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doctor | Nevada Senior Guide

How Old Are You Really? Biological Age

May 29, 2016 by · Comments Off on How Old Are You Really? Biological Age
Filed under: General 

People have always been interested in being “forever young” and today’s society is no different. We want to resist the ageing process.

The speed at which we are ageing can be measured – its called biological age, or how old your body really is.

The area of study which is now called longevity, and was once called anti aging, is hugely popular in the states.

It’s something I’m very interested in, and see it as a big part of the future for myself and my clients.

Your chronological age is how old you actually are.

Biological age is the age of your body at the cellular level.

Today we will look into how you can establish, what your biological age is and how you can improve it.

There are a few longevity factors in the list which surprised me!

(Deep question alert!)

What is the purpose of life? I don’t mean any deep seated stuff, like procreation.

I just mean, what is most people’s AIM in life. What do they want to get out of their time on earth?

Firstly and most importantly, people want to be happy. Easier said than done.

Happiness is a state of mind. It’s a feeling.

Ask someone with a big goal (like building a successful business or losing more than three stone).

“What will reaching your goal do for you?”

Often they will say something like “When I get there I will feel happy”, or “satisfied with myself”, or they say “I will feel proud”.

“I will have more energy”.

“I won’t be afraid of trying new clothes on or going out with friends”.

“I don’t want to feel like a slave to food”

“I don’t want to be scared to look in the mirror or get on the scales”.

Life is all about feelings.

People spend their entire lives in search of feelings! (mostly happiness, contentment, satisfaction and love)

How people actually reach this state of “happiness” is different for us all.

Most people I know AIM for a decent job (or business) with decent money.

All with the ultimate goal of having a good retirement.

I hear people say “When I finish work, I’m going to do this or I’m going to… (insert goal)”.

The point here being, if being happy and having a nice retirement is people’s main goal in life, then keeping your body fit and healthy surely must be part of your plan.

I know of a very wealthy man who got cancer and passed away just before his retirement, I’m sure that was not part of the master plan, he had built his business up so he could sell it and have a nice retirement (as most business people do).

He didn’t make it and didn’t get to “cash out”.

Many people don’t make it to retirement because their “plan” is messed up from the start.

Without sounding depressing we only get one shot remember.

This is NOT a rehearsal.

A lot of people get to retirement age and their body is wrecked!

This stops them from being able to enjoy their time off as much. Living life with lots of restrictions. “I can’t go there because of the steep hill”, or “I can’t do that because of my back or my knees”.

After working hard for 40-50 years – to give yourself a good pension and retirement, this is the last thing that anyone wants.

Peoples bodies are like cars.

On one hand you have new cars with high mileage that are not well serviced.

On the other hand you have old cars with low mileage that have been well looked after.

I want YOU to be like a well looked after old car, with low mileage when you get to your retirement.

I know some people, that slog away and get to the age of 40, and feel and look like they’re 50 or 60!

I also know many people who hit retirement age and feel like a 40 year old, and can keep on working and exercising for another 20 years!

This is all dependent on how we live our lives, obviously there are things such as injuries, diseases and other bad things which can impact our lives negatively through no fault of our own but on the whole we are in control of our own health.

What affects our longevity?

Scientists agree that these factors all affect your longevity in some way, big or small. (this is not a definitive list)

Muscle size and strength
Level of education
How pro active you are with going to see the doctor if needed
The amount of friends you can rely on, and love in your life
Your diet
Blood pressure
Your upper body strength
If you enjoy your work or not
Weather you smoke/drink alcohol or not, and the amount
If you exercise or not

Most of us shorten our lives and ultimately kill ourselves, through our bad habits and lifestyle choices, whatever they may be.

As you would of guessed, it is possible to slow down the onset of ageing and even reverse it to some extent.

I must say, that there is nothing wrong with ageing, it is inevitable. It is something we should be proud of, a chance to show our wisdom to the younger generation.

This article is just to show you how you can SLOW the ageing process with ease and actually enjoy it.

The Ageing Process

As we get older our bodies start to slow down and stop being able to function as well, sadly there is no getting away from this.

BUT through healthy living and making the right choices day in day out we can delay our body slowing down by years!

Just think how much more you will be able to enjoy your retirement if you feel like a 40 year old? and can spend it with the people you love.

Compare this to how much you will enjoy it if you can barely walk up a flight of stairs without having tired legs and being short of breath.

Your chronological age doesn’t have to be the same, or worse, than your physiological age.

How to slow the effects of ageing

The list above obviously helps you but here are a few more ideas for you to beat the clock.

When some people think anti aging, I’m sure some of you may think of things like anti wrinkle creams and lotions, hair dying products, botox and maybe even plastic surgery.

That does kind of sum up some of the western world that these are the steps that the majority of people (plastic surgery being an extreme example) will take to make them look younger, rather than eating healthily and exercising.

Aging leads to loss of muscle mass, loss of mental function, low mobility and a lack of energy, and as you know the cosmetic type anti aging steps I mentioned won’t help any of these.

Top tips to delay ageing naturally:

Enjoy the Outdoors – Don’t spend all of your time cooped up indoors behind the computer or watching TV. There are plenty of things to do and see outside, especially on a nice day I can’t think of anything better than going for a walk with the family down the park or beach. Sunlight also is a natural source of Vitamin D.

Yoga & Meditation – I would say that this is one of the most important strategies in staying young. I started to do this myself and it honestly makes me feel great. Yoga and meditation can help you relax and lower your stress levels (linked with aging) dramatically. It can also help you to see things a lot clearer.

Yoga is also great for your flexibility, the more flexible and supple you are the less chance you have in the future of suffering falls and lack of mobility.

Socialise – Loneliness can be a real killer. Socialise as much as possible with your friends and family. Get out there and do things, go to the cinema, concerts, attend an evening class (the more mentally stimulating the better).

Stay Strong & Active – You have to keep moving or your body will come to a standstill. Taking part in regular exercise is absolutely vital. Regular strength training is extremely important.

Losing muscle mass is something you want to avoid or at least delay for as long as possible so strength training will help this as well as keeping your bones strong, this will lower your chances of osteoporosis.

Nutrition

I believe food is medicine, many of the effects you get from modern day medicine you can get from eating the right foods.

Nutrition influences biochemistry. Biochemistry influences everything at a cellular level.

If you eat well there should be no need for some medications.

If you spend your whole life eating fresh, natural whole foods and stay active then it will also show. You will most likely be lean, mobile, disease free and full of energy, a rarity these days.

You should aim to eat a diet containing lots of quality fats and protein’s (the bodies building materials) which will help you to maintain your muscle stores. Also protein boosts the production of HGH in your body, HGH (Human growth Hormone) is your body’s natural ‘fountain of youth’.

As you age the production of this hormone slows down greatly, regular strength exercise (lifting, pushing and pulling heavy stuff) and quality protein keeps the production of this hormone going!

Eat plenty of antioxidant rich foods – Antioxidants which are found in colourful fruit and vegetables help to reduce the damage caused by free radicals in your system.

Free radicals can speed up the onset of ageing; they are unstable electrons (O1 molecules)which are produced during metabolism. They damage the cell nucleus and the mitochondria.

Free radicals bounce around inside your cells like a pin ball, causing damage every time they hit something. They cause absolute havoc.

Antioxidants provide the free radical with the extra O1 molecule they need to become stable O2 molecules.

Good quality natural foods are the best way to combat these harmful free radicals. Natural organic foods are packed with antioxidants which neutralise the free radicals before they cause too much damage.

Eat Omega 3s – They fight inflammation, improve the appearance of your skin and aid brain function. Three vital things that we need as we age. So make sure you get as many omega 3s into your system as you can, the best source is fresh fish, if not a fish oil supplement will do.

Lower Sugar Intake – Aim to cut out any excess sugar that you eat, excess sugars can modify essential proteins in our body which can lead to wrinkles and energy loss.

Look after your skin through good food and lots of water – Eating foods containing vitamin A (sweet potatoes, broccoli, spinach, asparagus and carrots), Vitamin C (red peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, strawberries, oranges, kiwi and pineapple) and Vitamin E (nuts, seeds and spinach) are a great way of helping your skin look healthy.

Stop smoking and limit alcohol intake – There are few things that age you faster than smoking and drinking alcohol every day so cut out smoking and do as much as you can to drink less.

Lower Stress Levels – This is another big one, I just mentioned that there are few things that age you faster than smoking and alcohol; well I think stress is one of them.

Being constantly stressed will ruin your mood, energy levels, social interaction as well as causing so many health problems.

As I mentioned above, I have found deep breathing techniques, yoga and meditation really important and a great way of combating stress.

Let’s be realistic the big medical and health companies aren’t going to promote anti aging through the things I just said, they are going to promote it through new miracle pills, lotions and creams, there is a lot of money to be made from it so they will keep on doing it.

The people who buy these products don’t have to alter their lifestyle one little bit so it suits them which is why it is so popular.

We ultimately reap our rewards in our retirement, if you have invested some time and effort into your “health & fitness account”, you will reap the rewards.

If you haven’t then you won’t!

You can actually measure your biological age online with a biological age calculator.

If all of the things I have mentioned above didn’t require effort or commitment then everyone would be running around into their 90s and later!!

But unfortunately we don’t, we die much younger than that.

Depending on what stats you use, in 2010, UK men were reported to live on average until about 77 or 78, and women on average live until 82 or 83 years old.

Do it naturally and do it right.

Let me know your thoughts on this topic, comment below, I really want to know what you think.

Thanks for reading, take care,

Richard

If you would like to receive weekly health and fitness updates on the top news in the industry along with several free gifts then follow this link: http://richard-clarke.co.uk/

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There are also many easy to read helpful articles and information which can inspire you to reach your fitness and exercise goals FASTER!

Thanks for reading.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7963927

Aging Is a Treatable Disease

May 22, 2016 by · Comments Off on Aging Is a Treatable Disease
Filed under: General 

Live Healthy – Look Marvelous – Live Longer

There are actions you can, and should take today to dramatically improve your health, your appearance and your longevity. You can control 70% of the factors affecting your longevity; only 30% are controlled by genetics until very late in life when genetics become more controlling

Almost all of the effects of aging and the common diseases that come with aging are treatable, to at least some extent. The key is early detection and early treatment.

Our understanding of the aging process is advancing rapidly. Some scientists believe that the first immortal human may be living today.

In 1786, life expectancy was 24 years. Better diets and some medical innovations allowed it to double to 48 years in the next 100 years.

Modern medicine has now increased life expectancy to over 76 years. Future medicine promises to increase it to over 100 years during our lifetime.

“Over half the baby boomers here in America are going to see their hundredth birthday and beyond in excellent health.” says Dr. Ronald Klatz of the American Academy of Anti-Aging. “We’re looking at life spans for the baby boomers and the generation after the baby boomers of 120 to 150 years of age.”

The key to Live Healthy – Look Marvelous – Live Longer is to delay the diseases of aging so that when they do occur, it is very late in your life.

The causes of aging are finally being understood. There are actions you can take today to take advantage of the recent medical developments. Dr. Rudman ran a series of tests on aging people and demonstrated that the effects of aging could be slowed and even reversed. He concluded: “The overall deterioration of the body that comes with growing old is not inevitable.”

The Causes of Aging

Almost all life on earth blossoms with youth, until it has reproduced and passed its genes on to the next generation. After that, the flowers wilt and die, and we humans began to age. Yes, we begin to age while we are still in our 20’s.

We age because the products of our metabolism, I.e., the “ashes” from the oxidation processes that produce energy in our cells, accumulate faster then our endocrine system can remove them. This is because most of the cleansing hormones that surged through our youthful bodies begin to decrease as we begin to age. Some of these more critical hormones have decreased by about 10 to 30% as we enter our 30’s. The decreases become ever more dramatic as we enter successive decades of life. Most of our hormones have decreased by over 50% and some have been reduced to near zero as we enter our 70’s. So we age. Our muscles and bones weaken; our reaction time slows; we lose our agility; all combine to make us more susceptible to accidents. Our immune system weakens and makes us more susceptible to disease. And we die.

The Death Clock

Dr. Hayflick has shown that we have another cause of aging. He has shown that we have a built-in death date of about 120 years, if diseases or accidents do not get us earlier. The point at which our cells have divided a fixed number of times sets this death date. It has been termed the “Hayflick limit.”

Our cells divide to produce new cells to replace the old cells damaged by metabolic ash build-up, free radicals, toxins, and other wear and tear mechanisms. As the cells divide, the chromosomes split to provide chromosomes for the new cells. When the chromosomes split, they lose part of their telomeres – the genes at their ends that keep the chromosomes organized. After a certain number of splits, the telomeres wear away and become too short to keep the chromosome organized and therefore the cell dies without being able to replace itself.

You can think of telomeres as analogous to the plastic bands on the ends of shoelaces. Telomeres hold the important DNA code intact, preventing it from fraying as the molecules replicate over time.

Resetting the Death Clock

But tests over the past few years have shown that the “Hayflick limit” can be extended by the use of an enzyme that causes the “organizing genes” at the ends of the chromosomes (the telomeres) to re-grow. This enzyme is called telomerase.

Telomerase treatments on human cells in the laboratory have indicated that telomerase can make human cells immortal. Doctors and researchers involved in these treatments are reporting that it is their belief that death is not inevitable.

Telomerase is actually an enzyme (a catalytic protein) that is able to arrest or reverse the telomere shortening process. The body produces telomerase when we are embryos in the womb to accommodate the very rapid growth of the embryo. But, unfortunately our bodies do not produce telomerase after birth except possibly for the creation of sperm.

So for humans to extend life we must do two things: first, eliminate the oxidants and toxins in our foods and environment; and find a dietary or pharmaceutical method for increasing and preserving the length of our cells’ telomeres.

Promising Anti-Aging Research

There are many ongoing projects that promise to solve our problems of aging. One is from a team of South Korean scientists. They report that they have created a newly-synthesized molecule, named CGK733 that can make cells younger.

“All cells face an inevitable death as they age. On this path, cells became lethargic and in the end stop dividing but we witnessed that CGK733 can block the process,” Prof. Kim Tae-kook reported. He further stated: “We also found the synthetic compound can reverse aging, by revitalizing already-lethargic cells. Theoretically, this can give youth to the elderly via rejuvenating cells.”

Kim expects that the CGK733-empowered drugs that keep cells youthful far beyond their normal life span would be commercialized in less than 10 years.

Researchers at The Wistar Institute have defined a key target of an evolutionarily conserved protein that regulates the process of aging. The study provides fundamental knowledge about key mechanisms of aging that could point toward new anti-aging strategies and cancer therapies.

Aging saps our strength and ability to enjoy life, cripples us, and eventually kills us. Tens of millions die from age-related conditions each and every year. Comparatively few people know that degenerative aging can be slowed with diet and lifestyle choices, medicines and nutracuetials.

Comparatively few people are aware of the many serious scientific efforts, presently underway, aimed at understanding and intervening in the aging process – in order to one day reverse its effects.

Your objective should be to have a healthy life and continue to live long enough to take advantage of all the medical advances and technologies now in development.

Our health is determined by our genetics, our diets, and our past and current lifestyles. You can now optimize your current and future health by defining and taking medications, vitamins, and other supplements and treatments tailored to your specific health needs. The program to do this recognizes the validity of three basic themes:

  • The Future of Medicine is in Personal Tailoring
  • Preventative Medicine is Key
  • Aging is a Treatable Disease.

Your Anti-Aging Longevity Plan

It is strongly recommended that you get familiar with the latest anti-aging information and develop your personal Longevity Plan. The key to longer life is to detect any health issues as early as possible and take advantage of the available technology to address them. Time really is of the essence.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5073181

Take a Number: Five Ways to Look at Age

April 24, 2016 by · Comments Off on Take a Number: Five Ways to Look at Age
Filed under: General 

One for the Ages

Satchel Paige was a great baseball pitcher, one of the greatest of all time. He was an African-American and, due to the racial discrimination of the time, most of his outstanding career was not spent in the (white) major leagues. However, after the historic breakthrough by the courageous and talented Jackie Robinson (Mr. Paige’s junior by about 14 years), Satchel Paige pitched in the major leagues for a number of years. In fact, he was still able to get major league batters out at the age of 60! (Mr. Paige’s age at his retirement from baseball is not known for certain because no one, probably including Mr. Paige himself, knew his exact year of birth; some thought he was older than 60). Mr. Paige revealed a mind as sharp as the break on his curve ball when he asked this profound question for the ages:

“How old would you be if you did not know how old you are?”

These writings are dedicated to the memory of Satchel Paige and to all the so-called “over-the-hill” guys and gals in every sport and in every area of life, from Churchill and Reagan in politics to Jessica Tandy in acting and Paul McCartney in fatherhood. They and many like them in the past and present will be joined by many more in the future who are not really “over the hill” because they are too busy taking the hill.

Five Ways to Look at Age

Chronological Age

The most common way to look at age is the Chronological. This is the one that everyone is familiar with. It is simply the time that has passed since your date of birth to today. It is the one that governments and insurance companies require of you and that your Doctor knows, even if your boy friend doesn’t. It is a unidimensional measure because it considers only time. It is uniform because everybody who is 48 years, 6 months, and 3 weeks old is exactly that, chronologically. People who view age only from the chronological perspective are somewhere between dumb and dumber.

True Age

True Age is another and better way to look at your age. True age is basically what a measurement of all the biomarkers of aging would reveal about you. Here’s four points about true age. One, if a well-trained physician did NOT know how old you are but reviewed a print-out of your biomarkers, she or he could accurately estimate your true age. Two, your true age is not uniform but varies by individual: you can be younger or older than your chronological age. Three, true age is multidimensional rather than confined to time. Four, absolutely nothing can be done about chronological age because it is fixed, but a great deal can be done about true age.

Appearance Age

Appearance Age is the age you appear to be to others. It no doubt has some relationship to both chronological age and true age. Yet it is different. This is because it is heavily influenced by a number of factors outside the scope of biomarker measurement, not the least of which is attitude. We all know people that appear to be quite a bit younger or older than their chronological age. But the only scientific way to measure a person’s appearance age would be to have a representative sample of the population observe a person for at least a few minutes. A quick glance is not sufficient because appearance age includes factors such as movement of the body and alertness, not just a frozen face. Then the estimates from all members of the representative sample would be gathered, simple statistical measures applied, and Voila! You have the person’s appearance age. Of course, unless we are part of a study, none of us will ever get this scientific about it. We will just have to rely on random comments from friends, family, and nice or mean strangers to estimate our appearance age; and usually it’s a pretty good estimate.

NEAT Age

A new way to look at age, which occurred to me awhile back, is what I call one’s N.E.A.T. age. This is simply one’s time left on the planet from right Now to the time of death. This age is unknowable by readers or anyone, except those committed to imminent suicide (and these poor folks are no more likely to take the short time remaining to do age calculations than they are to be caught dead reading an article about lively longevity). The best we can do is make a calculated estimate based on what we know about the general population and factor in any pluses or minuses that apply to us individually.

The N in NEAT of course stands for Now since the calculation is from the present, today, right now. E is for Elusive because I believe moments of time are elusive. As we humans try to hold or capture a moment of time it eludes us because the next moment is here, and then the next. Time and life are a flow.

The A in NEAT is for Allotted. Everyone who has ever lived has only so much time to live. Some have short lives, some have long lives, and some have lives neither particularly long nor short. But human life is finite and almost certainly will remain finite into the distant future if not forever. We do not need to take sides in the age-old debate about whether or not our allotted time is predestined by God in order to recognize that the amount is finite.

Of course, T is for Time. Time remaining is what it is all about. As has been oft noted: a millionaire on his death bed would gladly exchange his riches for a little more time, say one more day of healthy living.

So one’s NEAT age is one’s Now Elusive Allotted Time. It is a concept that provides a different perspective on aging and on life. For example, let’s suppose there was a 30-year old person named Terry and a 60-year old person named Sydney living in the same town in 1960. Conventional wisdom and simple arithmetic agree that Sydney was twice as old as Terry at that time. Such wisdom carries the (usually) unstated assumption that Terry is about 30 years further from the grave than Sydney. Statistically, this is difficult to argue with. But statistics are oft off for an individual and sometimes by a wide margin.

Let’s suppose that Terry had a lifetime of very bad health habits and, never having had the opportunity to read my writings, continued the very bad habits. Poor Terry expired a little shy of 40. (The same fate could have befallen Terry due to a dreaded disease or tragic accident.) Sydney, on the other hand, decided at some point to lead a health-conscious life. Sydney made good choices and stuck with them. Sydney enjoyed basically good health beyond age 100 before passing on. When Sydney was 60 and Terry was 30, Sydney had a NEAT age of 40+ and Terry had a NEAT age just under 10. So way back in 1960, who was younger: the one with less than a decade of life left, or the one with more than four decades of vibrant life left? One of the neat things about the NEAT age is that the bigger this age number the better.

Ideal Age

The fifth and final way that we will look at age is one’s Ideal Age. Your ideal age is your age of choice, your preferred age. The concept of ideal age brings us back to Satchel Paige’s question:

How old would you be if you did not know how old you are?

In a sense, perhaps most of us do NOT know how old we are anyhow. Sure we know our chronological age, and some of us have a rough gauge of our appearance age. But few of us know our true age, and none of us knows our NEAT age. So it should not be so difficult to put chronological age aside for a few moments and answer Mr. Paige’s question.

Before leaping to an answer like 21, keep in my mind that successful living usually involves a combination of physical vigor, mental acuity, and wisdom. Personally, my ideal age is 37; thus even at my next birthday I will still be one year younger than all the women over 40.

What about you? What’s your number? What’s your ideal age? The way my anti-aging program works for you is that after reflection you establish your ideal age. Then we work with all the tools and techniques of the program to bring your true age into ever closer alignment with your ideal age. There is a balance to be struck. A 90-year old reader shooting for an ideal age of 19 is setting up way too much of a challenge and thus is setting up for failure. A 50-year old reader settling for an ideal age of 45 is not challenging herself or himself enough.

Take a number.

Satchel Paige was the impetus for me to write the close to this article:

When it comes to matters of age,

It is best to take a page out of Paige,

And move forward with grace,

Paying no mind to this myth of the human race.

Gary Patrick is a certified anti-aging professional (Giovane Medical Services). He is also an author, hypnotist, personal trainer, and speaker. Free stuff is available for a limited time at his web site: [http://rapidresults.biz]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Gary_Patrick/18668

5 Ways to Beat Those Winter Blahs and Blues

January 30, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

It’s not even the end of January and winter has been brutal here in the Midwest. Along with other areas of the country unused to constant sub-zero temperatures and snow, we’re all growing weary of being stuck inside, trying to stay warm. After the normal post-holidays let-down, the winter blahs and blues tend to set in. This combination of bad winter and seemingly endless days until spring is not good, particularly if you’re trying to stay positive or keep those New Year’s resolutions.

If you’re experiencing Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) or depression beyond the usual winter blues, it’s best to check with your doctor for treatment options. But if not, Huff Post 50 has a handy list of ways to tackle the winter blahs. Here are a few of their suggestions:

continue reading here:  http://www.seniorsforliving.com/blog/2014/01/29/5-ways-to-beat-those-winter-blahs-and-blues/

Fight the Flu with Healthy Habits

January 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

11949(Family Features) With cold and flu season upon us, it may be tempting to hibernate until the danger of red, puffy eyes and a stuffy nose disappears. Waiting for a cold or flu to run its course can truly feel like an eternity, especially when the symptoms have you looking as bad as you feel.

 

While there is no guaranteed strategy for avoiding the flu or sniffles, there are steps you can take to safeguard yourself and your family. And if you do fall ill, taking extra care will help ease you through until you’re on the mend.

 

While the Centers for Disease Control recommends the flu shot as the single best preventive measure, you can also help ward off illness with healthy habits like these:

 

  • Keep yourself and your belongings away from others who may be sick to prevent the spread of germs. Don’t share dishes and utensils in the kitchen, and provide sick family members with their own hand towels in the kitchen and bathroom.

 

  • Wash your hands frequently using soap and water or an alcohol-based rub. Avoid unnecessarily touching your eyes, nose and mouth, which are easy portals for germs to enter your body.

 

  • Keep your immune system running strong by eating sensible and nutritious meals, exercising regularly, managing stress in a healthy way and getting plenty of sleep.

 

If your prevention falls short and you find yourself combatting sniffles, take these steps to nudge yourself back to good health:

 

  • Consult with your pharmacist or doctor about which medications may help relieve your symptoms.

 

  • Use a soft facial tissue on your irritated skin. Puffs Plus Lotion is dermatologist-tested to be gentle and helps soothe irritated skin by locking in moisture

 

  • Stay home for at least 24 hours after a fever passes. This will help you catch up on much-needed rest and prevent the chance of passing anything contagious on to your friends and co-workers.

 

  • Calm stuffy sinuses with the steam of a long, hot shower. Take the sinus soothing a step further by using Puffs Plus Lotion with the Scent of Vicks.

 

  • Cover your nose or mouth with a tissue like Puffs when sneezing or coughing to minimize the spread of germs.

 

As your symptoms ease, remember to take it easy and allow your body to fully recover so you don’t suffer a setback that needlessly prolongs your illness.

 

For more tips for warding off discomfort from a cold, flu or allergies, visit www.puffs.com.

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Living with diabetes? Watch your mouth!

January 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

11723Living with diabetes? Watch your mouth!

 

(Family Features)  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people with diabetes are two times more likely to develop gum disease. In fact, about one-third of people with diabetes have severe gum disease.

 

Why are those with diabetes more vulnerable to gum disease? High blood glucose levels impair the body’s ability to heal from oral infections and uncontrolled diabetes can make treating gum disease more difficult, according to the American Diabetes Association. The Association is joining with Colgate to launch a new “Watch Your Mouth!” campaign to help raise awareness surrounding the often over-looked link between oral health and diabetes. Here are some tips to help you live well with diabetes:

 

  • Watch your mouth! Begin to develop healthy oral care habits, like brushing, flossing and visiting the dentist regularly. Research shows that brushing twice a day with Colgate Total toothpaste can help improve gum health in as little as four weeks.*
  • Don’t miss out on your favorite foods. Just eat healthier versions that everyone in your family can enjoy. Making simple substitutions to most dishes can help increase nutritional value, while not sacrificing on taste.
  • Use the right tools. Stay organized with a journal large enough to keep your diet, exercise, goals and health information together. Keep a week’s worth of prescriptions in one place with a handy pill case.
  • Know your risks. The American Diabetes Association lists the common risk factors for diabetes as being 45 or older, being overweight, not exercising regularly, having high blood pressure and being a part of certain racial and ethnic groups.
  • Visit your dentist. While your doctor and certified diabetes educator play an important role in helping with your diabetes, so does your dentist. If you don’t see a private-practice dentist, you can visit dental schools that provide services at a fraction of the cost to help you keep your mouth healthy.

 

For more expert tips and information, visit www.OralHealthAndDiabetes.com.

 

*Results improve with continued twice daily use, as shown in 6 month clinical studies of the general population.

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

American Red Cross Advancing Health Options in Southern Nevada

January 22, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

dr-john-lunettaDr. John Lunetta, D.O. arrived in Las Vegas more than a year ago to help with the American Red Cross Blood Services regional expansion. For decades, the Red Cross blood supply in Southern Nevada came from other areas of the country, mostly from Idaho, Montana and Utah. But over the course of the last year and a half, the team has grown the program of blood collection to that of supplying nine of the area’s 14 hospitals.

 

But Dr. Lunetta’s presence here makes this program so much more than a simple blood collection service. Licensed to practice in seven western states, and eight of our local hospitals, Dr. Lunetta assists local doctors when they have questions about using Red Cross blood products. Transfusion recommendations to find the most compatible blood or questions about reactions to transfusions are all topics on which Dr. Lunetta can speak.

 

Dr. Lunetta also brings with him the latest in patient blood management education. His contemporary approach allows local doctors to, when appropriate; use less product resulting in less risk to patients.

 

But there are additional American Red Cross Blood Services here in Las Vegas not available in some other regions known as clinical services. With the medical equipment and the skilled nurses that work with Dr. Lunetta, Clinical Services can offer one-on-one patient contact delivering care through an apheresis machine, which uses centrifugal force to separate blood into its constituent components. This is a method used in the treatment of leukemia patients, sickle cell patients, and a large number of neurologic and oncology patients. Dr. Lunetta also oversees treatments involving some new technology using extracorporeal photopheresis, or ECP. In layman’s terms, it’s like a tanning bed for your blood.  Due to Dr. Lunetta’s expertise, some area patients will soon be able to receive treatment here that they could only get in California previously.  It’s used to treat patients who suffer from Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma in which the skin is attacked by the patient’s own T-cells. The treatment calms those cells down and the skin begins to heal. An average patient needs to receive 150 – 300 procedures once every two weeks.  Another more common use of this treatment is for patients who have graft vs. host disease; usually as a result of a bone marrow transplant, or other organ transplant such as lung or heart.

 

Many more procedures and innovations are in the pipeline that Dr. Lunetta and his staff may be able to offer in the future and the Red Cross is pushing the development of new ways in which Blood Services can help in our community. From his involvement with donors at blood drives to his work with patients who get the blood transfused, Dr. Lunetta is involved every step of the way.

 

Dr. Lunetta is available for interviews for print, online, radio and television. Well-spoken and with a talent to break complex medical ideas down into language that we can all understand, Dr. Lunetta is a delightful guest and talented subject matter expert.

 

To book Dr. Lunetta, or to interview him on his range of expertise, please contact the office of Lloyd Ziel at the contact below.

 

Lloyd Ziel

Public Information Officer | Communications and Public Affairs

 

American Red Cross

Southern Nevada Chapter

1771 E. Flamingo Rd. Suite 206-B

Las Vegas, NV 89119

702-232-6604 cl

702-369-3351 of

702-791-3372 fx

Lloyd.Ziel@redcross.org

www.redcross.org/southernnevada

Eye Drops And Ultraviolet Light — U.S. Clinical Trial Has Potential To Dramatically Change Landscape For Patients With Keratoconus And Corneal Ectasia

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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San Leandro, California Ophthalmologist One of Few Doctors Offering Treatment in Clinical Trials  

An exciting new treatment option for patients suffering from Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia is in U.S. Clinical trials right now.  Corneal Cross-linking is a non-invasive treatment that has the potential to halt the progression of Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia, possibly saving patients from the need for corneal transplant.

Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia

Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia cause the cornea (the clear front part of the eye) to thin and become weak, to bulge and protrude outward thereby causing visual problems. Keratoconus occurs naturally, while Corneal Ectasia can occur when the cornea is weakened by LASIK or PRK procedures. Both conditions can severely compromise eyesight and may lead to legal blindness and corneal transplant surgery.

Corneal Cross-linking

The Corneal Cross-linking treatment being investigated in the clinical study is Avedro’s VibeX eye drops (Riboflavin) and KXL device (Ultraviolet light). Corneal Cross-linking may help improve vision by stabilizing the cornea and reducing astigmatism.  Traditional treatments include Rigid Gas Permeable contact lenses, corneal implants, or corneal transplant.

The study was initiated to investigate an alternative way to treat Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia in patients after LASIK and PRK.  Only a small percentage of patients who have the surgery develop the sight-threatening condition, however, it frequently leads to corneal transplant or loss of vision.

Nicholas Batra, M.D.

Dr. Nicholas Batra, Medical Director of Batra Vision Medical Group in San Leandro, California, is one of only a handful of clinical investigators nationwide enrolling patients in this study.

“As a cornea specialist, I see this therapy has the potential to dramatically change the landscape of treatment for patients with Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia. The United States is the only western industrialized nation where Corneal Cross-linking is not approved for use outside of clinical trials.”

Corneal Cross-Linking therapy is offered to patients in Mexico, Canada and Europe and other countries around the world. Dr. Batra is currently accepting US patients for the post-LASIK and Keratoconus segment of the Cross-Linking study.

Dr. Batra was awarded his Doctorate of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and completed his ophthalmology residency at the University of California, San Francisco. In addition, Dr. Batra received a fellowship from UCSF/Proctor Foundation in Cornea and Refractive surgery and a Fellowship with the prestigious Heed Foundation.

(www.batravision.com)

For media interviews contact:
Zanides Public Relations
Linda Zanides
O:   415.456.8171
M:   415.342.1648

Animal-Senior Citizen Companionship Leads to Improved Overall Health

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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 The mental and physical benefits of animal companionship have been praised across the world, from seeing-eye dogs to therapy dogs to household pets. According to the US Pet Ownership and Demographics Sourcebook, there are approximately 70 million pet dogs and 74 million pet cats in the United States. Of this number, about 63 percent of pets are considered to be members of the family. Now, pet adoption companies are utilizing the health improvements to better the quality of life for senior citizens.

“The pairing of seniors with calm, manageable adult dogs and cats has yielded amazing vitality and unparalleled effects, the feeling of loneliness dissolves and a reason to be active arises,” affirms Will Post, CEO of Hound & Gatos Pet Food, whose mission is to provide the public with high-quality pet food options for dogs and cats. “The simple presence of animal companionship can provide amazing health benefits that truly lift a senior’s mental and physical state because they have someone to depend on and someone who depends on them.”

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention reports that pets can reduce stress, lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels, in addition to increasing social interaction and physical activity. Add unconditional love, purpose, and that special something to care for and nurture, and you have an elixir for senior citizens.

According to Pet Partners, seniors with pets experience fewer minor health issues when visiting their doctor, and overall better health and mental well-being.  Pets are also praised for reducing loneliness and depression, two major factors that can lead to an unhealthy body and mind. Since dogs live in the present, their focus on ‘today’ tends to rub off on their owners, resulting in managing anxiety levels.

“These positive results of animal companionship for seniors is one more reason to encourage the ownership and nurturing of pets for the seniors of today. We are only beginning to document these facts determining the health benefits of pet ownership for the elderly, though animal lovers have always suspected it. Their contribution to a better quality of life being recognized can only lead to happier and healthier seniors, something we can all be excited about,” says Post.  “The importance of love proves to be a major force in life no matter what age one might be.”

Research continues to show that pets help people of all ages enjoy a much fuller and rewarding life, and the mission of Hound & Gatos Pet Food Corporation is to try to create cat and dog formulas that can ultimately improve our beloved pet’s vitality and longevity. Dubbed as the original Paleolithic pet food company, their recipes are 100 percent protein and zero percent plant protein, with the number-one ingredient being meat. To learn more about Hound & Gatos, including where to buy products, visit their site at: www.houndgatos.com.

About Hound & Gatos Pet Foods Corporation

Hound & Gatos Pet Foods Corporation is based in New York. Their mission is to provide the public with high-quality pet food options for dogs and cats. Their line of pet foods focus on quality ingredients that provide maximum nutrition, and avoid all bi-products and other ingredients that would generally be unnatural to a pet’s diet. For more information on Hound & Gatos visit the site at www.houndgatos.com.

 

# # #

Source: American Veterinary Medical Assocation. US Pet Ownership & Demographics Sourcebook.https://www.avma.org/KB/Resources/Statistics/Pages/Market-research-statistics-US-Pet-Ownership-Demographics-Sourcebook.aspx

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Health Benefits of Pets.http://www.cdc.gov/healthypets/health_benefits.htm

Pet Partners. Health Benefits of Animals for Seniors. http://www.petpartners.org/page.aspx?pid=312

Study Shows that People Who Undergo Cataract Surgery to Correct Visual Impairment Live Longer

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Australian researchers find a 40 percent lower mortality risk among patients who had their vision corrected through the procedure  

SAN FRANCISCO – Sept. 4, 2013 – People with cataract-related vision loss who have had cataract surgery to improve their sight are living longer than those with visual impairment who chose not to have the procedure, according to an Australian cohort study published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. After comparing the two groups, the researchers found a 40 percent lower long-term mortality risk in those who had the surgery.

The research is drawn from data gathered in the Blue Mountains Eye Study, a population-based cohort study of vision and common eye diseases in an older Australian population. A total of 354 persons aged 49 years and older and diagnosed with cataract-related vision impairment –  some of whom had undergone surgery and others who had not – were assessed between 1992 and 2007. Adjustments were made for age and gender as well as a number of mortality risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, smoking, cardiovascular disease, body mass index and measures of frailty and comorbid disease. Follow-up visits took place after five and ten years since the baseline exam.

Previous research had indicated that older persons with visual impairment were likely to have greater mortality risk than their age peers with normal vision, and that cataract surgery might reduce this risk. These studies – unlike the Blue Mountains Eye Study – compared people who had undergone cataract surgery with those in the general population or with those who had not had cataract surgery, and did not link vision status to the surgical status.

“Our finding complements the previously documented associations between visual impairment and increased mortality among older persons,” said Jie Jin Wang, Ph.D., of the Westmead Millennium Institute and one of lead researchers of the study. “It suggests to ophthalmologists that correcting cataract patients’ visual impairment in their daily practice results in improved outcomes beyond that of the eye and vision, and has important impacts on general health.”

The association between correction of cataract-related visual impairment and reduced mortality risk is not clearly understood, but plausible factors may include improvements in physical and emotional well-being, optimism, greater confidence associated with independent living after vision improvement, as well as greater ability to comply with prescription medications.

Dr. Wang noted one limitation of the study is that participants with cataract-related visual impairment who did not have cataract surgery could have had other health problems that prevented them from undergoing surgery, and that these other health problems could partly explain the poorer survival among non-surgical participants. This issue is addressed by the researchers in a subsequent study.

Caused by the clouding of the lens, cataract is a leading cause of treatable visual impairment that will affect more than half of all Americans by the time they are 80 years old.[1]  Surgical removal of the opaque lens with an artificial lens implanted is a successful procedure of cataract treatment. If completing everyday tasks is difficult, cataract surgery should be discussed with an ophthalmologist − a medical doctor specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

Seniors who are seeking eye care but are concerned about cost may qualify for EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, which offers eye exams and care at no out-of-pocket cost to qualifying seniors age 65 and older. Learn more at www.eyecareamerica.org. For more information on cataracts and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology 
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons — Eye M.D.s — with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who has the education and training to treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trusted and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

About Ophthalmology
Ophthalmology, the official journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, publishes original, peer-reviewed, clinically applicable research. Topics include the results of clinical trials, new diagnostic and surgical techniques, treatment methods technology assessments, translational science reviews and editorials.

Specific Ingredients That Senior Citizens Should Look For In A Multivitamin by Michael Walters

October 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Specific Ingredients That Senior Citizens Should Look For In A Multivitamin

Senior citizens require a different mixture of ingredients in their multivitamins. These multivitamins are geared towards them using a unique combination of important vitamins and the question is whether or not others should use it as well.

Naturally, those multivitamins are beefed up, due in large part to a senior citizen’s far more substantial needs than say, a young adult male. This is why some people are actually considering using them even though they’re not in that demographic.

That doesn’t mean you have to exclusively go for multivitamins targeted at the elderly. There are premium natural multivitamins out there that provide the same levels of health benefits that the elderly targeted alternatives would.

Multivitamins are important for the elderly because they make sure that they don’t end up nutritionally deficient. Young people can get away with not taking multivitamins.

Anti-oxidants are something you should also get in your multivitamins. Flavonoids and carotenoids are other things that should also be in it. There’s more to multivitamins that just, well, the vitamins. There are things that synergize with vitamins that make them doubly effective, if not more.

The internet helped me immensely when I was studying these facts myself. I dug through so many websites as I learned more. That means that you can learn more things about multivitamins without working too hard on it. As for me, I spent a lot of time on it.

Your health is important. The healthier you are, the more comfortable you will be in your twilight of your life. Doctors and scientists around the world have been struggling to make sure that life is more than about just living longer – it’s about living better as well as longer.

So many people could have had one more year if only they took care of themselves. You should take care of yourself.

This author frequently posts his thoughts on electronics like cheap computer speakers and computer speaker cable.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Michael_Walters

How to Take Care of a Senior Citizen in the Family – Some Do’s and Don’ts by Ruma Sen

September 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Expert Author Ruma Sen

Although the idea may sound quaint to some, having a senior citizen in your home is something unavoidable. Yes, it is burdensome. Yes, it means having frayed nerves. Yes, it means sacrificing your privacy. Yes, you should not expect any pay-back from your elderly parents…this is their time in the sun.

From the outset,let me explain, that there is no one who will understand the problems faced by the family when an elderly person is a permanent resident, unless he/she too is in a similar position. Elders grow even older, and with increasing age comes unexpected blows, in the form of health issues, visits to doctors, and mounting medical bills. Realize that no one from the extended family or even the closer family members will be there to pitch in. It’s a fact of life….no one wants to INVITE trouble!

Most articles on Senior Citizen care lay stress on the fact that it is an honourable task that you have undertaken, to look after an old person. Few go on to explain what measures you can take to avoid those inevitable moments of depression, craziness, and having the blues, whilst you’re at the job.

Being a seasoned caretaker of a permanent live-in elderly in-law for the past two decades, I can only say this: forget your Ego, forget your cravings for instant happiness and impulsive actions. Look at the long term benefits only. Do you really want to ignore an old person’s problems by staying away and pretending to have fun? In that case, you are only playing with fire. With their lack of presence of mind, the family elder may either leave the house premises, and roam unattended, or leave the gas or geyser on, leading to gravely dangerous situations.

Be kind to the elderly, even though it may raise your hackles at times. Remember, their insensitivity and memory losses are something beyond their understanding or intention. Sometimes, the elderly get violent…handle the situation appropriately. Nowadays there are n number of forums, support groups etc who cater to specific problems involved in caring for the elderly.

Here are some pointers to follow at home, in the event of having an elderly person to take care of.

 

  1. Do keep your house well-ventilated, clean and dust-free.
  2. Try keeping the bathrooms of the elderly clean and DRY, to avoid cases of slipping.
  3. Provide ample reading material and interesting things to do, customized to suit the individual.
  4. Music is a great mood elevator; keep music of their generation easily accessible, with simple to operate music systems.
  5. Constant reminders are needed for the elderly; sometimes they react negatively to such instructions. Be prepared to face bouts of anger.
  6. Keep a doctor’s number, an ambulance number handy.
  7. Inform all the people living around your house about the elderly relative you are looking after. This will help avoid situations in which you will feel flustered.
  8. Keep all medicines out of their reach, and administer medicine in your presence.
  9. Employ a part-time help at home in cases where you feel helpless.
  10. Try to involve them in family outings and fun.
  11. Make them feel respected, loved and wanted. This is an uphill task, as the next generation has no patience to communicate with the elderly.
  12. Keep all the financial support ready. This may be in the form of medical insurance, pensions, savings and other schemes. One never knows when an emergency situation requiring a sudden lumpsum of money may arise.
  13. Make them carry some form of an identity on their person if they happen to be going out for a walk, by themselves.

 

Lastly, do pay attention to their diet.

It finally does not matter whether the senior citizen you are looking after happens to be an in-law or your own parent. In both cases, remember you are dealing with aging problems, and this is not an easy task. It calls for a lot of patience on your part. And when I say Patience, I mean patience! Try not to shout and express your feelings of disgust, anger, and rage: even though these might feelings may be uppermost on your mind.

Balance your own life out by reading, meditation, having friends over, or going out for a break. A strong family bond will ensure that the stressful moments will be counterbalanced with relaxed ones. Lastly, always boost yourself up by reminding yourself that the present situation could have been worse!

This article is an original one. The contents have been garnered from various sources, online, books and real life experiences. In case the reader wishes to add any new dimension to this, I would welcome it.
http://rumasen77.wordpress.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ruma_Sen

Treat them like a person, not a patient

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Treat them like a person, not a patient

New living systems developmental model of care shifts the focus of treating Alzheimer’s disease and other debilitating illnesses

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. – Donald H. Ford observed that advanced Alzheimer’s patients, like his mother-in-law, are typically bored and lonely, and often depressed, frightened or angry.  His professional knowledge convinced him it didn’t have to be that way.  When Alzheimer’s struck his wife, he created a scientifically based alternative form of Alzheimer’s care that enabled her to still have a satisfying life.
Ford shares this revolutionary plan he used with his wife, Carol in the new book Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey: Treat Them Like a Person, Not a Patient. He is an experienced psychology professional and developed a living systems developmental model for care that incorporates an individual’s humanity. It helps patients live a meaningful and pleasurable life, despite their limitations. Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey is a guide for caregivers of senior citizens with serious limitations to improve their care receivers’ quality of life.
“Traditional medical model caregiving focuses on what’s wrong with a person and tries to fix it. However, when what is wrong can’t be fixed, the caregiver can’t succeed and that’s discouraging,” Ford says. “In Our developmental model of care, the focus is on what the person can still do and on designing experiences from which they get satisfaction.”
As people continue to gain more awareness of Alzheimer’s disease and other seriously debilitating diseases, plans like the model in Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey become more relevant. Based on his professional research, Ford believes that a person always functions as an integrated unit, so a model was needed that combined the biological, psychological, behavioral, social and contextual aspects of a person’s patterns of behavior when planning for elder care. Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey asks society to adopt the view that it is not enough to focus on keeping senior citizens alive and “warehousing them” until they die.
Ford’s plan in Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey is a person-centered quality of care focus.  It replaces the traditional medical emphasis on what is wrong with the person with a positive emphasis on using their remaining capabilities to create a satisfying life, despite limitations.

 

Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey: Treat Them Like a Person, Not a Patient
By Donald H. Ford
ISBN: 978-1-3008-0321-8 (sc); 978-1-3009-9178-6 (e)
Softcover, $26.55
Ebook, $8.99
Approximately 564 pages
Available at www.LuLu.com, www.amazon.com and www.barnesandnoble.com.

 

About the author
Donald H. Ford earned a Bachelor of Science, Master of Science and doctorate degrees in mathematics and psychology from KansasState and PennsylvaniaStateUniversities.  He spent the first 10 years of his career creating a new kind of psychological and developmental services program at PennState for students and their families.  Then PennState asked him to create a new kind of college called Health and Human Development.  It stimulated other universities to develop similar colleges.  After 10 years as Dean, he resigned and returned to his first love of teaching, scholarly and professional work.  He published seven books about psychotherapy and human development.

How Senior Citizens Can Stay In Shape by Mark Warrington

August 21, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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senior-exercise-2

As we grow older, our bodies undergo many changes. And not all of those changes are good ones. Our bones go weak, our muscles sag and our strength walks out on us. It’s something that we cannot avoid but there is a way to slow down the aging process and that is with exercise. Almost 85 percent of senior citizens fail to exercise regularly even though they know the importance of it. And the reason for that is almost the same as the one younger people have. That being exercise is too tiring, too hard or it takes too long for the results to show. It’s also a problem for older people being at the gym because of the younger people around them. And honestly, we all have our insecurities and when we’re older, being around a lot of younger people doesn’t help out. So, if you’re part of this age group and you want to stay fit, you can start working out at home instead.

The first thing older people need to consider is what exercises they should do. The number one exercise for seniors are cardio exercises. Cardio exercises can help keep the heart healthy. Walking, swimming and bike riding are the recommended exercises for seniors. If you don’t have a pool at home, 2 out of 3 isn’t bad. You can get a treadmill and a stationary bike to get the exercise you need. The next best exercise is strength training with the help of some dumbbells. As we grow older, our muscles grow weaker and they actually shrink. Doing strength exercises can help with preventing this because muscles that are frequently used decline slower. It is critical that before you do any of these exercises that consult your doctor so they could give you a recommendation.

If you’re ready to start working out at home, the next thing to do is to get the equipment you need. Before you get them though, you have to look out for some things. Since seniors are not as strong, the equipment needs to have soft steps or cushions for some equipments such as a treadmill. For dumbbells, you can get those that are made of rubber so it would be safer in case it’s dropped.

Before you start, make sure that you have someone to workout with, if necessary. This person not only ensures that you’re safe, they can also encourage you. It’s just like being in the gym with a trainer except you don’t have to deal with that many people and with that noise which irritates some older people easily making their exercises more uncomfortable. Don’t forget to do some stretching as well as this helps with your flexibility which is also important to keep your joints healthy.

Exercise is good for everyone, young or old. We just have to remember that old saying, no pain, no gain. Go ahead and make a fresh start tomorrow. Don’t be aged, be ageless.

Over at the FitnessArmory.com, you can let our expert advice on fitness and equipment reviews help you create the perfect home gym but without all the huge costs. We have the exclusive reviews on all your favorite brands and models to help you get in shape, get healthy and look great. Recent product reviews include: HealthRider H90THealthRider H95E. We invite you to stop by or drop us a line if you have any questions or need help with your fitness equipment selections.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mark_Warrington

In an Aging Society – Are Senior Citizens Driving Safely? by Diane Carbo

August 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Remember when you couldn’t wait until you were old enough to drive. Getting a driver’s license gave us an opportunity to experience a new freedom we did not have before. For those of us with two parents working, driving meant taking ourselves and our siblings to after school activities and work. Driving took us to a level of independence that we had not experienced before. In an aging society of drivers, those very same feelings exist in many today. Driving gives us a sense of independence and freedom, the ability to go out and socialize, go to work or to church. Safety issues are a concern as many move into the golden years. The life expectancy of seniors is increasing. There are more active senior citizens out on the road today than ever before. Since we all age differently, many aging adults, can drive into their seventies and eighties. As we age, the risks for having a serious car accident that requires hospitalization rises. Statistics show that fatal car accidents rise after the age of seventy.

If you know an aging adult driver who is experiencing difficulty with driving, it is important to carefully monitor the situation. This article can help you determine whether you should take steps to encourage the senior to stop driving.

An aging society and risk

Some key risk factors that affect our aging society are:

Vision declines affecting depth perception and ability to judge speed of oncoming traffic. Night vision becomes a problem as our eyes loose the ability to process light. By age 60, you need three times the amount of light that you did at age 20 in order to drive safely after nightfall. We also become more sensitive to bright light and glare. Signs and road markings can be difficult to see.

With age, flexibility may decrease as response time increases. A full range of motion is crucial on the road. Turning your head both ways to see oncoming traffic, moving both hands and feet can be difficult for those with chronic conditions such a rheumatoid arthritis, or Parkinson’s disease, heart disease and diabetes.

Older adults in an aging society will often need to begin to take medications. Certain medications, as well as a combination of medications and alcohol, can increase driving risk. Be aware and careful about medication side-effects and interactions between medications. It is important to talk to your pharmacist to be aware of interactions that could affect your driving safely. Some medications cause drowsiness.

Aging affects our quality of sleep, resulting in daytime sleepiness. Falling asleep at the wheel is a major concern for those that dose off during the day.

The beginning of dementia or mental impairment can make driving more dangerous. A decreased mental capacity or decrease tolerance to stressful driving situations such as complex and confusing intersections may cause delayed reactions to sudden or confusing situations on the road. An aging brain and body does not have the same response time as we did when we were younger.

Look for warning signs

There are multiple warning signs that an aging adult is becoming or is an unsafe driver. Some of them are small, but if there are multiple concerns it may be time to talk about your concerns with the aging driver. Warning signs of an unsafe driver include

 

  • Abrupt lane changes, braking, or acceleration.
  • Increase in the dents and scrapes on the car or on fences, mailboxes, garage doors, curbs, etc
  • Trouble reading signs or navigating directions to get somewhere
  • Range-of-motion issues (looking over the shoulder, moving the hands or feet, etc.)
  • Becoming anxious or fearful while driving or feeling exhausted after driving
  • Experiencing more conflict on the road: other drivers honking; frustration or anger at other drivers. Oblivious to the frustration of other drivers towards them
  • Getting lost more often
  • Trouble paying attention to signals, road signs, pavement markings, or pedestrians
  • Slow reaction to changes in the driving environment
  • Increased traffic tickets or “warnings” by traffic or law enforcement officers
  • Forgetting to put on a safety belt

 

If you are concerned about an aging adult driver, closely monitor their driving before deciding whether they need a refresher coarse on their driving skills or approaching them to give up their driver’s license altogether. Ongoing and open communication is important to addressing the issue of driving. Studies conducted by Harvard and MIT show that while most drivers preferred to discuss the issue with their spouse, doctor or adult children (in that order), this is not the case for everyone. The right person may not necessarily be the most forceful or outspoken one, but rather someone whose judgment and empathy are especially trusted by the driver.

Talk with other family members, your doctor, and close friends to determine the best person for “the conversation.” Remember driving signifies independence, freedom and being self sufficient to active senior citizens. Realize you may meet with resistance and the aging driver may become defensive. Emotion may get in the way of a rational conversation. Express your concerns and give specific reasons for those concerns.

The goal is to get the aging driver be part of the decision making process

You may begin by asking your loved one to make some concessions because of your concerns.

 

  • Taking a driver refresher course
  • Not driving at night
  • Suggest they not drive on busy thoroughfares or during rush hour
  • Taking shorter trips
  • Not driving under adverse weather conditions
  • Encourage a visit to their primary care physician or pharmacist to go over medications that may affect driving skills. Your physician may be able to recommend a Driver Rehabilitation Specialist. This individual can assess driving safety by an office exam and driving test and make recommendations regarding special equipment or techniques that can improve the driver’s safety. Consider ways to decrease the need to drive. Check out alternatives to shopping by car, including:

  • Arrange for home deliveries of groceries and other goods, and try to arrange for home visits by clergy, medical and personal care providers, and government service providers.
  • Use financial services that don’t require bank visits, like automatic bill paying, direct deposit, and bank-by-phone or on-line banking services.

Fears of those living in an aging society 

Fear of isolation and decrease in socializing is a real concern for the aging driver. It is important to keep spirits high as the aging driver makes the adjustments to becoming a non driver. Be in tune to their need for fun, volunteering, work and religious activities. Create a transportation plan that can make it easier for the aging driver to give up driving. You can create a list of friends and family that are willing to drive, contact the church and the local Area Agency on Aging in regards to transportation programs in the area.

Some seniors may adjust better if they can keep their own car, but have others drive them. Their own car may feel more comfortable and familiar, and the sense of loss from not driving may be lessened. Remember, baby boomers have grown up walking out the door and being able to go where they want to go. We need to keep the aging adult driver and those on the road with them safe.

Diane Carbo RN- As a geriatric care manager, that has cared for her father and mother in law in their homes, she learned first hand how overwhelming, stressful, and time consuming caring for a loved one can be. Staying in their homes was very important to them. As a result, Diane started http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com to assist others age in familiar surroundings and avoid the emotional and frustrating task of maneuvering the medical delivery system

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

A Senior Citizen In Juvenile Hall by Eva Fry

August 9, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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It was my first time speaking at Juvenile Hall, I was terrified! I had seen enough movies to know I didn’t want to be there. As I hurried through the metal detectors, and pushed through the big metal doors, my heart was pounding and I was filled with fear. I wondered if I would get out of this place alive.

I passed the holding tanks, rooms with big windows containing kids who had just been arrested. In there were kids pacing, fighting addictions, fearfully waiting to be assigned to a unit. Some kids were right at home. They knew this place! They had been there before.

When I stepped into the inner sanctum I heard sounds that confirmed my fears. Angry kids were screaming, using profane language. I heard loud pounding on the doors, which dotted the narrow hallways. Juvenile inmates were communicating through the thick cement walls. As I scurried along, I saw empty eyes piercing out at me through the small, eye level windows of their rooms. I passed through more metal doors and hallways, until I came to the unit I was to speak in. Inside sat fifty young men, of all nationalities. I knew from their varying hair color. Their backs were toward me. They were juveniles from the age of 15 to 17.

As I slowly walked to the front of the room, I made sure there was a guard on either side, in case one of them grabbed me. I took a deep breath and turned toward them. My heart stopped! I was shocked! They were just kids! I expected them to look like criminals, but they looked like they could be one of my nine grandkids.

Although some did appear tough, and others rough, there was something about them that touched me. At that moment, my life changed! A still small voice inside me said, “you must try to help them!”

Thus began my continuing, nine-year mission, to help kids who are in trouble with the law. These are my kids. “The Forgotten Kid.” The children we think we can lock up, throw away the key, and forget. The ones who learned most of the bad things they have done, from us, the older generation. They are kids, paying the price for the sins of society. Our scapegoats

There are up to 600 kids locked up, in this facility, at any time. The Hall houses kids from the age of 10 to 18, although I saw a nine-year and ten-year-old carrying blankets and pillows. Were they going camping?
No! They were headed to their rooms, to be locked up, for armed robbery.

BE A WINNER IN LIFE IS MY PROGRAM. I help the kids believe they can still be WINNERS. I teach them they have potential to do amazing things with their life. In fact, I believe God sent them to this earth to do good with their lives. I tell them each one is a genius, in their own way, and can do something better than anyone else can do. They must find their genius. They must go to school, obey the law, obey their parents, be honest and work hard. My goal is to share with them the same truths I taught my kids: the basic truths of right and wrong.

I hope to support the parents who are good parents, but their kids got on the wrong track. I try to teach the ones with bad parents, or no parents, values they were never taught: basic principals of good and bad.

How did I start speaking at Juvenile Hall? It began a long time ago, when I was a little girl, the daughter of an alcoholic father who emotionally damaged my mother and us kids. I grew up in circumstances similar to some of these young wards.

I speak to them because I would have loved to have had someone, who cared, talk to me when I was young.

Some of these kids, like me, are the off spring of parents who didn’t care how their actions affected their kids. We were from homes full of contention caused by parents with addictions. Sick parents who were unable to control their own lives, let alone parent a child. So-called parents, who lived in their own hell and created havoc in the lives of their children. Parents who abandoned their kids.

When I talk to the kids, I relate to the ones who hope to fix their parents, and those who must care for their siblings. I relate because I remember pouring my Dad’s alcohol down the drain, thinking it would fix our problems but instead, I got myself into lots of trouble. I remember taking money from my Dad’s pocket, after he passed out, to give to my Mom. Money for food.

I remember the day I realized that whatever I did at home would change nothing. I would never have the loving family I longed for. Like many of these kids, I turned to friends for the family I needed. Like them, they were usually the wrong kids of friends, peers who were doing bad things. I remember drinking alcohol, even though I hated it, so I could fit in.

I hear my same story, over and over again, at Juvenile Hall.

To help them I share a profound truth, which I discovered in my young life. “Bad things happen for a reason!”

My bad thing: after a wasted life, at the age of 57, my Dad died an alcoholic. His drink of choice was 100% over proof rum. The good thing: My Dad’s death led to me realize I didn’t want to end up like him, or give my kids the life he gave me. I eventually made a commitment to stop drinking and change my life. Thankfully I was young and not an alcoholic, like my Father and Grandfather.

My commitment worked! I share with them how wonderfully my life has turned out, because of one small choice. I used my Dad’s mistakes to choose a better life for myself. I now have the life I dreamed about. My husband and I have been happily married for 45 years and with our children and grandchildren, are a close knit, happy, non-drinking family.

I tell them, “you can turn the bad things which have happened in your life into motivation for a better life too.” I help them believe they still have time to change.

Another reason I speak at Juvenile Hall is because I was a victim of a drunk driver. At the age of 17, the car I was riding in was hit head-on by a drunk driver. My head went through the windshield. My nose and part of my ear was torn off. Thankfully doctors put me back together, but I came to realize the terrible carnage alcohol could cause. I’ve had a mission all my life to teach the evils of alcohol use. I was a speaker for Mother’s Against Drunk Driving for several years. In fact, they were the ones who first sent me to speak at Juvenile Hall.

I teach the kids to abstain from alcohol and drugs. I have commitment cards, which I encourage them to sign and honor. I know if I can help them make a commitment not to drink alcohol, or use drugs; they will have a better chance at changing their lives and reaching their potential. They don’t need alcohol or drugs in their life. Most of the kids are locked up because of their first drink of alcohol, which lead to drug use and criminal behavior.

One of the questions people always ask me is “what is it like to talk to young criminals? Do they listen to you?”

My answer is, “at first it took a little time to know what to say and how to say it, so they would accept me. It took me time to overcome my fear of knowing how to communicate with them and have them accept me.”

One night, one of them asked, “why do you come to Juvenile Hall?” I answered, “why do you think?” His response, “for the money!” I replied, “no one pays me, in fact the first time I spoke, someone stole the hub caps from my car.” His mouth fell open and then he really listened to my program.

I’m happy to say I do very well with them! The kids are very attentive. They know I care. I don’t judge them. In most cases, I don’t know what their crime is. I don’t want to know. I tell them that what they have done is wrong and they must pay the price. On the other hand, I hope to stop them from getting deeper into crime. If I can stop them from hurting someone in the future, I feel my time is worthwhile.

I know I won’t get through to all of them, but I hope to plant seeds, which may take root someday when they have choices to make. My dream is to save as many as I can.

It is very gratifying when I feel I have gotten through to them and when they thank me. One boy said. “You told me bad things happen for a reason. Your right!” I never would have gotten an education if I hadn’t come to Juvenile Hall. I just got my GED. I applied to a college and was accepted. I will be going to school to be come an engineer when I get out.”

I am happy when I feel I have helped them look at life in a more positive way.

I try to help them turn their mistakes and bad experiences into something good. My greatest success is that I encourage the kids at Juvenile Hall to write letters to save other kids from the consequences they are experiencing. They have written incredible letters. Their letters have great impact on other kids because they come from their peers. My latest book “Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids contain the letters.

Here are inserts from some of the letters:

Addiction controlled my life. Don’t let it control you! I wish for all you guys to be safe, and I pray for you kids that don’t know what life is really about, because after that second when you make the bad decision, it goes down hill from there. Only you can change your future. I hope you all understand that there’s a number in prison with your name on it, if you don’t change. Now’s the time to change. Not later. Not when you get out, but now! If you don’t change now you never will.

Gang banging was my worst thing I ever gotten into. If I could take it back, I would. I repeated my Dad’s cycle.

Now I sit here in a one-room cell, facing 25 years to life. I want you to look around and see what kind of situation you’re in. Open you eyes and your minds and soak as much education as you can. I’m 17 years old in a couple of weeks. I will be graduating from high school (in Juvenile Hall). Education is the key to life.

I’m in the Hall, Unit 800. Why? Because I committed a sin while I was on drugs. At the age of 13, I started using drugs because my best friend was asking me to try some. At the age of 16, my charges are DUI, evading a peace officer, driving at an unsafe speed with no license, a firearm in the car and 187 murder.

All the violence that is going on in our community is not solving nothing. The only thing it’s doing is killing us off, one by one. Before you know it the human race will be extinct. Because we are the last of the dying breed. I’m only telling you this so you guys can make the right decision. Your homies probably say they are down for you, but they be faking, and that’s real. The only people that’s going to stick by you is your mama and your family. I seen too much in my life young homies and it’s not what you are thinking. I lost my little homie and that really hit me. All that was on my mind was retaliation but when I thought about it, I knew it wouldn’t bring him back so I thought of another game plan. I prayed!

Eva, I want to thank you for all the help that you have given me. All the little words you’ve spoken in your groups have helped me so much along the way. I have changed in ways that people wouldn’t believe. I have done a whole 360. Without the help of you, I see the change being 100% more difficult. I wish my family was around to see my new life.

As you can see, my experience with my kids, at Juvenile Hall, has been emotionally rewarding and very satisfying to me. These kids give my life meaning. I feel I am making a difference.

I continue to try to help kids. I have written a book called “BE A WINNER IN LIFE”, which I hope to get into the hands of every child in Juvenile Hall’s, all over the country. Also, I want to get it into the hands of parents. I hope to get to kids before they are locked up.

Yes I’m a grateful to be a senior citizen at Juvenile Hall! I’m grateful my senior years have value and that I am doing something with my time, which is worthwhile.

I now know that every senior citizen can use the wisdom they have gained throughout their life to make a difference. We can all do something. I encourage you to find a way to help a child. Our kids need you!

Eva Fry is an author, singer/songwriter and motivational speaker. She had a ten year volunteer program at Juvenile Hall called “Be a Winner in Life” She has three books “You Must Have a Dream” for seniors, “Be a Winner in Life” for kids, troubled kids and their parents, and Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids” – for all kinds, especially those who are locked up and to help kids from being locked up. She started writing and songwriting at the age of 60. Her goal is to encourage seniors to reach their potential and help kids do the same. She has many free articles on her web site to help young and old. She has six CD’s which are spiritually based and inspire young and old. She is avilable as a speaker or performer. Her work is available on her web site Eva Fry – eva@evafry.com http://www.evafry.com ( She has many free articles on her web site)

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eva_Fry

Recovering from Hip Replacement Surgery

August 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Recovering from Hip Replacement Surgery

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One of the most complex joints in the human body is the hip. In order for the thighbone to move smoothly and normally in the socket, the body must have healthy cartilage and adequate joint fluid.

Disruption of this system — disintegrating cartilage, fluid imbalance, fractures, etc. — can cause the joint to swell, bringing severe pain and stiffness that makes daily activities and work almost impossible. Osteoarthritis, overuse of the joint, injury and other medical conditions can cause these problems.

Treatment Options

If physical therapy and medication do not control hip pain or improve mobility, doctors may consider one of two surgical options. One treatment is hip resurfacing, a procedure that caps the ball of the joint with a metal prosthesis and replaces the socket. The other treatment option is hip replacement, a procedure that replaces the original joint with an artificial one.

Hip Replacement Surgery and Complications

Hip replacement surgery is a very serious procedure that requires a lot of preparation on the patient’s end. In addition, it is important that recovery plans and follow-up treatment are tailored carefully to the needs of the patient to ensure safe and effective healing. Without a proper recovery plan, complications and additional surgeries could follow.

The most common complications from hip replacement surgery are infection and blood clots. To reduce the risk of infection, patients are usually given antibiotics after surgery. To prevent blood clots, health care providers may choose medication and/or physical therapy.

Some patients experience complications with the hip implants themselves. Implants with two or more metal parts, including some made by manufacturers Biomet and DePuy, can lead to metal poisoning and other severe complications. Zimmer manufactures the Durom Cup, which can come loose and cause serious pain. Patients need to contact their surgeon right away if they have any serious complications after hip surgery.

Recovery

After hip replacement surgery, it is important to do mild strengthening exercises, such as contracting and releasing the leg muscles, and short pumps of the ankles. However, patients must limit the movement of their hips. Exercises should be initially performed with a physical therapist, and then at home after proper instruction has been given.

Patients should plan ahead to have family and/or friends assist them at home for at least the first week or two after hip replacement. In addition, patients will not be allowed to drive for up to four weeks and will need to plan transportation to doctor appointments, physical therapy and the grocery store.

After hip replacement, patients should avoid using lotions or oils on the hip area, especially around or near the incision. Keeping the area dry is important in order for the incision area to heal properly. Within one to two months, physical activities and daily routines should start to return to normal, however, these activities should be resumed gradually to avoid falls and other injuries that might damage the hip again.

Slow walks with leverage from a crutch or cane can be helpful during recovery. Patients should avoid steps, hills and slopes. Routine visits to the physician should occur at three, six and 12 weeks, as well as six and 12 months after surgery.

 

Jennifer Mesko is the managing editor of Drugwatch.com. She keeps the public informed about the latest medical news, recalls and FDA warnings.

Convenience and Product Selection Encourage More People to Manage Incontinence Online, Parentgiving.com Survey Reveals

July 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Convenience and Product Selection Encourage More People to Manage Incontinence Online, Parentgiving.com Survey Reveals

For the first time in its five-year history, the senior wellness site Parentgiving.com conducted an opinion survey on incontinence, reaching out to nearly 5,000 of its customers who shop for self-care products in this category. The focus was to learn how people best cope with incontinence and if a greater awareness about it as a medical issue has erased its stigma and prompted more people to talk to their doctors about treatment. Respondents were also asked to share both their frustrations and their strategies for maintaining quality of life.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130724/PH51806LOGO)

Results show that progress is being made. Slightly over 70 percent have talked to their healthcare provider about incontinence—many of them are taking or have tried medications, and a few have had surgical procedures.

But nearly 30 percent of respondents have still not sought medical attention. Reasons are varied. A few people still feel too embarrassed to bring it up, even in front of a doctor, while some assume it’s just a normal part of old age (it’s not!) or don’t know that there are treatments that might help. Others say they have more life-threatening medical issues, from diabetes to stroke recovery, that take precedence when they’re at the doctor’s office. For a few, the possibility of yet another medication to add to their existing regimen would be financially out of the question.

More Key Points From the Parentgiving Survey

* Fear of accidents is the top concern.
Two-thirds of respondents ranked this as their number one worry. The lack of product selection came in second at 21%. People want more product choices, which will, in turn, help them feel more secure about avoiding accidents.

* Online is the way people want to buy products.
Nearly 46% buy products online where they can get the widest selection and have anonymity.

* Absorbency is the key feature in choosing products.
An overwhelming 81% ranked this first. Information on a product’s absorbency should be front and center on product descriptions, say the respondents. Comfort ranked second and the ability to buy a product online ranked a strong third at 36%, above both cost and anatomical design of items.

* Many people are satisfied with their incontinence products. In fact, 40% are very satisfied. However 44% are only somewhat satisfied—there’s room for better education about products to help people find those that are more effective for them and the respondents had numerous suggestions for incontinence product manufacturers to improve styles.

For complete survey results, go to http://www.parentgiving.com/elder-care/incontinence-survey-results/. There is also a companion article, “Survey Says: 50 Top Strategies for Managing Incontinence,” featuring respondents’ experiences and suggestions at http://www.parentgiving.com/elder-care/survey-says-50-top-strategies-for-managing-incontinence/. For more information, please contact Julie Davis, Chief Content Officer at 203-984-4424 or email.

About Parentgiving. Parentgiving.com is the online destination dedicated to the health and wellness needs of seniors and their caregivers. A comprehensive website, Parentgiving offers hundreds of informative articles on eldercare, plus Q&As with experts on healthy aging. The Parentgiving Store sells find thousands of products from medical supplies to practical tools for the activities of daily living. Everything can be ordered by phone or online with fast shipping right to the senior. For more information please visit www.Parentgiving.com or follow us on Twitter.

Eyes are the Window to Your Soul and Health!

July 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Eyes are the Window to Your Soul and Health!

DADE CITY, FLORIDA – (July 22, 2013) – According to the World Health Organization, in high-income countries two-thirds of people live beyond the age of seventy and predominately die of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive lung disease, cancers, diabetes or dementia. If caught early on, some of these health issues are treatable and preventable.

“70 percent of the neurological system is linked to the eye,” affirms Dr. Kondrot, founder of Healing the Eye & Wellness Center and the world’s leading ophthalmologist. “The correspondence between your eyes and your health is extremely insightful. When part of your body is failing or not working properly, oftentimes your eyes reflect that.”

The National Eye Institute states that approximately 4,195,000 people in the United States suffer from some form of vision impairment and 7,685,000 have diabetic retinopathy. Here are five health issues that produce symptoms in the eye:

  • High Blood Pressure: hypertension can cause damage to the blood vessels in the retina, known as hypertensive retinopathy. The damage can be serious if left untreated.
  • Liver disease: one of the symptoms of liver disease is jaundice, the discoloring of the skin and whites of the eyes due to the high levels of bile the blood stream.
  • Stroke: the damage the stroke does in the brain impacts the visual pathways of the eye, which can result in blurry vision, double vision, moving images, loss of visual field, and sensitivity to light.
  • Nutritional deficiency: a lack of vitamin A can lead to night blindness.
  • Alzheimer’s Disease: some individuals suffering from Alzheimer’s also experience a decline in vision such as motion blindness, contrast sensitivity, or a lack of depth or color perception.

“Your eyes are a complex organ and any diseases that one sees in your eye is most likely occurring somewhere else in your body,” adds Dr. Kondrot, “It is essential to maintain periodic visits to your eye doctor and live a healthy lifestyle to prevent and treat these health issues before it’s too late.”

Dr. Kondrot is the author of three best-selling books, including “10 Essentials to Save Your Sight” (Advantage Media Group, July 2012), and president of the Arizona Homeopathic and Integrative Medical Association. He has founded the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center, located just north of Tampa, Fla., which offers alternative and homeopathic routes to vision therapies known as the “Kondrot Program.” The program focuses on such conditions as macular degeneration, glaucoma, dry eye, cataracts, and others. His advanced programs have helped people from around the world restore their vision. The center sits on 50 acres of land and features a 14,000-square-foot state-of-the art complex, an organic ranch, jogging trails, swimming pool, hot tub, and more. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

About Health The Eye & Wellness Center

The Healing The Eye & Wellness Center is located 30 miles north of Tampa, in Dade City, FL. Founded by Dr. Edward Kondrot, the Center offers world-class alternative therapies for vision conditions, including color and vision therapy, the treatment of glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration, dry eye, and more. The center also offers a variety of seminars, webinars, and training sessions for others in the medical community. Dr. Kondrot is the world’s only board-certified ophthalmologist and board-certified homeopathic physician. He is also author of three best-selling books in the field. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

Source:

World Health Organization. The Top 10 Causes of Death.http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs310/en/index2.html

National Eye Institute. Prevalence of Adult Vision Impairment and Age-Related Eye Diseases in America.http://www.nei.nih.gov/eyedata/adultvision_usa.asp

Sunscreen on Your Feet?

July 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Sunscreen on Your Feet?
Doctors Urge Sunscreen Use and Exams to Prevent Skin Cancer on Feet

CHICAGO—July 8, 2013 Many people do not think about their feet when applying sunscreen, but did you know that the skin on your feet is highly susceptible to melanoma and other forms of skin cancer? The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) warns that skin cancer of the foot is prevalent and can even be fatal if not caught early.

While all types of skin cancer, including squamous cell and basal cell carcinoma, can be found on the foot, the most common is the most serious form, melanoma. Symptoms can be as subtle as an abnormal-looking mole or freckle found anywhere on the foot, and often go unnoticed without routine foot exams.

The foot and ankle surgeons of ACFAS offer these tips to keep your feet safe this summer:

  • Lather up with sunscreen from head to toe—literally—when at the pool or beach to protect your skin from the harmful rays of the sun.
  • Check your feet and toes regularly for symptoms such as an abnormal-looking mole or freckle anywhere on the foot – even under toenails and on your soles.
  • Look for moles or freckles that change in size or shape. If you notice anything suspicious, promptly schedule an appointment with your foot and ankle specialist to have the mark examined.
  • Schedule routine exams with your foot and ankle specialist so he or she can keep track of suspicious, changing marks.

According to Boston foot and ankle surgeon Thanh Dinh, DPM, FACFAS, early diagnosis is key to effective treatment for the condition. But because people aren’t looking for the early warning signs or taking the same precautions they do for other areas of the body, often times skin cancer in this region is not diagnosed until later stages.

For more information on skin cancer of the foot or other foot and ankle health information, visit the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeon’s patient education website, FootHealthFacts.org,

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The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of over 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons. Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research, provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its patient education website, FootHealthFacts.org.

THE BOULEVARD MALL HOSTS HEALTH AND FITNESS FAIR

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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THE BOULEVARD MALL HOSTS HEALTH AND FITNESS FAIR

Nearly 25 local vendors to provide free services and information on Saturday, June 29

 

WHAT:            The Boulevard Mall, in partnership with Las Vegas Review Journal, El Tiempo, Mundo Fox TV, La Buena and ESPN Deportes hosts a Boulevard Mall Health and Fitness Fair on Saturday, June 29 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event is planned to occur annually to provide the public with convenient access to a variety of health and wellness resources in the community.

The Fair includes a variety of free services and information, such as health screenings and workshops.  Participating vendors include; American Heart & Stroke Association, American Lung Association in Nevada, Behavioral Bilingual Services, CareMore Medicare Advantage Program, First Person Care Clinics, Health and Wellness, Helping Kids Clinic, Kopolow & Girisgen, Doctors of Optometry, Nathan Adelson Hospice, Nevada Donor Network Inc., Nevada Health Centers, Nevada State Immunization Program – NVWeblz, Planned Parenthood of Southern Nevada, Vitamin World, State of Nevada Office for Consumer Health Assistance, Sunrise Children Foundation WIC, Three Square and US Senator Harry Reid.

For additional information and a complete list of all participating organizations, please contact The Boulevard Mall Management office at 702-735-7430 or visit boulevardmall.com.

WHEN:           Saturday, June 29, 2013

                        11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

                       

WHERE:        The Boulevard Mall

                        East Event Area

3680 S. Maryland Parkway

Las Vegas, NV 89169

 

About The Boulevard Mall:

The Boulevard Mall is a super-regional shopping center strategically located in the heart of Las Vegas just two miles from the Las Vegas Strip. The Boulevard is located on Maryland Parkway, a six-lane thoroughfare with easy mall accessibility from all directions. Some of its notable retailers include JCPenney, Macy’s, Sears, Charlotte Russe, Old Navy, Cotton On and Victoria’s Secret. For additional information, please visit www.boulevardmall.com.

Ophthalmologists Warn that Fireworks-Related Injuries Can Cause Permanent Vision Loss

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Ophthalmologists Warn that Fireworks-Related Injuries Can Cause Permanent Vision Loss
American Academy of Ophthalmology and Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology urge parents to closely supervise children when around fireworks

LAS VEGAS – June 26, 2013 – As the Fourth of July holiday approaches and Americans make plans to celebrate the stars and stripes with a little red glare from celebratory rockets, the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology urge the public to take important steps to prevent fireworks-related eye injuries. The academies ask parents and other adults to be especially cautious when children are in the presence of fireworks.

Of the more than 9,000 fireworks injuries that occur in the United States each year, [I]approximately 45 percent are sustained by children age 15 and under.[II] Eyes are among the most injured body parts,[III] and one in six fireworks-related eye injuries results in permanent vision loss or blindness.[IV]

All fireworks are dangerous if not properly handled; however, sparklers cause the most injury and are particularly dangerous since many children handle them on their own. Sparklers typically burn at 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit. That temperature is nearly 1,000 degrees hotter than the boiling point of water, double the heat required to burn wood, hot enough to melt glass and cause third-degree burns to the skin.[V] Out-of-control bottle rockets also cause some of the most serious eye injuries, including corneal abrasions, traumatic cataract, retinal detachment, optic nerve damage and rupture of the eyeball – all of which can lead to potential blindness.

Both Academies advise the public that the best way to avoid potentially blinding injuries is to attend a professional public fireworks display instead of using consumer fireworks. For those who still decide to use legal consumer fireworks, the Academy recommends they follow these safety tips to prevent eye injuries:

  • Never handle fireworks without protective eyewear and ensure that all bystanders are also wearing eye protection.
  • Never let young children play with fireworks of any type. If older children are permitted to handle fireworks, ensure they are closely supervised by an adult and wear protective eyewear.
  • Clear the area of flammable materials and view fireworks from at least 500 feet away.
  • Leave the lighting of professional-grade fireworks to trained pyrotechnicians.

For those who attend professional fireworks displays and/or live in communities surrounding the shows:

  • Respect safety barriers at fireworks shows.
  • Do not touch unexploded display (show) fireworks; instead, immediately contact local fire or police departments to help.

“It’s vital that the public take seriously the dangers of using consumer fireworks. If mishandled, devastating injuries can occur – particularly to the eyes,” said Adam J. Rovit, M.D., president of the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology. “We urge parents and adults to be on high alert about these risks, especially if children are in the presence of fireworks, and take these safety measures to reduce the risk of eye injury.”

The Academy and the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology believe these tips can help to ensure safe Independence Day observances for everyone. If, however, a fireworks-related eye injury occurs, call 911 and seek medical help immediately. These injuries typically need advanced care by an ophthalmologist, a medical doctor who specializes in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

For more fireworks safety tips and additional information on how to maintain healthy vision, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology
The mission of the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology is to promote and advance the science and art of medical eye care. The Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology’s members are dedicated to treating and preventing eye diseases for all patients.  Learn more at Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide.  Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org.

About EyeSmart
The American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.orgto learn more.

###


[I] Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2011 Fireworks Annual Report, accessed at http://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/113888/2011fwreport.pdf

[II] Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Fireworks-Related Injuries to Children, accessed at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/108/1/190.full

Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2011 Fireworks Annual Report, accessed at http://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/113888/2011fwreport.pdf

[IV]  British Journal of Ophthalmology, Ocular firework trauma: a systematic review on incidence, severity, outcome and prevention, accessed athttp://bjo.bmj.com.proxy1.library.jhu.edu/content/94/12/1586.full#ref-11

[V] National Fireworks Protection Agency fireworks tips, accessed at http://www.nfpa.org/assets/files/pdf/public%20education/fireworkssafetytips.pdf

Headed to the Beach? Don’t Let Your Feet Ruin Your Vacation

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Headed to the Beach? Don’t Let Your Feet Ruin Your Vacation

CHICAGO—July 2, 2013 As millions of Americans hit the beach this summer, the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons offers these foot safety tips:

  • Wear shoes to protect your feet from puncture wounds and cuts. Sea shells, broken glass and other sharp objects when stepped on can ruin your day at the beach. Avoid the water if your skin gets cut – bacteria in oceans and lakes can cause infection. If you do suffer from a puncture wound, have it treated by a foot and ankle surgeon within 24 hours to avoid complications.
  • Feet get sunburned, too. Rare but deadly skin cancers, such as melanoma, can occur on the foot. Prevent skin cancer on your feet by lathering up with sunscreen. Don’t forget to apply to both the tops and bottoms of your feet!
  • Wear shoes to protect your soles from getting burned as you walk on blistering-hot sand, sidewalks and pavement. Take extra precaution if you have diabetes.
  • Be careful with your footing while playing beach sports such as Frisbee or volleyball – walking, jogging and playing sports on soft, uneven surfaces frequently leads to arch pain, heel pain, ankle sprains and other injuries. It’s best to wear supportive shoes while playing beach sports. If injuries occur, use rest, ice, compression and elevation to ease pain and swelling. Any injury that does not resolve within a few days should be examined by a foot and ankle surgeon.
  • Remember jellyfish stings can still occur even if it’s washed up on the beach. Remove any tentacles that may stick to the foot or ankle, and protect your hands. Vinegar, meat tenderizer or baking soda reduce pain and swelling. Most jellyfish stings heal within days, but if they don’t, see a doctor.
  • Diabetes Risks: People who have diabetes face serious foot safety risks at the beach. The disease causes poor blood circulation and numbness in the feet. A person with diabetes may not feel pain from a cut, puncture wound or burn. Any type of skin break on a diabetic foot has the potential to get infected and ulcerate if it isn’t noticed right away. People with diabetes should always wear shoes to the beach, and remove them regularly to check for foreign objects like sand and shells that can cause sores, ulcers and infections.

For more information on foot and ankle health, visit the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeon’s patient education page at FootHealthFacts.org.


About ACFAS

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of more than 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons. Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research and provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its consumer website, http://FootHealthFacts.org.

Health Insurance for Senior Citizens – How to Get the Best Rate by Brian Stevens

May 31, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As a senior citizen, you may find yourself in a health insurance crisis – no longer covered by an employer’s health insurance policy but needing health insurance more than you ever did before. Of course, Medicare covers some of your medical expenses, but how can you get the best rate on health insurance to cover the gaps Medicare leaves?

What Medicare Covers

Once you are 65 years old, you’re eligible to enroll in Medicare. Medicare can include several programs:

* Medicare Part A, which helps cover inpatient hospital care, nursing home care, hospice care, and some home health care. Most people pay for this coverage through taxes, so they do not pay a deductible or monthly premium.

* Medicare Part B, which helps cover doctors’ services, outpatient hospital care, medical equipment, physical and occupational therapy and some home health care. Most people pay an annual deductible and a monthly premium for this health plan.

* Medicare Part C, Medicare Advantage Plan, which offers you more choices among health plans and extends your benefits.

* Medicare Part D, prescription drug coverage.

In addition, you may need MediGap coverage, which is health insurance that covers what Medicare does not.

Affordable Health Insurance for Senior Citizens

As you can see, health insurance for senior citizens can be confusing. Fortunately, insurance comparison websites can help you gain a clear picture of what health insurance you need, as well as help you find that insurance at a reasonable rate.

All you need to do is go to an insurance comparison website and complete a simple form with information about yourself and your insurance needs. Once you submit the form, you will soon receive quotes for affordable health insurance from multiple A-rated insurance companies. And at the best insurance comparison websites, insurance professionals are standing by to talk with you and answer any health insurance questions you have. (See link below.)

Visit http://www.LowerRateQuotes.com/health-insurance.html or click on the following link to get health insurance quotes for senior citizens from top-rated companies and see how much you can save. You can also get more insurance tips there.

The authors, Brian Stevens and Stacey Schifferdecker, have spent 30 years in the insurance and finance industries, and have written a number of articles on health insurance for senior citizens.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Brian_Stevens

Medicare Supplemental Insurance Plans for Senior Citizens by Brant Reed

May 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

For senior citizens, having medical coverage through the federal government’s  Medicare program is literally a lifesaver. Many of these senior citizens would  not be able to afford the basic medical care that they need without Medicare.  This social insurance program allows them to stay healthy and enjoy a longer  life than they might otherwise enjoy without the assistance of Medicare. But as  great as the program is, it’s only designed to cover the basic insurance needs  of our nation’s elderly. That’s why the option of being able to purchase a  Medicare supplemental insurance plan is so key to the health and well-being of  American senior citizens.

A Medicare supplemental insurance plan is designed to cover holes and gaps in  basic Medicare coverage. Since most senior citizens are beginning to deal with  aging-related issues by the time they turn sixty-five years of age and are  eligible for Medicare, most of them need more than just the basic coverage  offered by Medicare. This means that left with only Medicare coverage, most of  these senior citizens will be left with inadequate coverage, which they may not  realize until they suffer a health emergency and realize that they can’t afford  the care that they need.

While Medicare is federally subsidized, Medicare supplemental insurance is  administered by the state governments and is sold by private insurance  companies. If you’re interested in purchasing a Medicare supplemental insurance  plan, first make sure that you understand the Medicare regulations in your  state. You don’t want to settle on a plan only to find that it’s not available  in your state. And be sure to shop around. You won’t get the best price if you  don’t take the time to get at least three price quotes from different companies  to compare and see what deals are available to you.

If the task of researching Medicare supplemental insurance seems too daunting  to tackle on your own, you’re not alone in feeling overwhelmed. That is why so  many quality insurance brokers are able to stay in business. They make it their  aim to understand not only the different Medicare supplements that are available  through different insurance companies, but also to understand the needs of the  senior citizens in their area so that they can recommend the best insurance  products to their clients. With the help of a good agent and a basic  understanding of the Medicare supplement, you’re sure to be able to get the  coverage you need.

Medicare Supplements for you will find and compare the best options for your  Medicare Supplemental Insurance needs.  You can make an  informed decision after perusing the information we provide you.  Did you  know you can cut costs and continue to see your preferred doctors?

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Brant_Reed

 

The Senior in Senior Citizens Doesn’t Automatically Mean Senile by Jeanne Gibson

April 27, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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I am well aware that teenagers often think that people over thirty don’t know  anything. They are partially right—many of us don’t know much about  things that interest teenagers, and don’t really want to. But that’s not what I  meant by the title of this article.

When a group is formed at church or in some other organization, a Senior  Citizen is seldom asked to lead it. It is just assumed that they aren’t capable  of thinking clearly enough for such an important job.

If a senior citizen applies for a regular 9-5 job, he or she is not likely to  get it if there are other equally qualified applicants, or often some not as  qualified applicants.

Should a Senior Citizen choose to run for President, a major talking point  against him is his age. He is referred to as dottering, senile, not all there,  and/or suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. (Although, I don’t see how they could  prove that last point since even doctors admit that they have to examine a brain  after the patient has died to be sure of that diagnosis.)

Today, I was called “Hon,” at least 3 times by a clerk that waited on me in a  local store. Do you think she would have called a woman in her 30’s or 40’s  “Hon?” I don’t think so. Do we older people look like little children or  something?

Sometimes, when a older person loses a spouse or someone close to them, they  experience a temporary period of time during which they may appear to be  withdrawn and confused, but this is not limited to seniors. It is often used,  however, to take advantage of seniors.

Recently, an elderly relative of mine lost her husband, who left a legally  witnessed will, leaving everything to her, but, within a few weeks relatives  began to descend on her, claiming that “Dad,” or “Uncle,” or “Grandpa,” had  promised him or her a particular item.

His wife, still grieving, and a bit bewildered by it all, rather than risk  dishonoring a promise her husband may have made, handed over the items without  question. It was months later that she realized she had been the victim of  greed.

Even senior citizens are sometimes guilty of assuming another person is  senile just because of their age.

I overheard two older single men in a group I belonged to discussing a  lovely, but very quiet widow lady in our group. One suggested that the other  invite the lady in question to a movie, but the reply was, “No way. I think  she’s senile because she doesn’t say much. Besides, she’s too old for my taste.”  Neither man was under 70 and both were overweight and almost bald. They assumed  that this woman was senile without even knowing her. The truth is that she was  younger than either of them and her shyness kept her from talking much until she  got to know a person well.

Senior citizens are not all senile, as some people seem to think. True, many  are not quite as strong in body as they were a few years ago, but most still  have as much if not more wisdom than many younger people today. If you are  guilty of leaping to conclusions due to a person’s age, take another look. You  may be missing out on one of the very best relationships of your life.

Jeanne Gibson writes from her home in Springfield, Oregon on a variety of  subjects such as marriage, divorce, kids, cats, electric bikes, working from  home and senior citizen issues. To learn more about keeping your brain alert,  check out her blogpost at: http://sowingseedsthatmatter.blogspot.com/2010/07/perk-up-old-brain-cells.html

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jeanne_Gibson

 

Senior Citizen Jobs – Great Opportunities Revealed by Abhishek Agarwal

April 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

It cannot be denied that some employees prefer to employ younger people. In  spite of this, job market researches have shown that senior citizens have a wide  range of job opportunities before them.

The following statistics reveal that the number of employers who realize the  potentials of senior citizens, and the benefits of employing them, is on the  rise.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics has shown that from August 1989 to August  2003, the positions of over 380,000 employees aged between 15 and 24 were  replaced by senior citizens. To explain the point further, when a large number  of Australia’s younger workers left their jobs to become full-time students,  their employers preferred to employ older people in their stead.

More than 500,000 employees in Netherlands are aged 55 and above, and the  number has been steadily rising since 1995.

Competing with the Younger Generation

In order to compete with the younger generation, a senior job seeker has to  take the following factors into consideration.

When you are preparing your resume, emphasise on your accomplishments,  without seeming to brag about them. You have one advantage over the younger  applicants and, that is, your experience, along with a list of achievements and  posts held over a long period of time.

Your work history is just as important as your personality. Employers have a  tendency to notice gaps in employment when a person has been unemployed;  however, they also emphasize on how long a person has served each of his or her  previous employers.

Refresh and enhance your skills by reading voraciously and enrolling in a  variety of programs that will improve your expertise. Keep in touch with the  latest developments and trends in your particular field of service.

Continuously research the Internet for fresh opportunities. Several agencies  place advertisements on the Internet, especially stressing their preference for  senior citizens. The availability of a number of search engines and job sites  will definitely make your job easier.

Best Jobs for Senior Citizens

Here is a list of opportunities that do not focus on the applicants age.

Specialized jobs: For example, people applying for the position of a doctor  are hired on the basis of experience and not age.

Lecturers or speakers: Senior citizens are paid to speak on a topic of their  expertise, and here, age does not really matter. What matters, however, is  qualification, knowledge, and experience.

Writers: A writer’s age is irrelevant. All that is required for novelists,  playwrights, or children’s writers is an excellent hold over language. Moreover,  they can work in peace and comfort from their own houses,  a real bonus for  those who are advanced in years.

Abhishek is an expert at conducting interviews and he has got some great  Interview Success Secrets [http://www.Career-Guru.com/4/index.htm] up his  sleeves! Download his FREE 82 Pages Ebook, “How To Ace Any Interview”  from his website [http://www.Career-Guru.com/4/index.htm]. Only limited Free  Copies available.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Abhishek_Agarwal

 

Injury-Free Physical Fitness For Senior Citizens Made Easy by Jeremy Reeves

April 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Physical fitness for senior citizens is more important than ever in today’s  society. Decades ago, everything was done manually.

Although technology has brought us many incredible things, it has also made  us a much more lazy society. No longer do we have to use our bodies to do yard  work, clean around the house, or even work on our own car.

There are now gadgets for virtually everything that lets us do it while using  minimal body strength.

But negative consequences come with the luxury we’ve been given. When manual  labor is no longer needed and our muscles aren’t getting used on a daily basis –  they start to weaken. Combine that with the fact that as every year goes by your  muscles get weaker and you’ll understand why physical fitness for senior  citizens is so important.

By strength training you will dramatically reduce your risk of osteoporosis,  sore joints and broken bones. Many doctors and health companies try to make you  buy Vitamin C and “drink a lot of milk” to overcome these problems, but in  reality they simply don’t work. Supplements can help in a small way, but  strength training has been proven time and time again to have a much more  positive effect with muscle, bone and joint problems that most senior citizens  face – even arthritis!

Isn’t It Dangerous To Exercise As I Get Older?

Unfortunately, many senior citizens are afraid to exercise due to fears of  injuring themselves. However, there are a few simple precautions you can take  such as:

  • Perform low-impact exercises such as pushups, bodyweight squats and other  bodyweight exercises.
  • If lifting weights, do it for 10 or more reps and keep it at a manageable  weight.
  • Don’t over-exert yourself. Stop or briefly rest if you get uncomfortably  tired.

 

Be smart and think about the injury-potential of each exercise before you  perform it.

For example, instead of jogging, consider using stationary exercise bikes.  Pro form exercise bikes are a great piece of equipment to try out. The Schwinn  231 recumbent exercise bike is also a great choice to have if you want to keep  one in your own home.

Besides the simple precautions you should take, there are a few other things  to consider. Physical fitness for senior citizens is a much more delicate  situation than physical fitness for younger individuals.

  • Take Things Slowly At First – Because of the weakening of bones,  joints and muscles you need to take things slowly at first. Don’t simply start a  program and push yourself to exhaustion. It’s also important to go to a doctor  who knows your medical history beforehand. They may even be able to help you  decide what type of exercise you should be doing.
  • Exercise Slowly – You should also perform the actual exercises  slowly. Don’t make jerky or bouncing movements or you’ll risk injuring yourself.  The slower you perform the exercise, the less risk you have of getting  hurt.
  • Warm Up Properly – Warming up is very important to anybody,  especially senior citizens. Lack of blood flow as well as tight joints and  muscles performing less efficiently are all factors contributing to injuries. By  properly warming up before your actual workout, you significantly reduce your  risk of getting injured.

 

Although physical fitness for senior citizens is a bit more complicated due  to more things that can possibly go wrong, it’s also just as or more important  than exercising at a young age. By taking the right precautions and making sure  you’re exercising correctly, you can enjoy injury-free and pain-relieving  exercise for a long time to come.

Jeremy Reeves is a certified personal trainer devoted to helping you get in  the best shape of your life. His website –  [http://www.fitness-product-reviews.com] – reviews the 4 most effective weight  loss products on the market today.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jeremy_Reeves

 

Senior Citizen Homes by David Stillwagon

April 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As the birth rate continues to go down in most of the world the senior  citizens population as a percentage of the total population is increasing. One  of the main reasons is health care that is geared toward older folks and the  increasing awareness of making the most of your later years. Not only are senior  citizens staying active they are also involved in their community and where they  want to reside. Senior citizens homes and apartments have become an important  issue in this country and others.

What are the issues facing senior citizens regarding where they live?

If you are an older person or couple and your children have left the house  then you might feel as though your present home is a little too big and you want  to down size. Of course it would be a tough decision not only for you but also  for your children. They probably don’t want to see you sell the house where they  grew up in and had so many memories. But you find that it is just too big for  the two of you now and taking care of the house and a lawn might be more than  you can handle.

Finding a home that is affordable, comfortable and one that meets your needs  can be a job for anyone no matter what age group you are in. The major indicator  of which house you choose is probably the price of the house. This is especially  true if you are a retiree living on a fixed income, you know what you can afford  and what you can’t. Unfortunately some of the houses that you may have thought  ideal were probably out of your pricing range.

Selling a house can be a real hassle whether the economy is good or bad. And  if you are in the market for a home it makes it twice as bad. But you have to  take your time find the house that is just right for you. Are there enough  bedrooms and bathrooms, is there room if you have overnight guest? And what  about that yard, is the right size to take care of?

It’s not only the house that you have to think about it is also the  neighborhood. What is the crime rate? Are the other houses in the neighborhood  taken care of? How close are you to your doctors and a hospital?

Finding senior citizen homes and apartments is a worthy task that takes time  and effort to achieve.

David Stillwagon blogs about health and age issues such as senior citizen homes

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Stillwagon

 

Tips For Senior Citizen Travelers by Gerry Restrivera

April 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Traveling is one thing that even older people can enjoy. Whether you are a  seasoned traveller or someone who is just beginning to enjoy traveling, these  travel advice can help you plan a safe and enjoyable trip. Here are some helpful  tips for senior citizen travelers:

Prepare your documents as early as possible. Passport is the most important  document and you can apply in person, through passport agencies and by mail.  When you receive your passport, be sure to fill in the information page so that  your family and friends can be notified in case of accident or emergency. Most  countries requires visa, so after acquiring a valid passport, you also need a  valid visa. These documents need time for processing and for senior citizen  travelers, it is best to apply 2-3 months before your trip to avoid stress and  rushing that could be bad for you.

Do not bring more than you need. Bring only the things that you need because  it will be so tiring to carry heavy suitcases. Senior citizen travelers, should  not burden themselves with too much luggage.  Wash and wear clothing is a  good idea so that you will not bring too many clothes.  Avoid bringing  valuable things like jewelries and dress simply to avoid being a target of  thieves. Bring only reasonable cash with you. Bring your additional budget in  the form of traveler’s check, credit card and ATM card.

Senior citizen travelers should check their health condition with their  doctor before traveling. Find out if you need immunization before traveling to  protect you from serious diseases abroad. If you are under medications, it is  important to bring enough supply to maintain your health. Bring your medicines  in its original packages or bottles and bring your doctor’s prescription to  avoid narcotics issues in foreign countries or airports. Review your insurance  policy and check if it covers your medical expenses abroad, if not it is best to  buy a policy that covers your travel medical expenses.

Read and get information about the country you want to visit. It is best for  senior citizen travelers to know the current situation of their destination in  terms of security, weather, culture, people, laws and other important things  about your destination.  You can protect your health, security and enjoy  more on your trip if you know more about your destination.

Don’t stress yourself. Senior citizen travelers should not subject themselves  to stressful situations. Even if this is the travel you’ve been waiting all your  life, it is not wise to stress yourself and fill in all your time with a lot of  activities. Take time to relax, you will not enjoy if you are too  tired.

Look for best deals to get the best out of your travel. Traveling could be  really expensive if you do not know where to find the best deals. There are a  lot of perks available especially for senior citizen travelers. Getting  discounts on your accommodation and airfare will give you more opportunity to  enjoy your trip. Find out how to get cheap airfare visit Your World Travel Guide  [http://www.yourworldtravelguide.com/]

To travel on a budget visit Travel Secrets

Gerry Restrivera writes informative articles on various subjects including  Tips for Senior Citizen Travelers. You are allowed to publish this article in  its entirety provided that author’s name, bio and website links must remain  intact and included with every reproduction.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Gerry_Restrivera

 

Not your ordinary joe – National Wellness Authority, Joe Piscatella, offers SIX-week Wellness and Heart Health Program

April 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

http://image.exct.net/lib/fec5167072610075/m/1/press_releases_header.jpg

Not your ordinary joe – National Wellness Authority, Joe Piscatella, offers SIX-week Wellness and Heart Health Program

 

RENO, Nev. (Feb. 15, 2013) –One of the country’s foremost authorities on lifestyle habits and heart health, Joe Piscatella, will offer 6 Weeks to a Healthier Heart – a six-week wellness program designed to improve heart health. The program will focus on lifestyle changes that can have a lasting impact on overall and heart health.

Piscatella underwent coronary bypass surgery at age 32 – and according to his doctors, his prognosis wasn’t good. He found a way to stay faithful to a healthy lifestyle, turned his life around and now is one of the longest-living survivors of bypass surgery – 35 years and counting.

This program is designed specifically for people who could benefit from practical tips that can be applied to daily life to achieve lasting results. Piscatella’s seminars – which TIME magazine calls a “force for positive change” – have inspired millions to achieve a healthier, better-balanced life.

Cost for the six-week program is only $50, which includes all six sessions, as well as pre- and post-fitness profiles to track results. The fitness profiles include a blood draw to calculate total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol), LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol), triglycerides and glucose, as well as weight and Body Mass Index (BMI) measurements.

Program participants across the country have reported proven results upon completion of the program. “On average, participants have lost 10.5 pounds, reduced their LDL cholesterol by 6.2 percent and increased their weekly exercise and activity by 28 minutes,” Piscatella said. “What’s even more impressive is that participants continued to report positive results even five months after the program ends. It is truly inspiring to see people adopt healthy lifestyle habits and improve their health.”

Each weekly 90-minute seminar focuses on a specific topic. All seminars will be held 6-7:30 p.m. at Hyatt Place , 1790 E Plumb Lane in Reno .

  • Monday, April 22: Make Your Health Last As Long As Your Life
  • Wednesday, May 1: Eating Healthy In A Doubleburger.com World
  • Wednesday, May 8: Move It Or Lose It
  • Wednesday, May 15: Take A Load Off Your Heart
  • Wednesday, May 22: Raising Fit Kids In A Fast World
  • Wednesday, May 29: Healthy Cooking At Home

More information about the program, including online registration is available at www.renown.org/HeartEvents. For general inquiries, call 775-982-4892.

Special media opportunity: Does a program like this sound appealing to you or a loved one? Media interested in participating in the program and sharing their story are able to do so at no cost. Interested media should contact Ayse (I-Shay) Caglar at 775-982-4609.

Media Interview / Photo Opportunity: Joe Piscatella is available for in-person media interviews Monday, April 22. He is available for other media interviews before that time via phone. Please contact Ayse (I-Shay) Caglar at 775-982-4609 

 Joe Piscatella - casual

About Joe Piscatella

Joe Piscatella, President of the Institute for Fitness and Health, lectures extensively to a variety of associations, including Fortune 100 companies, professional and medical organizations. He has authored 13 best-selling books including “Don’t Eat Your Heart Out,” “The Road to a Healthy Heart Runs Through the Kitchen,” and “Positive Mind, Healthy Heart!”. Piscatella is a frequent guest on television and radio programs that include CNN, the “Today” show, “Fox News” and “Good Morning America,” and is a guest expert on WebMD. He serves on the Legislative Task Force on Youth Health which focuses on improving nutrition and fitness in elementary schools in Washington state. He is also the only non-medical member of the National Institutes of Health Expert Panel on Cardiac Rehabilitation.

About Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health

Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health has more than 30 years of recognition as the region’s leader in heart and vascular care. The Institute for Heart & Vascular Health has championed innovative heart care with a history of firsts including the region’s first open heart surgery, first angioplasty and first stent replacement. Today, the Institute for Heart & Vascular Health continues to lead the way in state-of-the-art technology like the da Vinci Si HD Robotic Surgical System, 64-slice CT scanner, nuclear medicine, cardiac catheterization and the region’s only D-SPECT cameras that rule out heart attacks faster so patients can be diagnosed and treated quickly. With 17 board-certified heart physicians – more than any other hospital in the region – the heart physicians at the Institute for Heart & Vascular Health offer a variety of specialties and more than 345 years of combined cardiology experience. And with several care centers in Reno , Carson City , rural Nevada and Northern California , patients have convenient access to quality heart care throughout the region. For more information, visit renown.org/heart.

 

 

Connect with Us!

Ayse E. Caglar, MBA | Marketing Business Partner II 1155 Mill St. H8  Reno , NV   89502 | P 775-982-4609 | F 775-982-4666

Useful Tips For Senior Citizen Trips by James Redder

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

The best way to keep senior citizens engaged is by making them take part in  senior citizen trips. There are many organizations and clubs that organize such  trips regularly. Letting the elderly people travel and relax for a while is one  of the best gifts for them. The best thing about the trips is that they can meet  many similar people and share a lot of things between them. They can make new  friends and see many new places.

How to find such clubs? The best place to start the search is the internet.  Look for travel organizations that conduct regular trips for seniors. Gather  information about many such clubs and choose the best according to one’s  requirements. If possible they should enroll in the organizations and enjoy  various other benefits too. The trips may be of various types. They can either  be a one-day type or for many days. The people who are participating in the  travel should inquire about a lot of things to make their travel  comfortable.

If the tour has been planned to a far off place and is more than two or three  days then a lot of preparations have to be done before going for the tour. It is  better read and understand about the location planned for the trip. Try to know  about the climate also because the appropriate clothing will need to be packed.  Though the members will keep the members informed it is better to have some idea  beforehand.

Most of the senior citizens have to take different medications for various  ailments. While packing for senior citizen trips ensure that all needed  medications are also packed accordingly. Try to carry a first aid kit with all  the necessary medications for common ailments like cold, aches, diarrhea etc.  These can be useful in case of minor problems and at times when a doctor is not  available. Make a checklist of things to be carried and take all the necessary  things. Keep them in places where they are easily accessible.

The greatest advantage of participating in senior citizen trips is that a lot  of new places can be seen along with many people. Instead of traveling alone and  getting into problems it is better to go with senior citizen travel groups. Try  to find the best travel clubs and become a member. The tour will be planned  carefully in such a way that they are very comfortable and useful for older  people.

Next, now you are better informed on the benefits of senior citizen trips. Will you start planning one of your own?  Read more information concerning senior citizen travel groups on this website.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=James_Redder

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6324728

Senior Citizens Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, and Arthritis – Causes and Treatments By David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

“Arthritis” does not mean only that someone has stiff, aching joints. Many types of arthritis exist, each with its own symptoms and treatments. Most types are chronic, meaning that they can be a source of discomfort for an extended period of time. Arthritis can afflict joints almost anywhere in the body and may cause changes you can see and feel, including swelling, warmth, and redness in the joints. It can last for a short time but be very painful or continue for a long time with less pronounced results while still damaging the joints.

Arthritis is extremely common in the United States, especially among senior citizens. Still, there are many steps they and those providing care for the elderly can take to relieve the different types of arthritis. The most common types in this population are osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and gout.

Osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis in senior citizens and begins when cartilage, the type of tissue that pads joints, begins to wear away. This can eventually cause all the cartilage between bones to wear away, forming painful rubbing of bones against each other. This type of arthritis is most common in the hands, neck, lower back, knees, and hips.

Symptoms of OA can range from stiffness and mild pain that accompanies exercise or bending to severe pain in the joints even in times of physical rest. OA can also cause stiffness during times in which you haven’t used specific joints in a while, like when you’re on a long car ride, but this stiffness usually goes away when you move your joints again. OA can eventually lead to problems moving joints and sometimes to developing a disability if the areas affected are the back, knees, or hips.

Aging is often the greatest risk factor for developing OA. Other factors depend on the area of the body afflicted-for instance, OA in the hands or hips may be caused by genetic factors; OA in the knees may be caused by being overweight; and injuries or overuse of joints in the knees, hips, and hands may lead to OA.

Rheumatoid arthritis.

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) differs from OA in that it’s an autoimmune disease, meaning that your immune system attacks and damages the lining of a joint as if it were an injury or disease. RA leads to inflammation of the joints, which causes pain, stiffness and swelling, sometimes in multiple joints at once. It may be severe enough to prevent you from moving a certain joint. Senior citizens with RA may often experience fatigue or fever. You can develop RA at any age, and it’s more common in women.

RA can afflict almost any joint in the body and is often symmetrical, meaning that if you have RA in a specific joint on one side of your body, you probably experience RA in the same joint on the other side of your body. RA can damage not only joints, but also the heart, muscles, blood vessels, nervous system, and eyes.

Gout.

Senior citizens with gout experience the most severe pain relative to many other arthritis patients. An attack begins when uric acid crystals form in the connective tissue or joint spaces, leading to swelling, stiffness, redness, heat, and pain in the joint. Attacks often follow eating foods like shellfish, liver, dried beans, peas, anchovies, or gravy. Drinking alcohol, being overweight, and taking certain medications may worsen the symptoms. In senior citizens, using certain medications to lower blood pressure may also be a risk factor for a gout attack.

Gout is most common in the big toe, but it can occur in other joints such as the ankle, elbow, knee, wrist, hand, or other toes. Swelling may cause discoloration and tenderness due to skin stretching tightly around the joint. If you see a doctor during an attack, he or she may take a sample of fluid from the affected joint.

Other forms of arthritis.

Other forms include psoriatic arthritis  in patients who have psoriasis; ankylosing spondylitis, which mainly affects the spine; reactive arthritis, which occurs as a reaction to another illness in the body; and arthritis in the temporomandibular joint, the point at which the jaw attaches to the skull.

Arthritis Symptoms and Warning Signs.

Senior citizens and those providing their elder care should look out for the following symptoms as they may be indications of arthritis:

  • lasting joint pain
  • swelling in a joint
  • stiffness in a joint
  • tenderness or pain when touching a joint
  • difficulty in using or moving a joint normally
  • warmth and redness in a joint

 

Any of these symptoms lasting longer than two weeks should be addressed by a physician. If you experience a fever, feel physically ill, have a suddenly swollen joint, or have problems using a joint, a doctor should be contacted sooner. You will have to answer questions and go through a physical exam. Before suggesting treatment options, your doctor may want to run lab tests and take X-rays.

Arthritis Treatment.

Some common treatment options exist even though each type of arthritis is treatedsomewhat differently. Rest, exercise, eating a healthy diet, and becoming educated about the right way to use and protect the joints are key to minimizing the effects of arthritis. Proper shoes and a cane can minimize pain the feet, knees, and hips while walking, and some technology exists for helping open jars or bottles, turn doorknobs more easily, and otherwise improve quality of life in senior citizens with arthritis.

Additionally, some medications can lower the pain and swelling. Acetaminophen (in Tylenol) and some NSAIDs are sold over-the-counter and can ease pain. Other NSAIDs must be prescribed. It is important for senior citizens and those providing their in home care to pay attention to the warnings on both prescribed and over-the-counter drugs and to ask a doctor about how to properly and best use over-the-counter medicine to treat arthritis. The FDA also has information about many medications.

Some treatment options are specialized for individual types of arthritis.

Osteoarthritis Treatment.

There are medicines to help senior citizens with pain associated with OA, and rest and exercise may ease movement in the joints. Managing weight is also important. If one experiences OA in the knees, a doctor can provide shots in the knee joint, which can help to move it without as much pain. Surgery may also be an option to repair or replace damaged joints in senior citizens.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatments.

Treatment can diminish the pain and swelling associated with RA and cause joint damage to slow down or stop. One will feel better overall, and it will be easier to move around. On top of pain and anti-inflammatory medications, a doctor might prescribe DMARDs, which are anti-rheumatic drugs that can slow damage from RA. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, can minimize swelling while waiting for DMARDs to kick in. Additionally, biogenic response modifiers block the damage inflicted by the immune system and help people with mild to moderate RA when other treatments have failed to work properly.

Gout Treatment.

If you’ve gone through a gout attack, talk to a doctor to discuss possible causes and future prevention of attacks. Work together with your doctor and other elder care providers to plan and execute a plan for prevention. Commonly, NSAIDs or corticosteroids are recommended for an acute attack. This treatment diminishes swelling, allowing you to feel better fairly shortly after treatment. Usually, the attack fully stops within a few days. If one has experienced multiple attacks, a doctor may be able to prescribe medication to prevent further attacks.

Exercise can help Arthritis.

In addition to taking the proper medication and allowing your joints to rest, exercise can help senior citizens to stay in shape, maintain strong muscles, and control symptoms of arthritis. Daily exercise like walking or swimming keeps joints moving while lessening pain and strengthening the muscles around joints. Before starting any new exercise program, it is important to discuss options with your physician.

Three types of exercise are the best for senior citizens with arthritis:

  • Range-of-motion exercises reduce stiffness, improve flexibility, and keep joints moving. Activities like dancing fit into this category.
  • Strengthening exercises strengthen muscles, which improves support and protection to your joints. Weight training fits into this category.
  • Aerobic or endurance exercises improve health in the heart and arteries, prevent weight gain, improve how your body works overall, and may decrease swelling in some joints. Riding a bike fits into this category.

Other things to do to manage Arthritis.

 

On top of exercise and weight control, a number of other methods may help senior citizens ease the pain around joints. Applying heat or cold to joints, soaking in a warm tub, or swimming in a heated pool may help you feel better and move your joints more easily.

Surgery may be an option when damage has become disabling or when other treatment options have not adequately diminished pain. With surgery, joints can be repaired or replaced with artificial ones. Commonly, arthritic knees and hips are replaced.

Unproven remedies.

Many senior citizens with arthritis try treatments that have not been tested or proven to help. Some are harmful, like snake venom, while others are harmless yet unhelpful, like copper bracelets.

Here are a few ways to determine whether a treatment is unproven:

  • The remedy is said to work for all types of arthritis and other diseases
  • Scientific support is from only one research study
  • The label doesn’t include directions or warnings of use

Areas for further research.

 

Studies suggest that acupuncture could ease OA pain in some senior citizens. Dietary supplements such as glucosamine and chondroitin are also under investigation and may reduce OA pain. More research is needed to determine whether these types of treatments actually work to reduce symptoms and damage to joints.

Talk to your doctor and others involved in your elder care.

Try not to make light of your symptoms by telling yourself that joint pain or stiffness is simply caused by aging normally. Your doctor and other elder care providers can discuss possible treatment options with you to safely minimize your pain and stiffness and prevent more serious joint damage.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor by Nina Kramer

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Las Vegas, Press-Media Releases 

The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor by Nina Kramer

“‘You have cancer’ are three of the scariest words you will ever hear,”
says Nina Kramer, author of the new book, The Harrowing Medical Journey of
a Cancer Survivor. “But how you react after hearing those words can mean
the difference between thriving and deteriorating.”

Kramer’s journey through the world of cancer treatment began in 2000 when
she was diagnosed with bladder cancer. Every year over 73,000 people are
diagnosed with the disease in the United States. Men are three times more
likely than women to develop it and about 5% will die from the disease, but
the death rate has been declining over the past twenty years.

Like many, Kramer’s journey began with a routine physical. What followed was
anything but routine.  Her first detour began with a trusted doctor. She liked him and
followed his instructions faithfully but, as she was to learn, he was not giving her the best and most advanced treatments. The number one rule when facing an illness as serious as cancer, she quickly discovered, is to do your research and seek out the best doctors and institutions that treat your disease.

The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor is Kramer’s courageous
story as she copes with a severe illness that lasted more than a decade. It began with a diagnosis of low-grade bladder cancer, continued with the removal and/or reconstruction of vital organs, and ended with dialysis and a kidney transplant. Although the story is specific to bladder cancer and its aftermath, it covers aspects inherent in any serious,
and sometimes life-threatening, illness.

With candor, honesty and life-affirming messages, The Harrowing Medical
Journey of a Cancer Survivor shares:

* The impact of emotions on surviving a serious illness – fear, denial, anger, anxiety and depression can have devastating results
* The search for experts – the single most important thing you can do when
battling a severe illness is to find the best hospitals and doctors specializing in your disease
* The focus on other passions – engrossing yourself in activities other than the illness to relieve your mind from the constant anxiety of worrying about it
* The importance of cancer support groups and psychotherapy – talking to other people can help you explore your feelings so they don’t interfere with or hamper your recovery
* Spending time on what you love – do everything you can to fight your illness, but spend time doing the things that bring you pleasure and satisfaction
* Having sex – the human contact and intimacy, as well as the erotic pleasure, can be a wonderful antidote to pain and misery

“I wanted to share my story with other cancer victims,” adds Kramer. “As I travelled this frightening medical journey, I learned a lot about how to survive and even thrive under sometimes terrifying circumstances. I wanted to share this experience in the hope that it would help others undergoing frightening medical journeys.

Nina Kramer, is a published novelist and author of the new nonfiction ebook,
The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor. She has held various
positions from journals manager to assistant vice president with medical,
scientific and technical publishers while pursuing her craft as a writer.
While undergoing cancer treatment, she made an arduous trip through some
remote locations in China—described in her Medical Journey book—as
research for her next novel set in the Middle Kingdom, Phoenix Rising; Tigers Flying. She divides her time between New York City and Stockbridge, MA.

Blog: http://ninaikramer.wordpress.com/cancer

The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor is available in ebook format
through www.authorhouse.com. www.amazon.com, www.barnesandnoble.com,
and all online booksellers.

Review Copies Available Upon Request

Sometimes Little Things Can Be Huge!

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

By Thair Phillips, President, RetireSafe

A small and relatively new product is making life easier for older Americans. It’s a simple thing, but unit dose laundry detergent packs (or pods) are helping seniors perform necessary laundry chores that they might not otherwise be able to do without help. The laundry packs’ small size and pre-measured, consistent content is perfect for aging hands and eyes. With ten thousand of our fellow Americans reaching the age of 65 each day, it’s a really big deal!

While younger Americans can choose from many options, the pods are a huge help to the frail and the disabled.  Consider those who suffer from arthritis, for example. According to 2007-2009 data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), an estimated 50 million adults have self-reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis. That number is expected to grow to 67 million by the year 2030, per NHIS data. Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States, negatively impacting function and mobility for millions of senior citizens. The laundry pods meet the need created by those who can no longer heft a jug of detergent and pour it into a measuring cup. The small (but not too small to handle) size detergent pod fits the bill for aging-in-place seniors who wish to remain self-reliant.

And then there are those who must struggle each and every day with impaired vision.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), individuals over the age of 65 accounts for roughly 30 percent of the U.S. population considered to be visually impaired. Dimming eyesight can reduce physical, functional, emotional, and social well-being.  Doing the laundry can be a chore for all of us, but trying to measure the exact amount of liquid or powder for the person who is vision impaired can be a laundry room disaster resulting in ruined clothes and dangerous messes. For age-in-place seniors with cataracts, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and/or diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes that causes visual impairment, anything that can help simplify the laundry measuring process is truly a godsend.

Keep in mind that many older Americans in single family homes and apartments may well have to take their laundry and laundry supplies to a communal laundry room or a Laundromat.  Having the convenience of smaller, self-contained detergent pods to carry instead jugs of liquids and large boxes of powder is a big advantage for the elderly.  This is especially true for those navigating with canes or walkers, or those needing to keep one hand free for stability.

In short, pre-measured laundry detergent packs or pods are critical innovations for seniors. This is one small-sized product with a huge functional impact for seniors. In an aging America, we need every one of these impactful products, and many, many more.

RetireSafe is a nationwide organization of 4000,000 supporters that advocates on behalf of seniors on issues regarding Social Security, Medicare, health and financial well-being.

Contact Thair Phillips, (202) 628-5095

Renwon Offers Colorectal Cancer Home Screening Kits

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

To emphasize Renown Institute for Cancer’s commitment to quality cancer care and the importance of getting screened, Renown Health is offering a colorectal cancer home screening kit for only $15 ($5 savings) during the months of March and April. The $15 screening kit, Fecal Immunochemical Test (FIT), is a home screening for annual colon cancer detection.

 

Dr. John Gray and Dr. William Pfau created a fun, educational rap video on You Tube to raise awareness of the FIT Test and encourage patients to take the easy, at-home test which only requires “a swish and a flush.”

 

Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death in the US with more than 100,000 Americans being diagnosed each year. Despite the alarming statistics, if detected early though regular screenings, colorectal cancer is preventable.

 

Colon cancer has an 85 percent survival rate if caught early. It is estimated that as many as 30,000 lives could be saved each year through regular screenings and exams.

 

In 2008, the AmericanCollege of Gastroenterology (ACG) published updated guidelines for colorectal cancer screening. ACG recommends either a colonoscopy every 10 years or an annual FIT screening as the preferred test for colorectal cancer screenings starting at age 50. African Americans should begin screenings at age 45. Patients with a family history of colorectal cancer should speak with their doctor about a different screening schedule.

 

The new ACG guidelines list FIT as a preferred strategy because it has more extensive data than the guaiac-based Hemoccult SENSA test, and because fecal DNA testing is expensive.

 

Home Screening Kit – This screening detects blood in the stool often caused by cancers and polyps. The FIT Test detects blood more successfully than older and more widely used stool-screening tests.
Key patient benefits of the test include:

  • More convenient for patients because it is easy to prepare and complete in the privacy of your own home
  • Only one sample required, as opposed to three consecutive samples with the previous guaiac tests
  • Higher sensitivity resulting in fewer false readings
  • No dietary or medication restrictions required
  • No physician referral required

 

. To order a kit, visit renown.org/FITTest or call 775-982-6830.

 

About Renown Institute for Cancer

Renown Institute for Cancer offers fully integrated cancer services right here at home allowing patients and their families access to advanced treatment options. With three cancer physicians, patients experience coordinated care, appointments and treatments all at one location. For general inquiries, contact 775-982-6830 or visit www.renown.org.

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts April 2013 Calendar Of Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts

April 2013 Calendar Of Events

495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101

Contact:  Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993                              Feb. 28, 2013

Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org

City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

 

 

 

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

 

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)

Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m.
Admission: $4 dollars per person per week at the door.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of fun learning international dance styles, including Arabic, Armenian, Bulgarian, Chinese, Greek, Israeli, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian and Turkish folk dances. No need to bring a partner. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.

 

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)

Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.

Admission: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

 

Contra Dance (ages 8+)
Saturday, April 13. Group lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7 to 10 p.m.
Admission: $10 adults; $5 members, students & military; $3 children under 16 & non-dancers; pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance to a live acoustic band playing joyful fiddle tunes, driving reels and a waltz or two. All dances are taught and called; newcomers and families welcome. No need to bring a partner. Wear comfortable flat-soled shoes and casual clothing. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

 

Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’Ole Concert (all ages)
Saturday, April 13, 7 p.m.
Cost: $10 in advance, $15 event day.
Historic Fifth Street School Auditorium, 401 S. 4th St., (702) 229-3515.
Five-time Na Hoku Hanohano Award-winner Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’ole was honored at the 2009 awards as Male Vocalist of the Year.  An accomplished hula dancer and singer in the Hawaiian language, he brings a love of the Hawaiian culture to his performance. For more information on the artist, go to www.kaumakaiwakanakaole.com/. For tickets and information, call (702) 229-3515 or (702) 229-6469, or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Downtown Cultural Series – Rocky and Ruthie Lombardo Songs from the “American Songbook” (all ages)
Friday, April 19, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.

Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
Bring your lunch to enjoy a concert by Rocky and Ruthie Lombardo. The jazz duo will offer selections from the American Songbook featuring American composers from 1920 to the present. For more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org, or call (702) 229-3515.

Poets’ Corner

Friday, April 19, 7:30 p.m.

Admission is free.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.

Hosted by Keith Brantley, this monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants features the best local poetry talent.

 

USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, April 20, 7 to 11 p.m. Dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Admission: $5 members, military and students ages 13-25; $10 for non-members. Pay at door.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St. (702) 229-6383.
Presented by USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. For more information, call (702) 813-6694 or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org.

 

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Presents “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale”

April 26 and 27, May 3 and 4 at 7 p.m.; April 28, May 4 and 5 at 2 p.m.

Cost: $7 adults; $5 teen/senior/military; $3 children age 12 and younger.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The classic fairy tale of Rapunzel comes to life in this lively musical appropriate for the whole family. Enjoy the new twist on the old tale, from the writing team that created “How I Became a Pirate.” This production is ideal for anyone of any age who loves to laugh! For tickets and information, call 229-6383 or 229-6553, or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

 

African-American Midwives Film Series — “Bringin’ In Da Spirit” (ages 14+)

Saturday, April 27, 3 p.m.

Admission is free.  Call (702) 229-4800 to reserve a space.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.

“Bringin’ In Da Spirit” is a film about the history of African-American midwives from slavery to current times. This film was able to capture the interviews of “grand” midwives that worked in the segregated South. Most African-Americans born in the segregated South prior to the mid-1960s were born into the hands of a midwife. The sparse number of black physicians and the poverty of many blacks meant that not only did midwives “catch” babies, but they did most of the “doctoring” in the community. With the development of Medicaid and other social and political changes, midwives were no longer relied upon for healthcare. Martha-Marie Drohobyczer will moderate a discussion after the film to examine some of the reasons African-American women have the highest infant mortality rate in the United States, three times the rate of white Americans, and what we can do to reduce this rate.

Exhibitions

 

“African-American Heritage”

Artist Lolita Develay

Through April 18, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.

Free admission and open to the public.

Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.

Lolita Develay is a 2014 Master of Fine Arts candidate at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She lived in Hollywood, Calif., prior to moving to Las Vegas in 2008. Her works are well painted surfaces which reflect her interest in traditions of realism, often focusing on the intrigue of light acting on an object. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Sculptures in Glass”
Artists Larry Domsky and Barbara Domsky

Through May 30, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.

Free admission and open to the public.

Las Vegas City Hall Grand Gallery, 495 S. Main St., First floor, (702) 229-1012.

Glassworks designed and created by this husband-and-wife team will be displayed. The work will include newer pieces that fit the format and space of City Hall as well as pieces from their collection of glassworks. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Spirit Journeys”

Artist Rainer Bertrams

March 21-May 4, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Artist’s reception March 21, 6 to 8 p.m.

Free admission and open to the public.

CharlestonHeightsArtCenter, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.

The images will focus on meditative subjects and themes that explore human kind’s existential struggles for a universal understanding of human nature. For questions about this exhibit or the gallery program, call 229-1012 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Equinox”

March 28-June 8, during reception and by appointment only.

Artists’ reception March 28, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

Admission is free.

HistoricFifthStreetSchool, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.

For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Celebrating Life! 2013” (ages 50+)

Tuesday-Wednesday, April 23-24 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. entry submission drop off.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.

This is the 13th annual juried exhibit for ClarkCounty resident artists age 50 and better. It is free to enter and each artist may submit only one entry. There are six media categories, each awarded first, second, third and honorable mention awards: Drawing/Pastel, Painting, Mixed Media, Photography, Sculpture and Ceramics, Watercolor and Gouache. There is also a best of show award. This program is sponsored by the city of Las Vegas Arts Commission. For more details, or to receive a prospectus, call (702) 229-1012.

# # #

Editor’s Note: Photos are available for download at

ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/Exhibitions/.

ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/April_2013/

No password is required.

The Vision Council Launches Online Resource for Low Vision and Saving Sight

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

The Vision Council is pleased to announce the launch of www.whatislowvision.org — a new web site created to educate the public on low vision, its symptoms, and the resources available to help.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130228/PH61076LOGO-a )
(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130228/PH61076LOGO-b )

As America’s baby boomers enter their senior years, they may notice a gradual loss in some areas of sight. Loss of peripheral or central vision could indicate low vision, a visual impairment that cannot be corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses, pharmaceuticals or surgery. More than 2.9M people in the U.S. suffer from low vision and it is most common in people age 60+.

What is low vision?
“More likely than not, everyone knows someone with low vision — maybe a mother, sister, neighbor, or co-worker,” said Dr. Paul Michelson, Chair of The Vision Council’s medical arm — known as the Better Vision Institute — and  a low vision consultant.  “Recognizing the symptoms of low vision early and taking the proper actions may help preserve sight and in some cases, lessen the advance of low vision.”

Low vision can impair the ability to complete activities of daily living or follow routines and enjoy pastimes — such as reading — that people take for granted.

Symptoms
At first, people might notice a bit of distortion in their vision.  An object that is straight in reality — a telephone pole, for example — may appear curved or wavy to a person with low vision.  A low vision diagnosis is often the result of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, or another aging eye disease.

Low vision differs from presbyopia, which is when the ability to focus on near objects diminishes. Presbyopia, which can be corrected with reading glasses or other optical solutions, typically emerges between ages 40 and 45.  Signs of low vision are broader than presbyopia and include:

  • Areas of blurred or distorted vision or spots and blotches in your vision
  • Shadowed or darkened field of view or noticeable loss of peripheral vision
  • A gradual loss of central vision
  • Cloudy and blurred vision or exaggerated “halos” around bright lights
  • Blind spots in your field of view

Preventive Measures and Resources
Seeing an eye doctor at the first sign of any visual changes can help to detect the diseases that result in low vision.  In general, seeing an eye doctor is an important step in maintaining eye health.  The onset of low vision is a slow progression of symptoms and the ultimate goal is to maintain remaining sight and prevent further deterioration in vision.

Sometimes, a pharmaceutical or surgical solution may stop further development of one of the diseases associated with low vision, but there are also eye care providers who specialize in low vision.  These specialists can introduce patients to low vision devices such as stand magnifiers, closed-circuit TVs, and telescopic lenses that help people affected by low vision maintain independence and improve their ability to perform daily tasks.

Dr. Michelson continued, “We urge people to check on family, friends, and neighbors who might be experiencing some of the signs of low vision. Vision training, vision rehabilitation, and low vision devices can help people maintain and optimize visual function, and preserve as much sight as is possible.”

At the onset of any symptoms of low vision, The Vision Council reminds people to:

  • Seek an accurate diagnosis and develop a good relationship with an eye care provider
  • Know the risk factors of not maintaining sight and the overall prognosis

To learn more about low vision and find resources, visit www.whatislowvision.org.

”The information and resources on this new website can teach people more about the changes they are experiencing and help them make the most of their remaining vision — which can lead to increased independence and quality of life,” said Dr. Michelson.

About The Vision Council
The Vision Council is the global voice for vision care products, practices, and services.  We represent eyewear manufacturers and suppliers in the optical industry by providing education, consumer outreach and advocacy.  The Vision Council also serves as a resource to the public who want to learn more about options in glasses and sunglasses, eyewear trends, and advances in technology.  Learn more at www.thevisioncouncil.org or find us on Facebook.

 

CONTACT: Erin Hildreth, The Vision Council, +1-703-548-5089; or Susan Caldwell, Access Public Relations, +1-540-204-4033

Ophthalmologists Consider Five Tests and Treatments that Would Benefit from Doctor-Patient Conversations

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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American Academy of Ophthalmology Joins Choosing Wisely® Campaign to Advance Quality Eye Care and Promote Health Care Savings

The American Academy of Ophthalmology today announced it is participating in the Choosing Wisely® campaign, a national initiative of the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation to encourage conversations between patients and their doctors about treatment options and efficient use of health care dollars. The Academy is one of 17 organizations joining Choosing Wisely today – representing more than 350,000 physicians, nurses, pathologists, radiologists and other health care professionals – to release lists of commonly performed tests, procedures and treatments that patients and physicians should discuss.

The United States spends more on health care than many other industrialized nations, yet often does not achieve better health outcomes. This may be explained in part by an overuse of unnecessary and duplicative medical tests. Choosing Wisely, which promotes best practices and better management of health care resources, complements physicians’ efforts to use evidence-based medicine to meet patients’ needs.

To ensure that the best care options are considered for ophthalmic patients, the Academy has identified five common tests and treatments that ophthalmologists and patients should discuss:

  1. Preoperative Medical Tests: Don’t perform preoperative medical tests – such as an electrocardiogram or blood glucose test – prior to eye surgery unless there are specific signs indicating a need for them.
  2. Imaging Tests: Don’t routinely order imaging tests when there are no symptoms or signs of significant eye disease.
  3. Antibiotics for Pink Eye: Don’t prescribe antibiotics for pink eye that is caused by an adenovirus.
  4. Antibiotics for Eye Injections: Don’t routinely provide antibiotics before or after injections into the vitreous cavity of the eye.
  5. Punctal Plugs for Dry Eye: Don’t treat dry eye by inserting punctual plugs before attempting other options, such as medical treatments with artificial tears, lubricants and compresses.

“Some experts estimate that up to 30 percent of health care delivered in the U.S. may be unnecessary or duplicative,” said David W. Parke II, M.D., CEO of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. “Not only does this represent significant waste, but it also underscores patients’ unnecessary exposure to risks associated with any test or procedure. The American Academy of Ophthalmology is participating in Choosing Wisely as a way to support evidence-based medicine and promote greater patient involvement in their eye care. By increasing conversations between ophthalmologists and those they treat, we can better guarantee that patients receive the right eye care at the right time.”

The Academy’s health policy committee led the development of the list of five tests and treatments with input from members and ophthalmic subspecialty societies. Numerous recommendations and supporting evidence were researched and reviewed under the leadership of William L. Rich III, M.D., the Academy’s medical director of health policy.

“In medicine, more isn’t necessarily better,” said Dr. Rich. “Conversations around the five tests and treatments identified by the American Academy of Ophthalmology can reduce the potential for over-treating our patients. We will continue our work to identify treatments that could benefit from better conversations between ophthalmologists and their patients.”

To date, twenty-five specialty societies have released lists through Choosing Wisely. The lists released today will be promoted nationwide through the Choosing Wisely campaign’s consumer partners, including Consumer Reports, AARP, Wikipedia and the National Business Coalition on Health.

The Academy’s participation in the Choosing Wisely campaign is one component of its ongoing efforts to promote responsible use of health care resources, without sacrificing quality of care. The Academy also provides a wide variety of educational programs, products and services to ophthalmologists — medical doctors specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye disease and conditions — and the patients they serve in order to improve patient care. The organization’s EyeSmart® program features the most trustworthy and medically accurate consumer information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries.

To learn more about Choosing Wisely and to view the complete lists and details about the recommendations, visit www.ChoosingWisely.org. To learn how patients can start conversations about the five ophthalmic tests and treatments above, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons — Eye M.D.s— with nearly 32,000 members worldwide.  Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org  The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trusted and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org  to learn more.

About the ABIM Foundation
The mission of the ABIM Foundation is to advance medical professionalism to improve the health care system. We achieve this by collaborating with physicians and physician leaders, medical trainees, health care delivery systems, payers, policy makers, consumer organizations and patients to foster a shared understanding of professionalism and how they can adopt the tenets of professionalism in practice. To learn more about the ABIM Foundation, visit www.abimfoundation.org, read our blog blog.abimfoundation.org, connect with us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.

About Choosing Wisely
First announced in December 2011, Choosing Wisely is part of a multi-year effort led by the ABIM Foundation to support and engage physicians in being better stewards of finite health care resources. Participating specialty societies are working with the ABIM Foundation and Consumer Reports to share the lists widely with their members and convene discussions about the physician’s role in helping patients make wise choices. Learn more at www.ChoosingWisely.org.

City Of Las Vegas Presents Musical Theatre And Concerts Feb. 15-17

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Enjoy Rainbow Company’s “Across The Truckee” At The Historic Fifth Street School

The city of Las Vegas offers family entertainment options Feb. 15-17. The Rainbow Company Youth Theatre’s upcoming production of “Across The Truckee” combines musical theatre, Nevada history and audience participation in a “one-of-a-kind” experience that is bound to please audiences of all ages. “Across the Truckee” is the latest original chapter in the company’s on-going “Nevada Series.” Each year a play with music is developed that highlights Nevada’s exciting history and colorful characters. This season, four of Nevada’s most unusual historic figures are included: Eilley Oram, known as “The Washoe Seeress”; Henry T. Comstock, of Comstock Lode fame; Timothy H. O’Sullivan, ground-breaking photographer of the Civil War; and Adolph Sutro, known as the “the king of the Comstock.” The ending of the play may vary from performance to performance, since the audience will participate with choices! The show will be performed Feb. 15-17 at the Historic Fifth Street School, located at 401 S. Fourth St. Showtimes are 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, with additional 2 p.m. shows Saturday and Sunday. Ticket prices are $7 for adults, $5 for teens/seniors/military and $3 for children ages 12 and younger. For tickets and information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-6553 or 229-6383.

Bring your lunch at noon Friday, Feb. 15, to enjoy the latest installment of the city of Las Vegas’ Downtown Cultural Series of free concerts at the Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse Jury Assembly Room at 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South. Open to the public, the hour-long concert will feature the Emanuel Schmidt Quartet, led by guitarist Emanuel Schmidt. Swiss-born Schmidt earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Music Performance at the Wesley Institute in Sydney, Australia, as well as a doctorate in Communication Processes in Jazz Performance from the Sydney Conservatorium of Music. A versatile musician, he plays drums, keyboards, bass and guitar, and composes/arranges music for a full orchestra. For more information on the artist, go online to http://emanuelschmidt.com/ or call (702) 229-3515 for more details.

Tickets are on sale now for the 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, Guy Davis concert at the Charleston Heights Arts Center, located at 800 S. Brush St. Davis is a musician, composer, actor, director and writer. But most importantly, Davis is a bluesman. The blues permeates every corner of Davis’ creativity. Throughout his career, he has dedicated himself to reviving the traditions of acoustic blues and bringing them to as many ears as possible through the material of the great blues masters, along with African-American stories and his own original songs, stories and performance pieces. For more information on Davis, visit www.guydavis.com/. Priced at $10 in advance and $15 on event day, tickets are available online at www.artslasvegas.org or by calling (702) 229-6383.

Five Easy Steps to a Low Maintenance Eco-friendly Landscape

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Gardening expert Melinda Myers provides a step-by-step plan to transform your landscape while saving time, money and a natural resource

It’s possible to create a beautiful landscape and be kind to the environment even with a busy schedule and while staying within budget. “All it takes is a bit of planning and a few low maintenance strategies,” says gardening expert and author Melinda Myers.
Myers recommends these five strategies to create a low maintenance eco-friendly landscape this season.

Be Waterwise

Save money on the water bill, time spent watering and this precious resource, water. Start by growing drought tolerant plants suited to your growing environment. Once established they will only need watering during extended dry spells. Mulch with shredded leaves, evergreen needles, woodchips, or other organic matter to conserve moisture, reduce weeds, and improve the soil as they decompose.

Fertilize with a low nitrogen fertilizer, like Milorganite, that promotes slow steady growth instead of excessive greenery that requires more water. Plus, it won’t burn even during drought.

Put rainwater to work all season long by using rain barrels to capture rainwater off your roof or directly from the sky.

Recycle Yard Waste in the Landscape

Minimize the amount of yard waste produced, reuse what can be in other areas of the landscape and recycle the rest as compost. These are just a few strategies that will save time bagging, hauling, and disposing of yard debris. And better yet, implementing this strategy will save money and time spent buying and transporting soil amendments, since it will be created right in the backyar

Start by leaving grass clippings on the lawn. The short clippings break down quickly, adding organic matter, nutrients and moisture to the soil. Grow trees suited to the growing conditions and available space. That means less pruning and fewer trimmings that will need to be managed.

Make Compost at Home

Recycle yard waste into compost. Put plant waste into a heap and let it rot. Yes, it really is that simple. The more effort put into the process, the quicker the results.
Do not add insect-infested or diseased plant material or perennial weeds like quack grass, annual weeds gone to seed, or invasive plants. Most compost piles are not hot enough to kill these pests. And do not add meat, dairy, or bones that can attract rodents.

Manage Pests in Harmony with Nature

A healthy plant is the best defense against insects and disease. Select the most pest-resistant plants suited to the growing conditions and provide proper care.
Check plants regularly throughout the growing season. It is easier to control a few insects than the hundreds that can develop in a week or two. And when problems arise, look for the most eco-friendly control. Start by removing small infestations by hand. Consider traps, barriers, and natural products if further control is needed. And as always be sure to read and follow label directions carefully.

Energy Wise Landscape Design

Use landscape plantings to keep homes warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer. Homes will have a more comfortable temperature throughout the seasons and energy costs will be reduced.

Plant trees on the east and west side of a house to shade windows in the summer and let the sun shine in and warm it up through the south-facing windows in winter.
Shade air conditioners, so they run more efficiently and be sure to collect and use any water they produce for container gardens.

Incorporate these changes into gardening routines and habits over time. Soon these and many more strategies that help save time and money while being kind to the environment will seem to occur automatically.

Nationally known gardening expert, TV/radio host, author & columnist Melinda Myers has more than 30 years of horticulture experience and has written over 20 gardening books, including Can’t Miss Small Space Gardening. She hosts the nationally syndicated Melinda’s Garden Moment segments which air on over 115 TV and radio stations throughout the U.S. She is a columnist and contributing editor for Birds & Blooms magazine and writes the twice monthly “Gardeners’ Questions” newspaper column. Melinda also has a column in Gardening How-to magazine. Melinda hosted “The Plant Doctor” radio program for over 20 years as well as seven seasons of Great Lakes Gardener on PBS. She has written articles for Better Homes and Gardens and Fine Gardening and was a columnist and contributing editor for Backyard Living magazine. Melinda has a master’s degree in horticulture, is a certified arborist and was a horticulture instructor with tenure. Her web site is www.melindamyers.com

Research Suggests Massage Therapy Is Effective For Health Conditions In People Of All Ages

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Massage Therapy Shown to be Beneficial for Enhancing Immune Function in Preterm Infants, Decreasing Blood Pressure and Improving Stability in Older Persons and Reducing Stress in Cancer Patients.

People of all ages are beginning to understand the many benefits of massage therapy, including the role it can play in overall health and well-being. Recent research compiled by the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) suggests that massage can enhance the immune function in preterm infants, decrease blood pressure and improve stability in older persons, as well as reduce stress and anxiety in cancer patients.
Massage Therapy for Improved Immune Function and Weight Gain in Preterm Infants
Research[1] published in Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), showed that for stable, preterm infants, daily massage therapy is positively associated with higher natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity and weight gain. American Massage Therapy Association President, Cynthia Ribeiro, says of the study, “This research demonstrates that massage therapy can benefit preterm infants by enhancing immunity and stimulating growth. Parents of preterm infants are encouraged to speak with a certified massage therapist to learn more about certain techniques designed to aid in their child’s development.”
Massage Therapy for Improvements in Balance, Neurological, and Cardiovascular Measures in Older Adults
Research[2]published in the International Journal of Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (IJTMB ) found that older adults who receive massage therapy for up to six weeks could benefit from decreased blood pressure and improved stability. “This study suggests that regular massage therapy can produce several advantages for the older generation, including a relaxation affect for the entire body, lowering blood pressure, decreasing stress and improving balance, amongst other things,” says American Massage Therapy Association President, Cynthia Ribeiro.
Massage Therapy for Decreasing Stress in Cancer Patients
Research[3] published in BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care indicates that massage therapy can have a positive influence on the quality of life of people suffering serious illnesses such as brain cancer. The American Massage Therapy Association acknowledges these study results, which suggest that massage therapy can improve physical as well as emotional well-being in patients with late stage disease and when used in combination with standard care, massage can help reduce stress, anxiety, pain and fatigue.
View AMTA’s Research Roundup Volume 2 online
Visit AMTA’s Find a Massage Therapist® to find a qualified massage therapist in your area.
Research Roundup, Volume 1
AMTA issued its first research roundup in 2012 which also highlighted the growing body of evidence showing that massage therapy can be effective for a variety of health conditions, including:
• Osteoarthritis of the knee
• Inflammation after exercise
• Chronic low-back pain
• Fibromyalgia
View this research in further detail.
Massage Therapy Facts
• Between July 2010 and July 2011 roughly 38 million adult Americans (18 percent) had a massage at least once
• 75 percent of American’s surveyed claim that their primary reason for receiving a massage was medical (43 percent) and stress (32 percent) related
• 89 percent of individuals believe that massage can be effective in reducing pain; with 29 percent of respondents admitting they have used massage therapy for pain relief
• 50 percent of people claim their doctor has either strongly recommended or encouraged them to get a massage
Visit AMTA’s research section for more information from our consumer and industry fact sheets.
About AMTA
The American Massage Therapy Association® (AMTA®) is a professional association of more than 56,000 members. AMTA professional members have demonstrated a level of skill and knowledge through education and/or testing and must meet continuing education requirements to retain membership. AMTA provides information about massage therapy to the public and works to improve the professional climate for massage therapists. The association also helps consumers and healthcare professionals locate qualified massage therapists nationwide, through AMTA’s Find a Massage Therapist® free national locator service available at www.findamassagetherapist.org.
[1] Ang J, Lua J, Mathur A, et al. A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial of Massage Therapy on the Immune System of Preterm Infants. Pediatrics. 2012; 130(6):e1549-58.
[2] Sefton JM , Yarar C, Berry JW, et al. Six weeks of massage therapy produces changes in balance, neurological and cardiovascular measures in older persons. International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork.2012; 5(3):28-40.
[3] Keir SM and Saling JR. Pilot study of the impact of massage therapy on sources and levels of distress in brain tumour patients. BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. 2012; 2:363-36.
For more information, contact:
Bob Szafranski
Edelman, 312.240.2687
Bob.Szafranski@edelman.com
or
Caroline Dowdy
Edelman, 312.240.2801
Caroline.Dowdy@edelman.com

Five Physicians Honored for Outstanding Care of Patients Near the End of Life

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Leaders who develop palliative care best practices receive 2013 Hastings Center Cunniff-Dixon Physician Awards.

(Garrison NY, January 15, 2013) Five physicians who have distinguished themselves in caring for patients near the end of life have been named recipients of the 2013 Hastings Center Cunniff-Dixon Physician Awards.

“The Hastings Center Cunniff-Dixon Physician Awards are in their fourth year, and the winners continue to exemplify excellence in doctoring for people with advanced illness,” said Richard Payne, M.D., Esther Colliflower Director of the Duke Institute on Care at the End of Life and a member of the selection committee. “They serve as beacons in their communities by being role models of quality comprehensive care.”

The awards were made in three categories: a senior award and a mid-career award of $25,000 each and three early-career awards of $15,000 apiece. Each recipient has been exemplary in one or more of four areas: medical practice, teaching, research, and community.

The Cunniff-Dixon Foundation, whose mission is to enrich the doctor-patient relationship near the end of life, funds the awards. The Hastings Center, a bioethics research institute that has done groundbreaking work on end-of-life decision-making, cosponsors the awards. The Duke Institute on Care at the End of Life oversees the selection process.

“Establishing high-quality end-of-life care has been a priority for The Hastings Center during its four-decade history,” said Mildred Z. Solomon, president of The Hastings Center. “The outstanding work of these physicians illustrates what we aim to promote in the care of all patients with advanced illness throughout the nation. The compassion and skill of these doctors are making a profound difference to patients and families, and we are enormously proud to honor them.”

The 2013 recipients are:
Senior Physician Award: Charles G. Sasser, M.D., FACP, FAAHPM, director of palliative care services at Conway Medical Center in Conway, S.C. He is a pioneer in palliative care who has been a model and mentor to generations of palliative care providers. Under his leadership, Conway established the first interdisciplinary team for palliative care services in South Carolina – a team that included nurses, social workers, pastors, and physicians. Colleagues praise the value he places on doctor-patient discussions and his mentorship of colleagues from all specialties and practices of medicine.

Mid-Career Physician Award: Daniel C. Johnson, M.D., FAAHPM, national physician lead for palliative care at Kaiser Permanente’s Care Management Institute, as well as director of Palliative Care Innovations and Development at Kaiser Permanente-Colorado and director of the Life Quality Institute in Denver. Dr. Johnson led the expansion of services at Kaiser Permanente-Colorado, partnering with local organizations to more than quadruple patient and family access to end-of-life care. At the Life Quality Institute, an organization dedicated to advancing palliative care through education, he oversaw the development of its award-winning education program for medical students, residents, and other health professionals.

Early-Career Physician Awards:
Drew Rosielle M.D., a palliative care physician and program director for the Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellowship at the University of Minnesota Medical Center in Minneapolis, for his commitment to evidence-based palliative and end-of-life care and education.

Jane de Lima Thomas, M.D., a palliative care physician and associate director of the Harvard Palliative Medicine Fellowship Program at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, for her leadership and impact on the development of the field of palliative care through training and modeling excellence in palliative care practice.

Alen Voskanian, M.D., regional medical director, VITAS Innovative Hospice Care, Torrance, Calif., for his effort to expand and develop innovative models of ambulatory palliative care and to raise awareness of the benefits of palliative and end-of-life care through work with government agencies and professional organizations.

The prize recipients were selected by a committee convened by The Hastings Center. In addition to Dr. Payne, the committee consisted of Thomas P. Duffy, M.D., of Yale University; Kathleen M. Foley, M.D., of Weill Medical College of Cornell University and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; and Larry R. Churchill, Ph.D., of Vanderbilt University.

Nevada Senior Guide : Senior Living Facilities – Some Criteria to Take into Consideration

November 27, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Senior Living Facilities – Some Criteria to Take into Consideration
by: Justin Woods

Once the professionals retire from the work, life becomes too dull for many of them. Though they live under the same roof with their children and grandchildren, still they feel the strong sense of mental loneliness. They miss the office environment where they used to share their feeling and experiences with the other colleagues and it was a real fun for all of them. The working sons and daughters are snowed under the workloads and find no time to chat with the elder parents. Some children are deeply immersed into the thought for their own loaves and fishes. Joining the senior living facilities is a prudent decision for the retirees to cut the shackles of loneliness and share the spaces and experiences with the others.

Senior living facilities: Are they ideal for you- Well, there are many criteria to mull over prior to opting for such choice. The persons feel strong pang of isolation when they have to move out of their houses. Their houses are the largest reservoirs of many fond memories. Still, sometime they have no other way but to choose the senior living facilities. Their children may be settled abroad or in some other parts of the country. They may be too self-centered to take care of the ageing parents. In such cases, the elder persons will feel good by living the rest of their life with the other retired seniors. Sharing the experiences and memories of the bygone days with the other members of the senior living facilities prevents the aggressive depression from setting in.

Senior living facilities: Choose the right one- The elder age is often infested with the minor and major health hazards. So, you need the facility to avail the quick services of a bunch of specialist doctors and trained nurses in times of your needs. Cleanliness and a flock of dedicated and well-behaved staffs are the major considerations prior to making any decision. There are other criteria too to be taken care of before choosing the senior living facilities. The location of the place is also an important factor. The elder persons hate the blaring horns, too much hustle-bustle and love the cool breeze, hues of flowers and sprawling garden in front of the building. So if the senior living facilities offer these criteria, you can go ahead to look for the other benefits.

Quality of food is another essential consideration to ponder over. Gather sufficient information about the qualification of the staffs, provision of any entertainment facility such as TVs or DVDs. The old age does not mean an end of life, it often implies to turn a new leaf. If you have been always a book worm, then ask the authorities if there is any library in the compound of the senior living facilities. Some senior facilities also offer ample spaces to play golf or badminton or lawn tennis. Such indulgence is not only good for the bodies but also a vital tonic for the mental refreshment.

Senior living facilities: Cost factor- It is the deciding factor for many retirees but it is not fair to compromise a lot to find the affordable senior living facilities. The investors often pass the bulk of the multifamily apartment purchase loans borrowed to accommodate the senior citizens to members of the house, but one should avert the over-the-top priced living facilities.
About The Author

Justin Wood is a financial advisor who have good information on Senior living facilities & multifamily apartment purchase loans. For more information please visit http://www.nationalcommercialpropertyloans.com/
The author invites you to visit:
http://www.nationalcommercialpropertyloans.com

Helping Hands Surgical Care Selects Eight Uninsured Nevadans to Receive no-cost surgeries on Second Annual Charity Surgery Day

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Helping Hands Surgical Care Selects Eight Uninsured Nevadans to Receive no-cost surgeries on Second Annual Charity Surgery Day

WHAT: Eight uninsured Nevadans suffering from a variety of conditions will receive surgeries at no cost from Helping Hands Surgical Care (HHSC), a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization founded by Dr. Kevin Petersen and his wife, Kelly Petersen, who also serves as HHSC’s unpaid executive director. The surgeries will be performed by Dr. Petersen and other Las Vegas surgeons, with the assistance from the medical staff at Valley View Surgery Center – all of whom are volunteering their services for the day. A medical advisory board screened the applications to select patients to receive no cost surgeries. HHSC’s mission is to fund and facilitate surgeries for uninsured and underinsured Nevadans without the means to pay for medically necessary surgeries.

WHEN: CHARITY SURGERY DAY – HELPING HANDS SURGICAL CARE
November 13, 2012
Surgeries scheduled on the hour from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (First arrivals starting at 8 a.m.)
Patients and doctors are available to media prior to or on surgery day.

WHERE: Valley View Surgery Center
1330 S. Valley View Blvd.
Las Vegas, NV 89102
PATIENTS:
Jeffery Silverman, 52, Hernia repair, mesh removal
Silverman had an initial hernia repair in 2009 and has been in constant pain ever since. With very little money left in the bank and no insurance, he is embarrassed to ask for help, but grateful Dr. Petersen is willing to remove the mesh that was used in his initial surgery and repair it again without mesh. He has formed a large support group on Facebook comprised of people around the country suffering from the same condition, and he is grateful to be chosen for free surgery. He can’t wait to reclaim his life.

Donald Sykes, 51, Umbilical hernia repair
Sykes is minister of Pentecostal Temple Church of God in Christ, married with four children and eight grandchildren. He had insurance at one point but lost it due to his inability to keep up with the payments. Sykes has suffered from his hernia condition for nine years and is in considerable pain. He is grateful that the pain will be gone soon, that his life will be extended and the hernia will no longer be visible through his clothing.

Mariana Flores, 26, Umbilical hernia repair
Flores is married with two sons, ages 2 and 7. She is excited she will be able to help her sons and be active again. She feels she has not been a good mother since her mobility has been so limited by excessive pain. In fact, she has not been able to clean her home. She is so grateful she was chosen to receive charity surgery so she can become a better mother and wife and not dependent on others.

Mark Babcock, 54, Umbilical and Right inguinal hernia
Babcock, who is single with three children, is unable to work because of his medical condition. He currently lives with a friend free of charge. He has been to the emergency room twice and was turned away both times because the surgery to cure his condition is considered elective. He is looking forward to regaining the confidence he has lost over the last seven years as he has struggled with debilitating pain. He is extremely thankful to finally receive the help he needs to get back his life.

Mario Zaccone, 49, Right inguinal hernia
Zaccone has suffered from his hernia for five years and is unemployed because of his inability to work due to pain. Previously, he worked in the food industry where he was required to lift, which is impossible for him now given his current condition. He is single with four children and lives with his mother because of his inability to provide for his children and care for himself. He is extremely grateful for HHSC and looks forward to beginning his life again.

Paul Labarre, 42, Umbilical hernia repair
Labarre is a veteran construction worker who with specific skills in flooring and laying carpet. He is unable to work due to his hernia and has lost his home and insurance. He currently lives with his parents and is looking forward to being healthy again and passing a physical so he can go back to work and provide for his family.

Michael Haws, 53, Left inguinal hernia repair
Haws has worked for years in the construction and oil industries. He has not been able to lift due to his hernia condition. Unable to provide for himself, he has been forced to move in with his brother. His current situation has had a major effect on his self-esteem, and he feels drained both physically and emotionally. He is thrilled to be chosen and looks forward to a bright future.

Linda Willis, 59, Trigger finger
Willis has been without medical insurance since she lost her job several years ago. Right-handed, she has not been able to do anything with her right hand for a long time. This includes preparing food, writing and simple daily tasks. Willis has been forced to move in with her daughter for both financial support and assistance with her daily care. She is excited about the future and the possibility of regaining some independence. She particularly looks forward to resuming things she enjoys, including sewing and refinishing furniture.

PARTICIPATING DOCTORS:

Dr. Kevin C. Petersen, General Surgeon
Dr. Bishr Hijazi, Hand Surgeon
Dr. Jon Darwin Halling, Anesthesiologist
Dr. Hosny Habashy, Anesthesiologist

COMMUNITY SUPPORT:
The Las Vegas community is coming together to support the efforts of HHSC.
• Valley View Surgery Center is donating the use of the one operating room for an entire day.
• The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf is providing coffee and breakfast for the physicians and medical staff (up to 35 people) on surgery day.

About Helping Hands Surgical Care
Helping Hands Surgical Care is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization whose mission is to fund and facilitate surgeries for uninsured and underinsured individuals without the means to pay for medically necessary, quality of life surgeries. Founded by Dr. Kevin Petersen of Las Vegas, Nevada based No Insurance Surgery, Helping Hands Surgical Care values the health and well-being of each individual regardless of their ability to pay. The organization is guided by its focus on the physician-patient relationship and its dedication to transforming and improving the lives of those it serves. For more information, visit www.HelpingHandsSurgicalCare.com or call 702-242-5393.

Daily Dental Care Tips

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Daily Dental Care Tips

(Family Features) While regular visits to the dentist’s office for routine cleanings are important for dental health, taking care of your teeth and gums each day is paramount to keeping your mouth healthy. Here are some brushing-and-beyond tips to help prevent oral health problems down the road.

Preventative care is imperative. Basic hygiene practices can help maintain the health of your mouth. Remember to:

• Regularly brush with toothpaste, floss and visit your dentist. Brush at least twice a day.

• Purchase a brush with soft bristles and make sure to use light pressure while brushing so you don’t wear away tooth enamel. A great option is a battery-powered toothbrush like the ARM & HAMMER® Spinbrush® ProClean®.

• Pay attention to your toothbrush. Does it need to be replaced? A good rule is to purchase a new toothbrush every three to four months.

• Speak with your dentist about best brushing and flossing practices, as well as the recommended number of visits to the dentist’s office each year. The number of necessary visits may vary depending on specific patient needs.

Preventing enamel loss. Consuming too many acidic foods or soft drinks, and a long list of other factors, can weaken enamel. Enamel loss can lead to cavities, tooth sensitivity, discoloration and other oral health problems. To help maintain your tooth enamel, try to avoid drinks such as soda and fruit juices, and foods such as those high in citric acid or sugar content whenever possible.

You can also look to products such as ARM & HAMMER® Complete Care™ Enamel Strengthening Toothpaste, which is specially formulated with Fluoride and Liquid Calcium® to help rebuild enamel. In addition, the baking soda within the toothpaste will help neutralize acids left behind by food and liquid.

When to call the dentist. Between dental visits, patients may experience symptoms of oral health problems. Make sure you call a doctor if you notice:

• Tooth pain
• Tooth decay or cavities
• Receding gum lines
• Bleeding of the gums
• Increased tooth sensitivity
• Discoloration of teeth
• Lumps on the lip or in the mouth or throat
To learn more about how to protect your teeth, visit www.myoralcare.com.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Innovative Senior Housing Community Takes Shape in Tucson include Horses! (equine therapy)

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Read about the role of horses and Dr. Andrew Weil along with other exciting news about Watermark’s latest innovation in senior living, The Hacienda at the River in Tucson, Arizona.

Innovative Senior Housing Community Takes Shape in Tucson
Partnerships and Affiliations Announced
Tucson, Ariz. – Before concrete is even poured for the Hacienda at the River, longtime Tucson senior housing developer David Freshwater and his operating partner, David Barnes, are carefully laying the foundation for Tucson’s newest and most innovative senior living community by solidifying partnerships and affiliations with some of Tucson’s biggest names in integrative medicine and therapy.
Most notably, Freshwater and Barnes are teaming with Andrew Weil, MD, to oversee onsite organic gardens and establish culinary principles that will promote optimum health. Co-directors of the Arizona Center on Aging, Mindy Fain, MD, and Janko Nikolich-Zugich, MD, Ph.D., have agreed to provide team-based interdisciplinary healthcare (Fain), incorporating the latest standards and advances of geriatric research (Nikolich) to Hacienda residents, complementing their primary care. Steven Wool, M.D. will serve as medical director and private practice doctor for the community. Evan Kligman, M.D. will coordinate and act as ongoing liaison for all University of Arizona partnerships and affiliations with the Hacienda at the River and other programs under development for Freshwater and Barnes’ organization, Watermark Retirement Communities.
According to Freshwater, the Hacienda team has also entered into an agreement with Barbara K. Rector, MA, CEIP co-founder of Therapeutic Riding of Tucson and Adventures in Awareness, to direct onsite equine therapy, believed to be the first program of its kind to be permanently integrated into an assisted living community.
“We’ve seen equine therapy work so well with residents in other Watermark locations that we’ve made it central to our vision for The Hacienda at the River,” said Freshwater. “Given that The Hacienda site is historically a horse property, we feel this use is especially fitting.”
Utilizing Mission Revival architecture, reflective of the Southwest’s iconic heritage, and set on the terrace at the edge of the Rillito River near River and Hacienda del Sol roads, the Hacienda at the River is envisioned to be a new style of community for mature individuals who need assisted living, memory care, nursing and short-term rehabilitation. The Hacienda is Watermark’s branded response to a new paradigm for de-institutionalized senior living environments: elders receive care almost invisibly through universal workers integrated into the core household, creating a family-centered setting that seamlessly provides expert personal and health support. Each of the four single-story homes at the Hacienda includes a living room and kitchen, library, family room and a front porch. The homes have courtyards with mesquite and other canopy trees. Resident suites in each home have private baths and roll in showers. Nursing and rehab services will also be provided at the new community in a two-story building with the look and feel of a boutique hotel rather than a traditional, institutional nursing home.
Other features of the development will include:
• Green building techniques including water harvesting and gray water systems, and other energy and water saving techniques leading to LEED certification;
• On-site orchard and gardens for providing a portion of fruits and vegetables used at the community;
• On-site restaurant and café featuring natural, organic foods (including those grown on-site) whenever possible serving residents, family members and visitors alike;
• Two rehab facilities for short-term and outpatient services including speech, hearing, occupational, and physical therapies. The Hacienda is also planning to integrate aquatic as well as equine therapies into its rehab programming.
The purchase of the 7.5-acre site closed October 3 and groundbreaking is expected in 2013. More affiliations are in the works, to be announced.
Freshwater and Barnes are nationally noted seniors’ housing experts who happen to live in Tucson. They opened their first senior living community, The Fountains at La Cholla, 25 years ago. Watermark now operates 31 communities coast to coast.
www.watermarkcommunities.com

Dr. Quinn Pauly Joins Premier Care at Renown Medical Group

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Dr. Quinn Pauly Joins Premier Care at Renown Medical Group

To help meet the need of patients in northern Nevada seeking more convenience and greater access to their primary care physician, Renown Medical Group is pleased to announce the addition of Quinn Pauly, M.D. as a new Premier Care physician.

Dr. Pauly is board certified in family medicine. He received his medical degree from the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine and completed his residency at Natividad Medical Center in Salinas, Calif.

The Premier Care Program, first introduced to the region through Renown Health last October, offers patients greater access to their primary care physician beyond traditional scheduled office visits. The program is based on a national trend and is made possible through a reduced practice size.

“Patients are requesting enhanced access and expanded personalized care,” said Larry Trilops, vice president of Ambulatory Services at Renown Health. “This program allows us to meet customer demand.”

What’s the difference?
Renown Medical Group offers same or next day appointments with your doctor if he’s available or another doctor, within Renown’s Medical Group consisting of more than 80 providers and 15 locations, if he’s not.

In contrast, the Premier Care program offers more access through a reduced practice size. With monthly membership fees (not covered by insurance) ranging from $35 – $55, you may communicate directly with your primary care physician 24/7, including weekends.

“My focus has always been to take time to listen to my patients so I can attend to their healthcare needs thoroughly,” Dr. Pauly said. “I enjoy getting to know my patients and their families and strive to give my patients personalized, compassionate care”.

Key Premier Care Benefits include:
• A smaller, low volume practice.
• Convenient appointments with your dedicated Premier Care physician with little to no waiting guaranteed.
• Online communication directly with your physician, regarding scheduled appointments, sick visits or general medical advice, with a response within 24 hours, seven days per week.
• Extended office time for appointments.

For more information about Premier Care, please visit renown.org/premiercare or call 775-982-8265.

About Renown Medical Groups
Renown Medical Group has more than 80 providers at 15 locations including Reno, Sparks, Fernley and Silver Springs.

Earlier this year, Renown announced awards that recognized two Renown Medical Group sites for initiatives for excellence in patient quality. In 2010, Renown became the first NCQA recognized Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) in Nevada, and in 2011, Renown became the fourth organization in the country to be recognized as a Level III PCMH under the new 2011 standards.

Renown Medical Group physicians provide preventive care and health education for all ages and treat most common illnesses and injuries including colds, flu, and aches and pains. They also coordinate their patients’ medical care including checkups, immunizations, referrals to specialists, lab and x-ray services and hospital admissions. Physicians see patients by scheduled appointment. Medical Group locations accept most insurance plans, including Hometown Health, UnitedHealthcare, Anthem Blue Cross/Blue Shield, Cigna, Great West, Coventry/First Health, Humana, Principal, Tricare and Medicare.

For added convenience, Renown Medical Group is the only primary care provider in the region that offers a secure, online venue for patients to manage their healthcare. With MyChart, patients can schedule and keep track of appointments, obtain certain test results and request prescription refills 24 hours a day. To sign up, ask a Medical Assistant for your access code at your next office visit. Same-day appointments are available by calling 982-5000, Monday through Thursday between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m., and Fridays between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. For more information, visit renown.org/medicalgroup.

Helping Hands Surgical Care Announces Second Annual Charity Surgery Day

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Local nonprofit seeks qualified patients to receive medically necessary surgery at no cost

Dr. Kevin Petersen, and Kelly Petersen, co-founders of Helping Hands Surgical Care (HHSC), a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization whose mission is to fund and facilitate surgeries for uninsured Nevadans without the means to pay for medically necessary surgeries, announce the second annual Charity Surgery Day, Nov. 13, 2012. HHSC doctors will provide 10 free surgeries that day to uninsured Nevadans without the means to pay and who do not qualify for government assistance through plans such as Medicare.

Dr. Petersen, a board certified general surgeon who has practiced for more than 26 years, along with his wife, Kelly, HHSC’s unpaid executive director, launched HHSC last year to end chronic pain and suffering for Nevadans with no other options. Since the organization’s inaugural Charity Surgery Day on Nov. 15 last year, HHSC has performed 24 free surgeries for uninsured Nevadans.

HHSC is seeking patients who may qualify to receive medically necessary surgery at no cost on Charity Surgery Day. Applicants must qualify both financially and medically and are screened via an advisory panel comprised of medical professionals.

Qualified patients must have a stable, chronic, non-emergency condition that requires surgery to restore a disabled patient to normal function or to remove a potentially life threatening condition, such as hernia repair, gall bladder removal, select gynecological surgeries, select back surgeries and cataract removal. Candidates must reside in Nevada, lack medical insurance and the resources to pay for surgery. They must also be acceptable surgical candidates. To review patient eligibility requirements and apply for surgery, visit www.HelpingHandsSurgicalCare.com and click on the How to Apply link.

In addition to Petersen, doctors working with HHSC include Allan Stahl, M.D., cardiology, Michael Verni, M.D., urology; Cameron Earl, M.D., plastic surgery; Jeannie Khavkin, M.D., otolaryngology and facial plastic surgery; Yevgeniy Khavkin, M.D., spine surgery; Ronette Cyka, M.D., gynecology; and George McMickle, M.D., ophthalmology and eye surgery. Medical District Surgery Center, has once again committed to donating the use of operating rooms on Charity Surgery Day.

“This past year has been one of the most gratifying in my entire career,” said Dr. Petersen, who has personally performed several of the organization’s free surgeries over the past year. “Helping people to get back their lives, to go back to work, to restore their ability to provide for their families and to start enjoying life again, is incredibly rewarding and reminds me of the reason I practice medicine,” said Petersen. “The spirit of HHSC has caught on in the medical community, and we are grateful for the other doctors who have willingly joined our program. It is truly a team effort that takes members of the entire medical community working together to make a difference.”

While all participating doctors waive their fees, surgery isn’t free. Costs such as lab fees, anesthesia, prescription, nurses and surgical techs must still be paid.

To volunteer to provide medical services, to make a donation that covers hard costs of surgery, or to inquire about patient qualifications to receive charity surgery, call 702-242-5393 or visit www.HelpingHandsSurgicalCare.com.

About Helping Hands Surgical Care
Helping Hands Surgical Care is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization whose mission is to fund and facilitate surgeries for uninsured and underinsured individuals without the means to pay for medically necessary, quality of life surgeries. Founded by Dr. Kevin Petersen of Las Vegas, Nevada based No Insurance Surgery, Helping Hands Surgical Care values the health and well-being of each individual regardless of their ability to pay. The organization is guided by its focus on the physician-patient relationship and its dedication to transforming and improving the lives of those it serves. For more information, visit www.HelpingHandsSurgicalCare.com or call 702-242-5393.

Renown Health News Update – October 2012

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Renown Health News Update – October 2012
Renown Health is committed to providing media with the latest news and events, national health trends and observances. Subject matter experts are available to discuss the following topics. Please contact Dan Davis at 775-982-6370 or ddavis2@renown.org to schedule an interview. Photos and video can also be made available.

INSIDE RENOWN HEALTH
• Pinterest – Renown Health has launched a Pinterest page featuring boards like Kidtastic Art, No Place Like Home and Passion for Purple. Renown’s Motivated Mommies board features pins from healthy and active moms who maintain a balance between work, parenting and self. If you know someone who fits this description, nominate them to participate by sending an email to support@renown.org.
• Flu Shots Available – As winter begins, so will an increase in cold and flu sicknesses. To keep from catching the flu virus, people should protect themselves with flu shots. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that everyone six months and older get a flu vaccine each year. A Renown representative is available to speak about ways to prevent the flu virus and other methods to keep from getting sick.
• Komen Race for the Cure – Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer and the fifth most common cause of death. To help spread awareness and raise funds, Renown Health’s team Renown Racers will raise money and participate in the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. Renown also offers preventative measures for women in the community. Screening and self breast exams are imperative to all women and should be discussed with a doctor. A medical expert is available to talk about the importance of early detection.

NATIONAL TRENDS LOCALIZED
• Halloween Tips and Tricks – As Halloween approaches, parents should prepare for a safe and healthy evening of trick or treating. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest offering nutritious snacks, limiting the number of treats children eat and ensuring that costumes and makeup are safe for children to wear. A Renown representative can discuss ways to make this Halloween night safe and fun for kids.
• Survival from Heart Attacks on the Rise – Death due to heart attacks is on the decline in the United States. Some doctors believe this trend is due to changes in healthcare and increases in medical technology. At Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health, leading edge physicians and technology help community members stay healthy and recover quickly if heart problems occur. A Renown representative is available to discuss ways to prevent heart attacks and to improve survival chances if one occurs.
• Paleo Diet – The Paleolithic Diet and other elimination diets like it have become increasingly popular as a way to lose weight quickly. Yet, once an individual stops dieting, he or she is likely to gain back most of the weight lost. A Renown representative is available to discuss more effective ways to lose weight and keep it off.

IMPORTANT HEALTH DATES/OBSERVANCES
• National Health Education Week – National Health Education Week is Oct. 15 to Oct. 19. This celebration focuses national attention on a major public health issue. This year’s health issue is “Adolescent Health: Planting Seeds for a Healthier Generation,” which aims to improve the health and future of America’s youth. A Renown representative is available to discuss ways to keep children healthy both physically and mentally.
• National Physical Therapy Month – October is dedicated to recognizing the important roles of those medical professionals who keep us moving. At the CARF accredited Renown Rehabilitation Hospital, physicians and physical therapists provide quality care to patients helping them to get back to their lives. A Renown Rehab representative can discuss how physical therapy helps people return to the quality of life they desire.
• Respiratory Care Week – Respiratory Care Week is Oct. 21 to Oct. 27. The week is dedicated to respiratory care professionals, and it is designed to bring awareness to the lung diseases like CDP and asthma. At Renown, the department of Respiratory Care Services dedicates itself to patients ensuring they receive the treatment necessary to manage their diseases. A Renown representative is available to discuss ways to manage respiratory diseases and treatment options available at Respiratory Care Services.

How to Care for an Elderly Person or Senior

October 11, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

How to Care for an Elderly Person or Senior
by: Starlet Nicole

It is not always easy caring for an elderly person. Their physical condition, health issues and their emotional state can present challenges for you, the caregiver. There are no doubts that caring for an elderly person is admirable, but it certainly comes with stress and at times can be overwhelming.

Far too many people feel guilty that they can not care for an elderly person on their own. Life presents far too many challenges and more often than not raising a family, paying into a mortgage and keeping food on the table can be challenging enough let alone adding to this caring for an elderly loved one. Although this can be challenging – it is not impossible. Preparing yourself and your family members for the transition is essential in order to make this work well.

Physical Considerations

Get informed about the physical needs of your loved one. Talk to the doctor and to anyone else who may have the wisdom and knowledge to help you care for the elderly member of your family. Know what to expect, what medications are required. Using services provided by a certified in-home caregiver from a professional agency can assist you in times that you need that extra help.

Keeping all important information in one file is important and this includes all medical information including test results, names and phone numbers of doctors, appointment dates, hospital cards, and insurance information. If your loved one is taking a lot of medications, make a chart to help keep track of what medication is to be taken and when.

Always be sure the home is safe. If your loved one uses a walker be sure throw rugs are secure, and there are no obstacles for them to trip over. Install safety railings should this help. If your loved one can get confused at times, it’s also a good safety precaution to have a baby gate positioned high enough in the door frame at staircases so that they can not fall down.

Emotional Considerations

Spending time caring for the elderly does not have to be all about taking care of their personal needs. Spend time asking them about their life. Everyone has stories to share about their life and some seniors have great experiences to share.

Teach an elderly person about the Internet. Many elderly people are nervous about computers and teaching them about all the amazing benefits of the Internet can spark new life in the person you are caring for.

The brain likes to stay active and no better way to do this than to play word games, crossword puzzles or even some board games such as Scrabble.

Always remember to be understanding because as we get older we tend to be very set in our ways and this means being stubborn at times. If the person you are caring for is being very stubborn and it is not a big issue, let it go. If the stubbornness is over something that is not negotiable it’s much easier to handle and you’ll have much less stress when you know to expect it.

When you have all the tools you need, it will make caring for the elderly much easier.

About The Author

Starlet is professional author for GC Nexus Group, Elderly Caregivers Agency help in finding professional caregivers throughout Montreal and Toronto in Canada. GC Nexus offers Live in Caregivers Canada, senior caregiver and elderly home care services for your parents and spouses by professionals.

http://www.gcnexus.com/elderly-care/
The author invites you to visit:
http://www.gcnexus.com

Hometown Health Offers Drive-Thru Flu Shots at Renown South Meadows

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases, Reno 

Hometown Health and Senior Care Plus will provide northern Nevada residents with the convenience of drive-thru seasonal flu shots, Saturday, Oct. 6 from 8 a.m. to noon, at Renown South Meadows Medical Center, 10101 Double R Blvd. This event is one of more than 45 scheduled Renown Health flu and pneumonia shot offerings around the Truckee Meadows community this season.

“The drive-thru flu shot event is one of our most popular events because of the ease and convenience it offers,” said Ty Windfeldt, vice president of Hometown Health. “Depending on wait times, the entire process can take as little as 10 minutes. It’s great for people who know they should get the shot or want the shot but have trouble finding the time to fit in a visit to their doctor’s office.”

Flu shots are offered at no cost to Medicare beneficiaries (Part B), members of Senior Care Plus or Hometown Health fully insured HMO and PPO plans and Renown Health employee plan members. All other individuals can receive the seasonal flu shots for $28. Pneumonia shots will be offered for those people whose medical conditions could be helped by one (individuals must meet CDC requirements). There are no out-of-pocket costs for Medicare (Part B), Senior Care Plus members or Hometown Health fully insured HMO and PPO plan members. For all others, the pneumonia shot is $70.

“The Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommends a flu vaccine as the first and most important thing people can do to protect against the flu,” said Lori Mitchell, health management services manager at Renown Health. “Additional preventive actions like washing your hands regularly and covering your cough will help stop the spread of germs.”

If unable to attend this flu shot event, people are encouraged to visit renown.org/flu for a complete flu and pneumonia shot schedule and locations. Pediatric flu shots are available by appointment only for children ages six months to eight years old. Call 775-982-5433 to schedule. Flu shots are available to children ages nine to 17 with a parent present.

About Hometown Health
Established in 1988, Hometown Health is the insurance division of Renown Health. Hometown Health is northern Nevada’s largest and most experienced health-insurance company. Providing wide-ranging medical coverage and great service to members, Hometown Health represents a philosophy of healthcare that emphasizes active partnerships between members and physicians. Hometown Health values prevention as a key component of comprehensive care – reducing the risks of illness and helping to treat small problems before they can become more severe. Hometown Health offers a number of insurance products including HMO, PPO, HAS, Dental, Vision and Senior Care Plus, northern Nevada’s first Medicare Advantage Plan. For more information, call 775-982-3000 or visit hometownhealth.com

Blindness and Vision Loss Spike by 23 Percent in the U.S.

September 24, 2012 by · Comments Off on Blindness and Vision Loss Spike by 23 Percent in the U.S.
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

American Academy of Ophthalmology Urges Seniors to Save their Sight through Prevention and Early Detection

Blindness and vision impairment are on the rise in the United States. A recent report by Prevent Blindness America indicates that, since the year 2000, incidence of blindness and vision impairment has increased by 23 percent among Americans age 40 and older.[i] However, most blindness in this country is preventable with proper eye care. The American Academy of Ophthalmology and EyeCare America urge Americans to get regular eye exams to better prevent and detect sight-stealing eye diseases.

Rising rates of age-related eye diseases and conditions are largely to blame for the increase in vision loss. Four of the most common causes of vision loss are diabetic retinopathy, where blood vessels in the retina swell or become blocked due to diabetes; age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a breakdown of the eye’s macula; glaucoma, an eye disease that damages the optic nerve; and cataracts, in which the eye’s lens becomes clouded. These conditions have shown a marked increase over the past 12 years:
• The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy increased by 89 percent.
• The frequency of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) increased by 25 percent.
• The incidence of glaucoma increased by 22 percent.
• The number of people affected by cataracts increased by 19 percent.[ii]
As baby-boomers continue to age, the incidence of age-related eye disease is also expected to continue to increase. Currently, people age 80 and older constitute only 8 percent of the population, but account for 69 percent of all cases of blindness.[iii] Early detection and treatment by an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor – may help prevent and in some cases, such as cataracts, even reverse vision loss.

Many seniors age 65 and older may qualify for an eye exam and up to 1 year of care at no out-of-pocket-cost through EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. EyeCare America matches qualifying patients age 65 and older with an ophthalmologist who provides a comprehensive medical eye examination. EyeCare America is co-sponsored by the Knights Templar Eye Foundation, Inc, with additional support from Alcon. To see if you or a loved one is eligible, visit the online referral center at www.eyecareamerica.org.

“Regular eye exams are imperative to detect and treat eye diseases and prevent serious vision loss,” said Richard P. Mills, M.D., chairman of EyeCare America. “This is especially true for people age 65 and older who are at increased risk for eye diseases. That’s why EyeCare America is so focused on providing access to eye care, and we hope that fewer people will suffer from preventable causes of blindness as a result.”

To learn more about EyeCare America or to find out if you or a loved one qualifies for the program, visit www.eyecareamerica.org. Learn more about eye diseases and conditions, and keeping your eyes healthy at www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® public education program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision, by providing the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. Visit www.geteyesmart.org to learn more.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. Since its inception, EyeCare America has helped more than 1.7 million people. More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

Fall Prevention Week!

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Fall Prevention Week Is Rapidly Approaching! “Don’t Fall Down! Fall Prevention 101 for Older Adults” Now Available as E-Book

The third week in September has been nationally recognized as “Fall Prevention Week” and we need your help to increase awareness of the growing public health concern of falls among our aging population!

Falls are the leading cause of accidental death and non-fatal injury for people over the age of 65. The greying of America is causing major concern among government agencies due to the financial and emotional costs to individuals, their families and society. In 2000, the average cost of a fall was over $28,000 (CDC, 2006). The good news is that up to 50% of falls can be prevented through increased awareness and behavior change.

“Don’t Fall Down! Fall Prevention 101 for Older Adults” explains situations that increase the risk of a fall and how a person can reduce that risk. Some factors can be changed and others must be accepted. The first step a person can do to prevent falls is become aware of things that contribute to instability and then make the necessary change when possible.

Balance is a complicated messenger system and this 70-page book offers scientifically-researched concepts in an easy to understand manner. The reader will gain a better understanding of what may be causing loss of balance, how to reduce the risk of a fall and where to go for help.

The index includes a “Help, I’ve Fallen and I CAN Get Up” demonstration, Fall Risk Medications List, Home Safety Checklist and a Senior Resource Directory.
Written in large print, this is a must read for older adults, loved ones, family members, caregivers, staff members, program planners, activity directors, nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, and doctors.

Knowledge is empowering. This easy to read book encourages a person to take responsibility his/her well-being in order to remain independent.

To request a review copy of this e-book, or to arrange an interview with the author, please contact:

Name: Kelly Ward, aka, “The Fall Prevention Lady”
E-mail: wardkelly@mac.com
Website: http://www.thefallpreventionlady.com
Tel: 916-821-5715

Renown Health Notices

Renown Health is committed to providing media with the latest news and events, national health trends and observances. Subject matter experts are available to discuss the following topics. Please contact Dan Davis at 775-982-6370 or ddavis2@renown.org to schedule an interview. Photos and video can also be made available.

INSIDE RENOWN HEALTH
• Hand Foot and Mouth Disease – During August, Washoe County School District and the Washoe County Health District issued warnings to parents of school children about hand, foot and mouth disease. A Renown Health pediatrician is available to answer questions about the disease and to suggest ways to prevent its spread.
• FastTrack ERs – The Emergency Rooms (ERs) at Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center now have the region’s first and only FastTrack ERs. Open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, the system is designed to treat patients who need immediate attention for small emergencies including minor cuts and burns, allergic reactions and other minor injuries. A Renown Health representative is available to discuss how FastTrack ER will help improve a patient’s ER experience.
• Pathway to Excellence® – Both Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center have been recognized as the first two Pathway to Excellence® hospitals in Nevada by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. This award honors a work environment designed to improve overall nursing satisfaction and retention of quality nursing staff. A Renown Health representative is available to discuss what this honor means for patient care.

NATIONAL TRENDS LOCALIZED
• Digital Accountability to Get Healthy – Getting exercise, eating right and losing weight always seems to be a challenge. Already connected to the digital world, people have turned to using social media tools and platforms to achieve their health goals. Renown Health has Healthy Tracks, an online program, to encourage employees to get screenings, exercise and eat nutritiously. A representative can speak on the benefits of digital accountability and how community members can become part of the Healthy Tracks challenge.
• Swallowing foreign objects – Each year, more than 100,000 cases of kids swallowing foreign objects are reported in the United States. Sometimes, the swallowed object may not harm a child at all. Other times, a doctor’s visit may be necessary. A Renown Health representative is available to talk about what to do if your child swallows something he or she should not.
• Dense breasts causing mammogram concerns – More women are learning from their physicians that they may have breasts too dense for mammograms to give a good picture. Women whose breast tissue is very dense have a greater risk of developing breast cancer than women whose breasts contain more fatty tissue. In addition, dense breast tissue makes spotting possible tumors on a mammogram more difficult. A Renown Health specialist can discuss other preventative measures and screenings women should take.

IMPORTANT HEALTH DATES/OBSERVANCES
• National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month – More than 23 million children and teenagers in the United States ages 2 to 19 are obese or overweight. Nearly one third of America’s children are at early risk for Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and even stroke. A pediatrician from Renown Health can discuss ways to prevent childhood obesity and keep children healthy.
• Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month – More than 20,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year, and approximately 15,000 women die annually from the disease. Ovarian Cancer is referred to as the silent killer because it usually is not discovered until its advanced stages. A gynecologist is available to talk about ways women can discover and effectively treat ovarian cancer early.
• Prostate Cancer Awareness Month – Prostate Cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in America affecting 1 in 6 men. Renown Institute for Cancer offers patients PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) screenings, da Vinci Robotic Surgery and leading radiation treatment options including TomoTherapy. Low-cost health screenings are offered every Wednesday. A local doctor is available to speak about this screening and cancer treatment options.

There’s No Place Like Home

September 1, 2012 by · Comments Off on There’s No Place Like Home
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Press-Media Releases 

There’s No Place Like Home
By Michael Clark

If you are on Medicare and have had a recent hospital stay, experts say there is about a 1-in-5 chance you will find yourself back in the hospital again within a month. Hospital readmissions are not only expensive they are hard on both patients and families. According to analysts, three-fourths of these readmissions are potentially avoidable.
Now, the Nevada Partnership for Value-driven Healthcare (NPV) has an initiative with an ultimate goal of reducing these hospital readmissions by at least 10%. The No Place Like Home Campaign is being implemented in Nevada by HealthInsight, the state’s Medicare Quality Improvement Organization.

Typically, problems begin when patients receive inadequate preparation for discharge from the hospital. The handover from the hospital to outpatient providers is poorly handled, and patients and their family caregivers are left to cope on their own with medical issues that they don’t understand. In fact, only about half of discharged patients follow up with their primary-care physicians after they leave the hospital, and those who don’t are much more likely to be readmitted than those who do see a doctor.
“Have we properly prepared the patient for a return home?” asks Deborah Huber, executive director of the non-profit organization HealthInsight, a prominent member of the NPV. “Poor communication is at the heart of the problem.”
Huber points out that too often people released from hospital care do not know when to go to their primary-care doctor, or which medications to take, or the costs involved. Making matters worse, there are no clear lines of authority. As a result, the system sets these individuals up to fail and creates a dangerous situation for patients, according to Brian Jack, an expert on hospital engineering.

In one study, for example, 78 percent of patients discharged from the ER did not understand their diagnosis, their ER treatment, home care instructions, or warnings signs of when to return to the hospital. Health care providers are partly responsible for this lack of comprehension.

IHI, a Boston-based nonprofit organization, advises hospitals and other institutions to use a patient-centered approach that looks at post-discharge care through a patient’s eyes. By doing “deep dives” into several patient histories, IHI says, and finding out why the patients were readmitted, it’s possible to understand where the entire process falls short and begin to fix it.

Another area that needs improvement has to do with what is called the transitions of care…do the health care providers receiving the patient know what the ones sending the patient home knows? “The patient gets stuck in the middle. They don’t know what to do,” Huber noted. And what about Advanced Planning…end of life care? Have patients and their families made these ultimate decisions? If not, these issues must be addressed. What if patients don’t want to go back to the hospital? Are they aware of what palliative care or hospice can do? “Medicare provides a good hospice benefit. The whole family can benefit from that.”

Here the goal is to make someone as comfortable as possible and give family members the support they need to help them through this difficult time. “These are the type of things I see every day with my home health patients, I see where patients would not have to return to acute if the goals set here could be obtained,” said Lucia Cleveland a home health occupational therapist.

HealthInsight’s goal is to reduce 30-day readmissions by 20% by October 2013. Finally, Huber observes “this is a community problem, not merely a hospital problem.” This community effort will produce sustainable and replicable strategies to achieve high-value health care for individuals in our communities and save potentially millions of dollars in healthcare costs.

“One way we support this statewide community effort is through a web-based campaign where providers, payers, and patients can pledge their support and become an active participant,” noted Jackie Buttaccio, HealthInsight’s Quality Improvement Manager. “The website is a one stop shop for all things readmissions with resources and tools that can be downloaded, and local success stories can be shared. “ The address is http://noplacelikehomenv.com

HealthInsight also supports this work through face to face workshops for providers to learn more about what they can change about their systems of care to keep patients safe from an avoidable hospital readmission.

Lions 2nd Annual Laugh-a-thon

September 1, 2012 by · Comments Off on Lions 2nd Annual Laugh-a-thon
Filed under: Events, General 

Laughter is still the best medicine!

Senior citizens and other needy people in the community will get a health
boost thanks to special musical-comedy event being organized by the Lions HealthFirst
Foundation and sponsored by South Point Hotel & Casino.
The event will be held Sunday (Sept. 23rd) at the South Point Hotel & Casino, in the
main showroom, located at 9777 So. Las Vegas Blvd. and is open to the public. Tickets are $25, with proceeds helping to fund the Foundation’s ultrasound health screening program.

Because of fund-raising activities such as this event, the ultrasound exams are
free or very low cost to patients, according to James Bartel, president of the Foundation. He said the exams pick up potentially serious medical problems such as masses, cysts, tumors and blockages. “Our screenings give you a heads up on what’s going on inside your body. They’re painless, non-invasive and only take about 60, minutes,” said Bartel.
The event will include music and comedy as well as meeting and mingling with a host of
celebrities and some of Las Vegas’ most prominent medical doctors.

Among those performing are entertainers Rich Little, Paige O’Hara, Bill Fayne,
Genevieve, Michele LaFong, Gordie Brown, Leigh Zimmerman, Lisa Smith and the Shades of Sinatra and Marlon Multo.  Kelly McDonald will Emcee the event, as well as perform.

Bartel said the event begins at 2 p.m. and ends at 4 p.m.
Additional information can be secured and tickets purchased by calling the Lions
HealthFirst Foundation at 739-6393. More information on the Foundation and its ultrasound screening program can be found on the Internet at www.lionshealthfirst.org.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Health Care Partners Medical Group

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Las Vegas 

facebook.com/healthcarepartnersnevada

About Us

HealthCare Partners Nevada is a network of more than 200 primary care physicians and more than 1,300 specialists. With medical clinics and specialty care affiliates throughout Las Vegas, North Las Vegas, Henderson, Boulder City and Pahrump, HealthCare Partners Nevada (HCPNV) is committed to delivering the highest quality of care to all our patients.
Through our total care model, HealthCare Partners provides patient centered comprehensive primary care, specialty, and urgent care services. Founded in 1996, HealthCare Partners Nevada is an affiliate of HealthCare Partners LLC with offices in California, Florida and Nevada.

For Patients

At HealthCare Partners we approach your health with Total Care. Our mission is to deliver the highest quality care to all our patients. We do this by offering you complete access to our services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We also accommodate same-day appointments.
Our health care providers are ready and able to offer expert care when you need it most. While our mission is to deliver the best possible care for our patients, our promise is to provide the personal attention you deserve. It is our pleasure to ensure your individual healthcare needs are met.

Specialty Services

When you choose HealthCare Partners, you are choosing to manage your health through what we call our Total Care Model.  Total care means that you are actively involved with a team of healthcare professionals lead by your primary care physician who is responsible for coordinating your care and ensuring the best outcome possible for your medical needs.
HealthCare Partners is continually adding medical specialties to our team of healthcare professionals, including cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, internal medicine, pediatrics, and podiatry.

Cardiology

Cardiologists are doctors with special training and skill in finding, treating and preventing diseases of the heart and blood vessels.
Click here to find a HealthCare Partners Medical Group cardiologists.

  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Repair
  • Angioplasty
  • Atrial Fibrillation Management
  • Cardiac Catheterization /Angiography
  • Cardiovascular Disease Management
  • Carotid Ultrasonography
  • Catheter Ablation (CA)
  • Cholesterol Management And Testing
  • Coagulation Monitoring
  • Coronary Angioplasty/Stenting
  • Doppler Ultrasound
  • Echocardiography (Echo)
  • Electrophysiological Studies (EPS)
  • Gated Blood Pooling Imaging
  • Heart Rhythm Management
  • Holter/Event Monitoring
  • Implantable Cardioverter /Defribrillator (ICD)
  • Laser Lead Extractions
  • Nuclear Cardiac Imaging
  • Patent Foramen Ovale Repair (PFO)
  • Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Rotational Atherectomy (PCTRA)
  • Peripheral Vascular Disease Management And Testing
  • Peripheral Vascular Interventions
  • Permanent Pacemaker Implantation
  • Stress Testing
  • Structural Heart Disease
  • T-Wave Alternans
  • Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)
  • Transesophageal Echocardiography
  • Ventricular Septal Defect Repair (VSD)
  • Women And Heart Disease
Endocrinology

Endocrinologists are doctors that focus on the medical aspects of hormones and their associated diseases and conditions.  Endocrine disorders may include: cholesterol disorders, coronary artery disease, diabetes, hormone replacement therapy, hypertension, hypoglycemia, obesity, osteoporosis, reproductive medicine and thyroid disorders.

Dermatology

Dermatologists are doctors that specialize in the diagnosis, treatment and management of disorders of the skin, hair and nails.

Internal Medicine

Internal medicine specialists are doctors that focus on adult medicine and have had special study and training focusing on the prevention and treatment of adult diseases. Internists are sometimes referred to as the “doctor’s doctor”, because they are often called upon to act as consultants to other physicians to help solve puzzling diagnostic problems.

Pediatrics

Pediatricians are doctors that focus on babies, children, adolescents, and young adults from birth to age 21.  Pediatricians manage the physical, mental, and emotional well-being of their patients in every stage of development.

Podiatry

Podiatrists are doctors that diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and related structures of the leg.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Laser Wellness PMA

August 10, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Las Vegas 

www.laserwellnesspma.com

We Believe in 3 Things…

Laser Wellness PMA believes in truly a three word motto:  Learn, Invest, Share We know that today is more important than ever for people to Learn about their health conditions, Learn about what natural options are out there, and to Learn how to think with a winning attitude towards health and life.  We believe that by Investing in your health you are taking responsibility for your health and not just relying on someone else alone.  It has been proven again and again that being an active partner in your health and wellness journey can make all the difference.  Most people have never really invested in their health before, they pay insurance, they supplement, they pay for medications, but they never really invest in their health and miss out on truly being responsible and given themselves the best quality of life possible.  We also believe in Sharing health and wellness with everyone you know.  Once you invest in LLLT, whether you are a professional or a consumer, Share it with every family member, friend, neighbor, and co-worker so they can get a glimpse of what LLLT can do for them…

Do You Believe In Health & Wellness?

 What is it that keeps our  Health in somewhat dismay?  As we age, we have been trained to think that taking medications, surgeries, pain, lack of energy, lack of mobility, memory and vision loss, are all just the way it is and “normal.”  The TRUTH is we have given up responsibility of our own health journey.  Who is Responsible for our health and our families, our Doctors? Our Government? Our Insurance Companies? FACTS are that we are living longer, but not healthier, we are living sicker, longer!  We have more disease, sickness, pain, and injury problems than ever, and we take more prescriptions and have more surgeries than ever, yet we seem to be unhealthier!  The US is near the bottom in Longevity and Life Expectancy out of all the industrialized nations on Earth!

Call for a FREE Information Packet with dvd AND for a FREE Consultation from our Specialist:  (605)791-2283 Direct

Low Level Laser Therapy Works!

Light Amplication by Stimulated (Oscillation) Emission of Radiation or “Laser” has continued to bring out new changes in just about every medical and consumer field there is.  “Why is Low Level Laser Therapy so effective and continues to show tremendous results thru research all over the world?”  The answer is simple, LLLT works at the cellular and atomic level.  It carries electrons back into the body, and it helps to Re-energize sick, injured, damaged cells and allows better permeability to take place once again…So what can LLLT do for you since it works at the cellular level? As we continue to do more research, to get more understanding of how to effectively use LLLT, we continue to understand that we have just begun to see the wonderful results that LLT can produce…LLLT and Qlaser is truly Tomorrow’s Health & Wellness Care Today….

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Nevada Personal Care Services Inc

August 10, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Las Vegas 

www.nevadapersonalcareservices.com

At Nevada Personal Care, you’re in control.

You choose the time/days your aide comes!

You choose the aide!

You always have the option to change caregivers!

  • You choose how much help you want. From a few hours a week, to around-the-clock care. We’re flexible. We can work around doctors’ appointments, work schedules and sleep patters.

You always have the option to change caregivers!

  • You choose how much help you want. From a few hours a week, to around-the-clock care. We’re flexible. We can work around doctors’ appointments, work schedules and sleep patters.

  • We can assign a caregiver, or you have the option to assign a friend or relative, (but not a spouse) to care for you. In some cases, we can bill Medicaid or Long-Term care insurance, then we pay that friend or relative to provide care.

Most people love their caregivers, but once in a while there’s friction. If you’re not getting along with your aide, just call us and we’ll arrange for another to provide care. We want you to be satisfied with your care and your caregiver.

Personal Care Assistance

PCA services are provided in the client’s home by a qualified professional called a Personal Care Assistant. PCA programs offer assistance with activities of daily living (ADL’s) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL’s).

Respite Care

(Similar to PCA/Chore services) Respite is provided when the primary caregiver (Friend or Family member) needs temporary relief.

Chore Services

Chore services include general housekeeping, laundry, shopping, Meal planning and preparation, running errands and more

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Dr Peter Randall – Randall Chiropractic Rehabilitation – Las Vegas

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care 

http://drpeterrandalllasvegas.com/

Bio

My journey started studying mathematics and sciences in college. I was a college athlete and I always made fitness and eating well a high priority in my life. In the late 1970’s my interest in health care was very strong, but I decided to pursue a career in mathematics or engineering simply because I could not find what I was looking for in the healthcare field of traditional medicine. I wanted to pursue a direction that emphasized more health than sickness. This all changed for me when I met a chiropractor at a health club that I was working in. He explained to me what chiropractic care was about, and after doing my own research, it sounded great! So my next assignment for myself was to contact local chiropractors in my area to observe their working with patients. I have to say that after practicing as a doctor of chiropractic for over twenty six years, having performed over one million chiropractic adjustments in my career, I still absolutely love what I do! In fact, I would not choose to do anything else for a career except chiropractic.

My chiropractic education and training was at Palmer College of Chiropractic. I enrolled there in 1982 and I graduated from Palmer College in 1985 having earned the degree of Doctor of Chiropractic. I also hold an additional board certification as a chiropractic sports physician and have worked with many high school athletes, professional athletes, and high school and professional teams throughout my career. Beyond my formal education at Palmer College of Chiropractic, I have completed several additional studies in the diagnosis and treatment of many conditions which affect our human bodies. These include, but are not limited to, disc, injuries, arthritis, aging, knee and shoulder injuries, nutritional deficiencies, gentile techniques and treatment for more difficult to manage patients, osteoporosis, MRI interpretation, CAT scan interpretation, and X-ray interpretation. I have also consulted with the New York State Attorney General’s office rendering expert opinions in civil litigation cases. I am a member of the Nevada Chiropractic Association, The Elks Club, and I am past President of Business Networking International in Las Vegas, NV.

I am licensed to practice chiropractic in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts since 1985, the State of New York since 1987, and the State of Nevada since 2007.

My practice uses a holistic, whole body, approach when treating each patient’s condition and necessary spinal and extremity joint adjustments, physiotherapy modalities including gentile electrical therapies, cold packs, hot packs, rehabilitation stretching and strengthening exercises, nutrition and weight loss for optimal health and healing. My office offers very caring and gentle approaches when treating each individual patient.

I live in North Las Vegas with my family consisting of my wife, our three daughters, our son, our two dogs and two cats. When I am not seeing patients I love to exercise, play golf, read both fiction and nonfiction novels. My wife and I enjoy going to Ballroom dancing lessons together. We have actually competed in several ballroom dance competitions in the past. I have fallen in love with the Las Vegas Valley and consider it my home (we have extended family that has lived here since 1986). Lastly, it is my mission to help all people in Las Vegas, and the surrounding communities, to feel better, suffer less pain, and lead healthier happier lives.

 

My patients say:

Bryan says:

Dr Randall is wonderful.  He not only fixed my back, he helped me even when my insurance initially declined my claim.

He’s very open and has such an easy-going manner, you feel like you can talk to him about anything.

He knows how to use pressure in a gentle manner, if that makes sense.

I would recommend Dr Randall.  He helped me and I know he can help you, too.

Te says:

 I’d never had chiropractic treatment in my life and Dr Randall explained everything to me.

He understood why my body just didn’t feel like ‘me’ – and his suggestions of things to do at home really helped much more than I expected.

I would recommend Dr Randall to anyone who is not sure what’s going on with their body and their bones – if you don’t feel like ‘you’, see Dr Randall.

It was a great experience.  Thank you.

Meg Mathis, Publisher/CEO, NV Senior Guide say:

Being 50+ has never slowed me down. My weekly visits to Dr. Randall have kept me in the gym at optimum performance. I’m strong, agile, and most of all I feel great all over!

Leigh S. says:

Orthopedic Doctors, Chiropractors, and other similar medical professionals have been part of my life since I was a child – and as such, I have around 40 years of experience in being able to know a quality health care professional when I find one.

Dr Randall is one of the best I have ever encountered.  He is an exceptionally experienced and knowledgeable doctor, and also one who trusts his instincts – and I trust him.

Without exception, I recommend Dr Peter Randall.  He is quality, through and through.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Oakhill Apartments – Las Vegas

www.oakhillseniorliving.com

Welcome to Oak Hill Senior Living!

Oak Hill Senior Living offers 121 beautiful retirement apartments in Las Vegas, Nevada. Our apartments include studio, one-bedroom and two-bedroom units. Many include a charming kitchenette and spacious bath.

Enjoy three excellent meals each day in our beautiful dining room. At Oak Hill, you can enjoy a full activity calendar with both inside and outside events to engage your mind, body and spirit. Weekly housekeeping and scheduled transportation is also part of your reasonable monthly fee.

Throw away your vacuum cleaner! Get rid of your toilet brush! Donate the lawnmower! Because at Oak Hill Senior Living Community, we take care of the chores so you don’t have to.

Oak Hill is more than a place to live – it’s a place to call home and it is a community for you to enjoy. If you have not been in for a tour, call us today for a complementary lunch and personal tour of this wonderful opportunity.

Amenities

Life in Our Community

Living at Oak Hill is an ideal lifestyle. Three meals are available to you each and every day; we do the cooking and the dishes. Or if you opt, your beautiful kitchenette gives you opportunity to enjoy a meal in your apartment.

You have worked hard for a long, long time. Put your feet up and let Oak Hill’s housekeepers do the vacuuming, the dusting, mop the bathrooms, and clean out the shower each and every week. They even change the flat linen.

Here you’ll find personal touches and activities unique to our vibrant community. Oak Hill’s activity program allows the flexibility to be as relaxed or active as you like. Here you have the option of taking up new hobbies as well as continuing with old favorites.

We’ve taken extra effort to ensure each detail at Oak Hill is above par when it comes to your enjoyment and convenience.Frequent trips around town will enable you to continue your active lifestyle while still enjoying extras such as weekly housekeeping, linen service, and landscaping. Escape to Oak Hill Senior Living and join us for the good life.

Your monthly rental rate includes the following programs and services:

  • Three delicious meals each day along with a 7:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. beverage bar
  • Weekly housekeeping
  • Paid utilities (except cable and personal telephone)
  • 24-hour security
  • Maintenance and grounds-keeping service
  • Scheduled transportation to doctor’s appointments, shopping, outings, tours, and more
  • Planned group activities and special events

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!