care communities and continuing care retirement centers, with more than 650 communities in 36 states and the ability to serve approximately 67,000 residents.  Through its Innovative Senior Care program, the Company also offers a range of outpatient therapy, home health, personalized living and hospice services. For more information, visit http://www.brookdale.com.

Contact: Andrea Turner, 615-564-6829, aturner2@brookdaleliving.com

Choosing A Nursing Home For Your Parents

July 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

nursing-home-abuse

CHOOSING A NURSING HOME FOR YOUR PARENT

So many of the most important decisions we make in life are made when we are least prepared to make them.   So it is, when the time comes to choose whether, or which nursing home facility in which to place an aging parent.  It’s estimated that 60% of nursing home admissions are made from a hospital, rather than from a home, or an assisted living facility.  Your loved one may have suffered a broken a hip or a stroke, or may be suffering from dementia.  The time constraints in this type of situation press care givers to make a quick decision regarding care of their love one, without the luxury of investigation and due diligence that such a decision deserves.

We will attempt in this post, to review resources which are available to help you make a decision of this kind, whether the situation is a hurried one or not.  Making such a decision depends, in large measure, on the condition of the parent and what types of care or treatment will be required for their individual circumstances.  It will largely depend on whether they are injured due to a broken hip, or other disabling condition, suffering from Alzheimer’s or other form of dementia, or other conditions.

There is a growing amount of information available online to assist in this process.  At the federal government level, there are many resources to assist.  The website, http://www.eldercare.gov/eldercare.NET/Public/index.aspx is a good place to begin.  You can either search by location or by topic to find resources available in your state or city.  There are a large number of resources listed on this site which address many of the concerns and problems faced by care givers to our aging populations.

Additionally, to assist with evaluating potential nursing homes, a publication called, Your Guide to Choosing a Nursing Home, (http://www.medicare.gov/pubs/pdf/02174.pdf)  presents a fairly complete outline of considerations when attempting to evaluate a place for an aging parent.   Subjects such as “Choosing the Type of Care You Need” to “Steps to Choosing a Nursing Home” are included.  The Nursing Home Checklist (http://www.medicare.gov/nursing/checklist.asp) will also provide many ideas for evaluating and screening potential facilities.

The federal government also funds state level Ombudsmen to assist in these matters.  The National Long-Term Care Ombudsman Resource Center website (http://www.aging.state.nv.us/) will allow you to find these resources in your state.  For Nevada, that contact information can be found here. (http://www.aging.state.nv.us/)  The Las Vegas office of the Ombudsman can be called at (702) 486-3545.  Concerns ranging from finding an appropriate care facility to reporting cases of elder abuse can be directed to the State Ombudsman’s office.

Among non-government agencies, there are many advocacy groups that can also provide assistance.  The Consumer Voice provides a Guide to Choosing a Nursing Home .

http://www.theconsumervoice.org/sites/default/files/advocate/A-Consumer-Guide-To-Choosing-A-Nursing-Home.pdf ) This organization also provides private ombudsman services to families and residents of nursing facilities.  Another privately funded website provides a registry and grading of nursing homes is http://www.memberofthefamily.net/.  This site provides listings of Medicare and Medicaid certified nursing homes and grades various aspects of the operations of the nursing home.

Beyond these and other resources that you may uncover in your search for a nursing home, many of the considerations you may want or need to consider have to do with costs.  Medicare will only pay for medically necessary care in a nursing home.  It will not pay for non-medical everyday assistance with normal living.  If your loved one needs assistance with walking or eating, these things are not covered.  Most nursing home costs are paid out of personal savings, social security benefits, Long Term Care (LTC)  insurance benefits, or Medicaid if the patient qualifies.  Nursing home costs are estimated to average $200 per day for patients, and this doesn’t include cost for treatment needed for additional services, such as dementia care, for example.  Long Term Care insurance must be purchased and in force, prior to your loved one’s need for services.

Once you’ve done the initial research, nothing replaces visiting the facility and seeing for yourself.  Visit often and at various unexpected times, to be sure that the facility is the type of environment you would want your parent or loved one to be exposed to.  Considerations include turnover rate of personnel in the home.  Does the home offer “consistent assignment” which means do nurses and aids treat the same patients on most of their shifts.  Consistency and familiarity are important considerations for your loved one.  Relationships built between patient and nursing home staff can provide a measure of security for your loved one.  If a home employs a high number of temporary workers, or turnover is high, that consistency can be lost.

Four items to think about in any nursing home placement include, how convenient is the home to all family members, quality of care for chronic conditions including dementia and/or physical disability, supportive environment for the potential resident, and do costs fall within an affordable range.  And once this decision is made and your parent or grandparent is now in such a facility, keeping an eye open for negligence or even abuse is important.  Unfortunately, this is a growing problem as our population ages and requires higher levels of care.  So if such a thing should happen to your loved one, the services of a trusted attorney may be required.  Our firm does provide such services, and more information can be found here.  (http://www.richardharrislaw.com/personal-injury/nevada-nursing-home-abuse-lawyer.php)

Additional resources:

http://www.medicare.gov/pubs/pdf/02174.pdf

http://www.medicare.gov/nursing/checklist.asp

http://www.theconsumervoice.org/sites/default/files/advocate/A-Consumer-Guide-To-Choosing-A-Nursing-Home.pdf

http://www.memberofthefamily.net/

http://www.eldercare.gov/Eldercare.NET/Public/Index.aspx

http://www.ltcombudsman.org/

http://health.usnews.com/health-news/best-nursing-homes/articles/2013/02/26/how-to-choose-a-nursing-home

http://guides.wsj.com/health/elder-care/how-to-choose-a-nursing-home/

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/20/health/20patient.html?ref=health&_r=0

http://www.richardharrislaw.com/personal-injury/nevada-nursing-home-abuse-lawyer.php

 

 

Eyes are the Window to Your Soul and Health!

July 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Eyes are the Window to Your Soul and Health!

DADE CITY, FLORIDA – (July 22, 2013) – According to the World Health Organization, in high-income countries two-thirds of people live beyond the age of seventy and predominately die of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive lung disease, cancers, diabetes or dementia. If caught early on, some of these health issues are treatable and preventable.

“70 percent of the neurological system is linked to the eye,” affirms Dr. Kondrot, founder of Healing the Eye & Wellness Center and the world’s leading ophthalmologist. “The correspondence between your eyes and your health is extremely insightful. When part of your body is failing or not working properly, oftentimes your eyes reflect that.”

The National Eye Institute states that approximately 4,195,000 people in the United States suffer from some form of vision impairment and 7,685,000 have diabetic retinopathy. Here are five health issues that produce symptoms in the eye:

  • High Blood Pressure: hypertension can cause damage to the blood vessels in the retina, known as hypertensive retinopathy. The damage can be serious if left untreated.
  • Liver disease: one of the symptoms of liver disease is jaundice, the discoloring of the skin and whites of the eyes due to the high levels of bile the blood stream.
  • Stroke: the damage the stroke does in the brain impacts the visual pathways of the eye, which can result in blurry vision, double vision, moving images, loss of visual field, and sensitivity to light.
  • Nutritional deficiency: a lack of vitamin A can lead to night blindness.
  • Alzheimer’s Disease: some individuals suffering from Alzheimer’s also experience a decline in vision such as motion blindness, contrast sensitivity, or a lack of depth or color perception.

“Your eyes are a complex organ and any diseases that one sees in your eye is most likely occurring somewhere else in your body,” adds Dr. Kondrot, “It is essential to maintain periodic visits to your eye doctor and live a healthy lifestyle to prevent and treat these health issues before it’s too late.”

Dr. Kondrot is the author of three best-selling books, including “10 Essentials to Save Your Sight” (Advantage Media Group, July 2012), and president of the Arizona Homeopathic and Integrative Medical Association. He has founded the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center, located just north of Tampa, Fla., which offers alternative and homeopathic routes to vision therapies known as the “Kondrot Program.” The program focuses on such conditions as macular degeneration, glaucoma, dry eye, cataracts, and others. His advanced programs have helped people from around the world restore their vision. The center sits on 50 acres of land and features a 14,000-square-foot state-of-the art complex, an organic ranch, jogging trails, swimming pool, hot tub, and more. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

About Health The Eye & Wellness Center

The Healing The Eye & Wellness Center is located 30 miles north of Tampa, in Dade City, FL. Founded by Dr. Edward Kondrot, the Center offers world-class alternative therapies for vision conditions, including color and vision therapy, the treatment of glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration, dry eye, and more. The center also offers a variety of seminars, webinars, and training sessions for others in the medical community. Dr. Kondrot is the world’s only board-certified ophthalmologist and board-certified homeopathic physician. He is also author of three best-selling books in the field. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

Source:

World Health Organization. The Top 10 Causes of Death.http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs310/en/index2.html

National Eye Institute. Prevalence of Adult Vision Impairment and Age-Related Eye Diseases in America.http://www.nei.nih.gov/eyedata/adultvision_usa.asp

TimeSlips Storytelling Inspires Senior Creativity

July 13, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

By Nancy LaFever / Posted on 12 July 2013 in Seniorsforliving.com (link below)

Timeslips StorytellingA creative program that was originally designed to assist seniors with dementia,TimeSlips uses a storytelling format to spur creativity in older adults and other age groups. Using TimeSlips,trained facilitators have people create stories from prompts, usually pictures. Especially effective with dementia patients, it relieves the often anxiety-producing effort of remembering with imagination. As described, “TimeSlips opens storytelling to everyone by replacing the pressure to remember with the freedom to imagine.”

A recent post on the Leadingage.org website reports that TimeSlips Creative Storytelling has launched a new online training system…  [to continue reading, go to http://www.seniorsforliving.com/blog/2013/07/12/timeslips-storytelling-inspires-senior-creativity/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+seniorsforliving%2FwtAk+%28Seniors+For+Living%29]

Know How Senior Citizens Become Targets for Fraud by Diana R Beam

July 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Although you and I can’t imagine cheating anyone- especially a sweet-natured senior citizen- thousands of other people can. In fact, they make a career of lurking in the shadows, waiting to the win the trust of your aging mother, beloved grandfather or isolated, elderly neighbor.

According to the National Crime Prevention Council, 56 to 80 percent of fraudulent telemarketers intentionally dial senior citizen’s telephone numbers. This is appalling information, of course. But this statistic hopefully has your full attention. To protect the aging loved ones in your family, you must commit yourself to two goals: one, to consistently stay abreast of fraud and scams directed toward the elderly; and two, make sure to educate your aging loved one about the do’s and don’ts of telephone communication, email responses, door-to-door sales visits and how to safely dispose of important personal information or documents that are no longer necessary to keep.

Aging seniors are often easy targets for criminals because:

  • The senior may be confused easily during telephone contact, either by dementia or hearing impairment.
  • The caller is a smooth talker who wins the trust of the vulnerable lady who lives alone.
  • If the dishonest telemarketer speaks sternly, demanding perhaps, that she absolutely must provide personal information, elderly seniors may feel intimidated, stressed and confused. More often than not, fraud has again been accomplished by the time the phone call ends. The senior may be unsure of how to judge if the call is legitimate, so the more pressured she feels; the more likely she is to give the demanded information.
  • The con artist telemarketer strikes up a conversation and asks many questions which not only builds a trusting relationship for a later con but also, the senior has unknowingly provided personal information to a potentially dangerous stranger. “You sound lonely today, Mrs. Smith. Does your family live in your neighborhood? What day does your daughter stop by? And that’s the only time you see other people? Just on that day? Well no wonder you sound a bit depressed.” You get the picture. By the end of many conversations, seniors have unknowingly placed themselves in danger not only for identity theft but also for burglary or worse.

 

Identity theft is rampant in our country and every person of every age is a potential victim. Keep in mind, though, that career thieves scope out particular trash cans- especially those of aging seniors. They wait for innocent victims to carelessly toss banking information, social security numbers, etc. in the trash can. So make a list of don’t-throw-away documents and tape it to your loved one’s fridge, to help her remember what to keep. Then periodically collect documents that are no longer needed and safely shred the information.

Helping aging loved ones can be a challenge because they can unwittingly become the targets of unscrupulous con artists that neither they, nor you, see coming. Your best defense is a proactive offense- starting with awareness.

Checking on aging loved ones every day to be sure they are safe is a challenge, however, you don’t have to go it alone. You have a valuable resource in Diana Beam, founder and owner of Keeping in Touch Solutions. Diana has ways to help your aging loved ones continue to live independently and safely in their own homes as long as possible while giving family comfort and peace of mind. Learn more at http://www.KeepinginTouchSolutions.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diana_R_Beam

ALZHEIMER’S SET TO MOVE FROM THE MOST DAUNTING GLOBAL HEALTH CRISIS TO THE 21ST CENTURY’S FISCAL NIGHTMARE

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

ALZHEIMER’S SET TO MOVE FROM THE MOST DAUNTING GLOBAL HEALTH CRISIS TO THE 21ST CENTURY’S FISCAL NIGHTMARE

OECD and the Global Coalition on Aging Convene at Harris Manchester College, Oxford University to Shape New Approaches for Solutions

Oxford, UK (26 June 2013) – The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Harris Manchester College, Oxford University and Global Coalition on Aging (GCOA) concluded on Friday 21 June, an “Expert Consultation on Unlocking Global Collaboration to Accelerate Innovation for Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia.”  Aimed at providing input to the OECD action agenda for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, the Consultation brought together the highest level of global experts across health, economics, public policy, business, biotechnology and beyond.

Its timing is aligned with UK Prime Minister David Cameron’s recent recognition that dementia is fast becoming the biggest pressure on care systems around the world.  “That’s why we’re using our G8 to bring together health ministers, clinical researchers and healthcare companies,” he said.  “If the brightest minds are working together on this then we’ve got a greater chance of improving treatments and finding scientific breakthroughs.  I’ve said before that we need an all-out fight-back against dementia that cuts across society. Now we need to cut across borders and spearhead an international approach that could really make a difference.”

The objectives of the Consultation included:

  • Providing a space for country experts, policy makers, and scientific, medical and academic experts to share views on the main scientific, technological and policy challenges Alzheimer’s and dementia raise in the context of creating a pathway for aging populations to be sources of economic growth in the 21st century; and
  • Creating an opportunity for multidisciplinary exchange on a collective action plan that maps the way forward.

“The impact of Alzheimer’s and dementia on individuals, families, health systems and national economies as populations age will become truly crippling, and no one nation or research organization can solve this global epidemic alone.” said Michael Hodin, Executive Director of GCOA.  “It requires global understanding, sharing and collaboration, and this Consultation was a critical step in our ongoing fight against Alzheimer’s – a fight we must win if we are truly to unlock our aging populations as new sources of economic growth.”

Alzheimer’s afflicts one in eight over 65 and one-half of all those over 85, and the economic, social and personal costs will only increase with age-related demographic change.  In 2010, the global cost of Alzheimer’s and dementias equalled 1 percent of global gross domestic product (GDP), or $604 billion.  The prevalence and cost, combined with the stigma, which prevents recognition of symptoms and subsequent treatments, signal an urgent call to action.

“Traditional strategies around healthcare services and investments in research are not enough to address the growing worldwide onslaught of Alzheimer’s and dementias,” said Marc Wortmann, Executive Director of Alzheimer’s Disease International.

“The global scale of the pending healthcare-economic crisis mandates a bold forward looking action plan to harmonize a multi-nation attack on the problem,” noted  Zaven Khachaturian, recognized at the meeting as the ‘Chief Architect’ of Alzheimer & Brain Aging research in the United States, now the President of the Campaign to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease by 2020. He indicated the urgent need for a “multinational strategic goal for reducing the prevalence of Alzheimer’s and other chronic brain disorders by 50 percent within a decade” – thus urging the OECD to “identify the framework conditions to accelerate multi-national collaborative R & D.”

George Vradenburg, Chairman of USAgainstAlzheimer’s and convener of the Global CEO Initiative on Alzheimer’s, called for new attention, resources, commitment and collaboration to defeat Alzheimer’s disease. In his keynote speech, coined “The Oxford Accord,” he called for G8 leadership equivalent to the G8 Summit that created the HIV/AIDS Global Fund.

Consultation experts presented their views for proactive public policy and an OECD role in supporting actions to : promote broad-based partnerships; identify incentives, frameworks and infrastructures for enhanced international data sharing; leverage big data as strategies to advance our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease, improve care, promote global exchange of good practice and move toward cure and even prevention.

The Consultation was borne out of the September 2012 OECD workshop, “Anticipating the Special Needs of the 21st Century Silver Economy: From Smart Technologies to Services Innovation,” co-hosted by the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, OECD and Waseda University, with the support of the Japanese government.  The workshop concluded that innovation was needed to meet the challenges and opportunities of global demographic change and mitigate the health, social and economic impacts of aging.

The Consultation was held on 20-21 June, 2013 at The Harris Manchester College (HMC), Oxford University in collaboration with the OECD.

For more information see OECD’s website: oe.cd/innovating-against-alzheimers.

ABOUT THE GLOBAL COALITION ON AGING

The Global Coalition on Aging (GCOA) aims to reshape how global leaders approach and prepare for the 21st century’s profound shift in population aging. GCOA uniquely brings together global corporations across industry sectors with common strategic interests in aging populations, a comprehensive and systemic understanding of aging, and an optimistic view of its impact. Through research, public policy analysis, advocacy and communication, GCOA is advancing innovative solutions and working to ensure global aging is a path for fiscally sustainable economic growth, social value creation and wealth enhancement. For more information, visitwww.globalcoalitiononaging.com.

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

At a time when thousands of Baby Boomers are reaching the age of 65 every day, the issues of senior rights, elder laws, and anti-ageism have never been more important, more volatile, or more questioned. After all, this is the generation that was ready to take down the establishment fifty years ago, and they haven’t lost any of their desire to change the world for the better. And, they have the numbers to do it. Here are our 100 top blogs for seniors dealing with senior rights, law & policy, and anti-ageism.

Boomers Against The Law

  1. Elder Law Plus: lawyer Evan H. Farr blogs about topics concerning elder law, including probate strategies and parental care.
  2. Michigan Elder Law Blog: the attorneys at Barsch & Joswick provide seniors and their loved ones with sage advice on a variety of Elder law issues.
  3. Everything Elder Law: Evan Farr is back at it again, this time focusing on Elder Law news, concepts, and innovations from around the country.
  4. Massachusetts Estate and Elder Law Blog: lawyer and blogger Stephanie Konarski gives tips on estate planning and other elder law topics.
  5. New York Elder Law Attorney Blog: your source for elder law news and comment in New York, this blog analyzes nursing home legislation and elder care costs.
  6. Elder Law Prof. Blog: Elder Law professor Kim Dayton authors a really nice blog that covers a wide range of Elder law issues, from Supreme Court cases to seminars.
  7. The Pop Tort: can a consumer advocates blog dealing with civil justice be cute? This blog proves it can, complete with an adorable “Pop Tort” logo, even while exploring such issues as Medicare and Medicaid lawsuits, nursing home scams, and medical malpractice against the elderly, among other legal issues.
  8. Supportive Senior Solutions: this blog from a geriatric care management practice in New York covers issues related to geriatric care, caregiving, and healthcare laws for the elderly and infirm.
  9. Aging Beats the Alternative: elder care specialist Lorie Ebers uses her blog to talk about overcoming the challenges of aging, caring for aging parents, and the less talked about side of elder law: Boomer divorce.
  10. Elder Law Blog: lawyer Ronald C. Morton’s elder law blog is full of sage advice for seniors looking how to tap into Veteran’s benefits, how to plan for their golden years, and more.
  11. The Best Elder Law Blog: published by the attorneys at Lamson & Cutner, this blog discusses elder law cases, the Affordable Care Act, and same-sex marriage.
  12. Elder Law Tips and News: the lawyers at Cooper, Adel & Associates bring you posts on living trusts, aging issues, and general estate planning.
  13. The Connecticut Elder Law Blog: lawyer Michael Keenan provides his readers with estate planning tips, elder fraud, and Medicare rules.
  14. The Teddy Bear Lawyers: attorney Rick Law gives readers a great resource for Elder Law in the Chicagoland area. Find articles on protecting vulnerable seniors and financial planning.
  15. Oregon Elder Law: attorney Orrin Onken blogs on elder law, estate planning, and probate proceedings in plain, easy to understand language.
  16. Florida Elder Law and Estate Blog: this informative blog includes great articles on VA benefits, estate planning, and trusts.
  17. Golden Law Center: written by attorney Sasha Golden, the Golden Law Center blog discusses elder law, special needs planning, guardianship, wills and trusts, and estate administration.
  18. Kraft Elder Law: attorney Robert Kraft blogs about Medicaid, Medicare, wills, trusts, probate, veterans benefits, and other elder law topics.
  19. Pennsylvania Law Blog: this elder law blog by the attorneys at the law offices of Shober & Rock discusses Medicaid, taxes, Veterans, banks, and annuities.
  20. Long Beach Elder Law Blog: this blog focuses on elder abuse, estate protection, the Cal MediConnect program, and reform of health law.
  21. Houston Elder Law Blog: the folks at Wright Abshire Attorneys blog about care planning, estate planning, Medicaid Planning, Probate & Estate Administration, and and Veteran’s Benefits.
  22. Hauptman Law Blog: readers of this blog can learn more about elder, estate, and special needs law. Includes articles on the Medicare Settlement and VA Aid.
  23. Fulkerson Elder Law Blog: the function of this elder law blog is for the firm to respond to common questions clients have about elder law and review developments in the law impacting elder law and estate planning.
  24. CMLP Estate Planning and Elder Law Blog: readers can look forward to reviewing articles on simplifying their estate plan and elder law news items of note.
  25. Massachusetts Estate Planning and Probate Blog: attorney Matthew Karr keeps readers up to date on estate planning and probate news and information.
  26. Marshall Elder and Estate Planning Blog: the author of this elder law blog has over 30 years experience in estate planning, special needs planning, and estates.
  27. Hartford, CT Elder Law Blog: the attorney’s at Ruggiero Ziogas & Allaire discuss estate planning, care planning, Medicaid, Veteran’s Benefits, and Probate.
  28. El Paso Elder Law Blog: the law firm of Stephanie Townsend Allala and Associates blogs on estate planning, guardianships, Medicaid Planning, Nursing Home Abuse, and Trust & Probate.
  29. Miami Probate Law Blog: the folks at the Byrant law firm keep readers up-to-date on estate administration, probate court, estate litigation, and the nuisances of will and trust disputes.
  30. Elder Law News: attorney Brian A. Raphan is based in New York City and specializes in Wills, Estates, Trusts, and Elder Care issues. His blog is full of great resources.
  31. Aging & Law in West Virginia: this blog contains news in law and aging in West Virginia, written by the West Virginia Senior Legal Aid organization.
  32. Florida Elder Law and Estate Planning: this Florida Certified Elder Law attorney provides in depth insights and news to help Floridians protect themselves and preserve their assets.
  33. Family Law Blog Maryland: while this blog looks at all matters pertaining to Family Law, elder law sneaks in as a prevalent theme in many of the cases discussed. They look at legal matters like when divorce and retirement coincide, or when grandparents wish to take custody of their grandchildren.
  34. Phoenix AZ Family Law Blog: looking at issues older couples face in Arizona, this family law blog explores the specific challenges elders face in divorces and custody battles, complete with the latest policy changes and laws.
  35. Otherspoon: hospice volunteer and blogger Ann Neumann talks about care-giving and the realities, politics, and senior rights involved in death and dying.

Seniors Talk Policy And Politics

  1. Aging in Place: this blog is concerned with seniors who are dealing with shrinking benefits and increasing costs—seniors find answers on how to protect themselves.
  2. Estate in Denial: providing news, analysis, and commentary on abusive practices occurring in probate courts. Features original perspective and direct communication.
  3. Florida Estate Planning Lawyer Blog: this blog covers estate planning legal issues, cases of interest, and news with a focus on Florida elder law.
  4. McGuire Woods: the people at McGuire Woods author this great blog on long term care legal issues, including timely news, articles, and white papers.
  5. Illinois Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: published by the law office of Wilson & Wilson, this blog covers asset protection, banking, estate planning, and trusts.
  6. Illinois Nursing Home Abuse Blog: covers Illinois nursing home law, including Supreme Court cases and other information relating to residents and family members.
  7. Law Office of Donald D. Vanarelli Blog: provides readers in New Jersey with information on elder law, estate and special needs planning, and mediation services.
  8. Maryland Nursing Home Lawyer Blog: this blog offers insight on nursing home abuse reports, legislation, and legal opinions of elder law in Maryland.
  9. Massachusetts Estate Planning, Probate & Elder Law: elder law attorney Brian Barreira writes on legal issues involving death, taxes, special needs, and long-term elder care.
  10. New Jersey Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: blog posts explore life and death in New Jersey from a perspective of estate planning, elder law, taxation, probate, and estate administration.
  11. Medina Law Group: postings provide readers with advice on estate planning and management, estate taxes, elder law, and VA benefits.
  12. North Carolina Wills and Trusts: this blog provides readers with estate planning and elder law news with a North Carolina focus.
  13. California Nursing Home Abuse Law Blog: covers nursing home abuse, elder law abuse, and features many quality articles relating to California elder law.
  14. Nursing Home Law Blog: this well written blog discusses elder issues, legislation, legal news, protections of elder rights, and helpful health tips.
  15. PA Elder Estate and Fiduciary Law Blog: focuses on elder law, long-term care, end-of-life and health care surrogate decision-making, and estate planning.
  16. Patti’s Blog: find information about this lawyer’s practice, which concentrates on advocacy for seniors. She shares personal interests and her passions.
  17. Pennsylvania Nursing Home Abuse Lawyer Blog: this blog discusses nursing home abuse laws, cases, and news items from Pennsylvania.
  18. Barbara Cashman Blog: Barbara blogs about elder law and policy issues, and often hosts guest bloggers to share their insights on elder law and news.
  19. NJ Elder Law: lawyer Kenneth Vercammen blogs about topics related to estate planning and elder law. He was once awarded the NJ State Bar Municipal Court Practitioner of the Year.
  20. The Senior Sentinel: a blog compiling news and information for Baby Boomers, the Senior Sentinel concentrates on the intersection of ageism and public policy both nationally and world-wide.
  21. Elder Consult: this geriatric medicine blog not only covers Alzheimers, dementia, financial decision making, and medications, it also discusses related legal issues such as elder financial abuse.
  22. Grey Pride: a UK blog by the Anchor Digital Marketing team is dedicated to keeping older people at the top of the political agenda and petitioning the government to create a Minister for Older People to ensure their needs are met.
  23. Over 65 Blog: project organizers from Harvard, Yale, and The Hastings Center host this blog for “seniors seeking solutions for health care and security, mainly looking at health care system reforms, elder law policies and practices, and how seniors can achieve a stronger role in the future of health care.
  24. Reaping Hope Blog: a blog from an NGO in Nepal promoting dignified aging and elder rights, Reaping Hope explores elder abuse and elder oppression while actively helping elderly people claim their rights and challenge discrimination.

Age Against The Machine: Anti-Ageism

  1. Ageist Beauty: the musings, product reviews, and random thoughts of a woman who is fighting against her age.
  2. Everyday Ageism Project: this blog aims to capture people’s everyday experiences dealing with ageism. The author has discovered that ageism is the most commonly experienced form of prejudice.
  3. The Lonely Gerontologist: professor Kelly Yokum blogs about all things aging—including aging stereotypes and other aging topics that come to mind.
  4. My Elder Advocate: this blog provides comprehensive coverage of ageism, the dangers of nursing homes, elder abuse, and elder care.
  5. The Roaming Boomers: David and Carol are great examples of a couple who doesn’t let age get in the way of living life to the fullest.
  6. The Gypsy Nester: Veronica and David show readers how to rock the empty nest and get the most out of life as you age.
  7. Changing Aging: this multi-blog platform challenges conventional views on aging. The authors believe aging is a strength, rich in developmental potential and growth.
  8. The Elders: founded by Nelson Mandela in 2007, the Elders is a group of seniors committed to addressing global challenges, including child marriage and climate change.
  9. Beauty and Wisdom: the blog of photographer Robbie Kaye, who traveled to salons throughout the US to photograph and interview women in their 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s and discovered that beauty is ageless.
  10. Advanced Style: don’t tell these women they are too old to model hip and alluring fashions. This blog teaches women how to dress to impress and that age is only a number.
  11. RL TV: the only cable network and online destination for folks 50+, features a nice blog that provides tips on elder issues and promotes active living.
  12. The 70-Something Blog: blogger Judy informs readers how to live a full and engaging life as she chronicles her journey of aging.
  13. Retirement is Work: newly retired librarian and blogger resolves to post one good thing about retirement every day for a year, but along the way struggles with senior rights and anti-ageism.
  14. Yo Is This Ageist?: a humorous blog by Ashton Applewhite dedicated to determining whether age-related remarks are offensive, “challenging the stereotypes that segregate us by age.”
  15. This Chair Rocks: a smart and sassy blog by Ashton Applewhite that challenges the ideas of ageism with humor and snark. All stereotypes and insensitive remarks are grounds for brilliant blog posts.
  16. Senior Planet: “aging with attitude” is the tagline of this blog community of older adults using technology to connect with each other and take on the issues of ageism and senior rights.
  17. Changing Aging: a blog founded by Dr. Bill Thomas to promote “a radical reinterpretation of longevity” which focuses on anti-ageism and senior rights, as well as getting the most out of a long life.
  18. Time Goes By: Ronni Bennett takes on aging, ageism and related issues with humor, exploring the truth of “what it’s really like to get old.” She starts by rejecting the “cutesy” terms for old people – they’re called “elders” around here!
  19. The Magic of Middle-Aged Women: author Daniel Even Weiss – a man – blogs on the theme of his latest book, The Magic of Middle-Aged Women, where he challenges the prevailing ageist idea that women don’t get better as they age. They do.
  20. Advanced Style: Ari Seth Cohen, a young-ish photographer, roams the New York City streets photographing stylish and creative elders. Here, art challenges the paradigm that age and beauty can’t co-exist.
  21. The New Old Age: the New York Times blog on aging takes advantage of the newspaper’s top writers to explore the unprecedented intergenerational challenge of the Baby Boomers.
  22. The Little Old Lady Stays Put (or doesn’t): explores the “lives, lifestyles and issues of interesting older people,” touching on the issues surrounding ageism, elder rights, living with dementia, and overcoming the struggles of aging with strength and good humor.
  23. Naked at Our Age: advocate of ageless sexuality, Joan Price, talks about sex and aging, taking on Senior Rights subjects like safer sex for seniors while providing helpful tips.
  24. Aging & Work at Boston College: scholars, academics, and researchers share their findings on ageism in the workplace and the challenges aging workers face in this PhD-heavy blog by The Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College.
  25. Ethnic Elders: this newsy blog by New America Media examines the Senior Rights issues and Elder Law of minority groups such as age discrimination, lawsuits related to Social Security, and elder healthcare reform.
  26. The Everyday Ageism Project: blending blogging and research, this site’s goal is to capture the experience of age discrimination. The forum is full of people sharing their experiences in a supportive environment.
  27. Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens Blog: the Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens sub-blog offers wide ranging posts on issues including senior rights and ageism – with its signature left-wing perspective.
  28. Clinical Geriatrics: created as more of a peer-reviewed clinical journal by the American Geriatrics Society, some of the top scholars in geriatrics converge on this blog to discuss geriatric health and wellness issues, which often cross over into legal and anti-ageism issues.
  29. Age Action Alliance: this organization brings together a network of 300 organizations and individuals committed to helping older people. Its blog is dedicated to improving older people’s lives through advocating against ageism, particularly in Britain.
  30. Manitoba Senior Centres: this Canadian blog covers the rampant ageism in Canada and promotes world elder abuse awareness. It also has a list of resources for older adults.
  31. Fierce with Age: defying ageism goes mainstream at this blog, created by veteran journalist Dr. Carol Orsborn. Having written about the Boomer generation for major newspapers and blogged for the Huffington Post and NPR’s Next Avenue, Orsborn is well equipped to take on the spiritual and policy hurdles of aging.
  32. Live Better Boomer!: a Philadelphia-based blog, by social worker Tiffany Matthews, devoted to helping educate and empower Boomers advocate for their own improved healthcare.
  33. Third Age: billed as “health for Boomers and beyond,” Third Age offers relatively fluffy fare, like “Change your Mood with Color,” to the legal issues surrounding Boomer divorce and care-giving.
  34. The Old Gunhand: one facet of senior citizen rights you don’t see every day is elder gun advocates. This website not only tells you the best types of guns for elderly wielders, it also goes into gun policy and senior self-defense.
  35. Age Discrimination Info: a simple name for a one-stop source of statistics and information on age discrimination, including legislation, cases, news, publications, events and training. The perfect resource for the activist.
  36. Age UK: the largest organization in the United Kingdom for working with and for older people, this website has an entire section dedicated to age discrimination and ageism.
  37. National Youth Rights Association: not just for youngsters, the National Youth Rights Association combats ageism in all its forms. In fact, they probably wouldn’t appreciate being called “youngsters.”
  38. Disability and Representation: a blog by writer, photographer and activist Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg that discusses (and tries to change the discourse about) disability rights and ageism, along with autism.
  39. Over 50: Career coaching and workshops for the over-50 crowd, this blog doesn’t stop at finding a job. This site explores Baby Boomer activism in and out of the workplace.
  40. Activist Post: while this blog deals with many topics requiring advocacy, they often include issues that regard Senior Rights, Elder Law and anti-ageism.
  41. California Booming: an informational blog dedicated to California Baby Boomers, this blog covers everything from sex, to diet, to politics of the Boomer generation, including issues concerning senior rights and ageism in the workplace.

Senior Citizens Health Conditions by Ian Pennington

April 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As we reach our later years we are at risk of a great many health concerns.  The list of senior citizens health conditions is a long and complex one. It  includes both mental and physical issues and some people will be plagued with both.

It can only be expected that, as time takes it toll on our bodies, we will  experience some deterioration in our physical and mental wellbeing. That is not  to say that once we have retired we are on the scrap heap and just waiting until  our lives are over. Far from it. There has been a huge amount of medical  research taking place over the last century, and indeed much longer, and this  has paved the way for a greater understanding of the aging process. We are now  much more educated regarding nutrition and health matters and are able to  control and sometimes eliminate many of the senior citizens health  conditions.

One of the main fears that the elderly face is that of dementia of one form  or another. The most commonly known is Alzheimer’s Disease but there are others.  This affects the patients mind and can be the cause of heartache for a caring  partner who will feel unable to help. They will find that they spend much of  their time caring for the patient whilst at the same time having to accept the  fact that they are becoming more distant as the disease progresses. This can be  aggravated if the carer is also suffering from any one of the other senior  citizens health conditions, either physically or mentally.

Other serious conditions can often include strokes. Post stroke problems can  vary hugely depending on the severity of the attack and the level of recovery of  the patient. Sometimes a stroke can result in partial paralysis. This obviously  has a far reaching affect on the elderly and may jeopardise their ability to get  out and visit family and friends. Even the most simple tasks, which were taken  for granted previously, may now cause a problem; shopping, housework etc.  Strokes are high on the list of senior citizens health conditions, but, they are  also the subject of a lot of research and our understanding of the subject is  increasing all the time. Post stroke care has improved a great deal and in some  cases patients now recover fully.

Heart disease has been an increasing problem in all age groups, but continues  to be a main factor in contributing to senior citizens health conditions. Once  again, however, research is good on the subject and our knowledge increasing all  the time. Surgical options are becoming more common and our expertise in the  field has contributed to many lives being extended.

There are a number of senior citizens health conditions which can be helped  by a careful diet being followed during our earlier years. Osteoporosis,  rheumatism and arthritis have all been the subject of studies and tests. Some  foods have been found to be a great help in reducing the chances of becoming a  sufferer.

Don’t wait until it is too late. There has been so much research undertaken  on the subject of senior citizens health conditions that you would be wise to  take action early and follow the advice that is available so that you can  increase your chances of enjoying your later years in the best possible  health.

Ian Pennington is an accomplished niche website developer and author.

To learn more about senior health  [http://seniorhealthblog.info/senior-citizens-health-conditions], please visit  Senior Health Blog [http://seniorhealthblog.info] for current articles and  discussions.

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Activities For Senior Citizens – How Hobbies and the Mind Body Connection Work By Diane Carbo

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Hobbies have a mind body connection, they are important activities for  senior citizens and are an important part of healthy aging. Active seniors  are proof that you can enjoy better health and have fun doing it.

Research studies have shown that leisure time and physical activity promote a  healthier lifestyle. Our bodies are meant to be active and move. Many, as they  age, tend to become increasingly inactive, preferring to watch TV to help pass  the time away. Finding fun activities for senior citizens can change that.

Some good activities for senior citizens

Active seniors are involved and participate in what life has to offer.  Hobbies give an individual a reason to get out and share with others. Whether it  is painting, building model airplanes or playing cards the benefits of a hobby  can be an increase your chances for improved physical, social and emotional well  being.

It is important to have regular leisure time physical activity. Anything that  promotes moving and being active will benefit you as you age. The health  benefits of staying active are a delay or prevention of a chronic disease such  as: heart disease, diabetes, some cancers and arthritis. Physical activity also  promotes brain fitness. This can help delay or prevent dementia or  Alzheimer’s.

Participating in a variety of hobbies helps many cope with the stressors of  life. How you react and respond to different situations in life affects your  health. Stress and anxiety can lead to poor health. Active seniors are involved  and lead a more balanced life.

Hobbies allow active seniors to socialize, find companionship and  camaraderie. Making connections with others that have the same interests can  often open an individual to new found friendships.

Many individuals that participate in similar hobbies find themselves with  other individuals that have similar situations and experiences in life. As we  age, we experience losses that affect our emotional health. Active seniors that  are involved in hobbies have a pool of other individuals that they can draw  emotional support and comfort. There are times when they can also learn from  shared experiences. Sharing our feelings with others is a way to connect with  others as well as relieve the stress and anxiety we may be feeling.

More Hobbies and the Mind Body Connection: How Active Seniors are Having  Fun and Enjoying Better  Health …

Hobbies as activities for senior citizens are a way to calm their  minds and relax. It is a way to belong, have something to look forward to  doing.

For many, their hobbies are a tool that releases stress and helps bring their  emotions back into balance again. It is a time when we get an attitude  adjustment and feel right with the world again.

Leisure time physical activity is important to healthy aging. Moving our  bodies and using our minds affect how we age. The mind body connection benefits  of participating in hobbies are improved mental clarity, enhanced immune system,  improved self esteem and self confidence.

Hobbies are a way to have fun, enjoy and stay regularly involved in leisure  time physical activity. Consistency and regular involvement is the key to  maintaining healthy aging.

Having a variety of hobbies during the week can keep an individual busy,  interested and involved. Participating in a hobby with a group can be  motivating. Knowing that the expectations of others are anticipating your  participation in the day’s activity may give one the boost to go when they feel  down. Even to know that you have others that depend on you to be there, may give  you an extra boost to participate when you don’t feel like it. Feeling a sense  of commitment to others, a sense of belonging is important to healthy aging.

Hobbies give many a sense of connection to others, when there are no other  connections in an individual’s life. Connections to others, a sense of  belonging, a sense of community gives many active seniors the reason to  participate in life to their fullest ability.

Hobbies are a way for many to stay physically and mentally stimulated. Trying  new things, meeting new people and sharing your knowledge, experience and  sometimes your creative side with others can keep an active senior challenged  mentally, as well as, physically.

Hobbies are a safe way to get out and meet people with like minded interests.  It is a great ice breaker to meeting new people and a way to stay active, no  matter how old you get to be.

Any activity that gets an aging senior moving and involved with others is a  step towards healthy aging. It is important to get busy and stay active. Take up  dancing, gardening; join a walking club or travel.

Hobbies have a mind body connection. Active seniors are having fun and  enjoying better health as they regularly participate in things they enjoy. It is  never too late to start enjoying yourself now. Take time to find your own  activities for senior citizens to help your loved ones and  yourselves.

Diane Carbo Registered Nurse has more than thirty five years in the nursing  field. Her experience as a geriatric care manager, makes her uniquely qualified  to help those who want to live out their lives in their own homes. Diane has  developed a web site to make people aware of issues and options. You will find a  mountain of helpful information that will be continually updated. Please visit:  http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com/activities-for-senior-citizens.html for more information on hobbies and senior activities Sign up for The Caring  Advocate Ezine her free newlsetter and receive a complimentary copy of  the Home Health Care Planning Guide.

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Light Bulbs For Senior Citizens By Atte Aaltonen

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Seeing the Light: Why Lighting Is Important for Senior  Citizens

As people age, they consider home improvements that will make their living  spaces both safer and more enjoyable. Some senior citizens choose to downgrade  to a smaller and easy-to-manage home, while others improve the safety of their  current household by making sure railings are tightly installed, rugs are put on  slippery floors and stairs are covered in soft carpet. One factor that is often  overlooked is the lighting throughout the home. While it may seem simple,  lighting is one of the most important features of the home, especially as people  get older.

According to SeniorJournal.com, senior citizens need three times the amount  of light than younger people do in order to see clearly. This is because the  lenses on the eye thicken and the pupils shrink, causing the eyes to react  slower to lighting conditions. Senior citizens with dementia also suffer from  additional eye impairment because they have a difficulty in distinguishing  objects from their backgrounds.

Not only is lighting necessary for senior citizens because of the effects of  aging, but they also need adequate lighting for safety. Senior citizens are at  an increased risk for slips and falls, so it’s important that they can see  clearly throughout the home.

Where Should Seniors Have Lighting?

It’s essential that every room has adequate lighting for both safety and  comfort, but there are certain areas that require careful attention. Make sure  that stairways and walkways have enough lighting, as these are some of the most  common places for slips and falls. Ideally, seniors should have a light switch  at both the top and bottom of the stairs so that they can switch the lights on  and off without being stuck in the dark. The lights should point toward the  stairs so that each step is well lit.

The kitchen is another room that needs adequate lighting, as this is where  seniors prepare all of their meals and handle appliances. Seniors must be able  to read the labels on food items, buttons on appliances and also be able to  handle cutting and chopping confidently. To increase lighting, consider  installing lights underneath cabinets. Other good choices include low-hanging  lights to go over a breakfast bar or recessed lighting in all corners of the  kitchen.

Another room that deserves attention is the family room or den, where  reading, watching television and relaxing is done. There is no need for seniors  to strain their eyes when engaging in their hobbies, so choose lighting that  will complement activities. For example, floor lamps that have 3-way bulbs are  ideal, since each bulb can be positioned differently, providing light from a  variety of angles.

Nightlights are also important to have throughout the home, especially  because seniors find themselves getting up during the night to use the washroom.  Consider the areas that are dark and often traveled through during the late  hours, such as hallways, stairs and bedrooms. Nightlights are easy to place in  both high and low outlets to provide sufficient lighting, at least until a  senior can reach the light switch.

What Types of Light Bulbs are Best for Seniors?

The standard and most basic type of light bulb is an incandescent bulb. What  makes an incandescent bulb a great option for seniors is that it is easy to  change, easy to keep clean and fits in standard lamps and fixtures. Because  incandescent bulbs contain no mercury or lead, they can be disposed of or  recycled with the regular trash.

Fluorescent light bulbs are another great option for seniors because they are  efficient, produce little heat and last up to 20,000 hours. A longer life means  seniors won’t have to change the bulbs as much. Fluorescent light bulbs do  contain mercury however, so it’s important to dispose of them properly.

Turning Light Bulbs On and Off with Ease

Light bulbs and fixtures aren’t the only important factors to consider;  seniors must also think about how their light bulbs will be turned on and off.  If possible, make sure that all light bulbs can be turned on using a light  switch so that the room is well lit upon entering or exiting. As an added  benefit, choose to install dimmers onto light switches so that the intensity of  the light can be altered using the switch.

Other great options are rocker switches, which are larger than standard  switches and can be turned on and off using an arm, elbow or even a cane. If  there are rooms where the lights are not hooked up to a light switch, clap-on  lights should be considered. These friendly alternatives make it easy for  seniors to gently clap their hands in order to activate light bulbs.

How to Safely Change a Light Bulb

Providing a senior citizen’s home with enough light is not only essential for  safety, but it also allows seniors more independence and confidence. Best of  all, once proper lighting is installed, seniors can maintain their light bulbs  and fixtures themselves. To change a light bulb is simple and requires no tools,  as long as the bulb is in a lamp or fixture that does not contain a glass  reflector. If a glass reflector is present, a small screwdriver can be used to  loosen the screws and remove the bulb.

1. Turn off the electricity and let the bulb cool for 5 minutes.  2. Hold  the base of the bulb firmly with one hand, while turning it counterclockwise  until it is released from the socket. 3. Insert the new light bulb into the  socket, making sure it fits snug. 4. Turn the light bulb in a clockwise  direction until is locked in. 5. Switch the electricity to “on” and make  sure that the bulb is working properly.

What to Look for When Choosing Light Fixtures

There may not be much that seniors can do about existing lighting, but if  updating fixtures or purchasing a new home, there are certain light fixtures to  consider. Look for ceiling fixtures that do not contain globes around them.  These need to be removed and cleaned often in order to maintain their look and  proper lighting. Not to mention, in order to reach these fixtures, seniors will  need a ladder or step stool, which only increases the risk of slips and  falls.

Floor lamps make great lighting options since they are easy to maintain.  Light bulbs can simply be swapped out and a cloth or paper towel can be used to  wipe down the bulbs and fixtures. Best of all, floors lamps are inexpensive, can  be matched to any décor and can be moved throughout the home.

Wall sconces are other great alternatives to ceiling lighting, especially in  stairwells and bathrooms. Wall sconces make it easy to change out light bulbs  and most models have openings on both the top and bottom. Sconces are easy to  clean, have decorative appeal and provide ample lighting, especially is awkward  places and corners.

Proper lighting is vital for the safety and independence of senior citizens.  Fortunately, senior centers and retirement homes have improved their standards  in regards to lighting, but it’s important that the homes of seniors are not  ignored. Take the time to consider new and updated light bulbs and fixtures, as  well as increasing the wattage where applicable. Ultimately, seniors will find  their homes more enjoyable and comfortable with these minor home  improvements.

Visit this site for information about fluorescent light bulbs.

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Nevada Senior Guide – Out ‘n’ About Services

Concierge Assistance – YOUR time is valuable!

Call:  (775) 772-5373

Email:  outnaboutservices@hotmail.com

 

Nevada Senior Guide – Senior Safeguards – Easier Independent Living

www.seniorsafeguards.net

Senior Safeguard

Senior SafeGuards specializes in Ramping, Handrailing and Independent Living Aids. We are a family oriented small business in the Reno, Sparks area of Nevada. We sell Modular, Suitcase, Multifold, Threshold, Solid, and Van Ramps. We also carry Independent Living Aids and disability equipment.

We are one of the few companies in the area that will install your ramp for you. We also have RENTAL RAMPS available if you are laid up for just a few months.

Give us a call at (775) 359-3889 for a free quote. We look forward to working with you.

Email:  rick@seniorsafeguards.net

 

Cleveland Clinic September calendar of social services and education programs

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

September calendar of social services and education programs for individuals, caregivers and family members impacted by brain diseases. All of these programs are open to the community and offered free of charge.

Healthy Aging: Up2Me – New Session Begins on September 28, 12:30 pm – 3:00 pm
Join us for this proven six week program helping caregivers and individuals with chronic diseases set goals and develop skills for success. Free and open to the public, advance registration required. Contact Susan, 483-6023, hirschs2@ccf.org

Lunch & Learn
Wednesdays, 12 noon – 1 pm
888 W. Bonneville Avenue, Las Vegas
Bring your lunch, drink & dessert provided; open to the public

Sept 5: What You Need to Know Before a Hospital Stay, Rose O’Donnell-Barker, RN BSN, Valley Hospital Medical Center
A hospital stay can be stressful for anyone. For those with Alzheimer’s or other memory disorders, being in an unfamiliar environment presents unique challenges. Learn strategies to address issues that can arise for patients and caregivers during a hospital stay.

September 12: Understanding Grief & Loss, Esther Langston, PhD, Professor Emeritus, UNLV School of Social Work
This presentation will explore grief and loss over the life span and increase our understanding of how we are affected as individuals and caregivers.

Sept 19: Tea Time & Spices of Life, Kristopher Hightower, Keep Memory Alive Café
A conversation about teas and spices of the world and their benefits. Tasting and samples!

Sept 26: Special Social Service Programs: CarePRO & Health Aging: Up2Me, Susan Solorzano, Pam Fine & Patti Nixon
Join us for this presentation on two special social service programs which have been proven to be effective: 1) CarePRO which provides education and support for dementia caregivers and 2) Healthy Aging: Up2Me, a 6 week program helping caregivers and individuals with chronic illness to set goals and develop skills for success.

Cleveland Museum of Art Series
Dynamic conversations about art through videoconferencing
All art education programs are held at the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health Library, 888 W. Bonneville Avenue and open to the public.

Ancient American Art: The Aztec and their Ancestors
September 4, 11:00 am – 12:00 noon
Learn about the art of selected cultures in ancient Mesoamerica. Ceramic, gold and stone objects will be examined to shed light on religion and rulership among the Aztec, Maya and other cultures.

Self Portraits
September 18, 11:00 am – 12:00 noon
Our self image influences many elements including our perspective, decision-making and daily experiences. We will explore ways in which artists from Rembrandt to Picasso represent themselves through their personal statements, historical moments and other approaches.

Contact Susan Hirsch, 483-6023 or hirschs2@ccf.org for additional information.
Support Groups
MEMORY LOSS SUPPORT GROUP
Wednesdays, 1 pm-2:30 pm
Meetings are held weekly for adult members who provide care for loved ones with memory loss.
Contact: Donna Munic-Miller 483-6035, municd@ccf.org
PARKINSON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP: September 11, 12 noon -1 pm
(Held the 2nd Tuesday of every month)
Christopher Borsellino, MA Ed of Deaf, MS/CCC-SLP from Speech Logic is guest speaker. Early stage group and adult family members meet together in the Library.
Contact: Jennifer 483-6036, gayanj@ccf.org

HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP: September 25, 12 noon -1 pm
(Held the 4th Tuesday of every month)
Separate groups for gene positive individuals (asymptomatic and early stage) and adult family members.
Contact: Jenna 483-6054, clifforj@ccf.org

Free Senior Help Fair

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

Free Senior Help Fair Provides Vital Information & Services

The Senior Help Fair is a collaborative event hosted by community-based organizations comprised of health care, senior service providers and government. The HELP Fair attendees will be treated to a variety of vendors, offering health and wellness screenings, health-related tips and information about local services from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thursday Sept. 6, 2012, on the campus of Christ Lutheran Church, located at 111 N. Torrey Pines Drive.

The Senior Help Fair is a one-stop destination for information about local services and organizations and is open to all ages. More than 50 agencies and companies will be on hand to provide information on community services for seniors. Community agencies will be on hand to help seniors connect with resources. Assistance programs that will be available include nutrition support, energy assistance, medication costs, affordable housing, legal services and transportation including the TAP taxicab assistance program. There will also be free health screenings for blood pressure, diabetes risk, vision, falls risk and dementia.

“This fair will help all seniors and those who care for them navigate the programs and services available to help people and to give voice to their concerns regarding services and resources,” said Senior Help Fair Organizing Committee Chair Jeff Klein. Individuals, who are 65 or over, should bring their identification and Medicare cards.
Along with the more than 50 agencies and companies offering information and services, free lunch will be served to the first 200 attendees, local singer Mark Miller will be providing entertainment and many door prizes will be offered on the hour.
The best time to think about aging is before the need arises. If an emergency happens, family members have to scramble to seek out options for care within a short time period, often not being able to take the time to make the best decision. “There are still a large number of people in the state who do not know what senior services are offered, or that these services even exist, so we will continue outreach efforts to the community,” said Commission on Aging member Lucy Peres “The goal is to raise awareness of health and safety related services in the state.”

The fair will also provide an opportunity for seniors to speak with their legislators and voice their opinions and concerns on issues that affect their daily lives.

When: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Thursday Sept. 6, 2012
Where: Campus of Christ Lutheran Church 111 N. Torrey Pines Drive
Information: Call Nevada Senior Services (702) 648-3425 www.nevadaseniorservices.org

Choosing Senior Care Services (Nevada Senior Guide)

September 27, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As our loved ones begin to age, we have to wonder if they need elderly care services. How does one determine if your parents need to live in a nursing home, if they require in home healthcare, or if you’ll be able to take care of them yourself? The elderly have many more options today than they once did. Not everyone needs constant care, but sometimes it’s difficult to figure out the best option. Most seniors won’t admit they need help, so it’s up to you to look for certain cues to figure out what is best for them.

If your loved ones want to keep their independence and don’t have dangerous health issues, consider independent living communities. They will have their own apartments and will be living with others their age. This is a wonderful option for healthy seniors who may be looking to get involved in activities and want additional company. They won’t feel like you’re leaving them in a nursing home. Instead, they will be part of a social community.

Assisted living is the best choice for those who are beginning to have trouble with daily tasks and have less severe health problems. If you notice that the house is not always clean, they forget to do laundry or take medication, or they can’t cook their own meals, these are your cues for assisted living or home aides. If you move them into an assisted living home, they will receive help with grooming, bathing, and meal preparations. If your parents want to remain at home, you can have healthcare aides provide similar tasks.

The final option are nursing homes and facilities. Nursing homes are good for seniors who need 24-hour care. It is the best choice for people who have debilitating illnesses, such as dementia and Alzheimer’s. Nurses will be on staff all the time to help your parents with daily activities. This also happens to be the most expensive choice, but sometimes you have no other option. Your parents need help and you cannot give them the proper care they need. If you’re unsure, speak with your parents’ doctors to find out if nursing homes are the best solution.

Before you make a decision, talk about elderly care services with your parents. Don’t just ship them off one day and expect them to be okay with it. Sometimes you will have to take matters into your own hands, but explain to them that you only have their best interest at heart and this is for their benefit.

SeniorComfortGuide.com is an online assisted living directory featuring a number of resources for elderly care services in Ohio.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mark_Etinger

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6312560

Senior Living Services: Caring for the Elderly and Easing the Pressure Off the Sandwich Generation (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Today, this rapidly expanding population is probably the largest it has ever been. Traditionally, women are a disproportionately large percentage of the caregivers. According, to “The Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Takes On Alzheimer’s,” women account for 65% of the Alzheimer’s population and up to three-fifths of Alzheimer patient caregivers.

The term “sandwich generation” was coined by Dorothy Miller in 1981 and refers to the group of adults whose dependents include both their own children and their aging parents.

Frequently adults, especially women, are caring for their elderly parents while simultaneously raising tweens and teenagers. Pulled in two opposite directions, it may often seem overwhelming and as though both parents and children are not getting what they need. Thus, many caregivers eventually seek out either a home health aide or senior care facility as their loved ones’ needs become more than they are equipped to handle.

Home health agencies partner an aide with an elderly patient. Home healthcare is ideal for clients who want to keep either themselves or their loved ones at home with family. Depending on a patient’s needs, the aide may be required to work either during the day or night, or live with the client for 5-6 days at a time. These aides may offer both companionship as well as custodial and medical care, helping with personal hygiene, daily medications, meals, etc. In home healthcare is minimally disruptive to a patient’s routine, allowing him or her to remain in an environment in which she is familiar. This service allows the elderly to either maintain their own residences or continue living with their families, which may actually preserve their mental and emotional health. Dementia patients, for example, benefit from a consistent environment as it helps stave off the disease’s progression. Medicare generally only pays for a small portion of home healthcare; the rest of the cost is covered by private insurance and funds.

Senior assisted living facilities allow residents to maintain some independence within a controlled environment. Seniors may bring their own furniture and other mementos from home. Generally these residences consist of little apartments that are outfitted with kitchenettes, an environment that enables residents to host family and friends in a more private setting. Main meals are generally served at set times in a large dining area and more individual care is available to those who need it. Certain senior assisted living facilities are authorized to dispense medication or reminders to take medication.

Assisted living centers also offer outings and other day trips for seniors who are able to participate. Senior assisted living is a compromise between a nursing home, which has more comprehensive medical care, and living completely autonomously. Although assisted living is normally paid from private funds and assets, certain long term insurance policies will cover licensed assisted living facilities. A few states offer Medicaid funds and waivers to help foot the bill. Assisted living is regulated by the state, so policies and practices vary.

Nursing homes offer the most extensive care, providing full custodial and medical care. For the elderly who require consistent, round the clock medical attention, this choice can be a viable option. Nursing homes provide occupational and physical therapy. Some nursing homes also offer physical rehabilitation programs, which are required after a major procedures, such as hip surgery. For sufferers of advanced dementia, nursing homes provide the round-the-clock care and attention they require.

Although nursing homes cost more due to the level of care they provide, they are also more frequently covered by Medicaid and Medicare. Some nursing home facilities have the air of a hospital and are run like one. Others try to be less austere and more homey and offer many of the same amenities as assisted living facilities.

Choosing the right solution to meet the needs of the elderly is a laborious process that requires individual case-by-case assessment. At home care, assisted living centers, and nursing homes all have their strengths and weaknesses. Each serves a dual purpose: to care for an aging population and ease the burden for familial caretakers. These services provide patients and their families with peace of mind.

www.KennethRozenberg.com operates the Centers for Specialty Care Group, a collection of prominent healthcare organizations offering short- and long-term care, as well as home health services. Learn more at www.KennethRozenberg.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mark_Etinger

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6305281

Senior Housing Options Explained (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Deciding to move to a senior retirement community is one of the biggest decisions you make. It can be an exciting time, but it can also cause some confusion when it comes to choosing which type of community is best for you or your loved one. People have different needs. Living options are not “one size fits all.”
To help you find the best fit, this article explains the main types of senior retirement options, including independent living, assisted living, skilled nursing, memory care and continuing care retirement communities.

Independent Living

Independent living facilities are apartment style homes that allow a person to maintain complete autonomy. This type of facility is a very good option for those that can still do everything for themselves but need contact with other people – and less isolation than living at home alone. Senior independent living facilities usually have on site staff members that provide minimal supervision. Independent living facilities also offer activities and services for residents, ranging from tennis and swimming to fine dining and hair salons.

Assisted Living

Assisted living facilities are designed to help those that have difficulty caring for themselves to the extent that they can no longer live in their own home. These facilities are staffed 24 hours a day. Employees are trained to assist residents with their needs and provide supervision. A typical person living in an assisted living facility may need help managing medication, bathing, or getting dressed. While assisted living provides residents with assistance with the activities of daily living, they do not provide round-the-clock skilled nursing services.

Skilled Nursing Centers

For round-the-clock medical supervision, Skilled Nursing is the way to go. Skilled Nursing facilities are designed to house and assist individuals who have health conditions that require constant monitoring and the availability of medical personnel. Because of the high level of monitoring that skilled nursing facilities provide, they are staffed with medical personnel 24 hours a day. Skilled nursing facilities provide an invaluable service to those that have medical problems that require constant medical monitoring and/or high levels of assistance.

Senior Memory Care Communities

Caring for those who have dementia requires special expertise. Alzheimer’s and dementia care communities represent a special form of assisted living, with housing, supportive services and care to those who have varying levels of dementia. Staff members are carefully selected and trained to understand and manage the unique challenges associated with dementia care. Physical and behavioral issues as well as life history are key factors in creating daily routines and service plans for residents. Memory Support Centers provides daily structure seven days per week to help maintain the resident’s abilities and encourage the use of their remaining skills.

Continuing Care Retirement Communities

Continuing Care Retirement Communities, or CCRCs, provide a place where seniors can live, socialize and receive they care they need, while knowing that they can remain in the same community should their care needs change in the future.

A CCRC setting is one that will be able to accommodate you or your family member’s needs now, as well as in the future – all in the same community. If their need for care increases, a person who chooses a CCRC will be able to remain in the same community setting, but get Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing or Dementia care, while keeping the same neighbors and living in a familiar setting.

This means that the ideal living situation is one that can provide for an individual’s current and future needs while allowing him to maintain as much of his independence as possible.

Carol Cummings is a RN and Certified Wellness Coach at Brookdale Senior Living. She shares her knowledge and experience at Brookdale’s Optimum Life Blog. Brookdale Senior Living has a full spectrum of senior living communities throughout the United States, including Independent Living, Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing Centers and Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care Residences. Find a Brookdale Senior Living Community near you at http://www.brookdaleliving.com/.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Carol_Cummings

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6394052

Nevada-Senior-Guide Medical and Health Services Directory – Northern Nevada Rural

City of Pioche – County Social Services
Information

(775) 728-4477 Lincoln County

www.co.lincoln.nv.us

Provides various essential programs, services,  benefits to assist qualified, needy families,  individuals achieve their highest level of
self-sufficiency, Transportation

Elder Protective Services (EPS)

State of Nevada – Aging & Disability
Services Agency – Northern Nevada

(775) 688-2964 Washoe County

Elder Protective Services for persons 60 years

old and older who may experience abuse,

neglect, exploitation, or isolation. Elder

Protective Services serves all of Nevada

 

Eureka Senior Center

20 W. Gold Street, Eureka NV 89316

(775) 237-5597
www.co.eureka.nv.us/county/senior.htm

Referral Services for Low Income Energy

Assistance, USDA, and Medicare

Fallon Paiute Shoshone Tribe Senior Center

1885 Agency Rd., Fallon, NV 89406

(775) 423-7569 Churchill County

www.fpst.org/programs/seniorcenter.htm

Offers meals, trips, traditional crafts, and

other cultural events, caregivers, food bank,

national relief charities program

Kids to Seniors Korner – Saint Mary’s

Community Wellness, Community

Based Outreach

(775) 770-6177 Washoe County

www.saintmarysreno.com

Kids to Seniors Korner assists vulnerable                           individuals and families, with special
emphasis on homeless children and seniors,                          by linking and providing them with community               resources through a collaborative community                    partnership to increase quality of life 8am-5pm

Lyon County Human Services

1075 Pyramid St., Silver Springs, NV 89429

(775) 577-5009 Lyon County

www.lyon-county.org

All emergency services, Senior Services,

Low Income, Employment. 8am-5pm

 

Nevada Rural Counties Retired & Senior                              Volunteer Program (RSVP)

Pahrump, Amargosa, Beatty, Crystal

2621 Northgate Lane, #6

Carson City, NV 89701

775-687-4680, treebanks@pahrump.com

RSVP Program provides free local transportation                           to doctors, shopping, bank, Respite Care,     Caregiver Program (4 hours at a time), Pro                           Bono Legal Services, Resistance Exercise

Training, Coupons for Farmers Market
(Call program director for information)

 

NYE/Esmerelda County Community

Health Nursing

1 Frankee St., Tonopah, NV 89049

(775) 482-6659. Referral Service, Immunization
flu shots, counseling for women’s/men’s
health, cancer screening

 

RSVP Program – NV Rural Counties

Homemaker Companions, Donations Welcome

Senior Daybreak Program

Washoe County Senior Services

(775) 328-2575 Washoe County

www.co.washoe.nv.us/seniorsrv

Daycare for adults age 18 years or older as
alternative to institutionalization, Provides                        respite care, nursing, day care and social
opportunities for the disabled adult,

Offers group care during the day

 

Senior ID Card – Douglas Cty Nevada TRIAD

(775) 782-9858 Douglas County

This card is wallet size and should be carried                     at all times. It contains information that could
save your life in case of an emergency.
CARE TRAK Program.

 

The Continuum Outreach Program

Nevada Care Connection Partner

3700 Grant Dr., Ste A, Reno, NV 89509

(775) 829-4700 Washoe County

www.thecontinuum-reno.com

Adult day care, therapy and rehab

 

Douglas County Nevada TRIAD

Dementia/Senior and Elderly Services

The Evacuation Disaster Program

(775) 782-9858 Douglas County

For those who live alone or are disabled:
in the event of a disaster and would not be                           able to evacuate without assistance. This                  program signs you up for immediate
assistance to come to your aid in the event                            an evacuation request is issued.

Contact for Magnet that holds health info.

 

Washoe County Senior Services Law Project

1155 E. 9th St., Reno, NV 89512

(775) 334-3050 Washoe County

Assists seniors of Washoe County with
Social security, supplemental security income,                   Medicare, food stamps, county assistance,                                 public housing and Foreclosure Info.

Call for hours. 60+

WEARC Program (Waiver for the Elderly in

Adult Residential Care)

State of Nevada – Aging & Disability
Services Agency – Northern Nevada

(775) 688-2964 Carson City County
www.nvaging.net

A home and community based waiver for                  the elderly in group care that offers individuals                   a less expensive alternative to supervised                              care in a residential setting

Nevada-Senior-Guide Education Directory – Northern Nevada

Center for Healthy Aging, Larry Weiss, PhD

11 Fillmore Way, Reno, NV 89519

775-376-3210, larry@addinglifetoyears.com

Life Line, Emergency Response & RX Programs,

Provide life span respite training, OASIS                               CATCH, Healthy Habits, Elder Gap

 

Community Health Program/Urban Indians                            Outreach

745 W. Moana Ln., Ste. 375, Reno, NV 89502

1-775-788-7600

Health promotion, AIDS education

 

Continuing Education, UNR

18600 Wedge Pkwy., Reno, NV 89511,

(775) 784-4046. www.olli.unr.edu – Info and                          Locations. Lifelong Learning Institute                            Program for Retirement, Extended studies.

 

Downtown Reno Library

301 South Center St., Reno, NV 89501

775-327-8312. Please call for hours.

 

Moments of Memory, Lynette Schweigert

775-848-4757, momentsofmemory@charter.net

www.momentsofmemory.org. Art classes for                       those with Alzheimer’s & other dementias

 

Nevada Geriatric Education Center

Patricia Swager, M.Ed.

411 W. Second St. / MS #150, Reno, NV  89503

775-327-2285, www.medicine.nevada.edu/ngec

Continued education

 

Truckee Meadows Community College Education

5270 Neil Rd. #216, Reno, NV 89502

(775) 829-9010

Silver College 65+; Computer/Internet,                                Wellness, Creative Writing, Digital Camera’s &           Photography, Call for additional activities

 

Washoe County Senior Center Library

1155 E. 9th Street, Reno, NV 89512

(775) 328-2586. Open Tues-Fri, 9am-1pm

Large print, DVD (No VHS available), computers

Nevada-Senior-Guide Support Groups Directory – Southern Nevada

Adult Diabetes Education & Mgmnt.

West Charleston Library

6301 W. Charleston Blvd., LV, NV 89146

(702) 349-7370, www.diabetes-lasvegas.org

Support Group 2nd Tues. each month, 6-7:30pm

 

Alcoholics Anonymous

1431 E. Charleston Blvd., #15, LV, NV 89104-1734

702-598-1888, www.LVcentraloffice.org

Meeting Schedules, Telephone Reassurance,

12 Step-calls, literature

ALS of Nevada

4220 S. Maryland Pkwy., Bldg. B, Ste 404

Las Vegas, NV 89119

(702) 777-0500

Support Groups, ALS Clinic, Medical

Equipment to Lend (Lou Gehrig’s Disease)

 

Alzheimer’s Association S. Nevada Chapter

5190 S. Valley View Blvd.,#104, LV, NV 89118

(702) 248-2770, www.alzdsw.org

Referral Services, Resources, Support Groups,

24-hour Help Line 1-800-272-3900, respite
care, safe return program, education on
Dementia & Alzheimers

American Cancer Society

6165 S. Rainbow Blvd., Bldg. 12, LV, NV 89118

702-891-9009, www.cancer.org. Referral                             Service, call for appointment & event info.

American Diabetes Association

For diabeties info, call 702-369-9995 or

801-363-3024 x 7069, 888-342-2383

Resource/Referrals, Advocacy

American Lung Association

3552 W. Cheyenne Ave. #130, N. LV, NV 89032

(702) 431-6333, www.lungusa.org

Literature, Support Group, Better Breathers
Club, Freedom from smoking club

American Heart & Stroke Association

4445 S. Jones Blvd.,Ste. B1, LV, NV 89103

(702) 789-4370, www.strokeassociation.org

Resources to Physicians, hospitals, healthcare

professionals, and individuals, CPR classes

 

Arthritis Foundation Nevada

1368 Paseo Verde Pkwy, S-200B

Henderson, NV 89012. 702-367-1626

www.arthritis.org. Telephone Reassurance,                         Referral Service, Literature, Exercise Classes,         Aquatics, self-help programs

 

Cancer Connection

Comprehensive Cancer Centers of Nevada

3730 S. Eastern Ave., Las Vegas, NV 89109

(702) 952-3400 Call for Info and Locations

 

Divorced & Widowed Adjustment, Inc.

P.O. Box 26504, Las Vegas, NV 89106

(702) 735-5544, www.info4nv.org

Counseling Service

 

Epilepsy Support Group

Sunrise Hospital Auditorium

3186 S. Maryland Pkwy., LV, NV 89109

702-731-8115. 2nd Wed. of the month, 5:30pm.                     Meet other people with seizures

 

For the Cure, So. NV Affiliate

4850 W. Flamingo Rd., #25, LV, NV 89103

702-822-2324, www.komensouthernnevada.org

Education, Resources, Friendly Visitation,

Telephone Reassurance

Grief & Loss Support Groups

702-796-3157, www.NAH.org. Call for additional info

 

Hemophilia Foundation of Nevada

7473 W. Lake Mead Blvd., Ste 100, LV, NV 89128

(702) 564-4368, www.HFNV.org

Telephone Reassurance, Advocacy,

Education on bleeding disorders

Las Vegas Valley Lewy Body Dementia

Caregiver Support Group

Call (702) 789-8371 – Joan

Caregiver, Support group meets at Pacifica                          Green Valley: 2620 Robindale Rd., Henderson,                        last Monday of month – 2pm.

 

Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

6280 S. Valley View Blvd.,#342, LV, NV 89118

(702) 436-4220, www.lls.org/snv

Information Resource Center, Education,                             Referral, Financial Aid, Support Groups

 

Muscular Dystrophy Assn.

6320 W. Cheyenne #150, Las Vegas, NV 89108

(702) 822-6920, www.mgausa.org

Counseling, Telephone Reassurance, Medical                      Care, Referral, Medical equipment available,                           must be registered with Muscular Dystrophy

 

National Kidney Foundation

15490 Ventura Blvd., Suite 210

Sherman Oaks, CA 91403, 1 (800) 747-5527

Patient Helpline 1-855-653-2273

www.kidney.org. Info, Referrals.

National Multiple Sclerosis Society

2110 E. Flamingo, Ste., 203, LV, NV 89119

(702) 736-1478, www.nationalmssociety.org                         9am-5pm. Provide information, education,                   support services for families & persons with MS

Nevada Council on Problem Gambling

5552 S. Fort Apache Rd., Ste 100, LV, NV 89148

(702) 369-9740, www.nevadacouncil.org

Telephone Reassurance, Referral,

Problem Gambling Helpline:1-800-522-4700

 

Nevada Tobacco Users

Real help for smokers who want to stop.

Call 1-800-784-8669 (QUIT NOW)

 

No to Abuse – NV Outreach

621 S. Blagg Rd., Pahrump, NV 89048

Crisis line: 1-775-751-1118

Education, Food, Referral, 24/7 Crisis Line,                         Shelter, Counseling, Advocacy, Support                   Groups, intervention & prevention groups,                                parenting groups, shelter for domestic

violence, legal services

 

Ostomy Las Vegas – St. Rose Siena Hospital

Eastern and St. Rose Pkwy., Henderson, NV

Group meets from Sept. to June, 2nd Sat of                          Month, 2pm-4pm, 2nd Tues – Sept. – June, 7:30pm

www.ostomylasvegas.weebly.com

(702) 483-8116 for Info, snvostomy@gmail.com

 

Ovarian Cancer Alliance of Nevada

(702) 796-0430, www.ocan.org

Call for phone support from other women

 

Prostate Support Group, “Us Too”

702-917-7779, www.prostatetaskforce.nv.org

3rd Wed. of the month @7pm, St. Rose

Dominican Hospital, San Martin campus

8280 W. Warm Springs Rd. LV, NV

 

So. NV Association of Polio Survivors –

Las Vegas, Henderson, Pahrump & Boulder City

(702) 644-5091 – Diane. Call for locations.

Support Group for polio survivors , monthly

meetings every 3rd Saturday at 1pm, sharing

knowledge, information, social activities

Sunrise Hospital Breast Cancer Support

The Breast Cancer Center at Sunrise

3006 S. Maryland Pkwy., Ste. 250 LV, NV 89109

Oncology Nutrition Program: 6-7:30pm,

3rd Wed of the Month, need to RSVP

(702) 784-7870. Taichi: Thursdays

11am – 12pm, $5. Call for other programs.

 

Sunrise Hospital Stroke Support Group

Sunrise Hospital – Auditorium

3006 S. Maryland Pkwy., Las Vegas, NV 89109

Meet other people that have suffered a stroke.

3rd Wednesday of the month at 6pm. Free                              and open to the public. Registration not                    required. Learn valuable, educational info about                      strokes. This class is for adults only and you are
welcome to bring a friend or loved one.

Call 702-784-7983 for more info.

 

The Barbara Greenspun Women’s

Care Center of St. Rose

2651 Paseo Verde Pkwy, Ste. 180

Henderson, NV 89074, (702) 616-4902

Senior peer counseling for seniors 50+,
issues such as loss, bereavement, health                                problems, relationships and retirement

 

The Center – Wize Womyn

401 S. Maryland Pkwy. LV, NV 89101

702-733-9800, www.thecenterlv.org

Social and support group for LGBTQ Senior

drop ins. M-F 10:30am-2pm

 

The Center (Gay Men’s Forum)

401 S. Maryland Pkwy., LV, NV 89101

702-733-9800, www.thecenterlv.org

Social and support group for gay and bisexual                    men of all ages, each Wed. at 6pm.

 

Veterans National Caregivers Support Line

1-855-260-3274 VA Clinic Info 8am-8pm EST.

caregiver.va.gov

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!

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