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Life Extension: The Modern Anti-Aging Movement – Are We Standing at the Threshold of Immortality?

July 17, 2016 by · Comments Off on Life Extension: The Modern Anti-Aging Movement – Are We Standing at the Threshold of Immortality?
Filed under: General 

Why is skincare the focus of longevity research? I guess a cell is a cell, and if you can crack the code for one human cell, it is only a matter of time to solving the puzzle with different types of cell – and skin is without doubt the most visible cells each of us have. And it’s our faces in particular we often judge ourselves and others by, and we are in turn quickly scrutinized, and often opinions reached in a fraction of a second. Our faces often show the most visible signs of aging, and for many in modern society age is by nature “bad” and young or looking young is the ideal. That is why billions and billions of dollars each year are poured by consumers into all sorts of treatments to minimize wrinkles, to push back the effects of gravity, and to turn back the hands of time. And with that much money to be spent by consumers, there are many manufacturers eager to find the next step in arresting Father Time – and at least detaining him until the next stagecoach arrives, where hopefully he can be encouraged to move on before too much damage can be done.

The Entire Issue Explained – In A Pair of Shoelaces

Some time ago a friend gave me a simple analogy that puts this entire issue in perspective. The science may not win a Nobel Prize, but it gave me the necessary ah-ha moment.

The double helix of the DNA strand – our most basic foundation for life – is held together at each end by things that act in the same way as the hard plastic bits on the end of shoelaces do – preventing the DNA from unraveling, and the individual chromosomes scattering across the floor like dropping a string of pearls down a marble staircase. These things are called telomeres.

Somewhere programmed into these tiny telomeres is the entire basis to how long the DNA stays intact – and by inference these are the keys to the length of life of the organism. Somewhere written into the telomere is a great musical score but like all musical scores it has a double bar somewhere to signify the end; but is it to be a minuet or a Wagnerian epic? But sure enough, when the time comes, and the telomeres blow the full time whistle, the DNA strand will unravel and die – and the circle of life begins again. Telomeres govern how often our skin cells are replaced; why a puppy and a child born on the same date may age exactly the same chronologically, but the puppy has become a geriatric before the child reaches puberty.

Telomeres, my friend explained, occasionally go on the fritz (that must have a very specific scientific meaning). One of the ways this occurs is they may forget their programming to release and unravel, and they just hang on, allowing the cells thus affected to multiply again and again without dying. In fact, when this occurs often they become very difficult to kill and to all intents and purposes once the telomeres act in this way, the cell – and those it propagates – are effectively immortal.

This condition has a name which we all know. Cancer.

But, what if we were able in some way to persuade the telomeres within a cancer to behave normally – would that not be the “magic bullet” cure for cancer? And the other side to that equation – if the telomeres in healthy cells could be persuaded to act as they do in a cancer – then is this the recipe for a healthy cell that does not die? Does the cure for cancer and immortality hang on just this one thread?

Whatever your views may be, the reality is that some of the world’s finest research scientists are working on that exact question and some would say it is only a matter of a decade or two before this is neither conjecture nor science fiction, but a reality to face up to. The changes that would take place in society even if life expectancy were to take a leap forward by say 10 or 20 years are enormous, but we should all be thinking that this is a distinct possibility.

From the dab of lanoline a generation ago to what I know hold in my hand as an anti aging skincare treatment is more than just a revolution – and I have no doubt in a few years I will be saying this cream will not just slow the aging process and reduce the visible signs of aging, making your face appear younger – but it will actually be younger.

But before that, let’s look back at how this whole engagement with life extension and anti-aging started. Mankind has always striven for longevity and mused about immortality – but the past 50 years has seen some dramatic steps in reality toward this goal.

Genesis

The thought of extending life has been on the mind of mankind for millennia. References to the search for ways to prolong life can be found as far back as the Epic of Gilgamesh.

Gilgamesh was reputedly the fifth king of the kingdom of Uruk, the modern-day Iraq, around 2500 BC. According to the Sumerian list of kings, he reigned for 126 years. The Torah or Old Testament records Methuselah as living over 900 years, with life spans measured in centuries apparently commonplace before the time of Noah.

Throughout the development of scientific thought from the Reformation onwards, scholars have applied themselves to solving this riddle and these endeavors continue today at the very leading edge of scientific progress.

Unraveling Secrets

As the secrets of our existence are unraveled in ever more minute detail, we are beginning to understand what it is that makes us grow from tiny babies into adults. We now know, for example, that cell functions slow down as the body ages and that production of certain substances required by the body to regenerate decrease or cease completely.

Skin, for instance, needs two substances to retain strength and firmness.
The production of these substances namely collagen (strength, tightness) and elastin (flexibility) decreases with age. The decreases in production together with other factors that include the threat of free radicals make the skin age and become wrinkly. Free radicals are essentially incomplete oxygen molecules causing destructive chain reactions within cells.

The same kind of thing happens in every cell, every tissue and organ around the human body. For example, people develop frown lines, crow’s feet and wrinkles. Nutrients are no longer absorbed easily and vital cell functions, hormones and other substances are produced at decreased rates resulting in the body aging.

A Brief History of the Life Extension Movement

Science has been looking for ways to slow down this process for centuries. The forming of life extension movements, however, did not really begin until around 1970.

➢ In this year, Denham Harman, the originator of the so-called ‘free radical theory of aging’, decided that an organization dedicated to the research and information sharing between scientists working in biogerontology (the field of science concerned with the biological aspects involved in the aging process) was needed. As a result, the American Aging Association was formed.

➢ In 1976, two futurists, Philip Gordon and Joel Kurtzman wrote a book on the research into extending the human lifespan. This popular volume was titled ‘No More Dying. The Conquest Of Aging And The Extension Of Human Life’.

➢ Kurtzman was then invited to speak at Florida’s House Select Committee (HSC) of Aging, which was chaired by Claude Pepper, an American politician and spokesman for the elderly. The aim of this talk was to discuss the impact on Social Security by life extension.

➢ In 1980, Saul Kent, a prominent activist in the field of life extension, published the book ‘The Life Extension Revolution’ and founded the nutraceutical (from ‘nutrition’ and ‘pharmaceutical’, in other words, a nutrition supplement) firm known as ‘The Life Extension Foundation’.

This foundation is a non-profit making organization promoting dietary supplements and publishing the periodical ‘Life Extension Magazine’. Kent was later involved in work relating to cryogenics. He was jailed in the course of this work over a dispute at one point, although charges were dropped at a later stage.

➢ In 1982, American health writer and life extension advocate Sandy Shaw and her co-writer, Durk Pearson, popularized the term ‘life extension’ even further with the bestseller ‘Life Extension: A Practical Scientific Approach’.

➢ Roy Walford, a gerontologist and life-extensionist, published ‘Maximum Lifespan’, another popular book on the subject. He and Richard Weindruch, his student, followed this up in 1988 with their summary on the research they had conducted into the ability to prolong the life of rodents through calorie restriction. The title of this book is ‘The Retardation of Aging and Disease by Dietary Restriction’.

Although this ability to extend life with calorie restriction had been known since the 1930’s, when gerontologist, biochemist and nutritionist Clive McCay did some research into the subject, it was the work of Walford and Weinbruch that gave solid scientific grounding to the McCay’s findings.

Walford’s scientific work was driven by a personal interest in life extension. He practiced calorie restriction as part of his own life and eventually died at the age of 80. The cause of his death was amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a progressive motor neuron disease.

➢ A4M, the ‘American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine’ was founded in 1992 to create a medical specialty for anti aging that was distinctly separate from geriatrics. This allowed scientists and physicians interested in this particular field of science to hold conferences and discuss the latest developments.

➢ The sci.life-extension, a Usenet group, was created by California-born author, philosopher and translator Brian M. Delaney. This represented an important development within the movement of life extension. It made it possible, for example, for the CR (Calorie Restriction) Society to be created.

➢ A more recent development is the proposal of Dr A. de Grey, a biogerontologist at Cambridge University. This proposal suggested that damage to cells, macromolecules, organs and tissues can be repaired with the help of advanced biotechnology. This is evident in hair restoration products, for instance.

More than Books

Although it would appear that most of the work revolving around life extension has been done solely by writing books or founding societies or organizations of some kind or another, the reality is that these books were written in response to or based on very specific, detailed scientific research that have yielded positive results.

They are no longer the works of hopeful minds, but the works of dedicated scientists who have spent their lives working on discovering facts about aging and trying to find ways to slow down, or even reverse the process.

Many breakthroughs have been made, and in many ways, we are already able to extend lives to a certain extent. The average lifespan of a human being is already far greater than it used to be as a result of medical, pharmaceutical and nutritional advances brought about by research and development.

The work continues, and scientists around the world are continually conducting research, comparing results, discussing options and making advances on our behalf.

Driving Forces behind the Development of the Life Extension Movement

What factors are driving this movement into ever greater efforts to find solutions to the extension of Life? The answer to this question actually includes a whole range of factors.

Expectations Have Risen

As the ‘baby boomer’ generation (born between 1946-1964) enters retirement age, expectations of this group are dramatically different from those of the preceding generations. They have greater expectations and desires to enjoy their life as pensioners to the fullest and for as long as is possible. This expectation covers not only length of life, but quality of life as well and this is not a passive request but an active and strident demand in many cases.

Pharmacology

Progress in pharmacology has led to a wide selection of drugs that allow people to live longer and fuller lives being developed over the last two decades or so. The work is still very much in progress and many more drugs are being developed daily.

One of the classic examples of a drug raising the quality of life for older individuals are erectile dysfunction treatments – notably Viagra, Cialis and Levitra. These drugs have dramatically reduced the number of fatalities or serious injury resulting from elderly men rolling out of bed, as well as a number of more qualitative benefits.

Advances in Genetics

Some of the latest scientific research and subsequent advances made in biotechnology and genetics are providing some hope that it may be possible to hold back some of the fundamental causes of aging.

As we outlined previously, chromosomes containing DNA strings are essentially capped with a binding substance known as telomeres. In effect, the telomeres are consumed during cell division and over time, they become shorter and shorter.

This was first observed by a scientist called Leonard Hayflick, and the process of limited cell division was subsequently named the Hayflick Limit. Advocates of life extension work on the thought that lengthening the telomeres through drugs or gene therapy may ultimately extend the Hayflick Limit and thereby fool the cells, and as such the body, into ‘thinking’ it is younger than it actually is.

Developments in Precision Manufacture

Advances made in the fields of nanotechnology, miniaturization, computer chips and robotics also provide hope for potentially life extending solutions.

In the 1970’s, a popular TV series starred Lee Majors as the ‘Six Million Dollar Man’? Science fiction then. Today, it is science fact. Millions of people now walk through life with artificial ankle, knee and hip joints and healthy feet. A generation ago, mass production of this kind of technology was a distant dream.

The same applies to many individuals with artificial limbs. Artificial legs used to be crude wooden contraptions that were just able to keep a person balanced. Today’s artificial limbs are almost fully functional.

The Blessings of Medical Progress

Who would have thought even 50 years ago that it would become possible to bypass a coronary artery, or even replace a heart completely? Yet there are hundreds of thousands, if not millions of individuals enjoying their lives after having this kind of surgery – few of whom would be alive just half a century ago.

Millions of people no longer have to wear glasses, because of the availability of laser surgery. This, too, was science fiction just a few years ago. Today, it is advertised next to shampoo in magazines and on TV.

In other words, science is moving rapidly towards not only extending life, but making the quality of these extra years better as well.

Is it Science, Science Fiction or Lunacy?

What should the average person believe? This question is almost as difficult to answer as finding solutions to extended life. Even among scientists, opinions are divided. Some do believe that extending the quality of life is as possible as extending life in general.

Others brush off the thought as un-scientific nonsense. This is often simply based on the fear of anything ‘new’ disturbing the status quo of established limits. Fortunately, real scientists do keep on looking, because if every single scientist had decided that some of the advancements already in medical, pharmaceutical and technological fields could not be possible, we would all still be dying at 30.

So where does that leave us?

There is no doubt what-so-ever that there are many charlatans out there trying to make a quick buck out of people’s desire to retain their youth. Even today, many products being sold in their millions are essentially non-effective – often given fantastic names and have the most bewildering ingredients to make them look scientific to consumers and justify their cost.

But the facts are while many advancements are being made and research points to the possibility of eventually finding the key to maintaining youth for longer, the scientific community is still warning the public that many of the products being sold today are unreliable to say the least.

➢ Although food supplements may assist in keeping a body healthier – something that can often be achieved by simply adopting a healthier life style and diet – there is as yet no categorical and undeniable proof that they slow down aging as such.

➢ The same goes for many hormone treatments. Although they may have a short term effect of some kind, it is not yet scientifically proven that they will actually work in the long run. The fear that it may not work is based on the fact that taking hormones, a good example is the hormonal acne treatment, will ultimately actually slow down the body’s own production of these hormones.

In addition, many treatments may have potential (and yet unknown) side effects in the long run that could be harmful to the user’s health. This includes the fears that such hormone treatments could increase the risk of cancer, diabetes and other major illnesses.

➢ Other ideas, like the calorie restriction method, are working for rodents. In fact, studies conducted with rats on 30 to 50 per cent restricted diets have shown to almost double the life span of rats.

Similar studies conducted on primates have also shown tendency to extend life to a certain extent and prevent a list of age related illnesses. There are as yet no studies on humans, although some are actually living on calorie restricted diets. Whether this will prolong their lives, however, is a question of having to wait and see.

The theory is that by reducing calorie intake, the metabolism of the body is slowed down, thereby slowing the aging process as well. Nutritionists say there is a certain amount of calories a body of a certain size and weight needs to have to maintain health. Reducing this amount by up to 50 per cent is hardly a good idea in the long term.

Time will tell, as they say, but how will anyone be able to tell the difference? If a person lives to the age of 80, is this because they are on this diet or would they have lived to this age anyway?

Where Will This Lead?

Many believe there is realistic hope and expectation of making significant strides in the area of longevity within the next two decades. This group typically believes the answer will ultimately lie within genetics and biotechnology. It is too early to make definite predictions, but the research so far shows promise and, as mentioned earlier, some of the results of this research are already being used in certain treatments to improve patients’ lives.

At present, overall aging is difficult to slow down, to say the least. Some products indicate they will assist in maintaining overall health/longevity, but the area we are seeing the first commercial products being developed is in the area of skin care and given the size of this market, it is likely that this will continue to be the weather-vane of longevity treatments.

Science or Snake Oil?

It will be difficult to tell these two apart for many years. Charlatans are likely to about, because it is difficult to disprove many theories easily. Equally difficult will be positive proof from those with an ethical perspective on the trail of a real breakthrough, as products based on valid research and using technology or ingredients that will actually have an effect rarely promise overnight results. This is something that anyone looking to find improved youthful looks, etc, will have to bear in mind. None of these products can perform miracles. Even the best of them will take time and regular use in order to achieve the desired effect.

The bottom line is that where we stand now, we can be sure there are some things which are ineffective or even harmful; there are some that show some promise and there are some that are starting to cross the line of being able to demonstrate results – albeit modestly at this point.

In the meantime, it is wise to research products very carefully and to refuse to be baffled by weird and wonderful sounding ingredients or fantastic sounding promises of instant youth. Regeneration will take time – let’s face it, it has taken a lifetime to get to this point, turning back the clock can never be possible over night.

Skin Care and the Life Extension Movement

One may well ask just what all this, and in particular the life extension movement as such, could possibly have to do with skin care, health and beauty products. The fact is, much of the research into life extension is resulting in new approaches to skin care as a kind of by-product.

A greater understanding of how genetics and cellular processes affect the aging and condition of skin allows these research and development teams to investigate different compounds, their compatibility with human cells and genetic make up.

Many compounds found in nature are not just compatible to human skin but in fact the skin cells actually have natural receptors for these compounds. Because life extension research has discovered these receptors, skin care developers can now use this knowledge and create the formulae for their products to provide maximum effect.

Another skin care ‘by-product’ of life extension research is the use of nanotechnology. The use of nanotechnology, or, to be more precise, nanoparticles, has had a huge impact on the way nutrients and other components of skin care products are being delivered to the skin cells. In some ways, nanotechnology has already revolutionized skin care. It is now possible to use active ingredients previously difficult to effectively deliver to the skin, as well as making old, proven ingredients even more effective. Some ingredients used in cosmetics for hundreds, if not thousands of years by certain cultures can now be even more effectively used to improve skin condition and maintain a healthy, youthful look.

Even the moisturizing effect of skin care products can be improved with nantechnology. For this effect, so-called nanosomes are used. Nanosomes are small, pocket-like particles that melt or disintegrate on skin contact. By doing this, the moisturising effect is accelerated, assisting the skin faster and more efficiently.

Nanotechnology plays a key part not only in slowing the aging of skin, but is believed to actively assist in repairing and healing skin cells and tissue.

Another breakthrough in life extension research that is beginning to make itself felt in skin care products is the research into stem cells. Stem cells are elements of all life, plant, animal and human. Stem cells have two properties other cells do not have. These properties are the ability to develop into any kind of cell type and the ability to divide almost indefinitely. The use of plant stem cell extracts in skin care is likely to become one of the next ‘big things’ in the industry. And prepare for the debate when human stem cells are proposed as part of an anti-aging skincare regime, as will inevitably occur!

One thing we can be certain of, is that science will continue to search for answers to the question of life extension, and business will drive the commercialization of discoveries. But whether these lead us to a utopian future or potentially a minefield of strife as we debate who will use and who will benefit from these new godlike powers. In the meantime, at a practical level in the skincare, health and beauty industry we remain hopeful and expectant we will see the emergence of products that not only promise results, but produce them.

David Christensen is a veteran of Asia Pacific business, currently residing in Bangkok, Thailand and heading up the business he was a co-founder of, Royal Siam Natural Health & Beauty – who can be located at [http://www.royalsiam.asia], and the information supporting site at [http://www.royalsiam.info]. Royal Siam was established after careful planning in early 2011, spending 2011 concentrating on building the necessary business infrastructure and concentrating on the domestic Thai market. Early in 2012 Royal Siam launched its international website and online store, and in April 2012 publicly declared the ambition to be among the world’s top 20 premium health and beauty brands by the year 2020. Royal Siam is a unique business, operating in the premium skincare, anti aging, and related fields. At its core, one mission is to commercialize and bring to a global market the immense wealth of knowledge about the healing and beneficial properties of Thai and South East Asian plants – a knowledge base carefully built up over the last thousand years. At the same time, the mission is to bring to market the very latest in scientific advances in the area of anti aging… resulting in the unique position of having a Thai heritage and offering the best of nature, tradition, and science.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/David_D_Christensen/1317312

Living with diabetes? Watch your mouth!

January 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

11723Living with diabetes? Watch your mouth!

 

(Family Features)  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people with diabetes are two times more likely to develop gum disease. In fact, about one-third of people with diabetes have severe gum disease.

 

Why are those with diabetes more vulnerable to gum disease? High blood glucose levels impair the body’s ability to heal from oral infections and uncontrolled diabetes can make treating gum disease more difficult, according to the American Diabetes Association. The Association is joining with Colgate to launch a new “Watch Your Mouth!” campaign to help raise awareness surrounding the often over-looked link between oral health and diabetes. Here are some tips to help you live well with diabetes:

 

  • Watch your mouth! Begin to develop healthy oral care habits, like brushing, flossing and visiting the dentist regularly. Research shows that brushing twice a day with Colgate Total toothpaste can help improve gum health in as little as four weeks.*
  • Don’t miss out on your favorite foods. Just eat healthier versions that everyone in your family can enjoy. Making simple substitutions to most dishes can help increase nutritional value, while not sacrificing on taste.
  • Use the right tools. Stay organized with a journal large enough to keep your diet, exercise, goals and health information together. Keep a week’s worth of prescriptions in one place with a handy pill case.
  • Know your risks. The American Diabetes Association lists the common risk factors for diabetes as being 45 or older, being overweight, not exercising regularly, having high blood pressure and being a part of certain racial and ethnic groups.
  • Visit your dentist. While your doctor and certified diabetes educator play an important role in helping with your diabetes, so does your dentist. If you don’t see a private-practice dentist, you can visit dental schools that provide services at a fraction of the cost to help you keep your mouth healthy.

 

For more expert tips and information, visit www.OralHealthAndDiabetes.com.

 

*Results improve with continued twice daily use, as shown in 6 month clinical studies of the general population.

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Baby Boomers and Seniors face nutritional triple threat of obesity, weight loss and lack of balanced meals

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Livliga dishware is a new solution to help these two generations eat right and stay healthy 

Americans are living longer than ever, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, but the fight to stay healthy is just as challenging as it has been with past generations. Recent studies show that the Silent Generation, born from 1927 to 1945 and Baby Boomers, born from 1946 to 1964, collectively face three major nutritional challenges.

 

A Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine study shows Baby Boomers have higher rates of hypertension, diabetes, obesity and high cholesterol when compared to their previous generation. The Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations also shows the highest obesity rates are currently found in Baby Boomers.

 

For the Silent Generation, currently ages 68 to 85, the National Institute on Aging says its main challenge is related to lack of balanced nutrition and getting enough calories.

The NIA says this group has:

  • decreased appetite
  • trouble chewing food
  • less socialization around food
  • diminished sense of taste and smell
  • medication interference with food enjoyment
  • fixed incomes

One new solution is Livliga, a tool Baby Boomers and Silent Generation seniors can use to promote right-sized food portions to reach target weights as well as to guide intake of balanced nutritional meals. Created with an Advisory Committee including a cardiologist and certified nutritionist, Livliga offers easy, subtle cues to improve and control the food environment.

 

“Livliga is a solution for every stage of life,” says inventor, Sheila Kemper Dietrich. “It can be used by people who are under eating and need to be reminded to take in more calories or to help those who are struggling to shrink their waistlines. The guide to portion sizes combined with reminders of what comprises a balanced meal are the keys to better health for both groups.”

 

Livliga is Swedish for LIVELY, VIBRANT or VIVID, which is the company’s core philosophy. Kemper Dietrich’s vision was to create an attractive suite of place settings designed for a healthy lifestyle and suitable for entertaining family and friends in both formal and informal settings. The beautiful designs on the dishware offer elegant visual cues to guide appropriate and right-sized servings. The initial product launch was a 4-piece place setting in two patterns, including a dinner plate, salad/luncheon plate, bowl and mug. Livliga also offers a serving bowl, etched water and wine glasses.

 

For Baby Boomers or Silent Generation seniors with grandchildren, Kidliga can also be helpful to promote healthy habits for the entire family. Kidliga is whimsical, fun dishware for kids, accompanied by a health-oriented children’s storybook. Sammie & Sax in the Land of Quinoa: The Search for a Balanced Meal just won a Moonbeam Award in the Health Issues category and is a useful tool and solution to help families in the fight against childhood obesity.

 

Livliga products are specifically designed to help both adults and children address the “psychology of eating”.  The rim sizes, color palette, and designs all combine to encourage slower eating, make portion sizes look larger, as well as make food more visually appealing.

 

A 4-piece Livliga place setting is available on the company website at www.LivligaHome.com at an introductory price of $49.95 (MSRP $59.95). All of the additional products and pricing can be easily found on the website as well. Kemper Dietrich says plans call for further product launches, including additional patterns and a set of LivSpoons that makes for easy, everyday measuring and serving of right-sized portions.

 

To purchase Livliga, visit the online store at www.LivligaHome.com.  “Like” Livliga on Facebook at facebook.com/LivligaHome, follow on Twitter @LivligaHome and visit our blog at LivligaHome.blogspot.com.  Watch our videos on YouTube.com/LivligaHome.

 
Audrey Strong
Agency Zero Public Relations
audrey@agencyzero.com
720.231.6097

Study Shows that People Who Undergo Cataract Surgery to Correct Visual Impairment Live Longer

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Australian researchers find a 40 percent lower mortality risk among patients who had their vision corrected through the procedure  

SAN FRANCISCO – Sept. 4, 2013 – People with cataract-related vision loss who have had cataract surgery to improve their sight are living longer than those with visual impairment who chose not to have the procedure, according to an Australian cohort study published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. After comparing the two groups, the researchers found a 40 percent lower long-term mortality risk in those who had the surgery.

The research is drawn from data gathered in the Blue Mountains Eye Study, a population-based cohort study of vision and common eye diseases in an older Australian population. A total of 354 persons aged 49 years and older and diagnosed with cataract-related vision impairment –  some of whom had undergone surgery and others who had not – were assessed between 1992 and 2007. Adjustments were made for age and gender as well as a number of mortality risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, smoking, cardiovascular disease, body mass index and measures of frailty and comorbid disease. Follow-up visits took place after five and ten years since the baseline exam.

Previous research had indicated that older persons with visual impairment were likely to have greater mortality risk than their age peers with normal vision, and that cataract surgery might reduce this risk. These studies – unlike the Blue Mountains Eye Study – compared people who had undergone cataract surgery with those in the general population or with those who had not had cataract surgery, and did not link vision status to the surgical status.

“Our finding complements the previously documented associations between visual impairment and increased mortality among older persons,” said Jie Jin Wang, Ph.D., of the Westmead Millennium Institute and one of lead researchers of the study. “It suggests to ophthalmologists that correcting cataract patients’ visual impairment in their daily practice results in improved outcomes beyond that of the eye and vision, and has important impacts on general health.”

The association between correction of cataract-related visual impairment and reduced mortality risk is not clearly understood, but plausible factors may include improvements in physical and emotional well-being, optimism, greater confidence associated with independent living after vision improvement, as well as greater ability to comply with prescription medications.

Dr. Wang noted one limitation of the study is that participants with cataract-related visual impairment who did not have cataract surgery could have had other health problems that prevented them from undergoing surgery, and that these other health problems could partly explain the poorer survival among non-surgical participants. This issue is addressed by the researchers in a subsequent study.

Caused by the clouding of the lens, cataract is a leading cause of treatable visual impairment that will affect more than half of all Americans by the time they are 80 years old.[1]  Surgical removal of the opaque lens with an artificial lens implanted is a successful procedure of cataract treatment. If completing everyday tasks is difficult, cataract surgery should be discussed with an ophthalmologist − a medical doctor specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

Seniors who are seeking eye care but are concerned about cost may qualify for EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, which offers eye exams and care at no out-of-pocket cost to qualifying seniors age 65 and older. Learn more at www.eyecareamerica.org. For more information on cataracts and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology 
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons — Eye M.D.s — with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who has the education and training to treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trusted and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

About Ophthalmology
Ophthalmology, the official journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, publishes original, peer-reviewed, clinically applicable research. Topics include the results of clinical trials, new diagnostic and surgical techniques, treatment methods technology assessments, translational science reviews and editorials.

Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

National Council on Aging Launches Second Year of Education Program for Older Adults and Those Who Care for Them Aimed at Helping to Protect More Older Adults from the Flu

Actor Lee Majors, best known for his iconic roles on The Big Valley, The Fall Guy, and The Six Million Dollar Man, is joining the National Council on Aging (NCOA) Flu + You program to help protect older adults from influenza (commonly known as “the flu”). Flu + You aims to inform adults 65 and older, their caregivers, and those who care about them, about the dangers of the flu, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options.

As a part of his involvement in the Flu + You campaign, Majors will appear in a public service announcement (PSA) that follows him as he embarks on an important and action-packed mission: learning about his vaccine options and getting vaccinated against the flu. The PSA will educate the public about the increased risk of flu in adults 65 years of age and older and the importance of knowing your vaccine options and getting a flu vaccine, even for tough guys like Majors.

Every year in the United States, roughly nine out of 10 flu-related deaths and more than six out of 10 flu-related hospitalizations occur in people 65 and older. Older adults are at a greater risk for flu due, in part, to the weakening of the immune system that typically occurs with age. This means that no matter how healthy or youthful we feel, as we age we become more vulnerable to the flu and its related complications.

“The CDC recommends an annual flu vaccine as the single best way to protect yourself from the flu, yet a third of people 65 and older still don’t get vaccinated,” said Richard Birkel, PhD, MPA, NCOA Senior Vice President for Healthy Aging and Director of NCOA’s Self-Management Alliance. “As NCOA continues to educate older adults about the flu and the potential severity of the illness, we hope to encourage more people to protect themselves and their loved ones by getting an annual flu shot.”

The flu vaccine offers the best defense to protect against the flu, and adults 65 years of age and older have several vaccine options. In addition to the traditional flu vaccine (which helps protect against three strains of the flu virus), there is also a quadrivalent vaccine (which helps protect against four strains), and a higher dose vaccine that was designed specifically for adults 65 and older. By improving the production of antibodies in older patients, the higher dose vaccine can provide a stronger immune response to the flu than traditional vaccines. All flu vaccines are covered as a Medicare Part B benefit, which means there is no copay for Medicare beneficiaries 65 years of age and older.

“I get the flu shot every year and encourage my peers to do the same – it’s a simple step you can take to protect yourself from the flu,” says actor Lee Majors.  “I urge everyone 65 years of age and older to talk to their health care provider about their vaccine options this flu season.”

The flu can make existing health conditions worse, and it is especially dangerous for people with lung disease, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer—conditions that commonly affect older adults. Nationwide, 86 percent of adults 65 years of age and older have at least one chronic health condition and approximately 66 percent of Medicare beneficiaries have two or more chronic conditions, putting them at increased risk of the flu and flu-related complications, which can be severe and include hospitalization and even death.

For more facts about flu, and to order free educational materials, including a brochure and fact sheet, visit www.ncoa.org/Flu.

About Flu + You
Flu + You is a national public education initiative, from the National Council on Aging with support from Sanofi Pasteur, to educate adults 65 years and older about the dangers of the influenza virus, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options. Older adults and their caregivers can learn more on the Flu + You website, www.ncoa.org/Flu, which features a public service announcement with Lee Majors and facts about the flu. Also available on the website is a calendar of Flu + You events that will be held in 12 cities throughout the United States in September and October. At the events, older adults will have the opportunity to learn more about their risks for flu and available vaccine options, as well as talk to a health care provider and receive a flu vaccination.

About NCOA
The National Council on Aging is a nonprofit service and advocacy organization headquartered in Washington, DC. NCOA is a national voice for millions of older adults—especially those who are vulnerable and disadvantaged—and the community organizations that serve them. It brings together nonprofit organizations, businesses, and government to develop creative solutions that improve the lives of all older adults. NCOA works with thousands of organizations across the country to help seniors find jobs and benefits, improve their health, live independently, and remain active in their communities. For more information, please visit:

www.NCOA.org | www.facebook.com/NCOAging | www.twitter.com/NCOAging

 

CONTACT: Dana Kinker, (212) 301-7181, dkinker@wcgworld.com

Healthy Eating – 5 Dietary Requirements For Senior Citizens by Christine Abbate

August 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Healthy eating, whether as a child or senior citizen is a vital part of a healthy and active lifestyle. Your nutritional needs are pretty much the same at 40, 50, 60 and beyond as they were when you were younger–with some minor variations. As we grow older, our bodies becomes less forgiving, and we will have to make more of an effort to eat well and stay fit.

Here are 5 Dietary Requirements for Senior Citizens:

1. Exercise:
Studies of the elderly indicate that current weight, rather than age, determined energy intake in men and women. The study suggests that changes in lifestyle, not age, resulted in the dietary changes seen in the healthy elderly survey. As you mature, your body will loose muscle mass, decreasing your metabolic rate, which in turn burns fewer calories at a slower rate. A great way to maintain control of your maturing body is to exercise regularly and eat healthy meals in moderation.

2. Eat More Fiber:
Maintaining a regular cycle of all systems in our bodies is very important. Fiber helps maintain regularity to prevent constipation and gastrointestinal diseases like divertculosis (pouches that cause spasm or cramping in the large intestines). You may also want to be extremely selective in your diet and not include gaseous foods.

3. Eat More Calcium:
Around 40 years old, our bones start to lose more minerals quicker than it can replace them. For women, menopause causes a drop in estrogen levels, estrogen helps bones maintain calcium. Menopause is responsible for a greater loss of calcium than in men. You should discuss with your physician a dietary supplement to ensure you are properly maintaining your body.

4. Water:
Water is essential from birth throughout life. It is critical to health-and is chronically overlooked. Second only to air in its steady and relentless necessity, H2O carries nutrients to cells; aids digestion by contributing to stomach secretions; flushes bodily wastes and reduces risk of kidney stones by diluting salts in the urine; ensures healthy function of moisture-rich organs (skin, eyes, mouth, nose); lubricates and cushions joints; regulates body temperature; and protects against heat exhaustion through perspiration. And the list goes on and on. Everybody should consume the minimum eight glasses of water daily to maintain our youthful vigor and pep.

5. Avoid Foods With Too Much Sugar:
Too much sugar causes a number of problems- it suppresses the immune system, weakens eyesight, contributes to obesity and diabetes, causes constipation, leads to all different types of cancers, and the list goes on and on about the effects of sugar intake. Young and old should never binge on sugar.

Eating well can make us feel a lot better. It gives us more energy – and it can actually help slow down the aging process!

Assisted Living New York

http://LakeShoreLI.com/

The Lake Shore Assisted Living Facility, located on beautiful Lake Ronkonkoma in Long Island, New York has been providing seniors with assisted living care, delicious dining, friendly services and award-winning recreational programs for many years.

Submitted by Christine at NewSunSEO Inc.
http://NewSunSEO.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Christine_Abbate

In an Aging Society – Are Senior Citizens Driving Safely? by Diane Carbo

August 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Remember when you couldn’t wait until you were old enough to drive. Getting a driver’s license gave us an opportunity to experience a new freedom we did not have before. For those of us with two parents working, driving meant taking ourselves and our siblings to after school activities and work. Driving took us to a level of independence that we had not experienced before. In an aging society of drivers, those very same feelings exist in many today. Driving gives us a sense of independence and freedom, the ability to go out and socialize, go to work or to church. Safety issues are a concern as many move into the golden years. The life expectancy of seniors is increasing. There are more active senior citizens out on the road today than ever before. Since we all age differently, many aging adults, can drive into their seventies and eighties. As we age, the risks for having a serious car accident that requires hospitalization rises. Statistics show that fatal car accidents rise after the age of seventy.

If you know an aging adult driver who is experiencing difficulty with driving, it is important to carefully monitor the situation. This article can help you determine whether you should take steps to encourage the senior to stop driving.

An aging society and risk

Some key risk factors that affect our aging society are:

Vision declines affecting depth perception and ability to judge speed of oncoming traffic. Night vision becomes a problem as our eyes loose the ability to process light. By age 60, you need three times the amount of light that you did at age 20 in order to drive safely after nightfall. We also become more sensitive to bright light and glare. Signs and road markings can be difficult to see.

With age, flexibility may decrease as response time increases. A full range of motion is crucial on the road. Turning your head both ways to see oncoming traffic, moving both hands and feet can be difficult for those with chronic conditions such a rheumatoid arthritis, or Parkinson’s disease, heart disease and diabetes.

Older adults in an aging society will often need to begin to take medications. Certain medications, as well as a combination of medications and alcohol, can increase driving risk. Be aware and careful about medication side-effects and interactions between medications. It is important to talk to your pharmacist to be aware of interactions that could affect your driving safely. Some medications cause drowsiness.

Aging affects our quality of sleep, resulting in daytime sleepiness. Falling asleep at the wheel is a major concern for those that dose off during the day.

The beginning of dementia or mental impairment can make driving more dangerous. A decreased mental capacity or decrease tolerance to stressful driving situations such as complex and confusing intersections may cause delayed reactions to sudden or confusing situations on the road. An aging brain and body does not have the same response time as we did when we were younger.

Look for warning signs

There are multiple warning signs that an aging adult is becoming or is an unsafe driver. Some of them are small, but if there are multiple concerns it may be time to talk about your concerns with the aging driver. Warning signs of an unsafe driver include

 

  • Abrupt lane changes, braking, or acceleration.
  • Increase in the dents and scrapes on the car or on fences, mailboxes, garage doors, curbs, etc
  • Trouble reading signs or navigating directions to get somewhere
  • Range-of-motion issues (looking over the shoulder, moving the hands or feet, etc.)
  • Becoming anxious or fearful while driving or feeling exhausted after driving
  • Experiencing more conflict on the road: other drivers honking; frustration or anger at other drivers. Oblivious to the frustration of other drivers towards them
  • Getting lost more often
  • Trouble paying attention to signals, road signs, pavement markings, or pedestrians
  • Slow reaction to changes in the driving environment
  • Increased traffic tickets or “warnings” by traffic or law enforcement officers
  • Forgetting to put on a safety belt

 

If you are concerned about an aging adult driver, closely monitor their driving before deciding whether they need a refresher coarse on their driving skills or approaching them to give up their driver’s license altogether. Ongoing and open communication is important to addressing the issue of driving. Studies conducted by Harvard and MIT show that while most drivers preferred to discuss the issue with their spouse, doctor or adult children (in that order), this is not the case for everyone. The right person may not necessarily be the most forceful or outspoken one, but rather someone whose judgment and empathy are especially trusted by the driver.

Talk with other family members, your doctor, and close friends to determine the best person for “the conversation.” Remember driving signifies independence, freedom and being self sufficient to active senior citizens. Realize you may meet with resistance and the aging driver may become defensive. Emotion may get in the way of a rational conversation. Express your concerns and give specific reasons for those concerns.

The goal is to get the aging driver be part of the decision making process

You may begin by asking your loved one to make some concessions because of your concerns.

 

  • Taking a driver refresher course
  • Not driving at night
  • Suggest they not drive on busy thoroughfares or during rush hour
  • Taking shorter trips
  • Not driving under adverse weather conditions
  • Encourage a visit to their primary care physician or pharmacist to go over medications that may affect driving skills. Your physician may be able to recommend a Driver Rehabilitation Specialist. This individual can assess driving safety by an office exam and driving test and make recommendations regarding special equipment or techniques that can improve the driver’s safety. Consider ways to decrease the need to drive. Check out alternatives to shopping by car, including:

  • Arrange for home deliveries of groceries and other goods, and try to arrange for home visits by clergy, medical and personal care providers, and government service providers.
  • Use financial services that don’t require bank visits, like automatic bill paying, direct deposit, and bank-by-phone or on-line banking services.

Fears of those living in an aging society 

Fear of isolation and decrease in socializing is a real concern for the aging driver. It is important to keep spirits high as the aging driver makes the adjustments to becoming a non driver. Be in tune to their need for fun, volunteering, work and religious activities. Create a transportation plan that can make it easier for the aging driver to give up driving. You can create a list of friends and family that are willing to drive, contact the church and the local Area Agency on Aging in regards to transportation programs in the area.

Some seniors may adjust better if they can keep their own car, but have others drive them. Their own car may feel more comfortable and familiar, and the sense of loss from not driving may be lessened. Remember, baby boomers have grown up walking out the door and being able to go where they want to go. We need to keep the aging adult driver and those on the road with them safe.

Diane Carbo RN- As a geriatric care manager, that has cared for her father and mother in law in their homes, she learned first hand how overwhelming, stressful, and time consuming caring for a loved one can be. Staying in their homes was very important to them. As a result, Diane started http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com to assist others age in familiar surroundings and avoid the emotional and frustrating task of maneuvering the medical delivery system

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

Convenience and Product Selection Encourage More People to Manage Incontinence Online, Parentgiving.com Survey Reveals

July 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Convenience and Product Selection Encourage More People to Manage Incontinence Online, Parentgiving.com Survey Reveals

For the first time in its five-year history, the senior wellness site Parentgiving.com conducted an opinion survey on incontinence, reaching out to nearly 5,000 of its customers who shop for self-care products in this category. The focus was to learn how people best cope with incontinence and if a greater awareness about it as a medical issue has erased its stigma and prompted more people to talk to their doctors about treatment. Respondents were also asked to share both their frustrations and their strategies for maintaining quality of life.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130724/PH51806LOGO)

Results show that progress is being made. Slightly over 70 percent have talked to their healthcare provider about incontinence—many of them are taking or have tried medications, and a few have had surgical procedures.

But nearly 30 percent of respondents have still not sought medical attention. Reasons are varied. A few people still feel too embarrassed to bring it up, even in front of a doctor, while some assume it’s just a normal part of old age (it’s not!) or don’t know that there are treatments that might help. Others say they have more life-threatening medical issues, from diabetes to stroke recovery, that take precedence when they’re at the doctor’s office. For a few, the possibility of yet another medication to add to their existing regimen would be financially out of the question.

More Key Points From the Parentgiving Survey

* Fear of accidents is the top concern.
Two-thirds of respondents ranked this as their number one worry. The lack of product selection came in second at 21%. People want more product choices, which will, in turn, help them feel more secure about avoiding accidents.

* Online is the way people want to buy products.
Nearly 46% buy products online where they can get the widest selection and have anonymity.

* Absorbency is the key feature in choosing products.
An overwhelming 81% ranked this first. Information on a product’s absorbency should be front and center on product descriptions, say the respondents. Comfort ranked second and the ability to buy a product online ranked a strong third at 36%, above both cost and anatomical design of items.

* Many people are satisfied with their incontinence products. In fact, 40% are very satisfied. However 44% are only somewhat satisfied—there’s room for better education about products to help people find those that are more effective for them and the respondents had numerous suggestions for incontinence product manufacturers to improve styles.

For complete survey results, go to http://www.parentgiving.com/elder-care/incontinence-survey-results/. There is also a companion article, “Survey Says: 50 Top Strategies for Managing Incontinence,” featuring respondents’ experiences and suggestions at http://www.parentgiving.com/elder-care/survey-says-50-top-strategies-for-managing-incontinence/. For more information, please contact Julie Davis, Chief Content Officer at 203-984-4424 or email.

About Parentgiving. Parentgiving.com is the online destination dedicated to the health and wellness needs of seniors and their caregivers. A comprehensive website, Parentgiving offers hundreds of informative articles on eldercare, plus Q&As with experts on healthy aging. The Parentgiving Store sells find thousands of products from medical supplies to practical tools for the activities of daily living. Everything can be ordered by phone or online with fast shipping right to the senior. For more information please visit www.Parentgiving.com or follow us on Twitter.

Headed to the Beach? Don’t Let Your Feet Ruin Your Vacation

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Headed to the Beach? Don’t Let Your Feet Ruin Your Vacation

CHICAGO—July 2, 2013 As millions of Americans hit the beach this summer, the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons offers these foot safety tips:

  • Wear shoes to protect your feet from puncture wounds and cuts. Sea shells, broken glass and other sharp objects when stepped on can ruin your day at the beach. Avoid the water if your skin gets cut – bacteria in oceans and lakes can cause infection. If you do suffer from a puncture wound, have it treated by a foot and ankle surgeon within 24 hours to avoid complications.
  • Feet get sunburned, too. Rare but deadly skin cancers, such as melanoma, can occur on the foot. Prevent skin cancer on your feet by lathering up with sunscreen. Don’t forget to apply to both the tops and bottoms of your feet!
  • Wear shoes to protect your soles from getting burned as you walk on blistering-hot sand, sidewalks and pavement. Take extra precaution if you have diabetes.
  • Be careful with your footing while playing beach sports such as Frisbee or volleyball – walking, jogging and playing sports on soft, uneven surfaces frequently leads to arch pain, heel pain, ankle sprains and other injuries. It’s best to wear supportive shoes while playing beach sports. If injuries occur, use rest, ice, compression and elevation to ease pain and swelling. Any injury that does not resolve within a few days should be examined by a foot and ankle surgeon.
  • Remember jellyfish stings can still occur even if it’s washed up on the beach. Remove any tentacles that may stick to the foot or ankle, and protect your hands. Vinegar, meat tenderizer or baking soda reduce pain and swelling. Most jellyfish stings heal within days, but if they don’t, see a doctor.
  • Diabetes Risks: People who have diabetes face serious foot safety risks at the beach. The disease causes poor blood circulation and numbness in the feet. A person with diabetes may not feel pain from a cut, puncture wound or burn. Any type of skin break on a diabetic foot has the potential to get infected and ulcerate if it isn’t noticed right away. People with diabetes should always wear shoes to the beach, and remove them regularly to check for foreign objects like sand and shells that can cause sores, ulcers and infections.

For more information on foot and ankle health, visit the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeon’s patient education page at FootHealthFacts.org.


About ACFAS

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of more than 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons. Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research and provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its consumer website, http://FootHealthFacts.org.

Senior Citizen Health Insurance – How to Make it Affordable? by Reina Raine

April 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Senior citizen health insurance becomes a necessity as Medicare alone might  be insufficient unless you have a good savings plan or 401K during working  years. Retirement is a time when you get away from the daily grind and do things  that you love to do. However, when you consider the cost of a senior citizen  health insurance plan and added medications versus the fixed income of the  retirees, the picture looks quite bleak. Why is senior citizen health insurance  so expensive to secure? Is there anything that can be done to help the situation?

Getting an insurance policy is paying against a calculated risk. People get  hurt or sick, and the insurance company takes this risk into consideration when  calculating the premium. The greater the risks, the higher the premium.

With increasing age, people are more susceptible to illness and injury.  Illnesses such as hypertension and diabetes require long term care and  medication, hence increasing the overall cost. Age is seen as a high risk factor  to the profitability of the insurance company. This results in the premiums for  senior citizen health insurance being higher.

However, there are some ways to help you prepare for this. When setting up  your 401K savings plan, make sure that you take into consideration both the cost  of living after retirement and the cost of health care. Include the projected  costs for the premium payments for the senior citizen health insurance.

Sign up for the plan prior to retirement as the plan will be less expensive  if you are younger at the beginning of the policy. Check the details to verify  that the plan covers everything that you want and is compatible with Medicare.  Your chosen plan should be supplemental to government provisions and is not  intended to replace them. Always read the policy carefully before signing the  acceptance of the policy.

While this may seem like an extreme expense, the additional coverage provided  by these policies is worth paying for considering the kind of expenses that  might be incurred.

When purchasing the senior citizen health insurance cover, shop around to get  the best possible rates and coverage for your needs.

To learn much more on other aspects of health insurance  [http://healthinsuranceconsiderations.com/] visit  healthinsuranceconsiderations.com where you will find information on how to find  affordable health insurance [http://healthinsuranceconsiderations.com/] and how  to ensure you get best value for your money.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Reina_Raine

 

The Critical Importance of Recreation For Senior Citizens by Robert McCluskey

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As our population ages, there is increasing emphasis on teaching and learning  lifelong recreational skills. Research has shown that recreation is an important  part of an individual’s social behavior. Recreation plays a critical role in the  lives of older adults by contributing to an improved quality of life. People who  participate in recreational activities as senior citizens report significantly  more life satisfaction than those who do not.

Physical recreation is especially important. Engaging in physical activity  reduces almost every risk of disease, including heart disease, high blood  pressure, colon cancer and diabetes. Participation in recreational activities  improves mental health, as well. Again, research shows that older individuals  who participate in recreational activities have better coping behaviors in  response to stressful life events and daily frustrations. They learn that social  support is important, and available, through these activities.

Unfortunately, we have come to view our older years as a time of diminishing  activity and social interaction. As a result of these expectations, aging folks  often assume they are incapable of recreational activity or that it will not be  available to them. They often cite scarce financial resources, lack of  transportation or declining health as reasons for avoiding these important  activities. Although there is some validity to these concerns, we often overlook  the increasing resources that are being dedicated to wellness among senior  citizens. Some of these resources are:

  • Travel programs. Fees are usually required, but deep discounts for seniors  are often available.
  • Volunteering. Seniors bring valuable experience, wisdom and compassion to  others
  • Elderhostel. A world-wide travel program bringing affordable adventure and  learning to seniors
  • Theme parks. Senior days! Special entry fees!
  • Entertainment and arts. Museum and theatre tours often provide discounts and  transportation to seniors
  • Local parks and recreation programs. Great outdoor activities
  • Community Gardening. Check with your local parks and recreation office
  • Senior citizen centers. Free or reduced price meals and more!
  • Book clubs. Reading and socialization are a potent therapeutic combination  for the brain

 

It is important for senior citizens and those who care for them to seek out  recreational activities even at this time when they may be reluctant to do so.  Research indicates that seniors who participate in these kinds of activities  tend to remain active once they begin.

Western cultures sometimes view their aging populations as economic and  social liabilities. In fact, when they are nurtured, they become assets.  Recreational activities can provide help and motivation that seniors require to  enable them to contribute their valuable time and wisdom in return for that  nurturance.

Robert A. McCluskey Bob McCluskey is a semi retired teacher and school  administrator. He has recently been teaching college-level psychology classes  and has developed a course in the psychology of aging. Bob teaches courses  specifically designed for senior citizens and is especially interested in the  mental health of aging, With an emphasis on the preservation and enhancement of  memory.

If you would like to learn more about this topic visit our web site: Senior Technology News! Going Strong Seniors is your premier source for Internet  resources!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Robert_McCluskey

 

Exercise for Senior Citizens At 50 And Beyond by Renie M Rutten

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Even a small amount of increased physical activity can benefit your  functional health. This means getting in and out of your home to attend church,  going for a walk, and getting your own mail without the assistance of someone  else.

Benefits Of Regular Exercise For Senior Citizens

—–Improved Overall Health

—–Smaller Waistline

—–Lowered Risk of Bone Fracture Including Hips

—–Lower Risk of Lung, Breast and Color Cancers

—–Stabilized Blood Sugar Reducing Type II Diabetes

—–Better Balance and Bone Strength

Levels of Senior Citizen Exercise Workouts

There are three basic levels of activity to discuss when thinking about  exercise for Senior Citizens, the first is sedentary. This is where many  senior citizens fall unfortunately. This means you are getting little or no  regular physical exercise. Sedentary individuals take less the 10,000 steps a  day and their risk of falls, illness and disease are much greater than seniors  in the next group.

The second group of seniors we want to discuss are those who get  moderate physical activity each day. Moderate activity should be the goal  of most seniors to keep them healthy and independent. Brisk walking, dancing,  bicycling, swimming, dance and exercise DVD’s are excellent examples of exercise  that will raise the heart rate, but allow you to breath and talk normally.

The final level of activity for the more active seniors is vigorous  activity. This level means you heart rate has increased to the level that  you are not able to talk and exercise at the same time. Some examples might  include running, tennis, Zumba dance or other high intensity exercise.

Senior Exercise the Answer to Anti Aging

Aging and lack of physical activity are often associated with health issues  like: loss of balance causing falls, forms of arthritis causing stiffness and  pain, breathing problems and sleep apnea, stroke, heart disease and even some  cancers. These conditions are attributed to the limited activity and excess  weight from a decrease in your muscle tone and RMR from not getting enough  movement as we age.

How To Increase Your Physical Activity Level

Increasing your activity especially if you fall into the sedentary level of  seniors may seem like a daunting task. The good news is that is not necessarily  true. Starting an exercise program can be fun and easier to start than you might  think.

The most important issue is to find some activity you enjoy. Remember you  don’t need to spend a fortune on a home gym to reach your peak fitness level.  Some ideas that cost little or nothing are walking, dancing or water aerobics.  Start slowly and increase your time and intensity each week or so. As always  it’s a good idea to visit with your doctor, especially if you have health issues  already.

Incorporate friends and make it fun. You can help others reach their peak  fitness and improve their health as well.

Learn more about exercise for senior citizens and how it can improve your  health and save your life. More fitness information is available on my website  at http://www.yourweightlossanswers.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Renie_M_Rutten

 

Riding to Death: How Healthy Eating Can Improve the Health of Senior Citizens by Stan Onodu

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Are you a senior citizen? Medical science told us that there are ailments  associated with age. You’ll agree with me that it is virtually unheard of for  youngsters to complain of illnesses like osteoporosis, high blood pressure,  diabetes, heart disease, arthritis and certain cancers. But these are mostly the  health challenges of older adults. As a senior citizen, you need to know that  you can effectively manage these diseases through healthy eating. Let me show  you how.

Fluids. Naturally, you’ll observe, in most cases, that the skin and the  entire body frame of older adults shrink as they get older and older. This is as  a result of the fact that they tend to dehydrate so easily, which may not be  unconnected with their inability to feel thirsty most of the time. As a senior  citizen therefore, you should form the habit of constantly ingesting water and  fruit juices into your system.

Proteins. Proteins are body-building foods. They are also in the business of  repair and or replenishment of worn-out body cells and tissues. The healthy  proteins for senior citizens include eggs, lean meats, turkey or poultry and  fish. From these, minerals such as calcium, zinc and iron, greatly needed by the  elderly can be sourced.

Carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are energy-giving foods. It is a known secret  that senior citizens need a lot of energy derivable from this kind of foods in  order to sustain their ability to perform basic daily activities like dressing,  bathing, etc. Whole grains, cereals and their derivatives form excellent diets  for them. And more so, with some fibre content in the foods, these older folks  will be less exposed to constipation.

Fats. Only unsaturated fat foods, as in lean meats, fish, low-fat diary  products, avocados, nuts and seeds, should be taken by senior citizens. The  reason being that other fats contain HDL kind of cholesterol that can aggravate  blood pressures, thereby putting their heart conditions at very high risk.

Moderate Exercise. Man shall not leave by bread alone. Our senior citizens  need some bit of exercises – taking a walk, light gardening, riding bicycles,  etc – which can help them burn off calories thereby reducing weight; improving  heart and lung functions, and ultimately engender overall feeling of well-being.  It is important to note, however, that before they embark on any form of  exercises, their doctors must be aware.

If our senior citizens can strive to adopt the above healthy lifestyles or  habits, I guarantee their good health even though, for sure, their health cannot  be as it used to be when they were younger. Healthy eating is a gateway to a  healthy, long life and the case of our senior citizens cannot be  different.

What is that health condition that constitutes a burden in your life? Do you  know that through healthy eating you can overcome it? You can learn a lot more  here: http://www.healthyeatingpalace.blogspot.com/.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Stan_Onodu

 

Depression in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Depression is a medical condition that is characterized by feeling down,  depressed, or hopeless; low self-esteem; and loss of interest in things one used  to enjoy. Senior citizens are prone to life-altering changes that can lead one  to feel depressed. Dealing with the trials life throws at us such as, loss,  change, loneliness, or a chronic medical condition can be quite overwhelming.  Still, depression is not a “normal” part of aging. Like heart disease or  diabetes, depression is a medical condition and it can be treated with  medication and therapy. Treatment is effective at alleviating symptoms within a  few weeks in at least 80 percent of people.

It is important that senior citizens and those providing their elder care  understand the symptoms of depression. If you think you or someone you know may  be suffering from depression, identify your symptoms by using the checklist  provided below. Then, if necessary, seek assistance. For senior citizens, the  most frequently used resource is a family doctor. Bringing a trusted friend or  relative may help ease any anxiety when going to an appointment. Understand that  your doctor may suggest a checkup and begin treatment or refer you to a mental  health specialist.

Before you say, “I’m okay”….

Do you feel:

  • Anxious or “empty”
  • Guilty or useless
  • Agitated or irritable
  • Less interested in things you used to enjoy
  • Like no one loves you
  • Life is not worth living

Or if you are:

  • A change in sleeping habits
  • A change in eating habits
  • Persistent headaches, stomach aches, or pain

Remember that these  may be real symptoms of a real medical condition that can be effectively  treated. Talk to your doctor today. Though many senior citizens suffer from  depression, feeling depressed is not a normal part of aging.

 

Health and Wellness tips

There are many measures senior citizens can take to help relieve the symptoms  of depression. Those involved in the elder care of senior citizens experiencing  depression should encourage the senior to follow these tips and improve their  wellbeing.

Check your medications. Senior citizens often take many  medications. Some medications, including those for sleep, blood pressure, and  nervousness, may affect mood. Talk with your doctor about each of the  medications you are taking. Be sure to include all over-the-counter medicines,  vitamins, and herbal supplements to minimize the chances of having side  effects.

Limit alcohol consumption. Alcohol use can bring about  depression. And, when alcohol and drugs are combined, interactions that lead to  depression can occur.

Stay connected. Sometimes, senior citizens find it more difficult  to get out and stay connected with others. Still, talking with friends and  family members, getting a pet, or even finding a new interest or hobby can help  one through this tough time.  Get involved in activities you take pleasure  in, such as reading a good book, going to a ballgame or a taking a class in a  subject that interests to you.

Be active. Physical activity can improve physical and mental  wellbeing. Though some senior citizens believe they cannot exercise, there are  activities like walking, gardening, or working out (even if one is in a  wheelchair) that can be helpful. Make a goal of 30 minutes of activity 5 days a  week. If you have not taken part in physical activity in a while, be sure to  check with your doctor and get his OK before you begin.

Eat healthy and drink plenty of fluids. Choose healthy snacks  like fruits, vegetables, yogurt, or nuts to increase your nutrition and energy.  Also, try to eat well-balanced meals.  Some senior citizens suffer from  loss of appetite and weight loss; if you have experienced either of these,  consult your doctor.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects  caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for  families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking  employment.

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Activities For Senior Citizens – How Hobbies and the Mind Body Connection Work By Diane Carbo

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Hobbies have a mind body connection, they are important activities for  senior citizens and are an important part of healthy aging. Active seniors  are proof that you can enjoy better health and have fun doing it.

Research studies have shown that leisure time and physical activity promote a  healthier lifestyle. Our bodies are meant to be active and move. Many, as they  age, tend to become increasingly inactive, preferring to watch TV to help pass  the time away. Finding fun activities for senior citizens can change that.

Some good activities for senior citizens

Active seniors are involved and participate in what life has to offer.  Hobbies give an individual a reason to get out and share with others. Whether it  is painting, building model airplanes or playing cards the benefits of a hobby  can be an increase your chances for improved physical, social and emotional well  being.

It is important to have regular leisure time physical activity. Anything that  promotes moving and being active will benefit you as you age. The health  benefits of staying active are a delay or prevention of a chronic disease such  as: heart disease, diabetes, some cancers and arthritis. Physical activity also  promotes brain fitness. This can help delay or prevent dementia or  Alzheimer’s.

Participating in a variety of hobbies helps many cope with the stressors of  life. How you react and respond to different situations in life affects your  health. Stress and anxiety can lead to poor health. Active seniors are involved  and lead a more balanced life.

Hobbies allow active seniors to socialize, find companionship and  camaraderie. Making connections with others that have the same interests can  often open an individual to new found friendships.

Many individuals that participate in similar hobbies find themselves with  other individuals that have similar situations and experiences in life. As we  age, we experience losses that affect our emotional health. Active seniors that  are involved in hobbies have a pool of other individuals that they can draw  emotional support and comfort. There are times when they can also learn from  shared experiences. Sharing our feelings with others is a way to connect with  others as well as relieve the stress and anxiety we may be feeling.

More Hobbies and the Mind Body Connection: How Active Seniors are Having  Fun and Enjoying Better  Health …

Hobbies as activities for senior citizens are a way to calm their  minds and relax. It is a way to belong, have something to look forward to  doing.

For many, their hobbies are a tool that releases stress and helps bring their  emotions back into balance again. It is a time when we get an attitude  adjustment and feel right with the world again.

Leisure time physical activity is important to healthy aging. Moving our  bodies and using our minds affect how we age. The mind body connection benefits  of participating in hobbies are improved mental clarity, enhanced immune system,  improved self esteem and self confidence.

Hobbies are a way to have fun, enjoy and stay regularly involved in leisure  time physical activity. Consistency and regular involvement is the key to  maintaining healthy aging.

Having a variety of hobbies during the week can keep an individual busy,  interested and involved. Participating in a hobby with a group can be  motivating. Knowing that the expectations of others are anticipating your  participation in the day’s activity may give one the boost to go when they feel  down. Even to know that you have others that depend on you to be there, may give  you an extra boost to participate when you don’t feel like it. Feeling a sense  of commitment to others, a sense of belonging is important to healthy aging.

Hobbies give many a sense of connection to others, when there are no other  connections in an individual’s life. Connections to others, a sense of  belonging, a sense of community gives many active seniors the reason to  participate in life to their fullest ability.

Hobbies are a way for many to stay physically and mentally stimulated. Trying  new things, meeting new people and sharing your knowledge, experience and  sometimes your creative side with others can keep an active senior challenged  mentally, as well as, physically.

Hobbies are a safe way to get out and meet people with like minded interests.  It is a great ice breaker to meeting new people and a way to stay active, no  matter how old you get to be.

Any activity that gets an aging senior moving and involved with others is a  step towards healthy aging. It is important to get busy and stay active. Take up  dancing, gardening; join a walking club or travel.

Hobbies have a mind body connection. Active seniors are having fun and  enjoying better health as they regularly participate in things they enjoy. It is  never too late to start enjoying yourself now. Take time to find your own  activities for senior citizens to help your loved ones and  yourselves.

Diane Carbo Registered Nurse has more than thirty five years in the nursing  field. Her experience as a geriatric care manager, makes her uniquely qualified  to help those who want to live out their lives in their own homes. Diane has  developed a web site to make people aware of issues and options. You will find a  mountain of helpful information that will be continually updated. Please visit:  http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com/activities-for-senior-citizens.html for more information on hobbies and senior activities Sign up for The Caring  Advocate Ezine her free newlsetter and receive a complimentary copy of  the Home Health Care Planning Guide.

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Comparison of Health Insurance Schemes for Senior Citizens By Shankar P Nath

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

It is absolutely vital that as one approaches old age, one has a substantial  health insurance cover. The probability that one’s health care expenses would  increase substantially is almost a given. In this piece we look and compare the  different health insurance plans that are available in the market for senior  citizens. While every health insurance company wants to insure the young (and  almost by definition, more healthy), there are very few plans which provide  health insurance to people beyond 60. Another interesting thing to note here is  that most of the health insurance plans for senior citizens is offered by the  public sector general insurance companies.

The health insurance plans available for senior citizens are:

  1. Varistha Mediclaim by National Insurance
  2. Senior Citizen plan by Oriental Insurance
  3. Mediclaim for Senior Citizens by New India Assurance
  4. Senior Citizen Plan by United India Insurance
  5. Red Carpet Plan by Star Health Insurance

 

Varistha Mediclaim by National Insurance: This policy can be  bought by anyone between 60 and 80 years of age. Renewals can be done upto the  age of 90. Between the age bands of 76-80, premiums have an added factor of 10%  and between 80 to 90 years of age, premiums are grossed up by 20%. The sum  insured under this policy for hospitalization is Rs 1 lakh. For critical  illness, the sum insured is Rs 2 lakhs. Under the critical illness cover,  diseases such as cancer, renal failure, stroke, organ transplants etc are  covered. If the person has already been insured for 3 years through a health  insurance policy, then he or she does not have to undergo a medical test, else  there has to be a medical test under the prospective customer’s costs. For  domiciliary treatment, the maximum claim is fixed at 20% of the sum insured.  Ambulance charges upto Rs 1000 are covered under this policy. For a mediclaim  cover of Rs 1 lakh and a critical illness cover of Rs 2 lakhs, the premium  varies between Rs 6200 (for a 60-65 year old) to Rs 9200 (for a 75-80 year old).  One interesting feature of this policy is that pre existing hypertension and  diabetes are covered from the 1st year itself of the policy by paying 10%  additional premium for each of the two diseases. Pre existing is of course not  available for the critical illness policy. Other pre existing diseases are  covered after 1 policy year. Dialysis, chemotherapy and radiotherapy for  preexisting ailment is never covered. Claims are paid only for events that occur  within India. Claims which occur within the first 30 days of the commencement of  the policy will not be covered, unless in the case of the person being insured  with an Insurance Company without break for the past 12 months. For the purpose  of this policy, pre existing diseases such as cataract, piles, fistula, hernia,  benign lumps, joint replacement etc will not be covered in the first 12 months.  War related medical claims, vaccination, spectacles cost, plastic surgery,  corrective dental surgery, venereal disease, vitamins and tonics which are not  part of the treatment, nuclear disaster related health claims, alternative  treatment like homeopathy etc are excluded.

Opinion: We think it is one of the best policies for senior  citizens, except that the sum insured is low. They are quite generous as far as  the norms for entry age and pre existing diseases are concerned.

2. Senior Citizen Specified Disease Plan by Oriental  Insurance: In this plan, the policyholder has the option to choose sum  insured of Rs 1 lakh, 2 lakhs, 3 lakhs, 4 lakhs or 5 lakhs. One restrictive  feature of this policy is that 20% of any claim amount has to be co-paid by the  insured. Cashless payment through TPA is restricted to Rs 1 lakh. This plan  covers 10 specified diseases: cancer, renal failure, heart diseases, liver  related diseases, COPD (lung ailment), stroke, prostrate, orthopaedic disease,  ophthalmic disease, accidental injury and knee replacement. The amount that one  can claim for a particular disease is restricted as a percentage of the sum  insured (for e.g., 50% of the sum insured can be claimed for cancer, while 20%  of the sum insured can be claimed for stroke). A sum insured of Rs 1 lakh will  cost Rs 4500 for a 65 year old, while it will cost Rs 6400 if one is eighty  years old or beyond. While this may seem cheaper than National Insurance’s  Varistha medical scheme, it is less wide in scope. This policy has an  interesting refund of premium clause if one withdraws from the policy: if the  policyholder gets out of the policy within the first month, 75% of the premium  is returned and if he opts out between 3 to 6 months of the policy, 25% of the  premium is returned. In this policy, pre-existing diseases are not covered for a  period of 2 policy years. Other exclusions are very similar to those of  National’s Varistha medical scheme.

Opinion: a good scheme in terms of the level of sum insured  and price, but the scope of diseases covered is restrictive. Another issue is  that pre-existing is covered only after 2 policy years.

Mediclaim for Senior Citizens by New India Assurance: This  policy is available for senior citizens between 60 and 80 years, and the sum  insured can be Rs 1 lakh or Rs 1.5 lakhs. Pre existing diseases are covered  after 18 continuous months of coverage, while for diabetes and hypertension to  be covered, additional premium needs to be paid. Pre hospitalization is covered  for 30 days, while post hospitalization is covered for 60 days. An insurance of  Rs 1 lakh for a 65 year old will cost Rs 3850 while it will cost Rs 5150 for an  80 year old. Thus, premiums are very competitively priced. If one wants to  extend beyond 80 years, then loading of 10% or 20% has to be paid. For pre  existing diabetes or hypertension, an additional premium of 10% each has to be  paid. One interesting feature is that there is a 10% discount if one’s spouse is  also covered under this policy. This policy also has the same partial refund  norms on cancellation as Oriental’s Specified Disease Plan. Claims would be paid  only for medical treatment in India. The exclusion conditions are standard, and  are very similar to National’s Varistha Mediclaim.

Opinion: Attractively priced. Sum insured ceilings are low.  The product brochure is silent on co-pay, and thus there is no co-pay  requirement in all probability.

United India Insurance’s Specified Disease Plan: In this  policy, sum insured of Rs 50,000 to Rs 300,000 is available to people between 60  to 80 years of age. Sum insured of Rs 1 lakh will cost Rs 3715 for a 65 year  old, and Rs 8613 for an 80 year old. So while it is cheaper for the younger age  bands, it is a bit expensive for the older age groups. An interesting feature of  this policy is that there is a hospitalization cash payment from the 3rd day of  hospitalization on payment of a particular additional premium. While other  exclusion features of this policy are comparable to that of the previous 3  policies that we have discussed, the biggest problem of this policy is that this  has a pre-existing waiting period of 4 years.

Opinion: Pre -existing waiting period of 4 years is  restrictive

Star Health’s Red Carpet Plan: This plan has been a good  marketing success. While one barely gets to hear about the reasonably broad,  well priced schemes of the 4 nationalised companies, the market is quite excited  about Star Health’s Red Carpet scheme. The sum insured under this policy can be  for Rs 1 lakh, Rs 2 lakhs, Rs 3 lakhs, Rs 4 lakhs or Rs 5 lakhs. Age of entry is  restricted between 60 and 69 years. Pre existing diseases are covered from the  1st year itself, except for those preexisting diseases for which the insured  received payment in the preceding 12 months. Subsequently, these pre-existing  diseases are covered. There are sub limits under this policy wherein different  diseases have different limits as a percentage of the sum insured. Sum insured  of Rs 1 lakh will cost Rs 4900 at entry, while a sum insured of Rs 5 lakhs will  cost Rs 20000.. The biggest catch in this policy is that there is a 50%  co-payment for pre existing diseases and 30% co-payment for other diseases!!  Other exclusions are very similar to what is there for the nationalized  companies.

Opinion: Simple, well marketed claim. But the co-payment  terms are a huge negative! The ceiling for maximum age at entry is quite low (69  years), though the guaranteed renewal feature is a big positive. Also, the sum  insured levels of Rs 5 lakh is quite high and attractive in these days of  escalated medical costs.

In summary, we feel that National’s Varistha Plan is the widest in scope. The  only issue with the plans of the Nationalised Insurance companies is that the  sum insured levels offered might not be adequate for today’s high healthcare  costs. On the other hand, they are at least offering senior citizen health  plans. It is very difficult to locate any meaningful health insurance scheme for  senior citizens offered by any private health insurance company, except Star  Health. The only problem that we see with Star Health’s Red Carpet plan is that  of the Co-pay restriction.

Shankar Nath is the founder of http://www.PolicyTiger.com,  a leading online insurance comparison site in India. http://www.PolicyTiger.com helps user compare health  insurance, life insurance and car insurance policies in an unbiased manner so  that they can get the best price on their insurance, sometimes saving as much as  50% of the quoted price.

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Healthy Eating, Exercise and Lifestyle Guide For Senior Citizens By David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Healthy Eating and Lifestyle

While it is important for people of all ages to stay healthy, it is especially important for senior citizens to maintain healthy eating habits as well as to stay active which is important in the prevention of chronic illnesses like diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. By practicing healthier living practices, senior citizens can maintain a healthy weight, avoid depression, and stay mentally sharp. Those participating in caring for the elderly should be aware of these healthy living practices and work to both encourage and facilitate them.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a healthy diet includes many different types of food that are rich in nutrients. They have outlined specifically what this eating plan entails at the website.. Because this eating plan is designed specifically for senior citizens, it focuses on the types of foods that are important for preventing common ailments of older Americans like obesity and serious chronic illnesses.

Healthy Eating 101:

By following some of the tips listed, senior citizens can start a healthier lifestyle today:

  • Don’t skip meals. It is important to eat regularly in order to maintain normal metabolism and not become tempted to eat higher fat foods when food is consumed.
  • Eat a diet that is high in fiber. By eating foods like whole-grain breads, beans, vegetables, and fruits, you can lower your susceptibility to diabetes and heart disease.
  • Senior citizens especially should begin to adjust their diet to one that includes less calories and fat because the body will need less as it ages.
  • Calcium and Vitamin D are very important for nutrition and keeping bones strong. You can get this by either getting in at least three servings of dairy every day, or substituting these with soy-based beverages and proteins.
  • Senior citizens will have a harder time absorbing adequate amounts of the B12 vitamin. For this reason, it is important to eat cereals fortified with this nutrient or taking vitamin B12 supplements with meals.
  • Snack the smart way. Senior citizens will want to limit the amount of unhealthy snacking they do which involves foods high in calories and sugars. Instead, keep small portions of dried fruit, peanut butter, or crackers at hand to keep the appetite under control while remaining healthy.
  • Drink plenty of water. Although senior citizens often feel less thirsty then they used to, it is important to stay hydrated by either drinking water or water-based beverages like tea, coffee, soup, and skim milk.

Planning and Preparing Meals

 

Sometimes people find it hard to eat healthily because eating is often a social event which involves many people with different eating preferences and goals. While it is important to be able to enjoy a meal with family and friends, it is also important to maintain your own eating integrity by making sure everyone is on board with your personal healthy eating goals. Friends and family, as well as those providing elder care should facilitate healthy eating, not detour from it. The following tips address ways that senior citizens can maintain the healthy eating habits without sacrificing the social aspect of sharing a meal with others or learning to adjust to a lifestyle that involves eating with less people on a day-to-day basis.

  • Grocery shopping with others. This can be a fun and smart way to control the cost and quantity of food that you consume. If you don’t live with many people, this is a good way to split large-quantity items like potatoes and eggs which you may not be ableto use before expiration.
  • A time saving a smart way to eat healthy is cooking large quantities of food ahead of time and portioning for heating on later dates.
  • A quick way to prepare meals for yourself or for guests involves keeping frozen or canned fruits and vegetables on hand. Draining and/or rinsing canned foods is a good way to lower sodium or calories in foods that are kept in high sugar or high salt fluids.
  • Eating or preparing a meal shouldn’t always be a chore. Trying new recipes or eating outside can be a fun new twist on a meal with someone special.
  • Try to eat with people you enjoy to be around.
  • Some senior citizens have difficulty preparing meals, which is why it is important to become informed about home health care agencies or eldercare facilities that can aid in providing meals. The Eldercare Locator number is 1-800-677-1116.

Loss of Appetite or Desire to Eat

 

There are various reasons for why some senior citizens may not eat as well as they should or lose the desire to eat completely.

If you find that it is difficult to eat well, then it is best to speak with a healthcare provider or someone involved in your elder care about what can be done to help you eat better.

Some senior citizens are unable to eat well due to issues involving the condition of their teeth or issues with dentures. Checking with a dentist about physical pain that occurs when eating or other issues can help with these issues that lead to poorer eating habits.

When senior citizens lose family and friends or become depressed about events in their life, they may lose the desire to eat. In these instances, it is of the utmost importance that these individuals seek help from people they trust like their family, friends, church community, or those assisting with their elder care that will happily help them in finding ways to continue a healthy lifestyle and eating plan.

Some senior citizens complain that the flavor of foods change when they begin to take certain medications. While it is best to consult with a physician about issues surrounding medication, people can also take vitamin supplements with food that will help them stay healthy.

If you have someone who assists with your in home care, ask them to be vigilant about helping you eat healthy. Have them remind you to eat, and ask them to lend you a hand in preparing meals that are good for you.

Healthy Weight

Maintaining a healthy weight is important for being able to function in day-to-day life as well as stay mentally sharp. Senior citizens often lose or gain weigh as they age. If you are unsure about what weight you should maintain, consult your physician.

Health Risks Associated with Being Underweight

  • poor memory
  • compromised immunity
  • osteoporosis (weak bones)
  • decreases strength
  • hypothermia (lowered body temperature)
  • constipation

Health Risks Associated with Being Overweight

  • type 2 diabetes
  • high blood pressure
  • high cholesterol
  • heart disease
  • stroke (lack of oxygen transported to the brain)
  • some cancers
  • gallbladder disease

 

Because healthy weights will differ for everyone, it is important to verify with a physician whether it is healthy for you personally to lose or gain weight.

Staying Active

Participating in regular healthy amounts of physical activity can not only make you feel better, but it can make you less prone to diabetes, heart disease, and colon cancer. Staying active can be difficult for senior citizens, still it is an important part of a healthy lifestyle.

The following are some tips for maintaining a lifestyle that incorporates physical activity:

  • Know what amount of physical activity is appropriate for you. Everyone has different levels of activity that is safe for them, and while remaining active is important, always consult a health care provider about what is right for your lifestyle.
  • Take time to warm up, cool down, or take breaks when participating in a session of increased physical activity.
  • Take it slow. Always start slowly and build up to more intense levels of physical activities.
  • If you experience any pain, dizziness, or shortness of breath during exercise, stop the activity immediately.
  • Drink water.
  • Dress appropriately if you decide to exercise outdoors. Wear warmer clothes during the winter and wear lighter clothes during the summer while applying sunscreen or wearing sunglasses.
  • Wear the correct shoes for the activities that you participate in.

Types of Activity

 

Aerobic activities include activities that increase the heart rate and work the larger muscle groups. You may be able to speak a few words, but would not be able to carry on an entire conversation due to breathing patterns. Some examples of aerobics include:

  • brisk walking
  • water aerobics
  • tennis
  • house work
  • active play with children or pets
  • dancing

 

Begin incorporating small periods of this activity into your schedule during the week while slowly increasing the duration and frequency as time progresses. It is also important to incorporate different types of exercise that focus on balance and flexibility. Becoming used to a lifestyle with regular patterns of aerobic activity can reduce the effects of aging, control weight, lower risk of heart disease, improve flexibility, increase mood and energy, and expand social networks by meeting new people while doing various activities.

Strengthening activities involve the use of muscle groups against resistant forces like when lifting weights or doing yard work that involves lifting, digging, or pushing a lawn mower. This type of activity can keep muscles strong, reduce the need for a cane, reduce risk of bone injury, and help maintain a healthy weight.

Balance activities focus on muscles in specific areas of the body that encourage control as you move through space, reducing the likelihood of falls. This kind of activity could include walking heel to toe, standing on one foot, getting out of a sitting position without the use of the hands, and standing on the tip of your toes. Balance activities can help you stay steady on your feet and reduce the risk of fall and subsequent injury.

Flexibility activities increase the length of the muscles and can include stretching, yoga, and popular exercise programs like pilates. These activities can maintain the felxibility of joints, prevent stiffness, prevent injuries, and lower stress levels in general.

Weight-bearing activities require the muscles to work against gravity where the arms or legs bear the weight of the body. Activities like walking, tennis, and climbing stairs can build and maintain bone mass or reduce the risk of bone fractures.

Some activities incorporate multiple types of strengthening addressed above. What is important is that senior citizens find an enjoyable and do-able activity that will help them incorporate as many benefits as possible which will have far-reaching benefits to their health.

It’s Easy to Stay Healthy

A common misconception is that it takes an excessive amount of time and extra energy to maintain a healthy lifestyle. However, by just taking short walks for ten minutes a time or cleaning the house regularly can be practical ways to incorporate different physical activities into your daily schedule. And remember, staying healthy as a senior citizen will have increasing benefits as you continue to age.

Staying Motivated to Take Care of Yourself

Just because we age doesn’t mean that we are any less stressed by occurrences in life that may make us feel bad about ourselves or decrease our motivation to be good to ourselves. If anything, many of the challenges senior citizens face add stress.  Losing loved ones and friends or having trouble being independent with the added stressed of disease and functioning due to aging can cause depression or lifestyle changes that contribute to bad health. Here are some important tips for being good to yourself when you may not feel motivated due to circumstances out of your control:

  • Get plenty of sleep
  • Stay connected with family and friends
  • Join clubs or other social groups that you enjoy
  • Spend time with people that you enjoy
  • Volunteer at organizations in your community
  • Work a part-time job that isn’t too stressful or demanding
  • Watch a funny movie or find a way to laugh
  • Take up a hobby that you enjoy

 

Most importantly, senior citizens should remember that it is relatively easy and worth-while to maintain a healthy lifestyle as they age. Be sure to keep family, friends, and those involved in your elder care informed of your goals as they can help assist you. And remembering to eat healthy meals regularly, getting in physical activity, getting enough sleep, and being good to yourself are critical for maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

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Sometimes Little Things Can Be Huge!

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

By Thair Phillips, President, RetireSafe

A small and relatively new product is making life easier for older Americans. It’s a simple thing, but unit dose laundry detergent packs (or pods) are helping seniors perform necessary laundry chores that they might not otherwise be able to do without help. The laundry packs’ small size and pre-measured, consistent content is perfect for aging hands and eyes. With ten thousand of our fellow Americans reaching the age of 65 each day, it’s a really big deal!

While younger Americans can choose from many options, the pods are a huge help to the frail and the disabled.  Consider those who suffer from arthritis, for example. According to 2007-2009 data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), an estimated 50 million adults have self-reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis. That number is expected to grow to 67 million by the year 2030, per NHIS data. Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States, negatively impacting function and mobility for millions of senior citizens. The laundry pods meet the need created by those who can no longer heft a jug of detergent and pour it into a measuring cup. The small (but not too small to handle) size detergent pod fits the bill for aging-in-place seniors who wish to remain self-reliant.

And then there are those who must struggle each and every day with impaired vision.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), individuals over the age of 65 accounts for roughly 30 percent of the U.S. population considered to be visually impaired. Dimming eyesight can reduce physical, functional, emotional, and social well-being.  Doing the laundry can be a chore for all of us, but trying to measure the exact amount of liquid or powder for the person who is vision impaired can be a laundry room disaster resulting in ruined clothes and dangerous messes. For age-in-place seniors with cataracts, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and/or diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes that causes visual impairment, anything that can help simplify the laundry measuring process is truly a godsend.

Keep in mind that many older Americans in single family homes and apartments may well have to take their laundry and laundry supplies to a communal laundry room or a Laundromat.  Having the convenience of smaller, self-contained detergent pods to carry instead jugs of liquids and large boxes of powder is a big advantage for the elderly.  This is especially true for those navigating with canes or walkers, or those needing to keep one hand free for stability.

In short, pre-measured laundry detergent packs or pods are critical innovations for seniors. This is one small-sized product with a huge functional impact for seniors. In an aging America, we need every one of these impactful products, and many, many more.

RetireSafe is a nationwide organization of 4000,000 supporters that advocates on behalf of seniors on issues regarding Social Security, Medicare, health and financial well-being.

Contact Thair Phillips, (202) 628-5095

CVS Caremark Emphasizes Commitment to Older Americans at Annual American Society on Aging Conference

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Company highlights the importance of medication adherence in helping seniors on their path to better health

CVS Caremark (NYSE:CVS) will highlight how medication adherence plays a vital role in helping older Americans on their path to better health at the 2013 Annual American Society on Aging Conference, which is being held in Chicago this week.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20090226/NE75914LOGO )

CVS Caremark, a Titanium Sponsor of the conference, will also be participating in a number of general sessions and panels and will highlight its efforts to ensure customers and patients receive quality care and guidance as they age. David Casey, the company’s Vice President of Workforce Strategies and Chief Diversity Officer, will open the March 12 General Session: Mysteries of Population Aging.

As a pharmacy innovation company, CVS Caremark is committed to developing new ways to lower costs and improve health. By advancing the understanding of medication adherence through research collaborations, the company is gathering important information about why some patients take their medications as prescribed and why others do not. CVS Caremark is also refining the ways it interacts with patients through proven programs, such as Pharmacy Advisor and Maintenance Choice, that help patients stay on their medications and improve health outcomes.

“People age 65 and older typically take two or three times as many medications as younger Americans,” said Casey. “As we reinvent pharmacy care, we will continue to be a trusted health care partner to all of our customers, but particularly to aging Americans who are more likely to have chronic conditions and require more guidance.”

CVS Caremark is not only committed to its older customers and patients, it is also committed to recruiting mature workers and supporting older colleagues who are already part of the company.

“At CVS Caremark, we believe talent is ageless. Our mature colleagues’ knowledge and experience are important assets to our company. They provide us with insight into the best ways to serve our mature customers and sometimes become mentors to their younger colleagues,” added Casey.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 4.7 percent of the nation’s workforce is age 60 and over. Currently, 6.9 percent of CVS Caremark’s workforce is age 60 and over, higher than the national rate. The number of CVS Caremark colleagues who are age 50 and over has grown from approximately 6 percent in 1990 to nearly 20 percent in 2013. To continue this upward trend, CVS Caremark is cultivating public and private partnerships at the local, state, and national level with the goal of recruiting more mature workers into all areas of its workforce.

About CVS Caremark

CVS Caremark is dedicated to helping people on their path to better health as the largest integrated pharmacy company in the United States. Through the company’s more than 7,400 CVS/pharmacy stores; its leading pharmacy benefit manager serving more than 60 million plan members; and its retail health clinic system, the largest in the nation with more than 600 MinuteClinic locations, it is a market leader in mail order, retail and specialty pharmacy, retail clinics, and Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans.  As a pharmacy innovation company with an unmatched breadth of capabilities, CVS Caremark continually strives to improve health and lower costs by developing new approaches such as its unique Pharmacy Advisor program that helps people with chronic diseases such as diabetes obtain and stay on their medications.  Find more information about how CVS Caremark is reinventing pharmacy for better health at info.cvscaremark.com.

Contacts:

Jeff Ventura
Corporate Communications
(401) 770-1990
Jeffrey.Ventura@cvscaremark.com

Nine simple ways you can improve your heart health

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Ten minutes a day is all you need to be heart healthy. Walking the dog, knowing your numbers, eating your greens – those are a few heart-healthy things that only Take 10.

Since 1963, to urge Americans to join the battle against heart and vascular diseases, Congress has advised the president to proclaim February “American Heart Month.” To celebrate American Heart Month this year, Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health is offering a variety of educational and screening events and opportunities for disease prevention and to support the fight against heart disease and stroke.

1. Beginning Feb. 1 though Feb. 28, Renown is helping people commit to improve their heart health in just 10 minutes a day. Every day in February, visit the Take 10 tab on the Renown Health Facebook page. From heart-savvy information and healthy recipes to useful apps, Renown will reveal a simple health tip that takes 10 minutes or less. Also enter to win an Ultimate Health Screening Package ($219 value).

2. Friday, Feb. 1, people are encouraged to promote awareness of heart disease by dressing in red on National Wear Red Day.

3. Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 5 and 6, Renown South Meadows Medical Center will host the life-saving services of Life Line Screening, the nation’s largest provider of preventive screenings. The screening event is designed to help local residents identify their risk of stroke, vascular disease and osteoporosis before the life-changing effects of these conditions can occur. The event is from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Northview Conference Room. Call 1-800-690-0295 to schedule an appointment.

4. Throughout February: Low-cost health screenings. These events include a variety of health screenings for cholesterol, diabetes, arthritis, heart disease and more. No appointment required. The schedule includes:

Feb 6, 8 – 10 a.m.: Renown Medical Group, 202 Los Altos Parkway.
Feb 13, 8 – 10 a.m.: 850 Mill St.
Feb 20, 8 – 10 a.m.: Renown Medical Group, 1343 W. Newlands Drive, Fernley
Feb 27, 8 – 10 a.m.: Renown South Meadows Medical Center, Northview Conference Room

5. Saturday, Feb. 9, Renown will participate in the Save a Heart – Simple 7 Health Expo featuring the American Heart Association’s Simple 7, steps to heart healthy living: Get Active, Control Cholesterol, Eat Better, Manage Blood Pressure, Lose Weight, Reduce Blood Sugar and Stop Smoking. The expo takes place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Scheels, Legends at Sparks Marina. The event is open to the public. No RSVP needed.

6. Friday, Feb. 15, at 12 noon, Renown will host a free Online Health Series webinar on the link between gout and heart disease. Renown Health Rheumatologist Malin Prupas, MD, FACP, will be the featured presenter. Register for this webinar at renown.org/onlinehealthseries.

7. Wednesday, Feb. 27, at 12 noon, Renown will host a free Online Health Series webinar on the early warning signs of heart attacks. Karen Meskimen, DNP, RN, will be the featured presenter. Register for this webinar at renown.org/onlinehealthseries.

8. Thursday, Feb. 28, Renown will host its annual Save Your Heart Luncheon featuring Letitia Anderson, MD, FACC. The educational luncheon will be from 12 noon to 1 p.m. at the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa, Paradise Ballrooms D & E. Doors open at 11:30 a.m. Cost is $10 and includes lunch. To RSVP, call 775-982-6483.

9. Friday, March 1, the American Heart Association will host its annual Go Red For Women Luncheon from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa:

Renown Provides Advanced Training for Healthcare Professionals

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Renown Provides Advanced Training for Healthcare Professionals

RENO, Nev. (Oct. 30, 2012) – Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health is teaming up with the Nevada Academy of Family Physicians (NAFP) to provide advanced training for healthcare professionals across northern Nevada this weekend in a three-day educational conference.

The 23rd Annual Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine Conference will be held at the Resort at Squaw Creek in Olympic Valley, Calif., Friday through Sunday, Nov. 2 – 4. This continuing medical education program is designed for internal medicine and family physicians, hospitalists, cardiovascular specialists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, pharmacists, nurses and all other physicians and healthcare personnel.

Topics include the most recent advances and current established guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, stroke and diseases or problems associated with heart disease.

The conference is sponsored by Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health. For more information and to register for the conference, visit renown.org/UpcomingEvents. Registration will also be available at the conference. To download a copy of the event program, click here.

About the Nevada Academy of Family Physicians:
The NAFP promotes the profession of family practice by preserving the scope of practice, promoting primary care research and encouraging family physicians to assume leadership roles. The NAFP works as an advocate for family physicians and their patients to various government and non-governmental organizations affecting healthcare access and delivery.

About Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health
Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health has more than 30 years of recognition as the region’s leader of heart and vascular care. More heart procedures are performed at Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health than anywhere else in northern Nevada. Renown’s heart physicians have access to sophisticated diagnostic and surgical equipment such as the D-SPECT camera that detects heart attacks faster, the da Vinci® S HD™ Robotic Surgical System, 64-slice CT scanner, nuclear medicine, MRI and cardiac catheterization so patients can be diagnosed and treated quickly. For more information, visit renown.org/heart.

Healthy Aging: Up2Me

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Healthy Aging: Up2Me
According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than 125 million people suffer from at least one chronic illness. If you are an adult with a chronic condition such as diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, heart disease, chronic pain or anxiety, this Healthy Aging : Up2Me workshop can help you.

It’s also important for family caregivers to avoid developing a chronic illness due to stress and neglect of their own health and well being.
• Join this FREE 2 1/2 hour workshop held each week for six weeks.
• Learn from trained volunteer leaders who have cared for those with chronic
health conditions.
• Set goals for yourself.
Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health
888 W. Bonneville Ave • Las Vegas, NV 89106
Fridays: September 28 – November 2, 2012
12:30 – 3 p.m.
Sign up with Susan Hirsch at hirschs2@ccf.org or 702-483-6023.

Blindness and Vision Loss Spike by 23 Percent in the U.S.

September 24, 2012 by · Comments Off on Blindness and Vision Loss Spike by 23 Percent in the U.S.
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

American Academy of Ophthalmology Urges Seniors to Save their Sight through Prevention and Early Detection

Blindness and vision impairment are on the rise in the United States. A recent report by Prevent Blindness America indicates that, since the year 2000, incidence of blindness and vision impairment has increased by 23 percent among Americans age 40 and older.[i] However, most blindness in this country is preventable with proper eye care. The American Academy of Ophthalmology and EyeCare America urge Americans to get regular eye exams to better prevent and detect sight-stealing eye diseases.

Rising rates of age-related eye diseases and conditions are largely to blame for the increase in vision loss. Four of the most common causes of vision loss are diabetic retinopathy, where blood vessels in the retina swell or become blocked due to diabetes; age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a breakdown of the eye’s macula; glaucoma, an eye disease that damages the optic nerve; and cataracts, in which the eye’s lens becomes clouded. These conditions have shown a marked increase over the past 12 years:
• The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy increased by 89 percent.
• The frequency of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) increased by 25 percent.
• The incidence of glaucoma increased by 22 percent.
• The number of people affected by cataracts increased by 19 percent.[ii]
As baby-boomers continue to age, the incidence of age-related eye disease is also expected to continue to increase. Currently, people age 80 and older constitute only 8 percent of the population, but account for 69 percent of all cases of blindness.[iii] Early detection and treatment by an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor – may help prevent and in some cases, such as cataracts, even reverse vision loss.

Many seniors age 65 and older may qualify for an eye exam and up to 1 year of care at no out-of-pocket-cost through EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. EyeCare America matches qualifying patients age 65 and older with an ophthalmologist who provides a comprehensive medical eye examination. EyeCare America is co-sponsored by the Knights Templar Eye Foundation, Inc, with additional support from Alcon. To see if you or a loved one is eligible, visit the online referral center at www.eyecareamerica.org.

“Regular eye exams are imperative to detect and treat eye diseases and prevent serious vision loss,” said Richard P. Mills, M.D., chairman of EyeCare America. “This is especially true for people age 65 and older who are at increased risk for eye diseases. That’s why EyeCare America is so focused on providing access to eye care, and we hope that fewer people will suffer from preventable causes of blindness as a result.”

To learn more about EyeCare America or to find out if you or a loved one qualifies for the program, visit www.eyecareamerica.org. Learn more about eye diseases and conditions, and keeping your eyes healthy at www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® public education program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision, by providing the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. Visit www.geteyesmart.org to learn more.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. Since its inception, EyeCare America has helped more than 1.7 million people. More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

Renown Health Notices

Renown Health is committed to providing media with the latest news and events, national health trends and observances. Subject matter experts are available to discuss the following topics. Please contact Dan Davis at 775-982-6370 or ddavis2@renown.org to schedule an interview. Photos and video can also be made available.

INSIDE RENOWN HEALTH
• Hand Foot and Mouth Disease – During August, Washoe County School District and the Washoe County Health District issued warnings to parents of school children about hand, foot and mouth disease. A Renown Health pediatrician is available to answer questions about the disease and to suggest ways to prevent its spread.
• FastTrack ERs – The Emergency Rooms (ERs) at Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center now have the region’s first and only FastTrack ERs. Open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, the system is designed to treat patients who need immediate attention for small emergencies including minor cuts and burns, allergic reactions and other minor injuries. A Renown Health representative is available to discuss how FastTrack ER will help improve a patient’s ER experience.
• Pathway to Excellence® – Both Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center have been recognized as the first two Pathway to Excellence® hospitals in Nevada by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. This award honors a work environment designed to improve overall nursing satisfaction and retention of quality nursing staff. A Renown Health representative is available to discuss what this honor means for patient care.

NATIONAL TRENDS LOCALIZED
• Digital Accountability to Get Healthy – Getting exercise, eating right and losing weight always seems to be a challenge. Already connected to the digital world, people have turned to using social media tools and platforms to achieve their health goals. Renown Health has Healthy Tracks, an online program, to encourage employees to get screenings, exercise and eat nutritiously. A representative can speak on the benefits of digital accountability and how community members can become part of the Healthy Tracks challenge.
• Swallowing foreign objects – Each year, more than 100,000 cases of kids swallowing foreign objects are reported in the United States. Sometimes, the swallowed object may not harm a child at all. Other times, a doctor’s visit may be necessary. A Renown Health representative is available to talk about what to do if your child swallows something he or she should not.
• Dense breasts causing mammogram concerns – More women are learning from their physicians that they may have breasts too dense for mammograms to give a good picture. Women whose breast tissue is very dense have a greater risk of developing breast cancer than women whose breasts contain more fatty tissue. In addition, dense breast tissue makes spotting possible tumors on a mammogram more difficult. A Renown Health specialist can discuss other preventative measures and screenings women should take.

IMPORTANT HEALTH DATES/OBSERVANCES
• National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month – More than 23 million children and teenagers in the United States ages 2 to 19 are obese or overweight. Nearly one third of America’s children are at early risk for Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and even stroke. A pediatrician from Renown Health can discuss ways to prevent childhood obesity and keep children healthy.
• Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month – More than 20,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year, and approximately 15,000 women die annually from the disease. Ovarian Cancer is referred to as the silent killer because it usually is not discovered until its advanced stages. A gynecologist is available to talk about ways women can discover and effectively treat ovarian cancer early.
• Prostate Cancer Awareness Month – Prostate Cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in America affecting 1 in 6 men. Renown Institute for Cancer offers patients PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) screenings, da Vinci Robotic Surgery and leading radiation treatment options including TomoTherapy. Low-cost health screenings are offered every Wednesday. A local doctor is available to speak about this screening and cancer treatment options.

Free Senior Help Fair

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

Free Senior Help Fair Provides Vital Information & Services

The Senior Help Fair is a collaborative event hosted by community-based organizations comprised of health care, senior service providers and government. The HELP Fair attendees will be treated to a variety of vendors, offering health and wellness screenings, health-related tips and information about local services from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thursday Sept. 6, 2012, on the campus of Christ Lutheran Church, located at 111 N. Torrey Pines Drive.

The Senior Help Fair is a one-stop destination for information about local services and organizations and is open to all ages. More than 50 agencies and companies will be on hand to provide information on community services for seniors. Community agencies will be on hand to help seniors connect with resources. Assistance programs that will be available include nutrition support, energy assistance, medication costs, affordable housing, legal services and transportation including the TAP taxicab assistance program. There will also be free health screenings for blood pressure, diabetes risk, vision, falls risk and dementia.

“This fair will help all seniors and those who care for them navigate the programs and services available to help people and to give voice to their concerns regarding services and resources,” said Senior Help Fair Organizing Committee Chair Jeff Klein. Individuals, who are 65 or over, should bring their identification and Medicare cards.
Along with the more than 50 agencies and companies offering information and services, free lunch will be served to the first 200 attendees, local singer Mark Miller will be providing entertainment and many door prizes will be offered on the hour.
The best time to think about aging is before the need arises. If an emergency happens, family members have to scramble to seek out options for care within a short time period, often not being able to take the time to make the best decision. “There are still a large number of people in the state who do not know what senior services are offered, or that these services even exist, so we will continue outreach efforts to the community,” said Commission on Aging member Lucy Peres “The goal is to raise awareness of health and safety related services in the state.”

The fair will also provide an opportunity for seniors to speak with their legislators and voice their opinions and concerns on issues that affect their daily lives.

When: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Thursday Sept. 6, 2012
Where: Campus of Christ Lutheran Church 111 N. Torrey Pines Drive
Information: Call Nevada Senior Services (702) 648-3425 www.nevadaseniorservices.org

Cataract Rates are on the Rise in Americans Age 40 and Older

August 21, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Cataract Rates are on the Rise in Americans Age 40 and Older

American Academy of Ophthalmology Offers Tips for Cataract Detection and Treatment

SAN FRANCISCO – August 16, 2012 – The incidence of cataracts in the U.S. has risen 19 percent since 2000, impacting nearly 25 million Americans age 40 and older.[i] In fact, more than half of all Americans will develop cataracts by age 80, according to Prevent Blindness America’s Vision Problems in the U.S. report. In response, the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart program is educating the public about cataract risk factors, detection and treatment options during Cataract Awareness Month.

Cataract is a clouding of the eye’s lens, which can make it more difficult to focus light onto the eye’s retina – the light-sensitive tissue that sends images to the brain. Cataracts, a natural part of aging, are the most common cause of vision loss in the U.S. They typically develop slowly, so symptoms may not be immediately apparent. Over time, cataracts can cause vision to become blurry, cloudy, dull, or dim, and can interfere with daily activities.

The good news is that cataracts are almost always treatable with cataract surgery. During cataract surgery, an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor with the training and certification to provide the full range of eye care and surgery – removes the eye’s cloudy natural lens and replaces it with a clear artificial lens implant called an intraocular lens (IOL). Cataract surgery is often performed as an outpatient procedure and does not require an overnight hospital stay. Cataract surgery is one of the safest types of surgery, and 90 percent of patients who have cataract surgery enjoy better vision afterward.[ii]

“If you notice vision changes, cataracts could be to blame and you might need more than a new pair of glasses,” said David F. Chang, M.D., a clinical correspondent for the American Academy of Ophthalmology and a clinical professor at the University of California, San Francisco. “If you do have a cataract, you should be reassured that it is a normal aging change and not an eye disease. Cataract surgery usually carries an excellent prognosis, and you should talk to your ophthalmologist about whether surgery should be done to restore your eyesight.”

As the aging population grows, it is increasingly important for seniors and their caregivers to understand cataract risks, symptoms, prevention, and treatment options. The American Academy of ophthalmology recommends the following tips to maintain healthy vision:
• Get a baseline exam by age 40. All adults should get a baseline eye exam by age 40 when early signs of eye disease and vision changes may start to occur. During this visit, your ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.) will advise you on how often to have follow-up exams.
• After age 65, schedule regular eye exams. Anyone age 65 and older should visit an ophthalmologist regularly to detect eye diseases and conditions like cataract early, and to monitor any vision loss. Seniors age 65 and older may qualify for an eye exam and up to 1 year of care at no out of pocket cost through EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of American Academy of Ophthalmology. See if you qualify at www.eyecareamerica.org.
• Know your risk factors for cataract. Diabetes, smoking, extensive UV exposure, serious eye injuries, steroid use, and a family history of cataract can increase your risk for developing a cataract.
• Reduce your risks to prevent or delay the onset of cataracts. Use sunglasses and hats to protect your eyes from UV damage. Don’t smoke. If you have diabetes, control your blood sugar carefully through diet, exercise and medications if needed.
• Talk to your ophthalmologist about your treatment options. Vision loss from cataracts can interfere with daily activities. Talk to your ophthalmologist about whether cataract surgery is right for you. When preparing for surgery, give your doctor your complete medical and eye health history, including a list of medications that you have taken. Some medications can cause the iris to move out of its normal position and may require your ophthalmologist to adjust his or her surgical technique.

For more information on cataract symptoms, risk factors, surgery, and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org.

About EyeSmart
The American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Health Care Partners Medical Group

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Las Vegas 

facebook.com/healthcarepartnersnevada

About Us

HealthCare Partners Nevada is a network of more than 200 primary care physicians and more than 1,300 specialists. With medical clinics and specialty care affiliates throughout Las Vegas, North Las Vegas, Henderson, Boulder City and Pahrump, HealthCare Partners Nevada (HCPNV) is committed to delivering the highest quality of care to all our patients.
Through our total care model, HealthCare Partners provides patient centered comprehensive primary care, specialty, and urgent care services. Founded in 1996, HealthCare Partners Nevada is an affiliate of HealthCare Partners LLC with offices in California, Florida and Nevada.

For Patients

At HealthCare Partners we approach your health with Total Care. Our mission is to deliver the highest quality care to all our patients. We do this by offering you complete access to our services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We also accommodate same-day appointments.
Our health care providers are ready and able to offer expert care when you need it most. While our mission is to deliver the best possible care for our patients, our promise is to provide the personal attention you deserve. It is our pleasure to ensure your individual healthcare needs are met.

Specialty Services

When you choose HealthCare Partners, you are choosing to manage your health through what we call our Total Care Model.  Total care means that you are actively involved with a team of healthcare professionals lead by your primary care physician who is responsible for coordinating your care and ensuring the best outcome possible for your medical needs.
HealthCare Partners is continually adding medical specialties to our team of healthcare professionals, including cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, internal medicine, pediatrics, and podiatry.

Cardiology

Cardiologists are doctors with special training and skill in finding, treating and preventing diseases of the heart and blood vessels.
Click here to find a HealthCare Partners Medical Group cardiologists.

  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Repair
  • Angioplasty
  • Atrial Fibrillation Management
  • Cardiac Catheterization /Angiography
  • Cardiovascular Disease Management
  • Carotid Ultrasonography
  • Catheter Ablation (CA)
  • Cholesterol Management And Testing
  • Coagulation Monitoring
  • Coronary Angioplasty/Stenting
  • Doppler Ultrasound
  • Echocardiography (Echo)
  • Electrophysiological Studies (EPS)
  • Gated Blood Pooling Imaging
  • Heart Rhythm Management
  • Holter/Event Monitoring
  • Implantable Cardioverter /Defribrillator (ICD)
  • Laser Lead Extractions
  • Nuclear Cardiac Imaging
  • Patent Foramen Ovale Repair (PFO)
  • Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Rotational Atherectomy (PCTRA)
  • Peripheral Vascular Disease Management And Testing
  • Peripheral Vascular Interventions
  • Permanent Pacemaker Implantation
  • Stress Testing
  • Structural Heart Disease
  • T-Wave Alternans
  • Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)
  • Transesophageal Echocardiography
  • Ventricular Septal Defect Repair (VSD)
  • Women And Heart Disease
Endocrinology

Endocrinologists are doctors that focus on the medical aspects of hormones and their associated diseases and conditions.  Endocrine disorders may include: cholesterol disorders, coronary artery disease, diabetes, hormone replacement therapy, hypertension, hypoglycemia, obesity, osteoporosis, reproductive medicine and thyroid disorders.

Dermatology

Dermatologists are doctors that specialize in the diagnosis, treatment and management of disorders of the skin, hair and nails.

Internal Medicine

Internal medicine specialists are doctors that focus on adult medicine and have had special study and training focusing on the prevention and treatment of adult diseases. Internists are sometimes referred to as the “doctor’s doctor”, because they are often called upon to act as consultants to other physicians to help solve puzzling diagnostic problems.

Pediatrics

Pediatricians are doctors that focus on babies, children, adolescents, and young adults from birth to age 21.  Pediatricians manage the physical, mental, and emotional well-being of their patients in every stage of development.

Podiatry

Podiatrists are doctors that diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and related structures of the leg.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Laser Wellness PMA

August 10, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Las Vegas 

www.laserwellnesspma.com

We Believe in 3 Things…

Laser Wellness PMA believes in truly a three word motto:  Learn, Invest, Share We know that today is more important than ever for people to Learn about their health conditions, Learn about what natural options are out there, and to Learn how to think with a winning attitude towards health and life.  We believe that by Investing in your health you are taking responsibility for your health and not just relying on someone else alone.  It has been proven again and again that being an active partner in your health and wellness journey can make all the difference.  Most people have never really invested in their health before, they pay insurance, they supplement, they pay for medications, but they never really invest in their health and miss out on truly being responsible and given themselves the best quality of life possible.  We also believe in Sharing health and wellness with everyone you know.  Once you invest in LLLT, whether you are a professional or a consumer, Share it with every family member, friend, neighbor, and co-worker so they can get a glimpse of what LLLT can do for them…

Do You Believe In Health & Wellness?

 What is it that keeps our  Health in somewhat dismay?  As we age, we have been trained to think that taking medications, surgeries, pain, lack of energy, lack of mobility, memory and vision loss, are all just the way it is and “normal.”  The TRUTH is we have given up responsibility of our own health journey.  Who is Responsible for our health and our families, our Doctors? Our Government? Our Insurance Companies? FACTS are that we are living longer, but not healthier, we are living sicker, longer!  We have more disease, sickness, pain, and injury problems than ever, and we take more prescriptions and have more surgeries than ever, yet we seem to be unhealthier!  The US is near the bottom in Longevity and Life Expectancy out of all the industrialized nations on Earth!

Call for a FREE Information Packet with dvd AND for a FREE Consultation from our Specialist:  (605)791-2283 Direct

Low Level Laser Therapy Works!

Light Amplication by Stimulated (Oscillation) Emission of Radiation or “Laser” has continued to bring out new changes in just about every medical and consumer field there is.  “Why is Low Level Laser Therapy so effective and continues to show tremendous results thru research all over the world?”  The answer is simple, LLLT works at the cellular and atomic level.  It carries electrons back into the body, and it helps to Re-energize sick, injured, damaged cells and allows better permeability to take place once again…So what can LLLT do for you since it works at the cellular level? As we continue to do more research, to get more understanding of how to effectively use LLLT, we continue to understand that we have just begun to see the wonderful results that LLT can produce…LLLT and Qlaser is truly Tomorrow’s Health & Wellness Care Today….

 

 

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!