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How Old Are You Really? Biological Age

May 29, 2016 by · Comments Off on How Old Are You Really? Biological Age
Filed under: General 

People have always been interested in being “forever young” and today’s society is no different. We want to resist the ageing process.

The speed at which we are ageing can be measured – its called biological age, or how old your body really is.

The area of study which is now called longevity, and was once called anti aging, is hugely popular in the states.

It’s something I’m very interested in, and see it as a big part of the future for myself and my clients.

Your chronological age is how old you actually are.

Biological age is the age of your body at the cellular level.

Today we will look into how you can establish, what your biological age is and how you can improve it.

There are a few longevity factors in the list which surprised me!

(Deep question alert!)

What is the purpose of life? I don’t mean any deep seated stuff, like procreation.

I just mean, what is most people’s AIM in life. What do they want to get out of their time on earth?

Firstly and most importantly, people want to be happy. Easier said than done.

Happiness is a state of mind. It’s a feeling.

Ask someone with a big goal (like building a successful business or losing more than three stone).

“What will reaching your goal do for you?”

Often they will say something like “When I get there I will feel happy”, or “satisfied with myself”, or they say “I will feel proud”.

“I will have more energy”.

“I won’t be afraid of trying new clothes on or going out with friends”.

“I don’t want to feel like a slave to food”

“I don’t want to be scared to look in the mirror or get on the scales”.

Life is all about feelings.

People spend their entire lives in search of feelings! (mostly happiness, contentment, satisfaction and love)

How people actually reach this state of “happiness” is different for us all.

Most people I know AIM for a decent job (or business) with decent money.

All with the ultimate goal of having a good retirement.

I hear people say “When I finish work, I’m going to do this or I’m going to… (insert goal)”.

The point here being, if being happy and having a nice retirement is people’s main goal in life, then keeping your body fit and healthy surely must be part of your plan.

I know of a very wealthy man who got cancer and passed away just before his retirement, I’m sure that was not part of the master plan, he had built his business up so he could sell it and have a nice retirement (as most business people do).

He didn’t make it and didn’t get to “cash out”.

Many people don’t make it to retirement because their “plan” is messed up from the start.

Without sounding depressing we only get one shot remember.

This is NOT a rehearsal.

A lot of people get to retirement age and their body is wrecked!

This stops them from being able to enjoy their time off as much. Living life with lots of restrictions. “I can’t go there because of the steep hill”, or “I can’t do that because of my back or my knees”.

After working hard for 40-50 years – to give yourself a good pension and retirement, this is the last thing that anyone wants.

Peoples bodies are like cars.

On one hand you have new cars with high mileage that are not well serviced.

On the other hand you have old cars with low mileage that have been well looked after.

I want YOU to be like a well looked after old car, with low mileage when you get to your retirement.

I know some people, that slog away and get to the age of 40, and feel and look like they’re 50 or 60!

I also know many people who hit retirement age and feel like a 40 year old, and can keep on working and exercising for another 20 years!

This is all dependent on how we live our lives, obviously there are things such as injuries, diseases and other bad things which can impact our lives negatively through no fault of our own but on the whole we are in control of our own health.

What affects our longevity?

Scientists agree that these factors all affect your longevity in some way, big or small. (this is not a definitive list)

Muscle size and strength
Level of education
How pro active you are with going to see the doctor if needed
The amount of friends you can rely on, and love in your life
Your diet
Blood pressure
Your upper body strength
If you enjoy your work or not
Weather you smoke/drink alcohol or not, and the amount
If you exercise or not

Most of us shorten our lives and ultimately kill ourselves, through our bad habits and lifestyle choices, whatever they may be.

As you would of guessed, it is possible to slow down the onset of ageing and even reverse it to some extent.

I must say, that there is nothing wrong with ageing, it is inevitable. It is something we should be proud of, a chance to show our wisdom to the younger generation.

This article is just to show you how you can SLOW the ageing process with ease and actually enjoy it.

The Ageing Process

As we get older our bodies start to slow down and stop being able to function as well, sadly there is no getting away from this.

BUT through healthy living and making the right choices day in day out we can delay our body slowing down by years!

Just think how much more you will be able to enjoy your retirement if you feel like a 40 year old? and can spend it with the people you love.

Compare this to how much you will enjoy it if you can barely walk up a flight of stairs without having tired legs and being short of breath.

Your chronological age doesn’t have to be the same, or worse, than your physiological age.

How to slow the effects of ageing

The list above obviously helps you but here are a few more ideas for you to beat the clock.

When some people think anti aging, I’m sure some of you may think of things like anti wrinkle creams and lotions, hair dying products, botox and maybe even plastic surgery.

That does kind of sum up some of the western world that these are the steps that the majority of people (plastic surgery being an extreme example) will take to make them look younger, rather than eating healthily and exercising.

Aging leads to loss of muscle mass, loss of mental function, low mobility and a lack of energy, and as you know the cosmetic type anti aging steps I mentioned won’t help any of these.

Top tips to delay ageing naturally:

Enjoy the Outdoors – Don’t spend all of your time cooped up indoors behind the computer or watching TV. There are plenty of things to do and see outside, especially on a nice day I can’t think of anything better than going for a walk with the family down the park or beach. Sunlight also is a natural source of Vitamin D.

Yoga & Meditation – I would say that this is one of the most important strategies in staying young. I started to do this myself and it honestly makes me feel great. Yoga and meditation can help you relax and lower your stress levels (linked with aging) dramatically. It can also help you to see things a lot clearer.

Yoga is also great for your flexibility, the more flexible and supple you are the less chance you have in the future of suffering falls and lack of mobility.

Socialise – Loneliness can be a real killer. Socialise as much as possible with your friends and family. Get out there and do things, go to the cinema, concerts, attend an evening class (the more mentally stimulating the better).

Stay Strong & Active – You have to keep moving or your body will come to a standstill. Taking part in regular exercise is absolutely vital. Regular strength training is extremely important.

Losing muscle mass is something you want to avoid or at least delay for as long as possible so strength training will help this as well as keeping your bones strong, this will lower your chances of osteoporosis.

Nutrition

I believe food is medicine, many of the effects you get from modern day medicine you can get from eating the right foods.

Nutrition influences biochemistry. Biochemistry influences everything at a cellular level.

If you eat well there should be no need for some medications.

If you spend your whole life eating fresh, natural whole foods and stay active then it will also show. You will most likely be lean, mobile, disease free and full of energy, a rarity these days.

You should aim to eat a diet containing lots of quality fats and protein’s (the bodies building materials) which will help you to maintain your muscle stores. Also protein boosts the production of HGH in your body, HGH (Human growth Hormone) is your body’s natural ‘fountain of youth’.

As you age the production of this hormone slows down greatly, regular strength exercise (lifting, pushing and pulling heavy stuff) and quality protein keeps the production of this hormone going!

Eat plenty of antioxidant rich foods – Antioxidants which are found in colourful fruit and vegetables help to reduce the damage caused by free radicals in your system.

Free radicals can speed up the onset of ageing; they are unstable electrons (O1 molecules)which are produced during metabolism. They damage the cell nucleus and the mitochondria.

Free radicals bounce around inside your cells like a pin ball, causing damage every time they hit something. They cause absolute havoc.

Antioxidants provide the free radical with the extra O1 molecule they need to become stable O2 molecules.

Good quality natural foods are the best way to combat these harmful free radicals. Natural organic foods are packed with antioxidants which neutralise the free radicals before they cause too much damage.

Eat Omega 3s – They fight inflammation, improve the appearance of your skin and aid brain function. Three vital things that we need as we age. So make sure you get as many omega 3s into your system as you can, the best source is fresh fish, if not a fish oil supplement will do.

Lower Sugar Intake – Aim to cut out any excess sugar that you eat, excess sugars can modify essential proteins in our body which can lead to wrinkles and energy loss.

Look after your skin through good food and lots of water – Eating foods containing vitamin A (sweet potatoes, broccoli, spinach, asparagus and carrots), Vitamin C (red peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, strawberries, oranges, kiwi and pineapple) and Vitamin E (nuts, seeds and spinach) are a great way of helping your skin look healthy.

Stop smoking and limit alcohol intake – There are few things that age you faster than smoking and drinking alcohol every day so cut out smoking and do as much as you can to drink less.

Lower Stress Levels – This is another big one, I just mentioned that there are few things that age you faster than smoking and alcohol; well I think stress is one of them.

Being constantly stressed will ruin your mood, energy levels, social interaction as well as causing so many health problems.

As I mentioned above, I have found deep breathing techniques, yoga and meditation really important and a great way of combating stress.

Let’s be realistic the big medical and health companies aren’t going to promote anti aging through the things I just said, they are going to promote it through new miracle pills, lotions and creams, there is a lot of money to be made from it so they will keep on doing it.

The people who buy these products don’t have to alter their lifestyle one little bit so it suits them which is why it is so popular.

We ultimately reap our rewards in our retirement, if you have invested some time and effort into your “health & fitness account”, you will reap the rewards.

If you haven’t then you won’t!

You can actually measure your biological age online with a biological age calculator.

If all of the things I have mentioned above didn’t require effort or commitment then everyone would be running around into their 90s and later!!

But unfortunately we don’t, we die much younger than that.

Depending on what stats you use, in 2010, UK men were reported to live on average until about 77 or 78, and women on average live until 82 or 83 years old.

Do it naturally and do it right.

Let me know your thoughts on this topic, comment below, I really want to know what you think.

Thanks for reading, take care,

Richard

If you would like to receive weekly health and fitness updates on the top news in the industry along with several free gifts then follow this link: http://richard-clarke.co.uk/

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American Red Cross Advancing Health Options in Southern Nevada

January 22, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

dr-john-lunettaDr. John Lunetta, D.O. arrived in Las Vegas more than a year ago to help with the American Red Cross Blood Services regional expansion. For decades, the Red Cross blood supply in Southern Nevada came from other areas of the country, mostly from Idaho, Montana and Utah. But over the course of the last year and a half, the team has grown the program of blood collection to that of supplying nine of the area’s 14 hospitals.

 

But Dr. Lunetta’s presence here makes this program so much more than a simple blood collection service. Licensed to practice in seven western states, and eight of our local hospitals, Dr. Lunetta assists local doctors when they have questions about using Red Cross blood products. Transfusion recommendations to find the most compatible blood or questions about reactions to transfusions are all topics on which Dr. Lunetta can speak.

 

Dr. Lunetta also brings with him the latest in patient blood management education. His contemporary approach allows local doctors to, when appropriate; use less product resulting in less risk to patients.

 

But there are additional American Red Cross Blood Services here in Las Vegas not available in some other regions known as clinical services. With the medical equipment and the skilled nurses that work with Dr. Lunetta, Clinical Services can offer one-on-one patient contact delivering care through an apheresis machine, which uses centrifugal force to separate blood into its constituent components. This is a method used in the treatment of leukemia patients, sickle cell patients, and a large number of neurologic and oncology patients. Dr. Lunetta also oversees treatments involving some new technology using extracorporeal photopheresis, or ECP. In layman’s terms, it’s like a tanning bed for your blood.  Due to Dr. Lunetta’s expertise, some area patients will soon be able to receive treatment here that they could only get in California previously.  It’s used to treat patients who suffer from Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma in which the skin is attacked by the patient’s own T-cells. The treatment calms those cells down and the skin begins to heal. An average patient needs to receive 150 – 300 procedures once every two weeks.  Another more common use of this treatment is for patients who have graft vs. host disease; usually as a result of a bone marrow transplant, or other organ transplant such as lung or heart.

 

Many more procedures and innovations are in the pipeline that Dr. Lunetta and his staff may be able to offer in the future and the Red Cross is pushing the development of new ways in which Blood Services can help in our community. From his involvement with donors at blood drives to his work with patients who get the blood transfused, Dr. Lunetta is involved every step of the way.

 

Dr. Lunetta is available for interviews for print, online, radio and television. Well-spoken and with a talent to break complex medical ideas down into language that we can all understand, Dr. Lunetta is a delightful guest and talented subject matter expert.

 

To book Dr. Lunetta, or to interview him on his range of expertise, please contact the office of Lloyd Ziel at the contact below.

 

Lloyd Ziel

Public Information Officer | Communications and Public Affairs

 

American Red Cross

Southern Nevada Chapter

1771 E. Flamingo Rd. Suite 206-B

Las Vegas, NV 89119

702-232-6604 cl

702-369-3351 of

702-791-3372 fx

Lloyd.Ziel@redcross.org

www.redcross.org/southernnevada

U.S. Veterans Honored by Encore.org’s 2013 Purpose Prize

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Seven Awards for People Over Age 60 Solving the World’s Toughest Social Problems

The Purpose Prize has become a “MacArthur genius award for people who develop a second career as social service entrepreneurs.” – The New York Times.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy organizes a network of volunteers across the country to teach disabled veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan how to combat stress — through fly-fishing.

A public relations executive helps wounded warriors find and renovate foreclosed homes – and transforms lives and neighborhoods in the process.

These are two of the seven winners of the 2013 Purpose Prize, awarded by Encore.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who translate decades of skill and experience into “second acts” that contribute to society’s greater good.

Now in its eighth year, The Purpose Prize is the nation’s only large-scale investment in people over 60 who are combining their passion and experience for the social good. Created in 2005 by Encore.org, the prize is aimed at those with the passion to make change and the wisdom to know how to do it, showcasing the value of experience and disproving the notion that innovation is solely the province of the young.

Two winners will receive $100,000 each and five winners will receive $25,000 each.

This year’s winners:

* Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. ($100,000 winner of The Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra)

* Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron taps into her own experience as a cancer survivor to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. ($100,000)

* Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing emotional wounds through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. ($25,000)

* Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
Fennelly runs a unique summer camp behind bars that is transforming federal prisoners into involved parents. ($25,000)

* Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
Huttinger’s project is on a path to eradicate human schistosomiasis, a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. ($25,000)

* Reverend Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. ($25,000)

* Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
Young’s rise from immigrant nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. ($25,000)

The Purpose Prize winners will be honored on December 5, 2013, at an awards ceremony in Sausalito, Ca. NBC’s Jane Pauley will emcee the event for hundreds of Encore leaders and the Purpose Prize winners.

Twenty-one judges – leaders in business, politics, journalism and the nonprofit sector – chose the seven winners from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees. Judges include Sherry Lansing, former CEO of Paramount; David Bornstein, author and New York Times columnist; Eric Liu, writer and founder of CitizenUniversity; and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, The Purpose Prize is a program of Encore.org, which aims to engage millions of boomers in encore careers combining personal meaning, continued income and social impact in the second half of life.

This year, Symetra is sponsoring the $100,000 Purpose Prize for Future Promise, which recognizes an individual whose approach for helping society has the potential to grow steadily over the next five years. The company plans to sponsor another Purpose Prize for Future Promise in 2014.

“While Purpose Prize winners are helping to solve a wide range of pressing social problems, they have one thing in common,” said Marc Freedman, CEO and founder of Encore.org and author of The Big Shift (PublicAffairs Books). “They – and millions of others in encore careers – are turning personal passions and decades of experience into invaluable contributions across sectors, continents and generations, often through entrepreneurship.”

Short summaries for all winners follow. Photos are attached. Longer bios and higher resolution photos are available.

Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas, winner of this year’s Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra, rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. Following a 35-year-career as a fundraising and marketing dynamo, she became the director of communications at Purple Heart Homes in 2008 in an effort to provide greater services for veterans who have service-connected disabilities. In just three years, Thomas helped take the fledgling nonprofit to new heights. She has raised millions for Purple Heart Homes in financial contributions and material donations. Revenue shot up 600% in her first year with the startup. She’s developed an innovative program that matches veterans with foreclosed homes donated by banks, then raises the funds to renovate a home for the individual veteran’s needs. It’s a win-win for all generations—and communities too. It helps veterans to grow assets, towns to recoup lost taxes and neighborhoods that have struggled with foreclosures to stabilize.

Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron is an award-winning journalist with more than 42 years in television broadcasting. She tapped into her own experience as a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. To focus on the plight of low-income Latinos fighting the disease, Duron founded Latinas Contra Cancer (Latinas Against Cancer), an organization committed to educating, supporting and providing essential services to low-income Spanish speakers often overlooked by the health care system. Latinas Contra Cancer has offered a range of programs that have taught more than 3,000 men, women and teens about the disease, resulting in more than 300 preventative cancer screenings. The group has provided psychological and social support to over 100 patients per year. However, the call to action Duron answered has had an impact far beyond the Bay Area. Her passionate commitment is helping Latino communities across the U.S. gain access to cancer support, information and treatment. Her great empathy for cancer patients has made her utterly clear on her bigger purpose in the second stage of life.

Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing the emotional wounds of battle through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. A cancer survivor and war veteran himself, Nicholson was impressed by the fortitude of disabled veterans at the Walter Reed military hospital, where he was treated for prostate cancer in 2005. It spurred him to found Project Healing Waters, a program dedicated to helping disabled soldiers and veterans recover from the trying aftermath of war through the sport of fly-fishing. One-on-one connections have been key to Project Healing Waters’ approach since the beginning. Nicholson knew there were fly-fishing groups and facilities all over the country. His innovation was to convince them to start, manage and lead fly-fishing instruction and outings with veterans through military and Veterans Administration facilities. The quiet bonds forged over fishing lines began to transform lives. Again and again Nicholson heard from family members who said their loved ones had returned from war withdrawn, angry, and difficult to be around. But after fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters, they’ve become happier, more open and engaged. Project Healing Waters works closely with VA Recreational and Occupational therapies to identify those who would most benefit from the program. Many are in wheelchairs or using prosthetics. A few are blind. Participants reflect of full spectrum of disabled veterans and include all ages, genders, ethnicities and disabilities. Nicholson says the impact “goes well beyond the mechanics of fly-fishing.”

Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
A lifelong social activist who ran homeless shelters in the District of Columbia for 17 years, Carol Fennelly abandoned her plans to retire in 1998 when she learned that D.C. inmates had been transferred to Youngstown, OH. One woman made 10-hour round-trip drives twice a week to visit her son. Moved to answer a social need, Fennelly thought about opening a hospitality house in Youngstown for family members visiting inmates. She soon learned that while 93% of the federal inmate population is male, in sheer numbers there are more programs for mothers in prison than there are for fathers. She decided she had what it took to change things. “I had spent years organizing, dealing with government, making change happen, and that emboldened me to think I could go into prisons and start all these radical programs,” Fennelly says. So she launched an encore career with Hope House, an innovative organization that helps prison inmates stay in regular contact with their children. In the past 14 years, Hope House has hosted 200 video teleconferences, 18,000 personalized book readings by fathers and 31 week-long summer camps, which allow kids to spend time with their fathers free of the usual restrictions that come with visitor hours and family chaperones. California recently decided to implement the Hope House model in its 33 state prisons. Prisons in Texas, Idaho and New Hampshire may follow. In 2013 Fennelly was honored at the White House as a Champion of Change.

Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
International public health expert Elizabeth Huttinger spotted a big idea in shrimp, and launched an encore career that could eradicate a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. Huttinger’s project – founded in 2006 – is targeting human schistosomiasis, an infectious parasite carried by river snails. Understanding that the population of prawns that eat those snails had precipitously declined, Huttinger, 63, has devoted her encore career to restoring the prawn population in the SenegalRiver Basin. Projet Crevette’s mission is multifaceted: the restoration of the prawn population diminishes the spread of schisto, provides new economic opportunities to afflicted communities and heals families infected by the disease. Today, Projet Crevette is a prawn-farming microenterprise, operated by locals at public watering holes. It has brought social innovation, new microbusinesses, environmental restoration and improved health to communities. Huttinger is confident Projet Crevette will meet its bold goal to fully restore the indigenous prawn population—and improve countless lives in the process.

Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Reverend Violet Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. After 14 years as parish pastor trained in psychotherapy, Little left behind her traditional congregation to create a religious refuge for the homeless on the streets of the city, which became the “WelcomeChurch.” The church relies mostly on word of mouth, and services can pop up in a city park or on a sidewalk. No questions are asked, and everyone is welcome. The WelcomeChurch coordinates medical services through local universities, helps people get into rehab or jobs, and offers educational services to the public on the causes of homelessness. Little estimates 40 percent of her congregants have moved off the streets into permanent housing and the WelcomeChurch celebrates each and every one of them, many of whom stay connected with Little through their transition. Little’s congregation has grown to include hundreds of homeless as well as non-homeless volunteers in the EvangelicalLutheranChurch in America.

Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
An immigrant from the West Indies who built a meaningful life on meager income, Young’s gritty rise from nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. She’s encouraged thousands to stand up for their right to earn a living wage, and counsels and trains others to become leaders themselves. In 2004, Young began building a movement to legislate a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in New YorkState, which would make overtime, paid time off and rest days mandatory. In 2009, when she heard then Governor David Patterson say on the radio that he’d sign the bill if it made it to his desk, she put on a full court press, becoming the engine behind passage of the law in 2010. The law is the first of its kind in the country, but Young is committed to making sure it isn’t the last. She’s now a key player in the NDWA’s expansion from 11 to 44 affiliated organizations with 15,000 members, up from 5,000 in 2007. Young’s passion for serving her community has only just begun.

Read More About Encore’s Purpose Prize at www.encore.org/prize.

About Encore.org

Encore.org is a national nonprofit that promotes the idea that people in their second acts have the talent and experience to solve some of society’s greatest problems.

About The Atlantic Philanthropies

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. In keeping with the Giving While Living philosophy of founder Charles “Chuck” Feeney, The Atlantic Philanthropies believes in making large investments to capitalize on significant opportunities to solve urgent problems now, so they are less likely to become larger, more entrenched and more expensive challenges later. The Atlantic Philanthropies also seeks to encourage others of significant wealth to engage in major philanthropic pursuits in their lifetime.

About The John Templeton Foundation

The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, supporting research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.

About Symetra

Symetra Financial Corporation (NYSE: SYA) is a diversified financial services company based in Bellevue, Wash. In business since 1957, Symetra provides employee benefits, annuities and life insurance through a national network of benefit consultants, financial institutions, and independent agents and advisors.

 

CONTACT: Sara Ying Rounsaville, srounsaville@encore.org, 415-952-5121, or Russ Mitchell, rmitchell@encore.org, 510-969-0801

Coalition to Protect Retirement Launches Campaign to Safeguard Retirement Savings Incentives

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Nearly 9 in 10 Americans Say Retirement Savings Accounts Should be “Off Limits” As a Source of New Tax Revenue – Part of National Campaign to Raise Awareness About Benefits of Tax Deferral

WASHINGTON, Nov. 7, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Americans overwhelmingly – by a margin of 4 to 1 – oppose changing tax rules for retirement savings accounts, according to a new survey released today by the Coalition to Protect Retirement, a group of America’s leading supporters of retirement savings plans.

The research shows widespread support across political parties for maintaining the current tax treatment for retirement savings vehicles, such as 401(k) plans, 403(b) plans, and traditional IRAs.  According to the survey, which was conducted in mid-October, 87 percent of all Americans and 95 percent of those who have a tax-deferred 401(k)-like retirement plan accounts believe retirement savings should be “off limits” to Congress and not a source of new revenue for the government.

Today’s release of the survey coincides with the Coalition’s launch of a national education and advocacy campaign to preserve the current tax incentives for retirement savings.  The campaign will raise awareness about how current tax deferral rules are helping millions of Americans prepare for their own retirement, and will urge workers and their employers to tell Congress not to change or limit these incentives to save.  Visitors to the Coalition’s website www.HowAmericaSaves.com will be able to send letters to their elected officials and follow developments in Congress.

“Retirement savings incentives play an essential role in encouraging Americans to save and employers to sponsor retirement plans,” said Hank Jackson, President and CEO of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) on behalf of the Coalition.  “This isn’t just smart tax policy – it’s proven good sense.”

Tax Incentives Help Americans Save for Retirement
The current tax incentives have succeeded in helping Americans save for retirement and have increased the number of workers who are covered by retirement plans.  According to the latest available data, more than 67 million people participate in private-sector defined contribution plans alone.  All told, Americans have $20.9 trillion in assets earmarked for retirement.

All Income Levels Benefit from Retirement Plan Tax Incentives
Individuals at all income levels have benefitted from these incentives, particularly middle-income earners.  More than 70 percent of American workers who earn between $30,000 and $50,000 a year contribute to a retirement savings plan when one is offered at work.

“Given the vast numbers of baby boomers who reach retirement age every day, retirement savings incentives are needed more than ever,” said Kenneth E. Bentsen, Jr., President of the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (SIFMA).  “They are doing what they were intended to do – helping people who need them most to take responsibility for their own retirement security.”

The Coalition noted the important role employers play in helping workers prepare for retirement.  Between 2000 and 2009, employers contributed almost $3.5 trillion to public and private retirement plans.  Changes to current incentives could adversely affect employer-sponsored plans, contributions, and the retirement security of millions of Americans.

“Raising new revenue should not come at the expense of Americans’ retirement savings, not now or in the future,” said Brian Graff, CEO and Executive Director of the American Society of Pension Professionals & Actuaries (ASPPA).  “If Congress reduces the benefits of offering and contributing to retirement savings, fewer people will save.  The result: more of tomorrow’s retirees will need to turn to the government for help, and that will mean more federal spending.”

Media Availability
Representatives of the Coalition to Protect Retirement and of Juncture Strategies/ORC International will be available to answer questions and discuss the national survey on Thursday, November 7 from 1:30 – 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time. 
Call-in number:  1-800-745-6370        Passcode:  5356061

About the Coalition to Protect Retirement
The Coalition to Protect Retirement believes that Congress should encourage retirement savings for American workers through the preservation of current tax incentives.  The Coalition is composed of the following associations:  American Benefits Council, American Council of Life Insurers, American Society of Pension Professionals and Actuaries, The ERISA Industry Committee, ESOP Association, Insured Retirement Institute, Investment Company Institute, Plan Sponsor Council of America, Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association, and the Society for Human Resource Management.

The Coalition’s website www.HowAmericaSaves.com was created to raise awareness among workers, employers, policymakers, and the public about the important role that tax deferral plays in helping people plan for their own retirement security.  The site provides tools for individuals and organizations to make their views known to elected officials and to stay informed about proposals being debated in Congress.  To learn more, visit:  www.HowAmericaSaves.com.

About the Survey
Juncture Strategies/ORC International conducted a national on-line survey of 1,011 adults, 18 years of age or older, during October 14–16, 2013.  A summary of the survey results is available at: http://bit.ly/retresearch.

Contact: Bill Maroni BMaroni@howamericasaves.com / 301 802-3375

National Report: Oral Health of Older Americans In A ‘State of Decay’

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Oral Health America Launches First-of-its-Kind Website to Connect Older Adults to Affordable Dental Care and Resources

The oral health of older Americans is in a state of decay, according to a new national report released today by Oral Health America (OHA).  A State of Decay, a state-by-state analysis of oral healthcare delivery and public health factors impacting the oral health of older adults, reveals more than half of the country received a “fair” or “poor” assessment when it comes to minimal standards affecting dental care access for older adults. Florida and Arizona, areas with large older adult populations, rank in the bottom five states due to a shortage of oral health coverage, a strained dental health work force, and deficiencies in prevention programs.

“While we are seeing improvements in certain areas of older adult dental care, there is still a lack of progress in advancing the oral health of such a vulnerable population,” said Dr. Ira Lamster, Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, ColumbiaUniversity, Mailman School of Public Health. “Older adults face significant health challenges if their oral health is poor, and there is no coordinated program to help fund necessary services.”

A State of Decay gave a rating of “fair,” “poor,” “good,” or “excellent” based on state level data analyzing five variables impacting older adult oral health: adult Medicaid dental benefits, inclusion of older adult strategies in state oral health plans, edentulism (loss of teeth), dental health professional shortage areas, and community water fluoridation.

The final evaluations in the report for each state are mixed, with several states performing well in some variables, but still in need of improvement in other important areas. The top findings of this report that require scrutiny and action are:

  • Persistent lack of oral health coverage across much of the nation. Forty-two percent of states (21 states) provide either no dental benefits or provide only emergency coverage  through adult Medicaid Dental Benefits.
  • Strained dental health work force. Thirty-one states (62 percent) have high rates of Dental Health Provider Shortage Areas (HPSAs), meeting only 40 percent or less of dental provider needs.
  • Tooth loss remains a signal of suboptimal oral health. Eight states had strikingly high rates of edentulism, with West Virginia notably having an adult population that is 33.8 percent edentate. Photo – PRN Photo Desk, photodesk@prnewswire.com
  • Deficiencies in preventive programs. Thirteen states (26 percent) have upwards of 60 percent of their residents living in communities without water fluoridation (CWF), despite recognition for 68 years that this public health measure markedly reduces dental caries. Hawaii (89.2 percent) and New Jersey (86.5 percent) represent the highest rates of citizens unprotected by fluoridation, an unnecessary public peril.

Daily, 10,000 Americans retire and only 2 percent do so with a dental benefit plan. The State of Decay analysis provides a tool for states to use in addressing shortfalls in oral health status, dental professional access sites, dental benefits for low-income adults, and population-based prevention, all of which affect the oral health of older adults, the fastest growing segment of the American population.

To help older adults and their caregivers address oral health needs and overcome many of the barriers to accessing affordable dental care, OHA launched toothwisdom.org. The website is a first-of-its-kind online tool that connects older adults to dental care and educates on the importance of maintaining oral health with age. The American Dental Hygienists’ Association (ADHA) and Special Care Dentistry Association (SCDA) supported OHA and the launch of the website by encouraging their members to provide meaningful articles for the toothwisdom.org.

“Dental Hygienists have the opportunity to assist older Americans with the oral health challenges they may face as they age,”” said Ann Battrell, Executive Director, American Dental Hygienists’ Association. “We’re all committed to sharing the message that oral health matters and changing the common misperception that with age comes a decline in oral health.”

Few websites focus on oral and systemic health topics, and even fewer provide resources for older adult oral health. Toothwisdom.org offers oral care resources by state – including direct links to dental care, caregiving support, financial tools, social services, and transportation. It also shares the latest news and reliable health information from dental experts across the country on relevant oral health issues, the importance of continuing prevention with age, and the impact of oral health on overall health.

“My dental procedures have been very costly and I had to contact a social worker to help me understand my bills. Dental care should be more available and affordable because we know poor dental care affects overall health, which is particularly important for seniors,” said senior Patricia Cosgrove, a client of The Carter Burden Center for the Aging, Inc.  “Toothwisdom.org can help me find a community health center so I can finally get an affordable check-up and stay up-to-date on oral health information.”

A State of Decay and toothwisdom.org are part of Oral Health America’s Wisdom Tooth Project™, an initiative designed to meet the oral health challenges of a burgeoning population of older adults with special needs, chronic disease complications, and a growing inability to access and pay for dental services.

Links to the 2003 and 2013 editions of A State of Decay can be viewed on toothwisdom.org.

About OHA’s Wisdom Tooth Project
For 55 years, Oral Health America has been the leading national non-profit dedicated to improving the oral health and well-being of Americans throughout the entire spectrum of life. Over the decades, the organization has evolved and adapted to the dynamic nature of our country’s demographics and specific health needs. The Wisdom Tooth Project was born in 2010 due to the current and future implications of an aging population and the need for oral health resources for them mean that we must take meaningful action now.

About Oral Health America
OHA is a national, non-profit association dedicated to changing lives by connecting communities with resources to increase access to oral health care, education, and advocacy for all Americans, especially those most vulnerable. For more information about Oral Health America, please visit www.oralhealthamerica.org.

Keepsakes, Family Heirlooms Passed Down More Effectively with New Legacy Builder Tool Chest from LegacyStories.org

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Allianz American Legacy Studies researchers asked a group of Baby Boomers and their parents to rank on a scale of 1-10 (10 being most) what was more important to them when it comes to passing down an inheritance: values and life lessons or financial assets.

Perhaps not so surprisingly, the results showed that passing down values were over seven times more important than passing down valuables.

Yet only a small fraction of these three generations has made any provisions, mostly due to lack of awareness, education and the tools to do the job properly.

In addition to values and life lessons, a lot more should be included when building and passing down a legacy. Keepsakes and awards often represent defining moments and milestone events and can become family heirlooms when the stories behind their acquisitions are documented.

Identifying people in a select group of vintage family photos is one the best ways to document personal history, as some of the people in the old photos might as well be strangers to grandchildren. Those who grew up in the 20th century were first generations to record special events and moments.

Today’s digital technology offers a chance to pass down a purposeful legacy that will survive the ravages of time, and the experts at LegacyStories.org have developed an innovative Legacy Builder Tool Chest to help.

Consisting of fourteen drawers, each “toolkit” focuses on a specific legacy topic with interactive how-to guidebooks, downloadable forms, video tutorials and lots of helpful resources.

Toolkit topics include “Life Lessons and Values“, “Keepsakes & Heirlooms”, “Vintage Legacy Photos”, and one titled “Loved Ones in Care” to help caregivers build a legacy for victims of Alzheimer’s, people in hospice care, or seniors living in assisted or skilled nursing facilities.

“Since passing down life lessons and values is the highest priority, we provide members the ‘Life Lessons and Values’ toolkit at no cost,” says Tom Cormier, co-founder of LegacyStories.org. “Membership in LegacyStories.org is also free so there are no obstacles to prevent anyone from securing an honored place in family history. They just need to take action before regretting it.”

The Legacy Builder Tool Chest is also being recommended by financial advisors, estate planners and elder law attorneys as a means to engage with their clients in a purposeful way.

Content for the individual toolkits is contributed by top legacy experts including members of The International Assoc. of StoryKeepers (I-ASK) and the Association of Personal Historians (APH).

Our goal is to help people establish themselves as “effective elders” while they are alive, and to become “awesome ancestors” when they pass on,” Cormier states. “Our grandchildren and descendants will one day have an interest in learning about their family history. Because so few people will take the time to document their personal history, those who do will live on forever as their descendants’ go-to awesome ancestor.”

Contact info:
Tom Cormier — Co-founder
Phone: 423-295-5904
Email
Website: www.legacystories.org

Read more news from LegacyStories.org

Study Shows that People Who Undergo Cataract Surgery to Correct Visual Impairment Live Longer

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Australian researchers find a 40 percent lower mortality risk among patients who had their vision corrected through the procedure  

SAN FRANCISCO – Sept. 4, 2013 – People with cataract-related vision loss who have had cataract surgery to improve their sight are living longer than those with visual impairment who chose not to have the procedure, according to an Australian cohort study published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. After comparing the two groups, the researchers found a 40 percent lower long-term mortality risk in those who had the surgery.

The research is drawn from data gathered in the Blue Mountains Eye Study, a population-based cohort study of vision and common eye diseases in an older Australian population. A total of 354 persons aged 49 years and older and diagnosed with cataract-related vision impairment –  some of whom had undergone surgery and others who had not – were assessed between 1992 and 2007. Adjustments were made for age and gender as well as a number of mortality risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, smoking, cardiovascular disease, body mass index and measures of frailty and comorbid disease. Follow-up visits took place after five and ten years since the baseline exam.

Previous research had indicated that older persons with visual impairment were likely to have greater mortality risk than their age peers with normal vision, and that cataract surgery might reduce this risk. These studies – unlike the Blue Mountains Eye Study – compared people who had undergone cataract surgery with those in the general population or with those who had not had cataract surgery, and did not link vision status to the surgical status.

“Our finding complements the previously documented associations between visual impairment and increased mortality among older persons,” said Jie Jin Wang, Ph.D., of the Westmead Millennium Institute and one of lead researchers of the study. “It suggests to ophthalmologists that correcting cataract patients’ visual impairment in their daily practice results in improved outcomes beyond that of the eye and vision, and has important impacts on general health.”

The association between correction of cataract-related visual impairment and reduced mortality risk is not clearly understood, but plausible factors may include improvements in physical and emotional well-being, optimism, greater confidence associated with independent living after vision improvement, as well as greater ability to comply with prescription medications.

Dr. Wang noted one limitation of the study is that participants with cataract-related visual impairment who did not have cataract surgery could have had other health problems that prevented them from undergoing surgery, and that these other health problems could partly explain the poorer survival among non-surgical participants. This issue is addressed by the researchers in a subsequent study.

Caused by the clouding of the lens, cataract is a leading cause of treatable visual impairment that will affect more than half of all Americans by the time they are 80 years old.[1]  Surgical removal of the opaque lens with an artificial lens implanted is a successful procedure of cataract treatment. If completing everyday tasks is difficult, cataract surgery should be discussed with an ophthalmologist − a medical doctor specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

Seniors who are seeking eye care but are concerned about cost may qualify for EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, which offers eye exams and care at no out-of-pocket cost to qualifying seniors age 65 and older. Learn more at www.eyecareamerica.org. For more information on cataracts and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology 
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons — Eye M.D.s — with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who has the education and training to treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trusted and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

About Ophthalmology
Ophthalmology, the official journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, publishes original, peer-reviewed, clinically applicable research. Topics include the results of clinical trials, new diagnostic and surgical techniques, treatment methods technology assessments, translational science reviews and editorials.

Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

National Council on Aging Launches Second Year of Education Program for Older Adults and Those Who Care for Them Aimed at Helping to Protect More Older Adults from the Flu

Actor Lee Majors, best known for his iconic roles on The Big Valley, The Fall Guy, and The Six Million Dollar Man, is joining the National Council on Aging (NCOA) Flu + You program to help protect older adults from influenza (commonly known as “the flu”). Flu + You aims to inform adults 65 and older, their caregivers, and those who care about them, about the dangers of the flu, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options.

As a part of his involvement in the Flu + You campaign, Majors will appear in a public service announcement (PSA) that follows him as he embarks on an important and action-packed mission: learning about his vaccine options and getting vaccinated against the flu. The PSA will educate the public about the increased risk of flu in adults 65 years of age and older and the importance of knowing your vaccine options and getting a flu vaccine, even for tough guys like Majors.

Every year in the United States, roughly nine out of 10 flu-related deaths and more than six out of 10 flu-related hospitalizations occur in people 65 and older. Older adults are at a greater risk for flu due, in part, to the weakening of the immune system that typically occurs with age. This means that no matter how healthy or youthful we feel, as we age we become more vulnerable to the flu and its related complications.

“The CDC recommends an annual flu vaccine as the single best way to protect yourself from the flu, yet a third of people 65 and older still don’t get vaccinated,” said Richard Birkel, PhD, MPA, NCOA Senior Vice President for Healthy Aging and Director of NCOA’s Self-Management Alliance. “As NCOA continues to educate older adults about the flu and the potential severity of the illness, we hope to encourage more people to protect themselves and their loved ones by getting an annual flu shot.”

The flu vaccine offers the best defense to protect against the flu, and adults 65 years of age and older have several vaccine options. In addition to the traditional flu vaccine (which helps protect against three strains of the flu virus), there is also a quadrivalent vaccine (which helps protect against four strains), and a higher dose vaccine that was designed specifically for adults 65 and older. By improving the production of antibodies in older patients, the higher dose vaccine can provide a stronger immune response to the flu than traditional vaccines. All flu vaccines are covered as a Medicare Part B benefit, which means there is no copay for Medicare beneficiaries 65 years of age and older.

“I get the flu shot every year and encourage my peers to do the same – it’s a simple step you can take to protect yourself from the flu,” says actor Lee Majors.  “I urge everyone 65 years of age and older to talk to their health care provider about their vaccine options this flu season.”

The flu can make existing health conditions worse, and it is especially dangerous for people with lung disease, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer—conditions that commonly affect older adults. Nationwide, 86 percent of adults 65 years of age and older have at least one chronic health condition and approximately 66 percent of Medicare beneficiaries have two or more chronic conditions, putting them at increased risk of the flu and flu-related complications, which can be severe and include hospitalization and even death.

For more facts about flu, and to order free educational materials, including a brochure and fact sheet, visit www.ncoa.org/Flu.

About Flu + You
Flu + You is a national public education initiative, from the National Council on Aging with support from Sanofi Pasteur, to educate adults 65 years and older about the dangers of the influenza virus, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options. Older adults and their caregivers can learn more on the Flu + You website, www.ncoa.org/Flu, which features a public service announcement with Lee Majors and facts about the flu. Also available on the website is a calendar of Flu + You events that will be held in 12 cities throughout the United States in September and October. At the events, older adults will have the opportunity to learn more about their risks for flu and available vaccine options, as well as talk to a health care provider and receive a flu vaccination.

About NCOA
The National Council on Aging is a nonprofit service and advocacy organization headquartered in Washington, DC. NCOA is a national voice for millions of older adults—especially those who are vulnerable and disadvantaged—and the community organizations that serve them. It brings together nonprofit organizations, businesses, and government to develop creative solutions that improve the lives of all older adults. NCOA works with thousands of organizations across the country to help seniors find jobs and benefits, improve their health, live independently, and remain active in their communities. For more information, please visit:

www.NCOA.org | www.facebook.com/NCOAging | www.twitter.com/NCOAging

 

CONTACT: Dana Kinker, (212) 301-7181, dkinker@wcgworld.com

Senior Citizens to Benefit From Care – Home Adult Education by Sarah Maple

September 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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A newly announced scheme from the government will improve the quality of life for residents of 21,000 care homes in an effort to bring adult education to senior citizens. According to trainingjournal.com, the project has been commissioned by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills and is in the hands of the National Institute of Adult Continuing Education.

The National Institute of Adult Continuing Education (NIACE) is a non-governmental charity with a number of high profile members, including the BBC, universities, local authorities and the Ministry of Defence. The primary aim of the institute is to ‘encourage all adults to continue in learning of all kinds,’ and set to achieve this by setting up events, support networks, publishing texts, and hosting training courses.

Of course, the idea of adult education for senior citizens is not new. China has been at the forefront of lifelong learning since the establishment of its Agricultural Broadcast and Television School. Before switching over to a primarily ICT-led scheme, the distance learning institution used radio, TV, video, and audio cassette, to ensure those in rural areas had access to learning materials. The scheme is now an integral provider for older learners in an aging society.

The fresh enthusiasm for senior citizen education in the UK is in part due to recent examples of the positive affect it has had when implemented. Tansley House Care Home in Derbyshire has recently won 2009’s NIACE Adult Learners Week after starting an education scheme – resulting with an increase in the levels of health and happiness of the residents.

The next step in the scheme is for NIACE to conduct a report into the best models of learning and the extent by which such schemes improve the lives of care home residents. The scheme also has positive benefits for distance learning and the promotion of continuing education for your whole life – which is a great thing at a time when new learning technologies, open content and proposed broadband for everyone is making education even more accessible.

Sarah Maple is writing for Kaplan distance learning about degree courses online and education in general.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sarah_Maple

A Senior Citizen In Juvenile Hall by Eva Fry

August 9, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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It was my first time speaking at Juvenile Hall, I was terrified! I had seen enough movies to know I didn’t want to be there. As I hurried through the metal detectors, and pushed through the big metal doors, my heart was pounding and I was filled with fear. I wondered if I would get out of this place alive.

I passed the holding tanks, rooms with big windows containing kids who had just been arrested. In there were kids pacing, fighting addictions, fearfully waiting to be assigned to a unit. Some kids were right at home. They knew this place! They had been there before.

When I stepped into the inner sanctum I heard sounds that confirmed my fears. Angry kids were screaming, using profane language. I heard loud pounding on the doors, which dotted the narrow hallways. Juvenile inmates were communicating through the thick cement walls. As I scurried along, I saw empty eyes piercing out at me through the small, eye level windows of their rooms. I passed through more metal doors and hallways, until I came to the unit I was to speak in. Inside sat fifty young men, of all nationalities. I knew from their varying hair color. Their backs were toward me. They were juveniles from the age of 15 to 17.

As I slowly walked to the front of the room, I made sure there was a guard on either side, in case one of them grabbed me. I took a deep breath and turned toward them. My heart stopped! I was shocked! They were just kids! I expected them to look like criminals, but they looked like they could be one of my nine grandkids.

Although some did appear tough, and others rough, there was something about them that touched me. At that moment, my life changed! A still small voice inside me said, “you must try to help them!”

Thus began my continuing, nine-year mission, to help kids who are in trouble with the law. These are my kids. “The Forgotten Kid.” The children we think we can lock up, throw away the key, and forget. The ones who learned most of the bad things they have done, from us, the older generation. They are kids, paying the price for the sins of society. Our scapegoats

There are up to 600 kids locked up, in this facility, at any time. The Hall houses kids from the age of 10 to 18, although I saw a nine-year and ten-year-old carrying blankets and pillows. Were they going camping?
No! They were headed to their rooms, to be locked up, for armed robbery.

BE A WINNER IN LIFE IS MY PROGRAM. I help the kids believe they can still be WINNERS. I teach them they have potential to do amazing things with their life. In fact, I believe God sent them to this earth to do good with their lives. I tell them each one is a genius, in their own way, and can do something better than anyone else can do. They must find their genius. They must go to school, obey the law, obey their parents, be honest and work hard. My goal is to share with them the same truths I taught my kids: the basic truths of right and wrong.

I hope to support the parents who are good parents, but their kids got on the wrong track. I try to teach the ones with bad parents, or no parents, values they were never taught: basic principals of good and bad.

How did I start speaking at Juvenile Hall? It began a long time ago, when I was a little girl, the daughter of an alcoholic father who emotionally damaged my mother and us kids. I grew up in circumstances similar to some of these young wards.

I speak to them because I would have loved to have had someone, who cared, talk to me when I was young.

Some of these kids, like me, are the off spring of parents who didn’t care how their actions affected their kids. We were from homes full of contention caused by parents with addictions. Sick parents who were unable to control their own lives, let alone parent a child. So-called parents, who lived in their own hell and created havoc in the lives of their children. Parents who abandoned their kids.

When I talk to the kids, I relate to the ones who hope to fix their parents, and those who must care for their siblings. I relate because I remember pouring my Dad’s alcohol down the drain, thinking it would fix our problems but instead, I got myself into lots of trouble. I remember taking money from my Dad’s pocket, after he passed out, to give to my Mom. Money for food.

I remember the day I realized that whatever I did at home would change nothing. I would never have the loving family I longed for. Like many of these kids, I turned to friends for the family I needed. Like them, they were usually the wrong kids of friends, peers who were doing bad things. I remember drinking alcohol, even though I hated it, so I could fit in.

I hear my same story, over and over again, at Juvenile Hall.

To help them I share a profound truth, which I discovered in my young life. “Bad things happen for a reason!”

My bad thing: after a wasted life, at the age of 57, my Dad died an alcoholic. His drink of choice was 100% over proof rum. The good thing: My Dad’s death led to me realize I didn’t want to end up like him, or give my kids the life he gave me. I eventually made a commitment to stop drinking and change my life. Thankfully I was young and not an alcoholic, like my Father and Grandfather.

My commitment worked! I share with them how wonderfully my life has turned out, because of one small choice. I used my Dad’s mistakes to choose a better life for myself. I now have the life I dreamed about. My husband and I have been happily married for 45 years and with our children and grandchildren, are a close knit, happy, non-drinking family.

I tell them, “you can turn the bad things which have happened in your life into motivation for a better life too.” I help them believe they still have time to change.

Another reason I speak at Juvenile Hall is because I was a victim of a drunk driver. At the age of 17, the car I was riding in was hit head-on by a drunk driver. My head went through the windshield. My nose and part of my ear was torn off. Thankfully doctors put me back together, but I came to realize the terrible carnage alcohol could cause. I’ve had a mission all my life to teach the evils of alcohol use. I was a speaker for Mother’s Against Drunk Driving for several years. In fact, they were the ones who first sent me to speak at Juvenile Hall.

I teach the kids to abstain from alcohol and drugs. I have commitment cards, which I encourage them to sign and honor. I know if I can help them make a commitment not to drink alcohol, or use drugs; they will have a better chance at changing their lives and reaching their potential. They don’t need alcohol or drugs in their life. Most of the kids are locked up because of their first drink of alcohol, which lead to drug use and criminal behavior.

One of the questions people always ask me is “what is it like to talk to young criminals? Do they listen to you?”

My answer is, “at first it took a little time to know what to say and how to say it, so they would accept me. It took me time to overcome my fear of knowing how to communicate with them and have them accept me.”

One night, one of them asked, “why do you come to Juvenile Hall?” I answered, “why do you think?” His response, “for the money!” I replied, “no one pays me, in fact the first time I spoke, someone stole the hub caps from my car.” His mouth fell open and then he really listened to my program.

I’m happy to say I do very well with them! The kids are very attentive. They know I care. I don’t judge them. In most cases, I don’t know what their crime is. I don’t want to know. I tell them that what they have done is wrong and they must pay the price. On the other hand, I hope to stop them from getting deeper into crime. If I can stop them from hurting someone in the future, I feel my time is worthwhile.

I know I won’t get through to all of them, but I hope to plant seeds, which may take root someday when they have choices to make. My dream is to save as many as I can.

It is very gratifying when I feel I have gotten through to them and when they thank me. One boy said. “You told me bad things happen for a reason. Your right!” I never would have gotten an education if I hadn’t come to Juvenile Hall. I just got my GED. I applied to a college and was accepted. I will be going to school to be come an engineer when I get out.”

I am happy when I feel I have helped them look at life in a more positive way.

I try to help them turn their mistakes and bad experiences into something good. My greatest success is that I encourage the kids at Juvenile Hall to write letters to save other kids from the consequences they are experiencing. They have written incredible letters. Their letters have great impact on other kids because they come from their peers. My latest book “Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids contain the letters.

Here are inserts from some of the letters:

Addiction controlled my life. Don’t let it control you! I wish for all you guys to be safe, and I pray for you kids that don’t know what life is really about, because after that second when you make the bad decision, it goes down hill from there. Only you can change your future. I hope you all understand that there’s a number in prison with your name on it, if you don’t change. Now’s the time to change. Not later. Not when you get out, but now! If you don’t change now you never will.

Gang banging was my worst thing I ever gotten into. If I could take it back, I would. I repeated my Dad’s cycle.

Now I sit here in a one-room cell, facing 25 years to life. I want you to look around and see what kind of situation you’re in. Open you eyes and your minds and soak as much education as you can. I’m 17 years old in a couple of weeks. I will be graduating from high school (in Juvenile Hall). Education is the key to life.

I’m in the Hall, Unit 800. Why? Because I committed a sin while I was on drugs. At the age of 13, I started using drugs because my best friend was asking me to try some. At the age of 16, my charges are DUI, evading a peace officer, driving at an unsafe speed with no license, a firearm in the car and 187 murder.

All the violence that is going on in our community is not solving nothing. The only thing it’s doing is killing us off, one by one. Before you know it the human race will be extinct. Because we are the last of the dying breed. I’m only telling you this so you guys can make the right decision. Your homies probably say they are down for you, but they be faking, and that’s real. The only people that’s going to stick by you is your mama and your family. I seen too much in my life young homies and it’s not what you are thinking. I lost my little homie and that really hit me. All that was on my mind was retaliation but when I thought about it, I knew it wouldn’t bring him back so I thought of another game plan. I prayed!

Eva, I want to thank you for all the help that you have given me. All the little words you’ve spoken in your groups have helped me so much along the way. I have changed in ways that people wouldn’t believe. I have done a whole 360. Without the help of you, I see the change being 100% more difficult. I wish my family was around to see my new life.

As you can see, my experience with my kids, at Juvenile Hall, has been emotionally rewarding and very satisfying to me. These kids give my life meaning. I feel I am making a difference.

I continue to try to help kids. I have written a book called “BE A WINNER IN LIFE”, which I hope to get into the hands of every child in Juvenile Hall’s, all over the country. Also, I want to get it into the hands of parents. I hope to get to kids before they are locked up.

Yes I’m a grateful to be a senior citizen at Juvenile Hall! I’m grateful my senior years have value and that I am doing something with my time, which is worthwhile.

I now know that every senior citizen can use the wisdom they have gained throughout their life to make a difference. We can all do something. I encourage you to find a way to help a child. Our kids need you!

Eva Fry is an author, singer/songwriter and motivational speaker. She had a ten year volunteer program at Juvenile Hall called “Be a Winner in Life” She has three books “You Must Have a Dream” for seniors, “Be a Winner in Life” for kids, troubled kids and their parents, and Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids” – for all kinds, especially those who are locked up and to help kids from being locked up. She started writing and songwriting at the age of 60. Her goal is to encourage seniors to reach their potential and help kids do the same. She has many free articles on her web site to help young and old. She has six CD’s which are spiritually based and inspire young and old. She is avilable as a speaker or performer. Her work is available on her web site Eva Fry – eva@evafry.com http://www.evafry.com ( She has many free articles on her web site)

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eva_Fry

Convenience and Product Selection Encourage More People to Manage Incontinence Online, Parentgiving.com Survey Reveals

July 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Convenience and Product Selection Encourage More People to Manage Incontinence Online, Parentgiving.com Survey Reveals

For the first time in its five-year history, the senior wellness site Parentgiving.com conducted an opinion survey on incontinence, reaching out to nearly 5,000 of its customers who shop for self-care products in this category. The focus was to learn how people best cope with incontinence and if a greater awareness about it as a medical issue has erased its stigma and prompted more people to talk to their doctors about treatment. Respondents were also asked to share both their frustrations and their strategies for maintaining quality of life.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130724/PH51806LOGO)

Results show that progress is being made. Slightly over 70 percent have talked to their healthcare provider about incontinence—many of them are taking or have tried medications, and a few have had surgical procedures.

But nearly 30 percent of respondents have still not sought medical attention. Reasons are varied. A few people still feel too embarrassed to bring it up, even in front of a doctor, while some assume it’s just a normal part of old age (it’s not!) or don’t know that there are treatments that might help. Others say they have more life-threatening medical issues, from diabetes to stroke recovery, that take precedence when they’re at the doctor’s office. For a few, the possibility of yet another medication to add to their existing regimen would be financially out of the question.

More Key Points From the Parentgiving Survey

* Fear of accidents is the top concern.
Two-thirds of respondents ranked this as their number one worry. The lack of product selection came in second at 21%. People want more product choices, which will, in turn, help them feel more secure about avoiding accidents.

* Online is the way people want to buy products.
Nearly 46% buy products online where they can get the widest selection and have anonymity.

* Absorbency is the key feature in choosing products.
An overwhelming 81% ranked this first. Information on a product’s absorbency should be front and center on product descriptions, say the respondents. Comfort ranked second and the ability to buy a product online ranked a strong third at 36%, above both cost and anatomical design of items.

* Many people are satisfied with their incontinence products. In fact, 40% are very satisfied. However 44% are only somewhat satisfied—there’s room for better education about products to help people find those that are more effective for them and the respondents had numerous suggestions for incontinence product manufacturers to improve styles.

For complete survey results, go to http://www.parentgiving.com/elder-care/incontinence-survey-results/. There is also a companion article, “Survey Says: 50 Top Strategies for Managing Incontinence,” featuring respondents’ experiences and suggestions at http://www.parentgiving.com/elder-care/survey-says-50-top-strategies-for-managing-incontinence/. For more information, please contact Julie Davis, Chief Content Officer at 203-984-4424 or email.

About Parentgiving. Parentgiving.com is the online destination dedicated to the health and wellness needs of seniors and their caregivers. A comprehensive website, Parentgiving offers hundreds of informative articles on eldercare, plus Q&As with experts on healthy aging. The Parentgiving Store sells find thousands of products from medical supplies to practical tools for the activities of daily living. Everything can be ordered by phone or online with fast shipping right to the senior. For more information please visit www.Parentgiving.com or follow us on Twitter.

Local Las Vegas Company Launches New Crowdfunding Website BlessABuck.com

July 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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www.BlessABuck.com

Local Las Vegas Company Launches New Crowdfunding Website BlessABuck.com

 

Website created to bring dreams to fruition for entrepreneurs, charities

 

LAS VEGAS – July 23, 2013 – Local Las Vegas based company launches new crowdfunding website www.BlessABuck.com which is focused on helping people bring their ideas to fruition. The website and platform, created by ShoutLegacy, will help entrepreneurs from start to finish by providing campaigns with the essential tools and feedback needed to begin their progress. The new crowdfunding platform also has a section dedicated specifically to cause-related campaigns which will allow nonprofits to raise funds.

 

CLICK TO TWEET: Have an idea for a business or product but need funding? Does your favorite cause need money for a project? Visit www.BlessABuck.com today. http://clicktotweet.com/bn4ed

 

“Many people have great business ideas, although much of the time these dreams cannot be fulfilled due to lack of funding. BlessABuck was created to help bring dreams to life,” says Michael Durant, Creative Marketing Officer of BlessABuck. “We are people funding people. What makes us different, as a crowdfunding source is that every campaign matters; we also offer the business tools and strategic guidance to actually build and launch campaigns – even after the funds have been raised. Our goal is to provide a robust platform to help businesses and causes alike to grow and become successful.”

 

Starting a crowdfunding campaign on BlessABuck.com is free and easy. Users can log onto the website, create a profile and submit an idea for BlessABuck to review. Once BlessABuck has approved an idea, users can post a video and create campaign objectives and incentives.

In the launch phase, BlessABuck already has four live campaigns including a trip to Washington D.C. to visit historical monuments for Honor Flight Southern Nevada, a non-profit organization created solely to honor America’s veterans for all of their sacrifices. The campaign has received a significant amount of funds since its creation. For more information or to contribute to this campaign visit https://www.blessabuck.com/campaigns/honor-flights-of-southern-nevada/.

 

In 2012, more than $2.8 billion was raised through various crowdfunding platforms. According to an article at Forbes.com, this year global crowdfunding will double in annual revenue to $6 billion.
Crowdfunding is an innovative way to receive funds for an idea as the “crowd” determines which idea or campaign to “fund” by contributing a given amount of money. Funders can receive incentives for their contributions to a campaign based on a tier system. Campaigns remain live and active on the website for a set amount of time, usually 30-90 days.

 

BlessABuck focuses on four main types of campaigns:

 

  • Creative developments such as music, fashion and film

 

  • Tech campaigns such as apps/mobile, web and products

 

  • Cause campaigns such as community, education and environment

 

  • Entrepreneurial campaigns such as small business, food and sports

 

For more information or to create your own campaign please visit www.BlessABuck.com.

 

About BlessABuck

BlessABuck is a “people funding people” crowdfunding platform focused on innovative ideas, products, and social good. The platform was designed to help crowdfunders by providing feedback and services that assist in each campaign’s growth and overall success. Based out of Las Vegas, BlessABuck focuses on campaigns in four main areas: creative, cause, entrepreneurial, and tech. For more information call 702-589-3330 or visit www.BlessABuck.com.

 

About ShoutLegacy

ShoutLegacy is a Las Vegas digital agency focused on everything design such as creating logos, brands, print and media designs, websites, and applications. With an ever-expanding portfolio of in-house developed brands including www.BlessABuck.com, a crowdfunding platform and www.AtTheBlvd.com,  an app for Apple and Android and an online dream community for car and motorcycle lovers. For more information visit www.ShoutLegacy.com or call 702-589-3300.

For more information, contact:
Tana Shivers, Preferred Public Relations

Tana@preferredpublicrelations.com

702-254-5704

Video: Home Safety Tips for Seniors

July 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Videos 

This video is full of tips for seniors about home safety…

If you would like to suggest a topic for a video, I would love to hear from you!

You can find my email etc on the Contact Us page.

Thanks!

Leigh St John, Executive Director

Sunscreen on Your Feet?

July 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Sunscreen on Your Feet?
Doctors Urge Sunscreen Use and Exams to Prevent Skin Cancer on Feet

CHICAGO—July 8, 2013 Many people do not think about their feet when applying sunscreen, but did you know that the skin on your feet is highly susceptible to melanoma and other forms of skin cancer? The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) warns that skin cancer of the foot is prevalent and can even be fatal if not caught early.

While all types of skin cancer, including squamous cell and basal cell carcinoma, can be found on the foot, the most common is the most serious form, melanoma. Symptoms can be as subtle as an abnormal-looking mole or freckle found anywhere on the foot, and often go unnoticed without routine foot exams.

The foot and ankle surgeons of ACFAS offer these tips to keep your feet safe this summer:

  • Lather up with sunscreen from head to toe—literally—when at the pool or beach to protect your skin from the harmful rays of the sun.
  • Check your feet and toes regularly for symptoms such as an abnormal-looking mole or freckle anywhere on the foot – even under toenails and on your soles.
  • Look for moles or freckles that change in size or shape. If you notice anything suspicious, promptly schedule an appointment with your foot and ankle specialist to have the mark examined.
  • Schedule routine exams with your foot and ankle specialist so he or she can keep track of suspicious, changing marks.

According to Boston foot and ankle surgeon Thanh Dinh, DPM, FACFAS, early diagnosis is key to effective treatment for the condition. But because people aren’t looking for the early warning signs or taking the same precautions they do for other areas of the body, often times skin cancer in this region is not diagnosed until later stages.

For more information on skin cancer of the foot or other foot and ankle health information, visit the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeon’s patient education website, FootHealthFacts.org,

# # #


The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of over 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons. Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research, provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its patient education website, FootHealthFacts.org.

WestCare Foundation Announces Expanded Veterans Programs

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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WestCare Foundation Announces Expanded Veterans Programs

(Las Vegas) – WestCare, a community-based nonprofit providing responsive human services and behavioral health care programs for four decades, announced today that it has expanded its Veterans’ services.

WestCare, founded in Las Vegas 40 years ago, serves approximately 5,000 veterans throughout the United States annually.  America’s returning warriors often face health challenges including substance abuse and mental health disorders, identified as this generation’s “invisible wounds of war.”   Among them are post traumatic stress, brain injury, sexual trauma, anxiety and depression.  Episodes of homelessness, unemployment, and criminal justice involvement are not uncommon among our Veterans.

“These challenges present opportunities for community organizations, led by specially trained, qualified and informed staff, to assist with issues such as social isolation, domestic violence, reintegration and transition, and other problems a Veteran, as well as Veteran family members, may be experiencing,” said veteran and Director of Veteran Services, Dan Bernal. “WestCare is committed to helping Veterans and military family members live positive, productive and healthy lives.”

WestCare’s expanded programs are aimed at addressing a broad range of issues for Veterans and their families through services that  include: treatment for substance abuse and mental health disorders with gender or youth-specific services as appropriate, HIV/AIDS-specific programs, assistance to homelessness  including transitional shelters and permanent housing projects, family counseling, community reintegration, assistance to those who are justice involved, educational and vocational programs for both youth and adults, and case management.

From the top down, starting with WestCare’s President and Vietnam Veteran, Richard Steinberg, more than 10 percent of WestCare’s leadership and staff are Veterans and members of military families. The organization has a deep understanding of military culture at every level and in every program.  “Serving those who have served” is more than a slogan at WestCare.

Since the organization’s inception, Veterans have been welcomed into WestCare programs.  Today, the expanding reach of Veteran-specific programs is aimed at extending services to the men and women who deserve respect for their service, understanding of where they have been and opportunities for their future.

WestCare

WestCare, whose mission “uplifting of the human spirit,” was founded 40 years ago in Las Vegas.  Since its inception, it has grown to more than 100 locations in 16 U.S. States, the US Virgin Islands and the Pacific Islands headquartered in Guam.  The non-profit organization has a variety of programs available in each of the communities it serves.   For more information on the WestCare Foundation and its mission, visit www.WestCare.com.

Ophthalmologists Warn that Fireworks-Related Injuries Can Cause Permanent Vision Loss

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Ophthalmologists Warn that Fireworks-Related Injuries Can Cause Permanent Vision Loss
American Academy of Ophthalmology and Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology urge parents to closely supervise children when around fireworks

LAS VEGAS – June 26, 2013 – As the Fourth of July holiday approaches and Americans make plans to celebrate the stars and stripes with a little red glare from celebratory rockets, the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology urge the public to take important steps to prevent fireworks-related eye injuries. The academies ask parents and other adults to be especially cautious when children are in the presence of fireworks.

Of the more than 9,000 fireworks injuries that occur in the United States each year, [I]approximately 45 percent are sustained by children age 15 and under.[II] Eyes are among the most injured body parts,[III] and one in six fireworks-related eye injuries results in permanent vision loss or blindness.[IV]

All fireworks are dangerous if not properly handled; however, sparklers cause the most injury and are particularly dangerous since many children handle them on their own. Sparklers typically burn at 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit. That temperature is nearly 1,000 degrees hotter than the boiling point of water, double the heat required to burn wood, hot enough to melt glass and cause third-degree burns to the skin.[V] Out-of-control bottle rockets also cause some of the most serious eye injuries, including corneal abrasions, traumatic cataract, retinal detachment, optic nerve damage and rupture of the eyeball – all of which can lead to potential blindness.

Both Academies advise the public that the best way to avoid potentially blinding injuries is to attend a professional public fireworks display instead of using consumer fireworks. For those who still decide to use legal consumer fireworks, the Academy recommends they follow these safety tips to prevent eye injuries:

  • Never handle fireworks without protective eyewear and ensure that all bystanders are also wearing eye protection.
  • Never let young children play with fireworks of any type. If older children are permitted to handle fireworks, ensure they are closely supervised by an adult and wear protective eyewear.
  • Clear the area of flammable materials and view fireworks from at least 500 feet away.
  • Leave the lighting of professional-grade fireworks to trained pyrotechnicians.

For those who attend professional fireworks displays and/or live in communities surrounding the shows:

  • Respect safety barriers at fireworks shows.
  • Do not touch unexploded display (show) fireworks; instead, immediately contact local fire or police departments to help.

“It’s vital that the public take seriously the dangers of using consumer fireworks. If mishandled, devastating injuries can occur – particularly to the eyes,” said Adam J. Rovit, M.D., president of the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology. “We urge parents and adults to be on high alert about these risks, especially if children are in the presence of fireworks, and take these safety measures to reduce the risk of eye injury.”

The Academy and the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology believe these tips can help to ensure safe Independence Day observances for everyone. If, however, a fireworks-related eye injury occurs, call 911 and seek medical help immediately. These injuries typically need advanced care by an ophthalmologist, a medical doctor who specializes in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

For more fireworks safety tips and additional information on how to maintain healthy vision, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology
The mission of the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology is to promote and advance the science and art of medical eye care. The Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology’s members are dedicated to treating and preventing eye diseases for all patients.  Learn more at Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide.  Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org.

About EyeSmart
The American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.orgto learn more.

###


[I] Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2011 Fireworks Annual Report, accessed at http://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/113888/2011fwreport.pdf

[II] Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Fireworks-Related Injuries to Children, accessed at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/108/1/190.full

Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2011 Fireworks Annual Report, accessed at http://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/113888/2011fwreport.pdf

[IV]  British Journal of Ophthalmology, Ocular firework trauma: a systematic review on incidence, severity, outcome and prevention, accessed athttp://bjo.bmj.com.proxy1.library.jhu.edu/content/94/12/1586.full#ref-11

[V] National Fireworks Protection Agency fireworks tips, accessed at http://www.nfpa.org/assets/files/pdf/public%20education/fireworkssafetytips.pdf

NEW Barbershop Chorus Hits the Stage Running

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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NEW Barbershop Chorus Hits the Stage Running

The Silver Statesmen barbershop chorus, only six months old, is already making a name for itself.
With Jim Halvorson at the helm as our new director, the chorus has met competition head-on in Ontario, CA where they were awarded Plateau A Chorus Champion in their division. They will compete in October in Bakersfield, CA, where the Far Western District competition gets stiffer with choruses from Arizona, Nevada, Southern Utah, California, and Hawaii.
With nearly 80 men on the roster, the Silver Statesmen will be performing locally at four different venues to celebrate the 75th anniversary of their parent organization, the Barbershop Harmony Society.

The show, “Celebrate Harmony”, will be at these locations:

■ Friday, August 2, 7pm, Sun City Anthem – Freedom Hall, 1815 Hovenweep St., Henderson
■ Saturday, August 10, 7pm, Sun City Summerlin – Starbright Theater, 2215 Thomas Ryan Blvd., Las Vegas
■ Sunday, August 11, 2pm, Winchester Cultural Center, 3130 McLeod Dr., Las Vegas
■ Saturday, October 5, 2pm, Desert Spring United Methodist Church, 120 N. Pavilion Center Dr., Las Vegas

The Silver Statesmen chorus is Nevada’s largest men’s a cappella group. It is an award-winning, all volunteer chorus known for its thrilling, close harmonies and commitment to musical excellence.

The chorus is chartered as the Las Vegas Chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society. Proud to perform and preserve the unique sound of “barbershop” harmony, the chorus also sings a broad repertoire of other musical styles.
The chorus provides singing, music and performance education opportunities, as well as Youth In Harmony programs in communities within the Las Vegas Valley and throughout Southern Nevada. The chorus, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit educational organization, is self-sustaining through gifts, performance fees, admission to shows, and other fundraising activities.

The Silver Statesmen invites men of all ages to join. The chorus rehearses at 7pm each Thursday, at Christ the King Community Church, 4925 S. Torrey Pines Dr., Las Vegas, NV 89118. For more information, visit www.silverstatesmen.com

SilverStatesmen Ontario CA 5-11-13 (1)

Headed to the Beach? Don’t Let Your Feet Ruin Your Vacation

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Headed to the Beach? Don’t Let Your Feet Ruin Your Vacation

CHICAGO—July 2, 2013 As millions of Americans hit the beach this summer, the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons offers these foot safety tips:

  • Wear shoes to protect your feet from puncture wounds and cuts. Sea shells, broken glass and other sharp objects when stepped on can ruin your day at the beach. Avoid the water if your skin gets cut – bacteria in oceans and lakes can cause infection. If you do suffer from a puncture wound, have it treated by a foot and ankle surgeon within 24 hours to avoid complications.
  • Feet get sunburned, too. Rare but deadly skin cancers, such as melanoma, can occur on the foot. Prevent skin cancer on your feet by lathering up with sunscreen. Don’t forget to apply to both the tops and bottoms of your feet!
  • Wear shoes to protect your soles from getting burned as you walk on blistering-hot sand, sidewalks and pavement. Take extra precaution if you have diabetes.
  • Be careful with your footing while playing beach sports such as Frisbee or volleyball – walking, jogging and playing sports on soft, uneven surfaces frequently leads to arch pain, heel pain, ankle sprains and other injuries. It’s best to wear supportive shoes while playing beach sports. If injuries occur, use rest, ice, compression and elevation to ease pain and swelling. Any injury that does not resolve within a few days should be examined by a foot and ankle surgeon.
  • Remember jellyfish stings can still occur even if it’s washed up on the beach. Remove any tentacles that may stick to the foot or ankle, and protect your hands. Vinegar, meat tenderizer or baking soda reduce pain and swelling. Most jellyfish stings heal within days, but if they don’t, see a doctor.
  • Diabetes Risks: People who have diabetes face serious foot safety risks at the beach. The disease causes poor blood circulation and numbness in the feet. A person with diabetes may not feel pain from a cut, puncture wound or burn. Any type of skin break on a diabetic foot has the potential to get infected and ulcerate if it isn’t noticed right away. People with diabetes should always wear shoes to the beach, and remove them regularly to check for foreign objects like sand and shells that can cause sores, ulcers and infections.

For more information on foot and ankle health, visit the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeon’s patient education page at FootHealthFacts.org.


About ACFAS

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of more than 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons. Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research and provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its consumer website, http://FootHealthFacts.org.

VETERANS VILLAGE LAS VEGAS OFFERS EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Seeks Food Pantry and Water Donations; Open on July 4

 

WHAT:           Due to food and water shortage, Veterans Village, a temporary housing facility for vets that also offers a comprehensive roster of services to help vets heal and succeed – invites the community to donate bottled water and canned food items to provide relief to veterans and individuals in need.

 

Particularly during the extreme heat of the summer, Veterans Village is running low on supplies as they shelter vets and their families seeking respite from the heat.

                       

                        Veterans Village remains open on July 4 to shelter veterans, serve the community and  accept donations.

 

WHERE:         Veterans Village Las Vegas

                        1150 Las Vegas Blvd. South

                        Las Vegas, Nevada 89104

 

                       

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org.

RENOWN HEALTH WELCOMES 71 NURSE GRADUATES

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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RENO, Nev. (July 5, 2013) – Renown Health is excited to welcome 100 new
employees, including 71 local registered nurse (RN) graduates, several
experienced RNs, and 20 more employees in front-line patient care and other
roles. The new hires will meet for their first day of orientation at Renown
Regional Medical Center on Monday, July 8.

“We are pleased that so many of the area’s graduates choose Renown as the
place to build their career. Renown nurses and other healthcare
professionals have a tremendous opportunity to develop skills in multiple
areas. The Renown Health network includes three acute care hospitals, a
rehabilitation hospital, a skilled nursing facility and a large physician
practice,” said Michelle Sanchez-Bickley, Vice President Human Resources.
“With the wide range of clinical services we offer at Renown, employees have
a wealth of options to explore.”

As a private employer, Renown has developed programs to train healthcare
professionals and works closely with the university and community colleges
to offer residencies, clinical rotations, mentoring programs and local
faculty. The newly graduated RNs will participate in Renown’s nurse training
programs, which provide clinical support, education and mentoring. According
to Sanchez-Bickley, “Our residency and preceptorship programs are extremely
beneficial for new nurses they transition from the classroom to the
bedside.”

Renown is the region’s largest private employer and according to a recent
report from the Center for Regional Studies at University of Nevada, Reno,
the healthcare sector is a chief driver of western Nevada job growth. In
fact, healthcare employment grew by 9.6 percent over the past five years
while other sectors experienced a decline in jobs.

“We are committed to hiring, developing and retaining local employees,” said
Sanchez-Bickley. “To have a recruitment class of this size is very exciting
for Renown, and I hope for the new employees as well.” In total, Renown
employs 5,200 people and more than 1,400 of those are RNs.

Renown is a strong supporter of regional nursing programs, partnering with
the University of Nevada, Reno Orvis School of Nursing, Truckee Meadows
Community College, Western Nevada College and Carrington College. “Through
these partnerships,” said Sanchez-Bickley, “we are able to strengthen our
community ties, helping to provide education and support to individuals who
are looking to enter into the healthcare industry.”

# # # #

About Renown Health
Renown Health is Reno’s only locally owned, not–for–profit integrated
healthcare network. As the region’s largest private employer with a
workforce of more than 5,000 members, Renown provides more services than all
other local healthcare networks combined. It is comprised of three acute
care hospitals, a rehabilitation hospital, a skilled nursing facility, the
largest medical group and urgent care network and the region’s largest and
only locally owned not-for-profit insurance company, Hometown Health. Renown
also carries a long tradition of being the first in the region to
successfully perform the most advanced procedures.

Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center
recently achieved the Pathway to Excellence® designation, becoming the first
and only hospital in Nevada to receive this designation by the American
Nurses Credentialing Center. As a Pathway to Excellence designated
organization, Renown is committed to nurses’ satisfaction.

TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

 

Terry Murphy, a longtime local businesswoman and community leader who is president of Strategic Solutions and serves as president of Downtown Las Vegas Alliance, is the SHARE Humanitarian for the month of May for her volunteering efforts with Veterans Village, The Rape Crisis Center and the Variety Early Leaning Center Lorenzi Campus.TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

Murphy also serves as Honorary Consul for the Republic of Ireland and as a board member of The Smith Center for the Performing Arts.

 

Each month, SHARE honors those in the community who give without hesitation to help others in need. Murphy was selected for this honor from the more than 1,500 SHARE volunteers in Southern Nevada.

SHARE is involved with raising funds for various social causes including housing assistance and neighborhood support service programs.

 

About SHARE:

SHARE is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1994 by business executives dedicated to providing affordable housing for individuals in need. During its nearly 20 year history, the organization has served hundreds of families, seniors, veterans and those with physical challenges or terminal illnesses. sharelasvegas.org

 

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org

 

About The Rape Crisis Center:

The Rape Crisis Center (RCC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1974 by Florence McClure and Sandra Petta as the Community Action Against Rape (CAAR) with the goal of helping those in Clark County heal from the trauma of sexual violence. Today, The Rape Crisis Center operates a 24/7 crisis hot line for sexual assault victims and provides counseling, advocacy and support to help victims begin the healing process and navigate the legal system. The RCC is also committed to the prevention of sexual assault through educational programs and community outreach. To assist victims to become survivors, the organization depends on a core base of dedicated volunteers and staff. These individuals are empathetic and enthusiastic people who give their time, energy, and personal sacrifice to continue to serve Clark County’s victims of sexual violence. This service is provided through face-to-face and over-the- phone intervention with newly victimized individuals.The Rape Crisis Center hotline number is 888-366-1640.  For more information, visit www.therapecrisiscenter.org.

 

Top 10 steps to prepare for a remodel

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Top 10 steps to prepare for a remodel

NARI offers tips in honor of National Home Improvement Month.

  

Des Plaines, Illinois, May 8, 2013—In honor of National Home Improvement Month this May, the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) advises homeowners of the 10 most important steps to take before the remodeling project starts.

“The planning and researching phases of a project are the most critical steps in the remodeling process,” says NARI National President Art Donnelly, MCR, CKBR, Legacy Builders & Remodelers Corp., based in Mount Sinai, N.Y. “The more knowledgeable and prepared a homeowner is, the more they protect themselves.”

What can a homeowner do to prepare for a remodel? NARI provides a top 10 list of steps homeowners should take before breaking ground on their next remodel.

  1. Research your project. Taking time to research projects on the Internet and NARI.org will provide a good sense of what is involved such as price, scope of work, return on investment and new product/material options. Also, research property values in your neighborhood to make sure your project is in line with other homes in the area.
  2. Plan project around the long-term. How long do you plan to stay in your home? How might your family structure change over time? Life can change quickly—these questions should be answered early on to ensure your project will fit your lifestyle long after it’s complete.
  3. Set your budget. Deciding on a realistic budget and arranging finances to support your project are essential. This number needs to include everything—the project, products, contingencies, etc. Don’t be afraid to share this with your remodeler; professionals are respectful of a client’s budget and will create a plan around it, not over it.
  4. Use advanced search for professionals. The online world makes it easy to gather information about strangers. Ask friends, family and neighbors for referrals and then spend time researching that person online. Professional remodelers take their reputation seriously and hold credentials beyond licensing, such as certifications, memberships in trade associations and additional training. Look for examples of press coverage or involvement in industry presentations or events. Check online reviews and social media to see how they interact with past clients and peers.
  5. Ask the right questions. Time and cost are important, but getting the right information requires the right questions. Ask your professional remodeler about his educational background, training, specialties or past issues with clients. Ask about how the remodeling process will work.
  6. Verify your remodeler. Don’t take their word for it. Check the information given to you such as references, license numbers, insurance information and certifications by calling providers to verify. Request a visit to an active client’s jobsite. Make it known that you are checking on him—a true professional considers that as a positive sign to working with a homeowner.
  7. Review contracts word-by-word. A remodeling contract protects you and your remodeler. Homeowners should review this carefully. Professional remodelers have done this before, and know what should go in a contract. Homeowners are not as familiar with remodeling and should ask about terms if they don’t understand. Pay attention to details about change orders, payment, additional fees, timeline and responsibilities. If it’s not in the contract, it doesn’t exist.  
  8. Keep design in mind. Your design guides the entire project. Think about what you dislike about your current space and the intended use of the new space. Use Websites such as Pinterest.com and Houzz.com to gather design ideas. Make sure you can articulate specifically what you like about that design when talking to your designer. Professionals don’t recreate a photo—they incorporate accessibility, functionality, ease of modification, style and value into your design.
  9. Make your selections. Deciding on products and materials is a larger process than most imagine. With so many options to choose from, product selections are one of the primary reasons for project timelines to get extended. Base decisions on quality, function, price, style and availability. Include selections in the contract to lock down pricing and keep your budget intact.
  10. Create a communication plan. A common downfall in remodeling is lack of communication between homeowners and remodelers. Your remodeler should lay out a communication plan at the beginning of the project. If not, ask them to do so. This plan should clarify roles of everyone involved, communication methods, availability, and frequency of communication that is expected.

As an industry that struggles with a persistent negative perception of remodeling contractors, these tips serve both the industry and consumers in elevating real professionals from the pack.

The first step to hiring a professional is through NARI, whose members are vetted and approved by industry peers to ensure they live up to the professional standards that NARI sets. “NARI members are proud of their affiliation and commitment to professionalism, and it’s a reputation they work hard to protect,” Donnelly says.

Consumers may visit www.NARI.org to find a qualified professional who is a member of NARI or call NARI National at (847) 298-9200 and request a free copy of NARI’s brochure, “How to Select a Remodeling Professional.”

Click here to see an online version of this press release.

EDITOR’S NOTE: NARI can provide hi-res digital photos of award-winning projects to accompany your story. Contact NARI with your photo request at marketing@nari.org or ask for Morgan Zenner at (847) 298-9200.

# # #

About NARI: The National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) is the only trade association dedicated solely to the remodeling industry.  The Association, which represents member companies nationwide—comprised of 63,000 remodeling contractors— is “The Voice of the Remodeling Industry.”™ To learn more about membership, visit www.NARI.org or contact national headquarters, based in Des Plaines, Ill., at (847) 298-9200.

Government Grants For Senior Citizens – Specific Grants Set Up For the Elderly by Matthew Salvinger

May 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The government has grants set up to help every group of people in the  country, including senior citizens. In some cases these grants may be approved  to the senior citizens themselves, but the grants can also be awarded to people  who assist the citizens on a regular basis. Whether it’s medical research for  the elderly or increasing the safety of old folks homes there are grants that  will provide funding to those who need it.

Government grants for senior citizens will often go to organizations that  work with the elderly and charities that support senior citizen groups. These  organizations can be businesses or volunteer groups, as long as they work with  the elderly in some capacity. The grants can be used for special classes for  people over 65, providing cheaper medical services for the elderly, keeping  volunteer groups that run errands for disabled older adults funded, and just  about anything else an organization can think of to help the elderly  community.

Various websites have provided lists of where to find these government  grants. They have information on what government organization is funding the  grant, when the deadline for the grant application is, what the grant is  intended for, and how to apply for those specific grants. Anyone can apply for  government grants for senior citizens as long as they qualify for the grant. It  tends to be easier for individuals to go through organizations if they are  seeking grant money although individuals are permitted to apply also. Certain  grants for the elderly such as education grants and housing grants are simple to  get without the assistance of an agency. More information on who can apply for  these grants is available through government websites and some local government  agencies.

The US Government and private foundations award MILLIONS IN GRANTS to people just like you who are in need of  financial help. The best part is, most grants come with absolutely NO INTEREST!  Get More  Details

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Matthew_Salvinger

Viewing Our Senior Citizens As Part of History by John Harmer

May 2, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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When we consider the activities and contributions by the senior members of  our society, we only look at them now. Yet they have been around for over 60  years. In that time they had seen, been part of, and shaped much of the world we  live in.

Many who were born before World War II. They have seen and taken part in many  of the world’s conflicts. The Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Balkan conflicts,  the events of September 11, the Gulf War, the Falklands conflict, to name only a  few.

Their contributions to medicine and the health of our community includes our  ability to harvest body organs to make use of them to keep yet another person or  persons alive. Add to that the huge strides that have been made in the  health-care and community care, policing, and defence.

In business today’s retirees can show that they have contributed to the  growth and stability of the world’s industry and commerce. Motor cars,  airplanes, ships and shipping have all benefited from the experience and  knowledge of those who are now counted amongst our old folks.

In education what we know now is so far advanced from where it was 60 years  and more ago that it is barely recognizable. All of this progress in the  attributed directly to the work, talents, and experience of today’s seniors.

In the world of art,music,and theater, many of our greatest triumphs were  created designed and engineered by those who are now enjoying a well-earned  retirement. We often see today that the music art and theater that was made  years ago being taken out of mothballs and re-presented And why is this? Because  it was brilliantly done in the first place and imitation is sincere  flattery.

When today’s retirees were but children themselves, they never expected to  see a man walk on the moon. Or a spacecraft lands on Mars. Yet we have seen men  fly high in the heavens and plumb to the depths of the sea. All made possible by  the endeavors of people now aged over 60.

In sporting events we have seen people run faster, jump higher,swim even  faster, lift huger weights. None even thought that such was possible in past  years. All initiated by the then activities of now older people. Who wanted to  see how much we, as a human race, could improve.

Yes we have better foods in some respects, better food preparation, often  better housing and schooling. But not always. In many parts of our world older  people are struggling along with their younger counterparts. Many countries  unfortunately are in poverty, lacking in basic food water and medical supplies.  So our senior citizens have also been forced to look upon some spectacular  failures.

Development in some countries is lagging behind perhaps in what might be seen  to be the basic essentials and human rights. Clearly something that needs to be  addressed and rectified.

We are using up many things that previously existed in plenty. Raw materials,  water, vegetation, are diminishing all too quickly. Our native animals are  becoming extinct because we have not cared for them. Our grandchildren will not  enjoy the pleasure of seeing the animals, flowers, and trees we accept as part  of our lives.

One could go on forever trying to recall even some of the things that today’s  senior citizens have included in their activities and actions. That this is  impossible for us to so many things have happened in the last 60 years. The next  60 years will bring its own changes. We can only look forward.

John Harmer is an online researcher who is himself a senior citizen. He  admires the contributions made by his peers. He is constructing a website that  will provide information about, and advice for, our senior citizens.

You can visit the website by clicking on the following link  [http://www.lotson4seniors.com]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=John_Harmer

 

The Best Self Defense Measure For Senior Citizens Is A Personal Alarm by Carl Vouer

April 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Being in the business of non-lethal self-defense I have made it my mission in  life to protect as many innocent people as I possibly can through the education  and implementation of non-lethal self-defense items such as stun devices,  defensive sprays, personal alarms and the like. I firmly believe that every law  abiding adult should have the right, if not the responsibility to themselves and  their family, to carry some form of non-lethal self defense at all times.  Oftentimes you will see devices like pepper spray, stun guns and personal alarms  geared toward women and seniors and for good reason. The idea is that  individuals who may be at a physical disadvantage in the event of an attack  should be armed with a device that can help them walk away from such an attack  unscathed. Anyone male or female of just about any age could benefit from such  devices but I personally focus most of my efforts on educating senior citizens  in regards to non-lethal self-defense. Again, anyone could potentially benefit  from carrying some form of self-defense but I think senior citizens more than  anyone can see this benefit as they are often targeted by scumbag criminals that  assume seniors will be an easier target and less capable of physically defending  themselves.

There are a multitude of devices that senior citizens can use to help protect  themselves in the unfortunate event of an attack but none are safer and easier  to use than personal alarms. That is not to say that I don’t think stun devices  and/or defensive sprays would not be suitable for many seniors it is just that  with stun devices and defensive sprays one runs the risk of potentially injuring  themselves in the process of trying to defend themselves. Also stun devices and  defensive sprays could potentially be wrestled from a senior and used against  them by the attacker, especially if the attacker is considerably stronger and  faster than the senior in question.

Personal alarms are wonderful because not only are they absolutely and  completely safe but can also be extremely effective, just as effective as a stun  device or defensive spray in many cases. Personal alarms work by emitting an  extremely loud distress signal and when I use the words ‘extremely loud’ I am  talking about 130 decibels or roughly the volume equivalent of standing in the  10th row of the average rock show here. That is more than enough volume to scare  the holy heck out of any attacker and send him running in the opposite direction  for fear of being seen and apprehended. So if you are a senior citizen, or  anyone for that matter, who would enjoy the extra security that carrying a  personal alarm can bring, please consider carrying one yourself.

Stay Safe, Carl Vouer

To see more items of self defense for senior citizens or to buy personal alarms yourself please visit us online.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Carl_Vouer

 

Niche Marketing Strategies For Tutoring Businesses Looking To Attract Senior Citizens by SK Tilton

April 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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For years, we’ve heard about the graying of our population from the baby boom  years. Our current class of senior citizens inductees (the population born  during the Baby Boom after World War II from 1946 to 1964) is going to make up  close to 20% percent of the total US population by 2029 according to the US  Census Bureau. What often goes unmentioned is that this mature population also  controls one of the largest percentages of disposable income. As a group, senior  citizens are and will be for some time the most affluent Americans. They hold  about three quarters of the nation’s financial assets worth approximately $1  trillion in disposable income annually.

Again, that is $1 trillion dollars in disposable income annually.

Many product and/or service oriented businesses have taken the long view and  begun marketing various products and services geared specifically to the older  consumer. Despite this recognition on the part of a few marketers, this  financially secure, mature group of consumers remains largely untapped by  educational companies and services. Take for instance the onslaught of new  technologies that seem to pop up like daisies in the spring, out of all consumer  groups, our seniors, are usually the last to be courted. While it may be true  that certain technologies are better suited for younger tech savvy consumers (I  am reminded of my elderly grandmother who purchased an unlimited text messaging  package on a small phone without text messaging capability and did I mention she  had arthritis), it doesn’t mean that this market is entirely unsuited for those  educational businesses and services that use technology to deliver their product  or service.

For a supplemental education service tutoring provider, this mature consumer  group is wide open with far less competition and minimal requirements in the way  of overhead expenditures. Two of the much-needed services that senior citizens  in particular lack are computer training and technology acclimation. Many of the  services supplemental education companies can provide, are the ones that are  most often overlooked or taken for granted, i.e. using the internet, opening up  an email account, social networking account registration, etc. If you are  reading this article, you can definitely offer those services and more. Suppose  for a moment you feel uncomfortable with your level of competence in offering a  few of these services, let me repeat what I said in my previous article, Niche  Marketing Strategies for Tutoring Businesses Looking To Attract Parents of  Students Taking State Standardized Tests, you do not have to be an expert in the  subject matter in order to provide supplemental services in the subject matter,  you just need to hire people with thorough experience related to the field.

The reason for the lack of competition in this age group is precisely because  this mature audience is a bit more discerning with their spending habits and a  more sophisticated approach is required to gain their attention, loyalty, and  dollars. However, it is for this very reason that supplemental education service  providers should dive into this market with fervor and enthusiasm. Education is,  and has always been a cornerstone for any age group. The value that the 50 and  over age group places on education should not go unnoticed. Along with  education, communication plays an important role in everyone’s lives and its  role only expands as one gets older. In the past, many grandparents would send  letters to their grandchildren and eagerly await their response. Grandparents  yearn to be a part of their grandchildren’s lives. Why not offer the ability to  stay in touch while simultaneously helping an older population learn and acquire  new skills? Imagine grandma’s joy every time she logs on to her e-mail account  and sees a message from her grandchild or when she receives a tweet. It’s truly  a win-win proposition!

Of course that’s just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the type of  services supplemental education providers can offer up in addition to computer  training. Curriculum and/or activities marketed to senior citizens can range  from learning a new language to scrap booking to ballroom dancing. If you’re  looking for ideas on what senior citizens are interested in learning, you can  find a compiled starter list below. Since most of your organized activities and  programs will consist of a variety of group sizes, you will have the ability to  market age specific specials and discounted tuition fees accordingly. Remember,  you run a supplemental education service business that should be able to teach  and tutor in multiple disciplines. You do not need to have any expert knowledge  in any of these areas, just hire someone who does. It is highly unlikely that  Sam Walton knew how to repair the diesel engines of every tractor-trailer that  brought in a load of merchandise to his stores, but his business (Walmart) hired  people who did have that expertise.

The best part about marketing to this age group is that they are fairly  accessible if you know where to look. Putting up postings/flyers at local  community church bulletins, visiting the adult education departments of local  community colleges, and contacting the Facility Director or Onsite Coordinator  at various assisted living facilities to propose your computer training or other  services to their residents, is a good way to start. If interested, there are  plenty of online directories that list full contact information for assisted  living facilities narrowed by zip code or state.

How about the Bingo nights? They are usually held at lodges, halls, churches,  and schools/community colleges.

Hold the presses! Yet another great source that has been largely abandoned by  the younger generation is the newspaper. Here’s a little known fact about the  newspaper industry – 65% of its readers are over the age of 55. By advertising  in this medium you are reaching over half of the newspapers readers – Now that’s  worth another read!

When it comes to reaching senior citizens, let your creativity lead the way,  your opportunities are limitless. For the astute, forward thinking individual,  this is a unique opportunity to service an undeserved demographic and separate  your business from the competition. Remember, thinking outside the box never  gets old!

Activity Ideas for Senior Citizens: · Computer Training  · Dance   · Yoga  · Painting  · Sewing · Journal Writing · Knitting or  crocheting  · Photography · Discussion Groups  · Exercise  ·  Knitting  · Foreign Language Conversation · Needlepoint  · Pinochle   · Quilting  · Tai Chi  · Writing workshops  · Crafts  ·  Bowling  · Bridge

S.K. Tilton has served as a program director, site coordinator, area  director, and as a SES business consultant to various SES (Supplemental  Education Services) tutoring companies across the United States. S.K. Tilton has  written numerous business plans for SES start ups and filed many approved  applications on behalf of SES tutoring companies. As a consultant, S.K. Tilton  has been responsible for presenting and implementing successful marketing plans  and helping first year start ups achieve success normally enjoyed by seasoned  SES veterans. S.K. Tilton’s latest work combines practical experience of the  best and worst SES practices to bring you the only SES success guide book  available. For further information on the SES Made Easy book and the author,  please visit http://www.sestutoringbiz.com.

Stay informed on the latest information regarding supplemental education  service tutoring at http://sestutoringbiz.com/category/Blog/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=SK_Tilton

 

Seniors Citizens Joining a Gym – The Questions You Should Be Asking by Bob Alexander Smith

April 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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There aren’t too many seniors-only gyms around at the moment, however finding  a local one that caters to your needs isn’t impossible.

At your local gym try asking the following questions to see whether you might  join:

Does any of your staff have senior-fitness certifications? 

Several of the governing bodies that certify personal trainers offer training  in senior fitness, and you want to have access to a trainer who has taken  advantage of these educational opportunities.

In many countries the governing bodies which certify personal trainers are  beginning to offer specialist training certificates for those trainers which  undertake the appropriate courses and examinations. Finding a gym with one of  these certified trainers is a plus!

Also these specialist trainers will be able to tailor an exercise program  that suits your needs and what the gym’s is currently offering.

Does the gym offer any senior citizen fitness classes?

There can be a variety of classes offered by your local gym which can cater  to your needs. Having classes in the late morning and afternoons when it’s  quieter maybe what you’re looking for? The gym could even offer Yoga, Pilates of  even Marathon training group classes.

Do check to see if the gym offers classes and equipment suited to those with  arthritis, cardiovascular diseases or any other ailments you may have. There  could even be classes that offer low impact workouts or even chair aerobics  modified for seniors that you might be interested in.

Do you offer senior citizen discounts?

Senior Citizens get nice discounts on public transport, at the cinema, even  at the grocery store, so why not at the gym? Don’t be too shy about asking for  discounts – as in life, if you don’t ask you’ll never know!

Is there a fitness assessment before starting to use the machines? 

Sure the gym is a great habit to get into but before starting do ensure you  have a complete medical assessment by you own physician. You wouldn’t try to  drive a car before knowing what all the pedals and levers were for – it’s the  same thing with the equipment in the gym. Check to see if the gym you are  thinking of joining has a trainer on hand that is familiar with how to teach you  to use the machines and activities that are safe for seniors.

After deciding which of the gyms to join remember the following safety tips  when getting started on your brand new routine:

  1. Start slowly and gently if you’ve not done much exercise in a while.
  2. Breathe as you’ve been instructed for the specific machine – holding your  breath isn’t good.
  3. Wear good fitting shoes and use all of the recommended safety  equipment.
  4. Drink plenty of water.
  5. Warm up and cool down to protect your muscles from strain as taught by the  trainer.

 

If you experience any unusual pain or a shortness of breath whilst you  exercise, stop and get checked by your physician so that you can continue to  enjoy the benefits of exercising.

As well as providing advice to seniors I’ve also launched my first website at  http://www.loftconversionsscotland.com to help those  interested in expanding their living space.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Bob_Alexander_Smith

 

Spring Cooking Workshops by the Springs Cafe Presented by the Culinary Academy of Las Vegas

April 22, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Las Vegas 

Spring Cooking Workshops by the Springs Cafe

Presented by the Culinary Academy of Las Vegas

Las Vegas- April 19, 2013 – The Culinary Academy of Las Vegas announces the spring set of Springs Cafe Cooking Workshops. Learn how to grill, cook vegetables found at the local farmers market to perfection, and the slow and low art of smoked meats from the knowledgeable chefs of the Springs Cafe. Cooking demonstrations include plenty of scrumptious samples, recipes, and discussion with questions from attendees encouraged.

All classes are located at Springs Preserve, 333 S. Valley View Blvd. at US 95. Reservations are required. Space is very limited. For more information and to register please call (702) 822-7700.

WHEN: Every third Saturday of the month, 10 a.m.-Noon
COST: $30 members, $40 non-members per workshop

Member bonus: $75 all 3 three workshops purchased together

CLASS SCHEDULE

April 20: Grilling Favorites

Chefs show how to safely use a gas grill to skillfully prepare the grilling staples of beef, chicken and shrimp. Learn how to perfect steak, marinate and grill chicken satays, and season and grill shrimp like a pro.

May 18: Vegetables Under Fire

Grilling isn’t just for meat! You will learn how to properly grill vegetables and make a picture-perfect grilled vegetable salad, as well as, what seasonings work best for grilled vegetables and how to pickle veggies that are in season.

 

June 15: The Art of Smoked Food: Slow and Low Cookery

Smoked foods are in a flavor league of their own. Learn the method of cooking “low and slow” from the chefs of the Springs Cafe and how to create smoked salmon and beef brisket, as well as a Memphis-style BBQ sauce, in addition to cold smoking vs. hot smoking techniques.

About Culinary Academy of Las Vegas

Founded in 1993, Culinary Academy of Las Vegas (formerly the Culinary Training Academy), the country’s leading nonprofit culinary and hospitality training institute, was developed through a joint labor-management trust representing private sector employers, the Culinary Union Local 226 and the Bartenders Union Local 165. The Academy is licensed by the Nevada Commission on Post-Secondary Education and trains several thousand students per year for participating employers in the hospitality industry. Offerings include a 50-seat bistro-style restaurant, Westside Bistro, and a 400-seat banquet and events center located at the 710 West Lake Mead Blvd. campus. The Academy is the caterer of record for The Smith Center for the Performing Arts and operator of the cafe and catering services at the Springs Preserve. Culinary Academy of Las Vegas is an equal opportunity employer/program. For more information, call 702.924.2100 or visit www.theculinaryacademy.org. Stay up to date on happenings on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterestand YouTube.

The Benefits of Becoming a Senior Citizen by Rahmat Suki

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Most people hate or dislike the fact that in the years to come, they will be  living the second half of their lives as an old man or as an old woman. Being  old has been stereotyped to becoming ugly, slow, weak and isolated. But this is  not the reality at all times; some people grow old without the comfort of their  loved ones or even the care of other concerned citizens, but most of us have the  privilege to stay with our families and loved ones as we grow older each day.  Aging has its own disadvantages and unpleasant consequences, but there are a lot  of privileges being given to a senior citizen. The benefits that you can derive  from growing old are truly valuable and can help you deal better with aging.

To be considered as a senior citizen, one must reach the age of sixty-five in  the United States or depending on the age stated on the laws of a country. The  age of becoming a senior citizen is also considered as the retirement age for  professionals who have dedicated themselves to their work. Every month, there  are over one million people who turn sixty-five and imagine the fraction of the  population that belongs to this age group. By the time you have reached this  age, you are qualified for numerous benefits exclusive.

In the official context, a senior citizen is a term used for legal and  policy-related causes in verifying individuals who are eligible for specific  benefits to the age group. Some of the benefits of aging include caregivers  resources, consumer protection for seniors, education, jobs, and volunteerism  for seniors, end-of-life issues, federal and state agencies for seniors, health  for seniors, housing for seniors, laws and regulations concerning seniors, money  and taxes for seniors, retirement and travel and recreation for seniors. Even  for those seniors who are raising their own grandchildren have corresponding  benefits for doing so. Becoming old is not entirely full of detriments.

Senior citizen is a responsibility of every community. Every country has  responded to the needs of their graying population and being a senior citizen  means that you have fulfilled your role in your own community.

Do visit [http://www.agingpeople.net] to find out more FREE tips and secrets  of Anti-aging solutions.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Rahmat_Suki

 

How to Find a College Grant If You’re a Senior Citizen by Edward J. Woods

April 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The possibility of studying even in old age

We all undoubtedly understand the value of quality education especially in  this day and age. There is never such a thing as studying enough. There is  always something new that one can learn and that is why we are want to find out  whether it is possible to receive a college grant for senior citizens. The truth  of the matter is that it is very possible to get the college grant for senior  citizens. Some people sadly for them they think that senior persons are far  passed the capacity to undergo like the young people which is a very wrong  Norton. You may have invested your time and finances in your kids at an early  age and had to give up the idea of ever attending high level education however  this is the chance for you to realise your long awaited dream now that your kids  have attained their dreams.

Why would one go for the college grant for senior citizens?

Imagine yourself having kids and grandchildren. Imagine these kids all grown  up and taking care of you. Provided you with a beautiful house and paid for your  health insurance. You wouldn’t have to move a muscle in your anymore. It looks  like you might actually enjoy your retirement in perfectly good shape. So what  do you do with your newly found time? You might want venture into education,  perhaps do that course you have always wanted to do but could not o it due to  financial restrains and other responsibilities hence the college grants for  senior citizens comes in. you need to know that it is never too late. The truth  of the matter is that getting college grants for senior students is a lot  easier.

You realise that senior citizens have a greater chance of going back to  school compared to young kids directly from high school. And this is because  there are numerous state and online colleges that have quit comprehensive and  detailed degree programs specific for senior citizens and off course with  discounted tuition rates. The best thing about it is that there are college  grants for senior citizens hence you won’t have to worry about high costs given  that grants are not paid back to the donor, but are only given if the applicant  proves that he is worthy of the investment.

Government agencies and departments have offered tremendous support by  availing such facilities. At such a stage when getting college grants for the  senior citizens is a piece of cake, the only thing is to find out which school  you want to study in given the wide array of schools available and off course  the course that you want to pursue. The best way to hunt for a suitable school  of your choice is to go online. When applying for the college grant for senior  citizens you have to take note of the fact that there re requirements. For  instance a background check on your financial capabilities and restrains,  remember that financial is not given to anyone but anyone who have a limited  financial background but a passion for education and higher learning to be  exact.

If you think college is out of reach for you, for financial reasons, think  again. Find the best financial aid and grant opportunities at http://www.collegegrantsreview.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Edward_J._Woods

Top Senior Citizen Web Sites For Whatever You Need by Maria Norton

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Senior citizen web sites number in the millions and cover nearly every topic  imaginable. Whether you want to find information on benefits, retirement  planning, travel, healthcare, transitioning to another state like Florida, or  even senior citizen sex, there are senior citizen web sites dedicated to the  topic.

One of the most popular sites on the internet for seniors is the  long-recognized American Association of Retired Persons. If you are looking for  any kind of information that is specific to seniors, then their site is an  excellent place to start. The site includes main categories of information like  health, money, leisure, family, and volunteering. You can find information on  discounts available to seniors on travel, dining, and other services. There is  also an online community on the website where you can interact with other  seniors. You can create your own online profile that tells a little about your  and then you can decide what groups you’d like to join based on common interests  and activities.

Or, you can find an incredible amount of information for seniors on the  federal government’s website for senior citizens’ resources at  usa.gov/Topics/Seniors.shtml. The site provides in-depth information and links  to some of the most popular senior citizen web sites on issues like money,  volunteering, health, housing, retirement, end-of-life issues and caregiving.  But the site also includes important information specific to the government such  as:

· Laws and regulations concerning seniors – things like the Age  Discrimination in Employment Act, and the laws relating to Social Security  Administration and Medicare.

· Consumer protection for seniors – information on elder rights, nursing home  advocates, and types of consumer fraud.

· Federal and State agencies for seniors – such as the Veterans’ Health  Administration, the Administration on Aging and the Employee Benefits Security  Administration.

· Information on benefits – the site provides information on disability and  other government benefit programs, as well as a tool to determine if you are  eligible for any benefits.

· Resources specifically for grandparents that are raising their  grandchildren – links to benefits and government assistance information, DHS  programs for Children and Families, and organizations like the National Center  on Grandparents Raising Children

Of course, travel sites are among some of the most popular sites on the web  for seniors. Some of these senior citizen web sites are some of the best for  travel options, both because of their reputation and because of the types of  travel options that they offer:

· Elderhostel is the all-round champ of educational tours for seniors. This  company concentrates on delving into the history and culture of locations in  both the US and abroad.

· ElderTreks – if you want a bit more of an adventure aspect to your travel,  then this company can help. They offer treks that include what they call ‘soft  adventure’ – nothing too extreme.

· Grand Circle Travel – this is a tour operating company that offers trips to  all age groups, but that definitely caters to seniors.

· Seniors at Sea – as you can probably tell from the title, this travel  company offers cruises designed with the senior in mind.

· Grand Travel – this unique travel company offers packages for grandparents  and grandchildren to enjoy together.

There is simply no end to senior citizen web sites and the range of topics  they cover. No matter what kind of information you’re seeking, you can find it  with a bit of patience and an internet connection.

Maria Norton is the creator of florida-retirement.net, a website designed for  those who are considering retiring to Florida or buying second homes there. She  is a licensed real estate broker and a 20 year veteran of the Relocation  Industry. She provides comprehensive, personalized & free, Florida  Relocation Services. She has also published 4 eBooks: A Guide to Establishing  Florida Residency, How to Create the Perfect Retirement, The Florida Beach Book & How to Buy a Second/Vacation Home in Florida, which are available on the  website. To get your copy of How To Create the Perfect Retirement visit her  website at http://www.florida-retirement.net.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Maria_Norton

AARP: George Davis Appointed AARP State President

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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George Davis Appointed AARP State President

African-American Business Executive is Top Advocate for AARP’s 3.1 million members California

PASADENA, Calif., April 3, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — George Davis of Los Angeles, CA, has been appointed AARP California State President. Prior
to his appointment, Davis was acting state president and served for two
years on the state’s Executive Council, a five-member council that provides
direction and leadership in carrying out AARP’s strategic priorities in
California.

Davis came to AARP as a distinguished executive in the broadcasting and
entertainment industry.  He is currently Principal of Davis Broadband Group, a Culver City based consulting firm that advises media and entertainment
companies on digital content distribution.  Earlier in his career, Davis was
managing television technical operations in the US and Asia at Technicolor
and Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Throughout his career, Davis has been actively involved in
community and public service.  In 1999, he was appointed by Governor Pete
Wilson to the board of the California African American Museum.  A few years
later Davis was appointed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to represent the
public as a member of the Board of Governors of the California State Bar.  He
is also a board member of New Directions, a nonprofit organization that helps
homeless veterans.

As volunteer state president, Davis will lead the California Executive Council and work in partnership with State Director Katie Hirning and in collaboration with other volunteers and staff to achieve AARP’s strategic priorities in the state.

“We are thrilled to have George as our new state president,” said State Director Katie Hirning. “He’s a long-time advocate for small businesses and a strong supporter of
technology and outreach to diverse populations.  His knowledge and experience
in these areas will greatly benefit AARP’s more than 3 million California
members.”

Davis is an avid hiker and enjoys collecting rare books when traveling abroad.  He resides in Los Angeles and has two adult daughters and a son attending college.

AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, with a membership of more than 37 million, that helps people turn their goals and dreams into real possibilities, strengthens communities and fights for the issues that matter most to families such as healthcare,
employment security and retirement planning. We advocate for consumers in the
marketplace by selecting products and services of high quality and value to carry the AARP name as well as help our members obtain discounts on a wide range of products, travel, and services.  A trusted source for lifestyle tips, news and educational information, AARP produces AARP The Magazine, the world’s largestcirculation magazine; AARP Bulletin; www.aarp.org

AARP TV & Radio; AARP Books; and AARP en Espanol, a bilingual news source.  AARP does not endorse candidates for public office or make contributions to political campaigns or candidates.  The AARP Foundation is an affiliated charity that provides security, protection, and empowerment to older persons in need with support from thousands of volunteers, donors, and sponsors. AARP has staffed offices in all 50 states, the District of
Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Learn more at www.aarp.org

.

Attorney Receives National Community Service Award for Advocacy in Elder Law

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA) is proud to announce the winner of the 2013 Powley Elder Law Award: Reginald H. Turnbull, of Jefferson City, Mo. This award is presented annually to a NAELA member who is recognized in his or her community as a leader in promoting a greater understanding of the rights and needs of the elderly and people with special needs, and of how Elder Law attorneys advocate for those rights.

The award was established in the memory of Wes and Helen Powley, grandparents of NAELA member Timothy L. Takacs, of Hendersonville, Tenn. Both Wes and Helen were active in civic affairs for all of their lives, and Wes practiced dentistry well into his 80s. The award is funded by a cash grant from the Takacs family to a nonprofit organization chosen by the Powley Award recipient.

For more than a decade, Turnbull has served as an officer and leader of the Missouri Chapter of NAELA, keeping fellow Chapter members up-to-date on important legislation and encouraging continuing education in the field through such legal education programs as the Chapter’s “Missouri Elder Law Fundamentals Institute.” He has been a Certified Elder Law Attorney by the National Elder Law Foundation since 2003 and is a Fellow of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys.

Turnbull frequently speaks at local and statewide events on public and private benefits for people who are aged and people with disabilities. He serves on the pro-bono attorney panel of the Samaritan Center.

Turnbull has also demonstrated his commitment to promoting the needs of the elderly and special needs communities as past Chair and Board Member of the Missouri End-of-Life Coalition; as a past general manager and member of the Special Needs Alliance, a national organization of Special Needs Law attorneys; current Chair of the Elder Law Committee and Vice Chair of the Probate and Trust Committee of the Missouri Bar Association.

Turnbull is a Co-Chair of MO-WINGS, the working interdisciplinary network of guardianship stakeholders, which is rewriting Missouri’s guardianship code. He serves as a member of the Advisory Council of the Mid Missouri Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association and Ethics Committee of the Capital Regional Medical Center.

As part of his recognition, Turnbull can direct $1,000 from the Takacs family to charities providing services to people with disabilities. He has chosen to have $500 awarded to the Cole County Residential Services and $500 to the Jefferson City Area Chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI).

Turnbull will receive the award at NAELA’s Annual Conference in Atlanta, being held May 2-4, 2013.

About NAELA
Members of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA) are attorneys who are experienced and trained in working with the legal problems of aging Americans and individuals of all ages with disabilities.  Established in 1987, NAELA is a non-profit association that assists lawyers, bar organizations, and others.  The mission of NAELA is to establish NAELA members as the premier providers of legal advocacy, guidance, and services to enhance the lives of people with special needs and people as they age.  NAELA currently has members across the United States, Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom. For more information, visit NAELA.org.

Connect Nevada annual survey reveals 75% of residents now subscribing to broadband service, up from 67% in 2011

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Carson City – Connect Nevada today released new data showing that broadband adoption in Nevada is increasing, with 75% of residents now subscribing to broadband service, up from 67% in 2011. Mobile broadband usage also increased from 46% in 2011 to 54%.  Despite this progress, not everyone in Nevada is benefitting from these advances in technology.

“We’re excited to see healthy growth in Nevada toward embracing the amazing educational, professional, and quality-of-life benefits that high-speed Internet provides,” said Connect Nevada Program Manager Lindsey Niedzielski. “However, this new study makes it clear that the expense of the service is now creating a digital divide. Connect Nevada is working hard to address broadband access, adoption, and use across the state so that every Nevada resident is offered the same opportunities for a bright and prosperous future, regardless of factors like age, race, income, or where they live in the state.”

The data are available via an interactive widget on the Connect Nevada website.

Among the key findings of the residential survey are:

  • Three out of four Nevada households subscribe to home broadband service, which is an increase of 8 percentage points from 2011. Despite this upward trend, more than half a million Nevada adults still don’t subscribe to broadband service at home.
  • Mobile broadband is also growing in popularity across Nevada. Statewide, more than one-half of Nevada adults (54%) use mobile broadband, up from 46% in 2011. This includes 55% of rural Nevadans.
  • Nearly half of Nevada’s low-income households do not have home broadband service, and approximately 48,000 low-income Nevadans rely exclusively on mobile broadband service.
  • Expense plays a role in whether Nevadans adopt both home and mobile broadband. Approximately 105,000 Nevadan adults who do not subscribe to home broadband service say that the monthly cost of service is too expensive, while 104,000 Nevadan cell phone owners do not subscribe to mobile broadband on their cell phones due to the monthly cost.
  • Nevada cell phone owners report that the main reason they subscribe to mobile data plans is for the freedom of being able to access the Internet while away from home.

Connect Nevada conducted this survey in support of statewide efforts to close the state’s digital gap. It explores the barriers to broadband adoption, rates of broadband adoption among various demographics, and the types of activities broadband subscribers conduct online, among other findings.

While the results show broadband adoption increasing, approximately 513,000 adults (25%) in Nevada still do not subscribe to the empowering technology of high-speed Internet. To address this digital divide, Connect Nevada offers the Every Community Online program, which offers free digital literacy training and low-cost computers and Internet access.

For the 2012 Residential Technology Assessment, Connect Nevada surveyed 1,201 adults across the state in late 2012. Connect Nevada conducted this survey as part of the State Broadband Initiative (SBI) grant program, funded by the U.S. Department of Commerce, National Telecommunications and Information Administration, and by the American Recovery and Reinvestment of 2009.

# # #

About Connect Nevada: The Governor’s Office and the Nevada Broadband Task Force are leading the initiative to increase broadband Internet access, adoption, and use across the state. Connect Nevada is a nonprofit organization that was commissioned by the state to work with all Nevada broadband providers, create detailed maps of current broadband coverage, and coordinate efforts with other Federal grant award recipients in the state. Connect Nevada is now supporting the development of a statewide plan for the deployment and adoption of broadband. The goal is to spread high-speed Internet across the state and make sure all Nevada residents have access to its life-changing benefits. For more information visit: www.connectnv.org.

Veterans Village Las Vegas Receives $97,000 in Mattresses

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The Home Depot continues to support Veterans Village Las Vegas

 

The Home Depot Foundation (THDF) recently donated a truckload of mattresses valued at more than $97,000 to Veterans Village Las Vegas.  The Home Depot Foundation, which has been actively engaged in supporting VeteransVillage since its inception last year, continues to increase its support to help complete a comprehensive renovation of VeteransVillage’s physical facility, a former Econo Lodge Motel with 120 rooms.   Just last month, The Home Depot Foundation awarded VeteransVillage with a $600,000 grant – the largest grant to a single project and the largest grant in THDF’s western division.

“The miracle on the strip continues,” said Arnold Stalk, founder, Veterans Village Las Vegas.  “The Home Depot Foundation’s ongoing support allows us to give veterans a safe and comfortable place to stay. We are grateful and appreciative for all they have done and marvel at their ongoing support via unexpected donations like a truckload of mattresses.  The good folks at The Home Depot Foundation are true angels.”

 

In addition to providing temporary housing for vets and their families, Veterans Village provides a comprehensive roster of services to vets through partnerships with other community organizations and government agencies, including employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events.

 

The mattresses were donated through THDF’s partner, Good360 – a nonprofit that helps companies efficiently donate slow-moving, obsolete and seasonal inventory to charitable organizations. In 2012, the Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy recognized Good360 and THDF with an Excellence Award for its exemplary partnership.

 

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org.

 

About The Home Depot Foundation:

The Home Depot Foundation is dedicated to improving the homes of U.S. military veterans through financial and volunteer resources to help nonprofit organizations. The Foundation has committed $80 million to these efforts over five years.  Through Team Depot, the company’s associate-led volunteer program, thousands of Home Depot associates volunteer their time and talents to positively transform neighborhoods and perform basic repairs and modifications to homes and facilities serving veterans with critical housing needs. Since its formation in 2002, The Home Depot Foundation has granted more than $340 million to nonprofit organizations improving homes and lives in local communities. To learn more and see our associates in action, visit www.homedepotfoundation.org.

National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA) Celebrates 25th Anniversary

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Elder and Special Needs Law Attorneys Association Kicks Off Celebration at Annual Conference in Atlanta

Washington, D.C. — The National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA) is proud to celebrate “25 years of sharing and caring” through the Elder and Special Needs Law profession. Since 1988, NAELA’s mission has been to establish NAELA member attorneys as the premier providers of legal advocacy, guidance, and services to enhance the lives of people with special needs and people as they age. Through its meetings, publications, educational materials, and advocacy efforts, NAELA has established itself as a leader in Elder and Special Needs Law.

NAELA members go beyond traditional estate planning, helping their clients make complex decisions in areas such as how to plan for the rising cost of long-term care (especially for the Baby Boom generation that is living almost a decade longer than its parents) and transferring decision-making in the event of incapacity. In addition, NAELA members assist families with acquiring and maintaining public benefits to cover the lifelong costs of caring for those with disabilities. NAELA members are advocates for the rights of seniors and people with disabilities to have access to better medical care, the ability to stay in their own homes, and maintain self-respect and as much independence as possible.

“NAELA always has been at the forefront of Elder and Special Needs Law. Founded by a core group of 42 attorneys who were dedicated to meeting the legal needs of older Americans and persons with disabilities and special needs, NAELA now has a membership of 4,400 which continues to grow. NAELA members are the reason that the Academy has thrived, by contributing not only to NAELA but also to the communities they serve,” said NAELA President Gregory S. French, CELA, CAP.

NAELA is a founding member of the Elder Justice Coalition, a coalition of organizational members that support the fight against elder abuse, promote awareness of elder justice issues, highlight government’s responsibility to help create systems to ensure elder justice, and the passage of the Elder Justice Act (S.333).

NAELA also is a founding member of the Leadership Council of Aging Organizations, a coalition of aging organizations that serve older Americans and are dedicated to providing a voice for seniors and their families in the ongoing national debate on aging policy.

Visit the 25th anniversary website to learn more about NAELA’s history, read reflections by NAELA Past Presidents, view member photos, and more.

NAELA will kick off the 25th anniversary celebration at its Annual Conference, being held at the Atlanta Marriott Marquis in Atlanta, Georgia, from May 2-4, 2013. The Annual Conference is an unparalleled venue for Elder and Special Needs Law practitioners to learn, network, and engage with leading experts in the field. Members of the media are encouraged to attend the Annual Conference. For more information, contact Abby Matienzo.

About NAELA
Members of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA) are attorneys who are experienced and trained in working with the legal problems of aging Americans and individuals of all ages with disabilities. Established in 1987, NAELA is a non-profit association that assists lawyers, bar organizations, and others. The mission of NAELA is to establish NAELA members as the premier providers of legal advocacy, guidance, and services to enhance the lives of people with special needs and people as they age. NAELA currently has members across the United States, Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom. For more information, visit NAELA.org.

New Recording Studio Opens in Las Vegas – Vegas View Recording Welcomes Professional Artists and Students at IADT Campus

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The International Academy of Design & Technology Las Vegas (IADT), a college offering Associate’s and Bachelor degrees in a variety of design and technology disciplines, announces the completion and opening of Vegas View Recording, a 2,500-sq-ft recording and mixing studio within its campus.  Designed by renowned studio architect Carl Yanchar and IADT’s Robert “Bobby” Ferrari, the industry standard recording studio is first and foremost a teaching studio for IADT students.  But Vegas View Recording at IADT is also available for hourly and daily lease by professionals and others seeking use of a high quality studio operated by seasoned professionals.

 

The studio includes a vocal booth, a 1,200-square-foot live recording room and industry current control room – all with a view of the Las Vegas Strip. The control room is equipped with an SSL-9080J console for mixing and recording on a large format analog desk.  The studio features a 48IO Pro Tools HDX system with a Waves Mercury Bundle, along with a compliment of outboard gear ranging from Neve 1073 Mic Pres, Summit Audio Pres, Eq’s, and Compressors, Bricasti Reverb, JCF Latté Convertors, and Dynaudio M3 Main Monitors with Lab Grupen Amps.

 

The acoustical design of the new facility is a modern take on the classic designs created by legendary designer, Bill Putman, dubbed by his peers as “the father of modern recording.” Traditional acoustic treatments, such as hard tile flooring, acoustical ceiling materials on the walls and acoustic absorbers near the floor for a deep low-end transmission, combine with modern technology in the control room to create a “new” version of a classic sound environment.

 

“We’re thrilled to offer to everyone – from the famous to the independent artist or group – these new professional quality services and recording facilities.  Vegas View Recoding has been designed as a top quality studio to record and experience working with professionals and students in a comfortable environment.  We are confident it will be a hit with recording artists, engineers, students and everyone who loves recording music,” said Ferrari, Studio Manager at IADT Las Vegas.

 

“This will be a great place in Nevada to learn the true art of modern recording techniques,” Ferrari added. “IADT students will experience what real sessions are like in a truly professional environment, learning the minutiae involved in operating and managing a facility of industry standards.”

 

Ferrari has a long and successful track record in Las Vegas of developing and operating recording studios.  In 1998, he oversaw the remodel and technical install of Lee Pepper Sound; advised and chief engineered Studio Vegas (now The Killers’ Battleborn Studios); performed gear upgrades for Digital Insight Recording; and co-designed, managed, and installed the TEC Award-nominated Odds On Records & Studios featured on the Cover of MIX Magazine in November 2009.

 

Vegas View Recording is located on the campus of InternationalAcademy of Design & Technology, Las Vegas, 2495 Village View Drive, Henderson, NV.   IADT Las Vegas is just minutes from McCarranInternationalAirport off Interstate 215, just west of Green Valley Parkway, overlooking the Las Vegas valley. For more information or a tour of Vegas View Recording contact Bobby Ferrari at 702-596-3219.

 

The studio officially opens for business on April 2. A grand opening is planned during the National Association of Broadcasters convention in Las Vegas, April 9, 2013.

 

 

About the International Academy of Design & Technology Las Vegas:

With more than 30 years as an established institution, the International Academy of Design and Technology offers students a hands-on education with experienced faculty dedicated to providing students with the necessary skills, knowledge, support and guidance to pursue fulfilling career opportunities in the design and technology fields. The Las Vegas campus (IADT-Las Vegas), which opened in 2003, offers degree programs in audio production, cinema production, fashion design, graphic design, retail merchandise management and game production.  Students also have the opportunity to take a portion of their coursework online through IADT-Online. The school is accredited by the Accrediting Council for IndependentColleges and Schools (ACICS). ACICS is a national accrediting agency recognized by the United States Department of Education. IADT-Las Vegas cannot guarantee employment or salary and is part of Career Education Corporation network of schools (NASDAQ: CECO). For more information, visit www.iadt.edu/Las-Vegas or call (866)400-4238.

Veterans Village Collaborates with Heaven Can Wait Animal Society

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Veterans to pilot dog adoption program 

 

WHAT:                 VeteransVillageLas Vegas, a comprehensive housing and resource facility for U.S. veterans and their families, is collaborating with Heaven Can Wait Animal Society (HCWAS) Las Vegas.  Two veterans will pilot a dog adoption program by volunteering to assume responsibility for the care of a dog while staying at the facility.  When they leave, veterans can opt to adopt the dog permanently at no charge.  The plan is to expand the program so that more veterans will enjoy the opportunity to have a loving companion, while helping to save dogs’ lives by giving them a safe home at VeteransVillage.

 

WHEN:                 Two veterans will officially adopt their dogs on Thursday, March 14 at 10 a.m.

Other dogs will be onsite to meet potential veteran owners to be considered for future adoption.

 

WHERE:               Veterans Village Las Vegas, 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard South

 

DETAILS:              Veterans are responsible for keeping their dog active, grooming, ensuring the dog is fed and, crated when left alone. HCWAS will properly train the dogs, provide food, treats and toys as well as assume financial responsibility for all veterinarian visits.  HCWAS will also train veteran residents how to properly care for their animal.

 

HCWAS offers many other services for animals in the Las Vegas area. In addition to finding safe homes for animals, HCWAS focuses its attention on eliminating companion animal suffering and pet overpopulation through spay/neuter, adoptions, community outreach programs and education. By pairing with Veteran’s Village, HCWAS hopes to reach its projected goals of better educating adults on the importance of spay/neuter for their pet and eliminating the killing of more than 30,000 cats and dogs annually in Las Vegas.

 

In addition to providing temporary housing for vets and their families, Veterans Village provides a comprehensive roster of services to vets through partnerships with other community organizations and government agencies, including employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events.

 

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org

 

About Heaven Can Wait Animal Society

Heaven Can Wait Animal Society, a non-profit 501 (c)(3) animal humane organization, was formed in 2000 by a group of 5 concerned citizens with the idea of building a beautiful 20 acre sanctuary to house all of the unwanted animals in our community.  In the meantime, though, animals were and still are dying at rate of around 30,000 per year in our local shelters with even more just dying in the streets.  Therefore, we decided to refocus our efforts slightly away from rescue and more toward promoting spay/neuter as the solution to the tragic pet overpopulation problem here in Las Vegas.www.hcws.org

ICBA Kicks off 2013 ICBA National Convention and Techworld® in Las Vegas

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Las Vegas, Nev. (March 11, 2013)—Today more than 3,300 community bankers and industry leaders gathered for the opening of the 2013 Independent Community Bankers of America® (ICBA) National Convention and Techworld® at the Wynn Las Vegas and Encore. The convention, which runs through Friday, March 15, is the largest gathering of community bankers in the world and features an all-star lineup of speakers, more than 60 educational workshops and numerous networking opportunities.

“Community banks drive local economies throughout the nation by serving local residents and small businesses, so bringing them together in one place to discuss top-of-mind  issues and the future of the industry is something we all look forward to year after year,” Jeff Gerhart, ICBA chairman and chairman, president and CEO of Bank of Newman Grove, Neb., said. “This ICBA event is always a tremendous forum for community bankers and industry leaders to exchange ideas, discover the latest trends and learn about new developments. Most of all, it’s the perfect time for community bankers to come together and discover even more ways to empower their local towns and cities across the nation.”

Highlights of the convention include remarks from national newsmakers, including Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Chairman Martin Gruenberg, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray and Comptroller of the Currency Thomas Curry.

Other featured speakers include Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace, Wikipedia and the Wikimedia Foundation founder Jimmy Wales and legendary NFL quarterback Joe Montana.

Attendees can stay tuned to up-to-the-minute information on the convention with the ICBA 2013 Mobile App and by following the #ICBALV13 hashtag on Twitter.

For more information and a schedule, visit www.icba.org.

About ICBA
The Independent Community Bankers of America®, the nation’s voice for nearly 7,000 community banks of all sizes and charter types, is dedicated exclusively to representing the interests of the community banking industry and its membership through effective advocacy, best-in-class education and high-quality products and services. For more information, visit www.icba.org.

Barbershop Chorus Selects New Director

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It is a great pleasure to announce that Jim Halvorson has been selected as the new director for the Silver Statesmen barbershop chorus.
Jim’s experience and ability to connect with every member of the chorus was very much in evidence during the audition process. There was stiff competition with two other highly qualified and experienced directors vying for the important position. The chorus and selection committee had their work cut out for them when deciding which candidate would best serve the goals and vision of this Las Vegas Chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society (BHS).
By way of background, Jim currently holds a B.A. in Vocal Music Education from St. Olaf College in Northfield, MN, with graduate coursework in Music Ed. from UNLV. He taught elementary general music for 11 years (one year in MN, and 10 years in Las Vegas). Jim currently serves as the director of the choral program at Cheyenne High School, where he oversees four choirs enrolling about 150 students.
Jim has been a barbershopper for most of his life. He joined the BHS on May 30, 1983, with the Minneapolis Commodores at the tender age of 10. He sang and competed with the Commodores from 1983 to 1986. In 1986, Jim became a charter member of the Great Northern Union chorus and sang with them from 1986-1998. He moved to Las Vegas in 1998 and became a charter member (and musical director) of the City of Lights chorus from 1998 until 2003. In 2005, he took over as the musical director of the Celebrity City chorus of Sweet Adelines International. He served as the director from 2005-2011.
Jim currently sings in the quartet, 95 North, which is the 2012 Far Western District champions. He is also currently serving as the Chairman of Youth in Harmony for the Far Western District of the BHS.
The Silver Statesmen Chorus invites men of all ages to join. The chorus rehearses at 7 p.m., each Thursday, at the Christ the King Catholic Community Church, 4925 S. Torrey Pines Dr., Las Vegas, NV 89118.
For more information, visit www.silverstatesmen.com.

Renwon Offers Colorectal Cancer Home Screening Kits

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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To emphasize Renown Institute for Cancer’s commitment to quality cancer care and the importance of getting screened, Renown Health is offering a colorectal cancer home screening kit for only $15 ($5 savings) during the months of March and April. The $15 screening kit, Fecal Immunochemical Test (FIT), is a home screening for annual colon cancer detection.

 

Dr. John Gray and Dr. William Pfau created a fun, educational rap video on You Tube to raise awareness of the FIT Test and encourage patients to take the easy, at-home test which only requires “a swish and a flush.”

 

Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death in the US with more than 100,000 Americans being diagnosed each year. Despite the alarming statistics, if detected early though regular screenings, colorectal cancer is preventable.

 

Colon cancer has an 85 percent survival rate if caught early. It is estimated that as many as 30,000 lives could be saved each year through regular screenings and exams.

 

In 2008, the AmericanCollege of Gastroenterology (ACG) published updated guidelines for colorectal cancer screening. ACG recommends either a colonoscopy every 10 years or an annual FIT screening as the preferred test for colorectal cancer screenings starting at age 50. African Americans should begin screenings at age 45. Patients with a family history of colorectal cancer should speak with their doctor about a different screening schedule.

 

The new ACG guidelines list FIT as a preferred strategy because it has more extensive data than the guaiac-based Hemoccult SENSA test, and because fecal DNA testing is expensive.

 

Home Screening Kit – This screening detects blood in the stool often caused by cancers and polyps. The FIT Test detects blood more successfully than older and more widely used stool-screening tests.
Key patient benefits of the test include:

  • More convenient for patients because it is easy to prepare and complete in the privacy of your own home
  • Only one sample required, as opposed to three consecutive samples with the previous guaiac tests
  • Higher sensitivity resulting in fewer false readings
  • No dietary or medication restrictions required
  • No physician referral required

 

. To order a kit, visit renown.org/FITTest or call 775-982-6830.

 

About Renown Institute for Cancer

Renown Institute for Cancer offers fully integrated cancer services right here at home allowing patients and their families access to advanced treatment options. With three cancer physicians, patients experience coordinated care, appointments and treatments all at one location. For general inquiries, contact 775-982-6830 or visit www.renown.org.

City Of Las Vegas April 2013 Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle!

 

Spring Celebration and Foster Connect (all ages)
Saturday, April 6, noon to 4 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road, (702) 229-8100.
Families will enjoy a spring celebration with amusement rides, jump houses, crafts, games, farmers’ market, community vendors, music and much more. Interested families will be able to receive information on becoming a foster family.

 

Summer Themed Specialty Camp Registration (ages 6-15)

Thursday, April 11, 8 a.m. registration packets are available for pick up.

Thursday, April 11, 5 p.m., registration opens for Summer 2012 alumni at Mirabelli.

Saturday, April 13, 8 a.m., open registration at both sites in person. No online registration.

Cost: $115 per week for the first child; $110 each additional child from the same family.

MirabelliCommunity Center, 6200 Hargrove Ave., (702) 229-6359.

VeteransMemorialLeisureServicesCenter, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.

Two community centers will offer themed specialty camps with additional activities, cooking, and/or field trips from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday, beginning June 10. A few specialty camps have higher prices. Mirabelli special camp list is available online.

For more information on summer camps, call 229-6175.

 

Summer Camp Registration (ages 6-15)

Registration opens Saturday, April 13, 8 a.m. in person at the following sites.

Cost: $75 per week for the first child; $70 for each additional child from the same family.

Lorenzi Adaptive Summer Camp, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-6358.

CimarronRoseCommunity Center, 5591 N. Cimarron Road, (702) 229-1607; ages 6-11 only.

DoolittleCommunity Center, 1950 N. J St., (702) 229-6374.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

StupakCommunity Center, 251 W. Boston Ave., (702) 229-2488.

Camps will be offered from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays, beginning June 10; Lorenzi Adaptive camp will begin at 7:30 a.m. For more information on summer camps, call 229-6175. No online registration.

 

Ward 6 Free Shredding Event
Saturday, April 13, 10 a.m. to noon.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive.
Bring your documents that need to be shredded. Complimentary shredding takes place in the Centennial Hills Community Center Active Adult Center parking lot. Limit of five boxes per vehicle.

Dula Gymnasium Indoor Pickleball Tournament (ages 18+)

Friday, April 19, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Cost: $15 if registered by April 5; $20 if registered after April 5.

Dula Gym, 441 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6307.

Enter the Inaugural Promotional Pickleball Tournament. Four indoor courts will host Men’s Doubles, Women’s Doubles, Mixed Doubles and 50+ groups with A and B divisions. This is a double-elimination tournament. Minimum registration of four teams per division with a guarantee of three matches. First-place winners will receive awards. Please call 229-6307 for more information and registration flyer.

 

Ward 6 Free Movie in the Park – “Odd Life of Timothy Green”
Friday, April 19, 6:30 p.m.

Free admission.
Centennial Hills Park Amphitheatre, 7101 N. Buffalo Drive, Buffalo and Deer Springs.
Enjoy the PG-rated family film, the “Odd Life of Timothy Green” in the park. Bring a blanket or folding chair to be more comfortable. For more information, call (702) 229-5463.

 

Ward 1/Ward 2 Free Shredding Event

Saturday, April 20, 10 a.m. to noon.

All AmericanSportsPark, 1551 S. Buffalo Drive

Bring your documents that need to be shredded. For more information, call (702) 229-4645.

 

Mayor’s Health Walk (all ages)

Saturday, April 27, 8 to 9:30 a.m.

Free admission and open to the public

Kellogg Zaher Sports Complex, 7901 W. Washington Ave. at Buffalo Drive.
For more information, call (702) 229-6720.

Adaptive Recreation

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)

Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m.  Closed school district staff development days and holidays.

Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

Participants will enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

 

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)

Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

 

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)

Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed school district staff development days and holidays.

Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.

CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Call 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence

The Vision Council Launches Online Resource for Low Vision and Saving Sight

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The Vision Council is pleased to announce the launch of www.whatislowvision.org — a new web site created to educate the public on low vision, its symptoms, and the resources available to help.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130228/PH61076LOGO-a )
(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130228/PH61076LOGO-b )

As America’s baby boomers enter their senior years, they may notice a gradual loss in some areas of sight. Loss of peripheral or central vision could indicate low vision, a visual impairment that cannot be corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses, pharmaceuticals or surgery. More than 2.9M people in the U.S. suffer from low vision and it is most common in people age 60+.

What is low vision?
“More likely than not, everyone knows someone with low vision — maybe a mother, sister, neighbor, or co-worker,” said Dr. Paul Michelson, Chair of The Vision Council’s medical arm — known as the Better Vision Institute — and  a low vision consultant.  “Recognizing the symptoms of low vision early and taking the proper actions may help preserve sight and in some cases, lessen the advance of low vision.”

Low vision can impair the ability to complete activities of daily living or follow routines and enjoy pastimes — such as reading — that people take for granted.

Symptoms
At first, people might notice a bit of distortion in their vision.  An object that is straight in reality — a telephone pole, for example — may appear curved or wavy to a person with low vision.  A low vision diagnosis is often the result of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, or another aging eye disease.

Low vision differs from presbyopia, which is when the ability to focus on near objects diminishes. Presbyopia, which can be corrected with reading glasses or other optical solutions, typically emerges between ages 40 and 45.  Signs of low vision are broader than presbyopia and include:

  • Areas of blurred or distorted vision or spots and blotches in your vision
  • Shadowed or darkened field of view or noticeable loss of peripheral vision
  • A gradual loss of central vision
  • Cloudy and blurred vision or exaggerated “halos” around bright lights
  • Blind spots in your field of view

Preventive Measures and Resources
Seeing an eye doctor at the first sign of any visual changes can help to detect the diseases that result in low vision.  In general, seeing an eye doctor is an important step in maintaining eye health.  The onset of low vision is a slow progression of symptoms and the ultimate goal is to maintain remaining sight and prevent further deterioration in vision.

Sometimes, a pharmaceutical or surgical solution may stop further development of one of the diseases associated with low vision, but there are also eye care providers who specialize in low vision.  These specialists can introduce patients to low vision devices such as stand magnifiers, closed-circuit TVs, and telescopic lenses that help people affected by low vision maintain independence and improve their ability to perform daily tasks.

Dr. Michelson continued, “We urge people to check on family, friends, and neighbors who might be experiencing some of the signs of low vision. Vision training, vision rehabilitation, and low vision devices can help people maintain and optimize visual function, and preserve as much sight as is possible.”

At the onset of any symptoms of low vision, The Vision Council reminds people to:

  • Seek an accurate diagnosis and develop a good relationship with an eye care provider
  • Know the risk factors of not maintaining sight and the overall prognosis

To learn more about low vision and find resources, visit www.whatislowvision.org.

”The information and resources on this new website can teach people more about the changes they are experiencing and help them make the most of their remaining vision — which can lead to increased independence and quality of life,” said Dr. Michelson.

About The Vision Council
The Vision Council is the global voice for vision care products, practices, and services.  We represent eyewear manufacturers and suppliers in the optical industry by providing education, consumer outreach and advocacy.  The Vision Council also serves as a resource to the public who want to learn more about options in glasses and sunglasses, eyewear trends, and advances in technology.  Learn more at www.thevisioncouncil.org or find us on Facebook.

 

CONTACT: Erin Hildreth, The Vision Council, +1-703-548-5089; or Susan Caldwell, Access Public Relations, +1-540-204-4033

Social Services and Education Programs

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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March calendar of social services and education programs for individuals, caregivers, and family members impacted by the diseases we treat.  All of these programs are open to the community and are offered free of charge.

 

Lending Library (4th Floor)

Featuring hundreds of books, videos and brochures for patients, families and the community-at-large.  Open to the public Monday – Thursday, 10 am – 2 pm.  Receive a free tote bag when you check out a book.

 

Healthy Living: Up2Me

New 6 week session begins Mar 29, 12:30 pm – 3:00 pm

Join us for this proven six-week program designed to help caregivers and individuals with chronic diseases set goals and develop skills for success.  Free and open to the public, advance registration is required.  Contact Susan, 483-6055, solorzs@ccf.org.

 

Lunch & Learn

 

Wednesdays, 12 noon – 1 pm

888 W. Bonneville Avenue, Las Vegas

Bring your lunch, drink & dessert are provided; open to the public.

 

Mar 6: Brain Stimulation to Improve Movement, Brach Poston, PhD, Project Scientist, Cleveland Clinic

 

Gain an understanding of non-invasive brain stimulation techniques shown to improve the motor skills of individuals with Parkinson’s Disease as well as in older adults.  Learn about current Cleveland Clinic projects using these techniques along with their future therapeutic potential.

 

Mar 13: In Case of Emergency, Rodney Anderson, MHA, Department Supervisor, Cleveland Clinic

 

Learn tips and strategies to prepare for emergency situations and to keep you and your loved ones safe.

 

Mar 20: Healthy Meal Ideas, Master Chef Gustav Mauler, Spiedini

 

Answer the age-old question, “what’s for dinner” with quick, simple, and nutritious meal ideas.  Recipes and samples will be provided.

 

Mar 27: Interior Design – Supporting Daily Activities, Attila Lawrence, Professor, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

 

Discover inspiring ideas for the design of interior spaces to improve the quality of independent living for individuals and caregivers.

 

Cleveland Museum of Art Series

 

Dynamic conversations about art through videoconferencing.

 

All art education programs are held at the LouRuvoCenter for Brain Health Library, 888 W. Bonneville Avenue, Las Vegas; open to the public.

 

America’s Story through Art: America Emerging; 1700s

Mar 5, 11:00 am – 12:00 noon

America Emerging is a discussion of the 1700s.  This program includes the developing American identity, folk art, the influence of the Age of Reason, the effect of the mercantilist economy, and underlying causes of the Revolution.

 

America’s Story through Art: America Expanding; 1801 – 1861

Mar 19, 11:00 am – 12:00 noon

Art in the first half of the 19th century was a reflection of American values, identity, and political culture.  America Expanding explores frontier life, the results and impact of westward expansion, landscape painting, Jacksonian democracy, and genre art.

 

Contact Susan Solorzano, 483-6055 or solorzs@ccf.org for additional information.

 

Support Groups

 

MEMORY LOSS SUPPORT GROUP

Wednesdays, 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Meetings are held weekly for adult members who provide care for loved ones with memory loss.  Contact Donna, 483-6035, municd@ccf.org.

 

PARKINSON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP

Mar 12, 12:00 noon – 1:00 pm

(Held the 2nd Tuesday of every month)

 

Separate groups for early stage individuals and adult family members.

 

Contact Jennifer, 483-6036, gayanj@ccf.org.

 

HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP

Mar 26, 12:00 noon – 1:00 pm

(Held the 4th Tuesday of every month)

 

Separate groups for gene-positive individuals (asymptomatic and early stage) and adult family members.

 

Contact Jenna, 483-6054, cliffoj@ccf.org.

 

 

 

 

 

Social Services

LouRuvoCenter for Brain Health

Cleveland Clinic |  888 W Bonneville Ave  |  Las Vegas, NV89106

Desk: (702) 331-7042  |  Fax: (702) 260-9797 |  E-mail: louruvosocialserv@ccf.org

Connect:  www.keepmemoryalive.org

Nevada Volunteers to Present over $600,000 to Legislature

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Nevada Volunteers, the Governor’s Commission on Service, will present the Nevada Legislature in Carson City on February 28, 2013 at 9:45 a.m., a check of $679,276.  Nevada Volunteers distributes the AmeriCorps*State funding allocated to Nevada from Congress and is the state authority on volunteer information.

 

“This check represents the value of AmeriCorps members and all the volunteers they recruited last year to address unmet needs throughout Nevada” said Shawn Lecker-Pomaville, CEO of Nevada Volunteers.  “By providing the modest state match to this federal funding and investing in service as a strategy to solve problems, Nevada’s leaders saved the state $679,276.”

 

AmeriCorps*State is a cost-effective program that provides direct, results-driven services in the areas of education, human services, public safety and the environment.  AmeriCorps service gives individuals an avenue to help their communities while gaining real world experience and  earning an education award. During the grant year of 2011-2012 alone, 308 AmeriCorps members served 259,930 hours and recruited an additional 3,579 volunteers.  This impact in Nevada communities continues to multiply each year.

 

Upon completion of a member’s term of service, he or she is offered an education award  equal to the Pell Grant, which  can be used to pay for college, graduate school, vocational training, purchase educational supplies, or to repay student loans.  Those 55 and older during their time of service, can transfer their Educational Award to children, grandchildren or foster children.

Free Vision Forum At Las Vegas Senior Center March 7

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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No-Cost Basic Skills Workshops For Visually Impaired

 

Living as a blind or visually impaired person is such a challenge! How do you find where you’re going, achieve your potential, or complete your education? Join other visually impaired individuals, their families and those who serve them for a free one-day event with workshops on basic skills and a vendor area with high- and low-technology equipment and community resources. The eighth annual Vision Forum is scheduled for Thursday, March 7, from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Las VegasSeniorCenter, located at 451 E. Bonanza Road.  The vendor exhibit area will be open from 8 to 10 a.m. in the adjacent Dula Gym.

 

Workshop topics will include fitness, nutrition, technology tips, low vision resources, health advocacy, goals, Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines, blindness training, transportation, education and family discussion. The event is sponsored by Blindconnect, the city of Las Vegas, Nevada Council of the Blind and the Veterans Administration Vision Program. Those who pre-register by 5 p.m. Feb. 27 are guaranteed a free lunch, raffle ticket and expedited Paratransit service. Download the registration form and brochure at www.lasvegasnevada.gov/files/2013_Vision_Forum_brochure.pdf, register at the senior center, or call (702) 229-6454 to register by telephone. Registration March 7 opens at 8 a.m. at the senior center.

Top Five Tips To Save Your Vision: EyeCare America Encourages Prevention and Early Detection

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Many people take their vision for granted, but what if you lost your peripheral vision, developed a black spot in the center of your visual field, or even went blind altogether?  For more than 4.2 million Americans living with serious vision loss or blindness,  these and other vision challenges can make it difficult to enjoy life’s simple pleasures such as reading, playing cards, or watching grandchildren grow. Vision loss can also make it difficult to live independently, work, or drive. That’s why it is so important to prevent eye disease and vision loss whenever possible.

Often, preventive care and lifestyle choices can help keep your vision healthy. Ophthalmologists – eye physicians and surgeons – encourage seniors to follow these top five tips to safeguard vision:

  1. Get an eye exam. To protect healthy vision, seniors age 65 and older should have a dilated eye exam every 1-2 years, or as recommended by their ophthalmologist. Visit www.eyecareamerica.org to find out if you or a loved one qualifies for an eye exam at no out-of-pocket cost with one of EyeCare America’s volunteer ophthalmologists.
  2. Know your family history. Eye diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma can run in families, so it’s important to know your family’s history of eye disease and talk to your ophthalmologist about any possible genetic risk factors.
  3. Don’t smoke. Tobacco smoking is directly linked to many adverse health effects, including cataracts and AMD. Studies show that current smokers and ex-smokers are more likely to develop AMD than people who have never smoked.
  4. Eat right. A variety of vegetables, especially leafy green ones, are an important part of an eye-healthy diet. Researchers have found people on diets with higher levels of vitamins C and E, zinc, lutein, zeaxanthin, omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA are less likely to develop early and advanced AMD. For delicious recipes that incorporate these essential nutrients, EyeCare America offers a free, downloadable cookbook, called Feast Your Eyes on This.
  5. Protect your eyes from injuries. An estimated 2.5 million eye injuries occur in the U.S. each year, so it is critical to wear proper eye protection to prevent eye injuries, especially during home projects like gardening and cleaning. Eye injuries can also be prevented by securing loose rugs, railings, or other hazards that could cause falls or slips.

Seniors age 65 and older are at the greatest risk for eye disease and vision loss, and because diseases like AMD and glaucoma often have no early symptoms, comprehensive eye exams are especially important. EyeCare America provides care at no out-of-pocket cost to seniors age 65 and older through its corps of volunteer ophthalmologists across the U.S. and Puerto Rico.

EyeCare America is designed for people who:

  • Are U.S. citizens or legal residents;
  • Are age 65 and older;
  • Have not seen an ophthalmologist in three or more years; and,
  • Do not receive eye care through an HMO or the VA.

To see if you or a loved one age 65 or older is eligible, visit www.eyecareamerica.org. EyeCare America is co-sponsored by the Knights Templar Eye Foundation, Inc., with additional support provided by Alcon. The program is endorsed by state and subspecialty ophthalmological societies.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. Since its inception, EyeCare America has helped more than 1.7 million people.  More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

City Of Las Vegas March 2013 Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

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City Of Las Vegas March 2013

Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

 

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle!

 

Ward 1 Puppy Love Event (all ages)

Saturday, March 2, 10 a.m. to noon.

WoofterPark (DogPark), 1600 Rock Springs Drive (Corner of Rock Springs Drive & Vegas Drive).

Prepare to enjoy the Dog Costume Parade (with prizes), food trucks, vendors, raffles and information booths. Pet adoptions will be available. Spay and neuter clinic information will be available. Hosted by Ward 1 Councilwoman Lois Tarkanian. For more information, please contact Kimberly Reid at (702) 229-2299 or kreid@lasvegasnevada.gov.

 

Corporate Challenge Opening (all ages)

Saturday, March 2, 8 a.m. Torch Relay; 3:30 p.m. Family Fun; 5:30 p.m. Executive Relay; 7 p.m. Opening Ceremonies

Free admission.

Fremont Street East between Las Vegas Boulevard and Seventh Street.

Opening ceremonies will include a parade of flags and banners, a Corporate Challenge Light Show and musical entertainment.

 

Ward 5 Coffee With The Councilman

Thursday, March 7, 9 to 10 a.m.

Free admission and open to the public.

Starbucks, 751 N. Rancho Drive, at Bonanza Road.

Join Ward 5 Councilman Ricki Y. Barlow for coffee and conversation about your ideas to improve Ward 5 and Las Vegas.

 

The Fast and the Furriest Dog Walk & Health Fair (all ages)
Saturday, March 9, 10 a.m. to noon. Walk begins at 10:30 a.m.
Free and open to the public.
Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road, (702) 229-8100.
Bring your four-legged friends and family out for a walk in the park. Community vendors will be participating in this event to provide information to help you, your family and your four-legged friends stay healthy this year. The animal foundation will share information about low-cost spay and neuter, microchip and vaccination clinic.

Coffee With The Mayor

Thursday, March 14, 8 to 9:30 a.m.

Free admission and open to the public.

Starbucks, 751 N. Rancho Drive, at Bonanza Road.

Residents looking to meet and converse with Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman and Ward 5 Councilman Ricki Y. Barlow will have the opportunity from 8 to 9:30 a.m. Coffee with the Mayor is an opportunity for residents who have issues to discuss, or would simply like to meet the mayor.

 

Spring Youth Flag Football Leagues (ages 6-14)

Games on Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., March 16-May 11. Advance registration required.

Fee: $75, includes NFL jersey, black shorts, flags, and trophies or medals.

CimarronRoseCommunity Center, 5591 N. Cimarron Road, (702) 229-1607.

VeteransMemorialLeisureServicesCenter, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.

For boys and girls ages 6-14. Birth certificate is required at registration. Practices will be held once or twice each week for 1-1½ hours in locations to be determined. There will be 6-8 games, based on size of league. Divisions: Pee Wee (ages 6-8), Juniors (9-11), and Seniors (12-14). Participants must purchase their own mouth pieces and rubber cleats. Coaches are always needed. There will be a city championship for the top four teams in each division for an additional $10 fee.

 

Ward 3 Free Shredding Event

Saturday, March 16, 10 a.m. to noon.

Kmart, 5051 E. Nellis Blvd. on east side near Nellis.

Ward 3 Councilman Bob Coffin sponsors this complimentary shredding event. Bring your documents that need to be shredded. Limit five boxes per vehicle. For more information, call 229- 4623.

 

Spring Break Splash Camp (ages 6-11)

Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Cost: $110 per child

Municipal Pool, 431 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6309.

Camp activities include daily swim lessons and more. Excursions will be included for an additional fee. Campers should bring a sack lunch, beverages, swim suit, towel and a change of clothes each day. Limited to 25 youth. Advance registration is required. Call 229-6309 to register.

 

Spring Break Kids Camp (ages 6-11)

Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Cost: $75 first child, $70 each additional child.

CimarronRoseCommunity Center, 5591 N. Cimarron Road, (702) 229-1607.

VeteransMemorialLeisureServicesCenter, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.

Youth need to bring a sack lunch and snacks each day. Enjoy sports, games, arts, crafts and more fun.

 

Free Souper Spring Egg Hunt (ages walking-13)

Saturday, March 30, 10 a.m. to noon.

Dula Gym, 441 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6307.

Bring a canned good or non-perishable food item and receive an extra ticket to win a prize egg.  Donations will be delivered to Three Square Food Bank. Children will be released at listed times in designated areas of Dula Gym to search for eggs filled with treats and discoveries. Tots ages walking-4, gym floor 9:30 a.m.; ages 5-6, dance room 9:50 a.m.; ages 7-8, fitness room 10 a.m.; ages 8-9, computer lab 10:10 a.m.; and ages 10-13, gymnasium floor 10:20 a.m.

Ward 2 Spring Egg Hunt Eggstravaganza (all ages)

Saturday, March 30, 10 a.m. to noon.

Free and open to the public.

VeteransMemorialLeisureServicesCenter, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.

Bring the family to enjoy DJ music, photos with Easter Bunny, egg hunts, craft projects, games, face painting, jump houses and raffle drawings.

 

Adaptive Recreation

8th Annual Vision Forum (all ages)

Thursday, March 7, 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Free admission. Those who pre-register by Feb. 27 are guaranteed a free lunch, raffle ticket and expedited Paratransit service, if requested.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Registration and vendors exhibit hall in the adjacent Dula Gym will be open 8-10 a.m. Workshops scheduled 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. include fitness, nutrition, technology tips, goal setting, ADA guidelines, blindness training, transportation, education, health advocacy, low-vision information and a family session. The day is sponsored by the city of Las Vegas, Blindconnect, Nevada Council of the Blind and the Veterans Administration Vision Program. For more information and a registration form, call 229-6454.

 

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)

Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m.  Closed March 25-29, school district staff development days and holidays.

Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

Participants will enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

 

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)

Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

 

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)

Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed school district staff development days and holidays.

Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.

CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Call 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence.

Ophthalmologists Consider Five Tests and Treatments that Would Benefit from Doctor-Patient Conversations

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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American Academy of Ophthalmology Joins Choosing Wisely® Campaign to Advance Quality Eye Care and Promote Health Care Savings

The American Academy of Ophthalmology today announced it is participating in the Choosing Wisely® campaign, a national initiative of the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation to encourage conversations between patients and their doctors about treatment options and efficient use of health care dollars. The Academy is one of 17 organizations joining Choosing Wisely today – representing more than 350,000 physicians, nurses, pathologists, radiologists and other health care professionals – to release lists of commonly performed tests, procedures and treatments that patients and physicians should discuss.

The United States spends more on health care than many other industrialized nations, yet often does not achieve better health outcomes. This may be explained in part by an overuse of unnecessary and duplicative medical tests. Choosing Wisely, which promotes best practices and better management of health care resources, complements physicians’ efforts to use evidence-based medicine to meet patients’ needs.

To ensure that the best care options are considered for ophthalmic patients, the Academy has identified five common tests and treatments that ophthalmologists and patients should discuss:

  1. Preoperative Medical Tests: Don’t perform preoperative medical tests – such as an electrocardiogram or blood glucose test – prior to eye surgery unless there are specific signs indicating a need for them.
  2. Imaging Tests: Don’t routinely order imaging tests when there are no symptoms or signs of significant eye disease.
  3. Antibiotics for Pink Eye: Don’t prescribe antibiotics for pink eye that is caused by an adenovirus.
  4. Antibiotics for Eye Injections: Don’t routinely provide antibiotics before or after injections into the vitreous cavity of the eye.
  5. Punctal Plugs for Dry Eye: Don’t treat dry eye by inserting punctual plugs before attempting other options, such as medical treatments with artificial tears, lubricants and compresses.

“Some experts estimate that up to 30 percent of health care delivered in the U.S. may be unnecessary or duplicative,” said David W. Parke II, M.D., CEO of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. “Not only does this represent significant waste, but it also underscores patients’ unnecessary exposure to risks associated with any test or procedure. The American Academy of Ophthalmology is participating in Choosing Wisely as a way to support evidence-based medicine and promote greater patient involvement in their eye care. By increasing conversations between ophthalmologists and those they treat, we can better guarantee that patients receive the right eye care at the right time.”

The Academy’s health policy committee led the development of the list of five tests and treatments with input from members and ophthalmic subspecialty societies. Numerous recommendations and supporting evidence were researched and reviewed under the leadership of William L. Rich III, M.D., the Academy’s medical director of health policy.

“In medicine, more isn’t necessarily better,” said Dr. Rich. “Conversations around the five tests and treatments identified by the American Academy of Ophthalmology can reduce the potential for over-treating our patients. We will continue our work to identify treatments that could benefit from better conversations between ophthalmologists and their patients.”

To date, twenty-five specialty societies have released lists through Choosing Wisely. The lists released today will be promoted nationwide through the Choosing Wisely campaign’s consumer partners, including Consumer Reports, AARP, Wikipedia and the National Business Coalition on Health.

The Academy’s participation in the Choosing Wisely campaign is one component of its ongoing efforts to promote responsible use of health care resources, without sacrificing quality of care. The Academy also provides a wide variety of educational programs, products and services to ophthalmologists — medical doctors specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye disease and conditions — and the patients they serve in order to improve patient care. The organization’s EyeSmart® program features the most trustworthy and medically accurate consumer information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries.

To learn more about Choosing Wisely and to view the complete lists and details about the recommendations, visit www.ChoosingWisely.org. To learn how patients can start conversations about the five ophthalmic tests and treatments above, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons — Eye M.D.s— with nearly 32,000 members worldwide.  Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org  The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trusted and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org  to learn more.

About the ABIM Foundation
The mission of the ABIM Foundation is to advance medical professionalism to improve the health care system. We achieve this by collaborating with physicians and physician leaders, medical trainees, health care delivery systems, payers, policy makers, consumer organizations and patients to foster a shared understanding of professionalism and how they can adopt the tenets of professionalism in practice. To learn more about the ABIM Foundation, visit www.abimfoundation.org, read our blog blog.abimfoundation.org, connect with us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.

About Choosing Wisely
First announced in December 2011, Choosing Wisely is part of a multi-year effort led by the ABIM Foundation to support and engage physicians in being better stewards of finite health care resources. Participating specialty societies are working with the ABIM Foundation and Consumer Reports to share the lists widely with their members and convene discussions about the physician’s role in helping patients make wise choices. Learn more at www.ChoosingWisely.org.

City Of Las Vegas March 2013 Senior Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City Of Las Vegas March 2013 Senior Events

Las Vegas Residents Invited To Celebrations, Luncheons & Activities At City Centers

 

The city of Las Vegas active adult and senior centers offer exercise, fitness, craft, arts, dance, music and computer classes; cards; games; discussion and social groups; luncheons; sports; and special events Monday through Friday to residents age 50 and better. Many of these activities contribute to wellness and a healthy lifestyle. A listing of classes and activities is published in the Beyond the Neon Leisure Guide, available in the centers and online at www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. All activities are subject to change. Most activities require $2 annual membership to city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all senior and active adult centers.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, through April 12, by appointment only.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Low-income residents can get free assistance in preparing their personal income tax forms.  Some restrictions apply; call 229-6454 for details and appointment.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Mondays and Thursdays, through April 11 by appointment only.
Free with appointment only.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Income restrictions apply. Call 229-1702 for information and appointments.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesday afternoons, through April 9.
Free with appointment only.
LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Income restrictions apply. Call 229-1600 for information and appointments.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesdays, through April 9, by appointment only.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern, (702) 229-1515

Income restrictions apply.  Call 229-1515 for information and to make an appointment.

 

VITA Free Tax Form Preparation

Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., through April 11, by appointment only.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program is an Internal Revenue Service program designed to help low- and moderate-income taxpayers complete their annual tax returns at no cost. All ages with income under $49,000 are welcome. Call 229-6125 for appointments.

Bunco (ages 50+)
Wednesday, March 6, 10 a.m. Advance registration required.
Cost: $5 with a current annual $2 senior programs membership.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Enjoy playing Bunco and having a light snack afterwards.

Centennial Hills Active Adult Book Club (ages 50+)
First Wednesday of each month at 12:30 p.m.; March 6.

Cost: Free with a current annual $2 senior programs membership.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Come prepared to discuss this month’s book.

March book: “The Given Day” by Dennis Lehane.

April’s book: “The Art of Racing in the Rain” by Garth Stein.

May’s book: “Defending Jacob” by William Landay.

8th Annual Vision Forum (all ages)

Thursday, March 7, 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Free admission. Those who pre-register by Feb. 27 are guaranteed a free lunch, raffle ticket and expedited Paratransit service, if requested.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Registration and vendors exhibit hall in the adjacent Dula Gym will be open 8-10 a.m. Workshops scheduled 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. include fitness, nutrition, technology tips, goal setting, ADA guidelines, blindness training, transportation, education, health advocacy, low-vision information and a family session. The day is sponsored by the city of Las Vegas, Blindconnect, Nevada Council of the Blind and the Veterans Administration Vision Program. For more information and a registration form, call 229-6454.

 

Springtime Tea Party (ages 50+)

Thursday, March 7, 10 a.m. Register by March 1. Space is limited.

Cost: $2.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Wear your fancy spring hat and bring your favorite teacup to enjoy a variety of teas, fruit, cookies, cakes, music and a raffle.

 

Waffle Day Brunch (ages 50+)
Thursday, March 7, 10 a.m. Advance registration is required by March 1.
Cost: $3.
EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.

Enjoy waffles, waffles, and more waffles at this brunch.  Come hungry!

Final Arrangements and Wills Lecture (ages 50+)

Monday, March 11, 1:30 p.m.  Must register by March 8.
Free admission.
LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Palm Mortuary representative will lecture on final arrangements and wills.

St. Patrick’s Luncheon, Under the Rainbow (ages 50+)

Thursday, March 14, 11:30 a.m. Advance registration required by March 8. Space is limited.

Cost:  $5; must have senior programs membership.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Enjoy a meal of corned beef and cabbage, a traditional St. Patrick’s Day lunch, and entertainment by the Sun City Aliante Songsters.

 

Luck of the Irish Luncheon (ages 50+)

Thursday, March 14, noon. Register by March 8.

Cost: $5.

DoolittleSeniorCenter, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Enjoy corned beef, cabbage, potatoes, cornbread, dessert, green punch and great company!

 

St. Patty’s Luncheon (ages 50+)

Friday, March 15, 11:30 a.m. Must register by March 12.

Cost: $5.

LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Enjoy corned beef and cabbage with all the fixings.

 

St. Patrick’s Day Luncheon (ages 50+)
Wednesday, March 20, 11:30 a.m. Advance registration is required by March 15.
Cost: $5.
EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.

Enjoy a traditional St. Patrick’s Day meal.  Wear green, so you don’t get pinched!

Waffle Day Breakfast (ages 50+)

Monday, March 25, 8:30 to 10 a.m. Advance registration required.

Cost: $4

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

It’s National Waffle Day!  Enjoy waffles, eggs and bacon for breakfast.

Pediatric Flatfoot – Cause for Alarm?

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Untreated Flat Feet in Children Can Result in Chronic Pain, Reduced Mobility

and an Increased Risk for Obesity

 

Parents keep a close eye on their growing children, watching for proper development and alert for any sign of a problem because small problems can have big implications. Surgeons at the Annual Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) this week are conferring with one another on Pediatric Flatfoot, a childhood condition that, if left untreated, can result in permanent deformity in adulthood. Flatfoot deformity makes mobility and exercise painful, increasing the risk of reduced cardiovascular health and obesity.

“Parents never want their child to undergo a surgical procedure,” says Mary Crawford, DPM, FACFAS, an Everett, Washington foot and ankle surgeon and conference presenter. “But uncorrected symptomatic flatfoot can lead to chronic pain and instability as the child ages into adulthood. Children will be on their feet for a long time to come. It’s vital to keep those feet healthy. A foot and ankle surgeon can help parents understand the options – surgical and non-surgical – for treating pediatric flatfoot.”

 

Not all children have symptoms, but others will complain of pain, tenderness or cramping in the foot, leg, and knee. Parents may notice an outward tilting of the heel, awkwardness or clumsiness in walking and difficulty with shoes. Pediatric flatfoot makes participating in activities more difficult, so parents should take note if their child is unable to keep up with playmates, tires easily or voluntarily withdraws from physical activities.

 

To diagnose a pediatric flatfoot, a foot and ankle surgeon examines the child’s foot in weight bearing and non-weight bearing positions, both in and out of shoes. The physician also notes how the child walks and evaluates the foot’s range of motion. In some cases, flat feet are associated with issues of the hip and knee, so the physician may examine those as well.

 

For further detailed analysis, the physician may order imaging tests such as x-ray, a CT scan, MRI or bone scan. Family history will be evaluated as well, since the presence of flatfoot disorder in the family increases the possibility of flatfoot in the child.

 

“There are different types of flatfoot deformities,” notes Crawford. “Thorough testing helps us pinpoint the causes of the flatfoot disorder and develop an appropriate treatment plan.”

 

Pediatric flatfoot can be divided into two categories, flexible and rigid. Flexible flatfoot is characterized by a normal arch when non-weight bearing, or sitting, and disappearance of the arch when standing.  There may or may not be symptoms. In the case of rigid flatfoot, however, the arch is stiff and flat when both sitting and standing. In most cases, children with rigid flatfoot display symptoms associated with the condition. In either case, flexible or rigid flatfoot, there are a variety of underlying reasons, requiring different treatments.

 

Babies often appear to have flat feet due to cramped positioning inside the womb, and the symptoms will abate with time. In other cases, the surgeon recommends stretching exercises or a soft brace for a short period. Children who do not exhibit symptoms typically do not require treatment, but will be monitored and reevaluated periodically by the foot and ankle surgeon.

 

For children who do exhibit symptoms, the physician may recommend physical therapy, shoe modifications, anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen to reduce pain and inflammation, or an orthotic device. This device fits inside the shoe and supports the structure of the foot. In some cases, surgery is the best alternative.

 

For more information on pediatric foot and ankle conditions or injuries, visit the ACFAS patient health education website, FootHealthFacts.org.

###

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of over 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons.  Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research and provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its consumer website, FootHealthFacts.org.

AmeriCorps* State Grant Funds Available

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

MAKE AN IMPRINT ON NEVADA

Each year Nevada AmeriCorps grantees impact the quality of life in Nevada through national service funding provided through the Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act. Nevada received more than $2,109,000 in AmeriCorps funding for the 2013-2014 program year and is currently opening its Notice of Funding Opportunity for nonprofits, faith-based organizations, government entities or Indian tribes looking to make a positive imprint through development of a national service program in Nevada.

 

“In 2011-12, more than 308 Nevada AmeriCorps*State programs recruited and managed 3,579 more volunteers throughout the state, an economic impact of in excess of $6,000,000 worth of community service.  AmeriCorps members serve in core areas such as education, human services, public safety and the environment.  We invite new organizations to learn more about how they can become a part of meeting critical needs through national service in Nevada,” said Shawn Lecker-Pomaville, CEO of Nevada Volunteers, the Governor’s Commission on Service that develops and administers AmeriCorps*State programs in Nevada.

 

Applicants must be able to demonstrate the capacity to administer federal funds; implement a detailed plan of action to address a local unmet need; present strong connections to the community it serves, and have the ability to raise the required cash match, which averages $30,000. Applicants are strongly encouraged to attend an AmeriCorps Application Instructions webinar to apply.

 

  • National Service in Nevada: Determining How Your Organization Can Fit?

February 22nd at 10am or March 5th at 2pm

Advanced Registration Required

  • AmeriCorps Application Instructions Webinar

April 2nd at 10am or April 4th at 2pm

Advanced Registration Required

To reserve a place in the webinars and find more information on the Nevada Volunteers AmeriCorps Notice of Funding, visit www.nevadavolunteers.org.

All applications must be submitted electronically through eGrants by May 10, 2013 by 5 p.m. PST.

Lisfranc Injury: Easy to Miss, Hard to Get Over

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care 

Left untreated, this little-known foot injury can lead to serious long-term problems

 

Elite athletes like NFL quarterback Matt Schaub and wide receiver Santonio Holmes had productive seasons ended by the little-known and often overlooked Lisfranc injury, a serious foot injury that few have heard of and no one wants.  But foot and ankle surgeons at the Annual Scientific Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) this week are evaluating how to effectively diagnose and treat this injury, which can result in severe long-term complications like chronic pain, osteoarthritis and even foot deformities.

Relatively uncommon, found in only 1 of every 55,000-60,000 people annually, Lisfranc injuries occur in the midfoot – where the long bones leading up to the toes (metatarsals) connect to the bones in the arch (tarsals).  “The Lisfranc complex is a critical joint in propulsion during walking and running.  Unfortunately, injuries there are easily overlooked.  As many as thirty percent of Lisfranc injuries are missed at initial diagnosis by providers who are not foot and ankle specialists.  The long-term effects can be debilitating,” observes Cleveland, Ohio foot and ankle surgeon Mark Hardy, DPM, FACFAS, and a conference presenter.

 

Diagnosis can be difficult because the signs, even during examination and imaging, can be extremely subtle. Injuries most often occur to car accident victims where the foot is jammed into the floorboard or to athletes when the foot is planted and twisted.  Direct trauma injuries can result when a heavy object is dropped on the foot.  “Most people don’t have an appreciation of the amount of force required to disrupt the Lisfranc complex.  Whether you’re an athlete or a laborer, early and appropriate treatment is mandated,” says Hardy.

 

Lisfranc injuries can also result simply from missing the last step on the stairs; even a minor slip and fall can cause serious injury. Symptoms of a Lisfranc injury may include swelling of the foot, pain throughout the midfoot upon standing or during examination, inability to bear weight, bruising on the bottom of the foot in the arch area, and an abnormal widening of the foot, possibly signaling dislocation.

 

Lisfranc injuries fall into three categories; sprains, fractures and dislocations. Sprains typically do not require more than rest and recuperation time, as they are comparable to ankle sprains.  In a fracture, a break in a bone in the Lisfranc joint occurs. In a dislocation, the bones are forced from their normal positions. In severe cases, both fractures and dislocations occur. In fractures and dislocations, surgery is often the best option. Patients hope for a non-surgical response, but foot and ankle surgeons are well aware of the dangers associated with putting off necessary surgery.

 

“A number of factors impact the surgeon’s decision on treatment options; the patient’s age, overall health and activity level,” says Hardy. “Because of the possible long-term impact of this injury, our chief objective is ensuring a positive outlook for the future.”

 

Wires, pins and even surgical buttons can be used to stabilize the joint, both permanently and in some cases temporarily. Some promising studies have focused on the effectiveness of a minimally invasive technique that can help reduce the recuperation period.

 

“Lisfranc injuries can be successfully treated when properly diagnosed and treated in a timely manner.  If you have experienced any sort of foot trauma and symptoms appear, it’s time to see a foot and ankle surgeon,” urges Hardy. “Especially in the case of Lisfranc injuries, the earlier someone visits a foot and ankle surgeon, the greater the likelihood of a positive outcome.”

 

For more information on foot and ankle injuries and conditions, visit the ACFAS patient education website, FootHealthFacts.org.

###

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of over 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons.  Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research and provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its consumer website, FootHealthFacts.org.

The Home Depot Foundation to Announce Significant Grant to Veterans Village

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

HELP LAUNCH VEGAS LOVES VETERANS CAMPAIGN

 WHAT:                 Fred Wacker, COO of The Home Depot Foundation, will announce the awarding of a significant grant to Veterans Village Las Vegas at a brief ceremony that will also include dozens of associate volunteers from The Home Depot.  The Home Depot Foundation, which has been actively engaged in supporting VeteransVillage since its inception last year, is increasing its financial support to help complete a comprehensive renovation of VeteransVillage’s physical facility, a former Econo Lodge Motel with 120 rooms.

 

A 103-day fundraising campaign for Veterans Village Las Vegas – VEGAS LOVES VETERANS – will launch that day to encourage locals to donate what they can up to $103 ($1 per day from Valentine’s Day through Memorial Day 2013) – to show support of veterans from all conflicts who have defended our freedoms over the decades. ( www.vvlv.org – click on the Vegas Loves Veterans icon or donate button)

 

In addition to providing temporary housing for vets and their families, Veterans Village provides a comprehensive roster of services to vets through partnerships with other community organizations and government agencies, including employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events.

 

WHEN:                 Thursday, February 14

                                10:00 – 11:00 a.m.

 

WHERE:               Veterans Village Las Vegas

1150 Las Vegas Blvd. South (Just south of Charleston Blvd. on the west side of the street)

Las Vegas, NV89104

 

WHO:                   Fred Wacker, COO, The Home Depot Foundation

Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman

Las Vegas City Councilman Bob Coffin

                                Arnold Stalk, founder and visionary, Veterans Village Las Vegas

 

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org

 

About The Home Depot Foundation:

The Home Depot Foundation is dedicated to improving the homes of U.S. military veterans through financial and volunteer resources to help nonprofit organizations. The Foundation has committed $80 million to these efforts over five years.  Through Team Depot, the company’s associate-led volunteer program, thousands of Home Depot associates volunteer their time and talents to positively transform neighborhoods and perform basic repairs and modifications to homes and facilities serving veterans with critical housing needs. Since its formation in 2002, The Home Depot Foundation has granted more than $340 million to nonprofit organizations improving homes and lives in local communities. To learn more and see our associates in action, visit www.homedepotfoundation.org.

SLCC Joins National Program to Train Baby Boomers for Jobs

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Salt Lake Community College was recently chosen to join the Plus 50 Encore Completion Program, a national effort to train 10,000 baby boomers for new jobs in healthcare, education and social services. The program is sponsored by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC).

The College will assist adults age 50 and over in completing degrees or certificates in high-demand occupations that give back to the community. With many adults age 50 and over out of work or seeking to transition to a new career, the program offers skill updates and career makeovers. Salt Lake Community College will prepare older adults for careers such as pharmacy or ultrasound technicians and medical terminology specialists. In addition, the College’s Transition to Teaching program is offered in partnership with the State Office of Education to prepare students as elementary and secondary educators.

“The Plus 50 Encore Completion Program represents a meaningful, national validation of the work the College’s Division of Continuing Education has undertaken. The program will support individuals who want to design a second career—either out of practical necessity or personal interest,” said Jennifer Saunders, Associate Dean of Continuing Education. “People returning for education and training at this stage of their lives are building on rich employment histories, valuable interpersonal skills, and knowledge achieved through experiential learning. These resources are then being coupled with the most current workforce education.”

The program will be implemented utilizing a variety of strategies, including accelerated classes, flexible scheduling and cohort models, which provide groups of students with similar goals an opportunity to move through a program together.

Since 2008, AACC and its network of Plus 50 Initiative colleges have worked with baby boomers to help them prepare for new careers. An independent evaluation of AACC’s Plus 50 Initiative found that 89 percent of students agreed that college work force training helped them acquire new job skills, and 72 percent attributed landing a job to such training.
“Many adults age 50 and over want to train for new jobs that help others and are hiring, but they need to update their skills. Community colleges offer a supportive environment where baby boomers can train for new jobs quickly and affordably,” said Mary Sue Vickers, director for the Plus 50 Initiative at AACC.

In addition to grant funds to augment training programs, participating colleges gain access to toolkits and extensive marketing resources tailored to reach baby boomers. They’ll also benefit from the advice and support of staff at other community colleges that have successfully implemented programs for older learners and understand the unique needs of the plus 50 student population.

The Plus 50 Encore Completion Program is funded with a $3.2 million grant to AACC provided by Deerbrook Charitable Trust—supporting AACC’s work to increase the number of students who finish degrees, certificates, and other credentials. In April 2010, AACC committed alongside other higher education organizations, to promote the development and implementation of policies, practices and institutional cultures that will produce 50 percent more students with high quality degrees and certificates by 2020.

While the AACC Encore Completion Program focuses on serving the Plus 50 population, Salt Lake Community College welcomes anyone interested in making a career transition to learn more about the broad range of training opportunities available at: www.slcccontinuinged.com.

For more information about the Plus 50 Initiative at AACC, see: http://plus50.aacc.nche.edu.

The Encore Institute at Salt Lake Community College is an innovative program designed for adult learners who want to expand their knowledge through career and personal enrichment courses. The Institute offers flexible class scheduling, non-degree and degree learning experiences and affordable training to deepen or expand the personal and professional skills of students.

The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) is a national organization representing close to 1,200 community, junior and technical colleges nationwide. Community colleges are the largest and fastest growing sector of higher education, enrolling more than 13 million credit and non-credit students annually. More information is available at: http://aacc.nche.edu.

About the College: Salt Lake Community College is an accredited, student-focused, urban college meeting the diverse needs of the Salt Lake community. Home to more than 62,000 students each year, the College is the largest supplier of workforce development programs in the State of Utah. The College is the sole provider of applied technology courses in the Salt Lake area, with 13 sites, an eCampus, and nearly 1,000 continuing education sites located throughout the Salt Lake valley. Personal attention from an excellent faculty is paramount at the College, which maintains a student-to-teacher ratio of less than 20 to 1.

Grimaldi’s Pizzeria To Host Special Dinner for Susan G. Komen for the Cure of Southern Nevada

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

“Grimaldi’s Pizzeria For the Cure” to serve three-course meal for $15 donation on Feb. 25

LAS VEGAS – Grimaldi’s Pizzeria, famous for its award-winning, hand-tossed, coal-fired brick oven pizzas, will host a special dinner for Susan G. Komen of Southern Nevada on Monday, Feb. 25 at the Rainbow restaurant (7155 S. Rainbow Rd.) A three-course meal, including salad, pizza and dessert, will be served for a cash-only donation of $15.

The event is open to the public and two seatings will be offered for guests. The first from 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. and the second from 6:30 – 8 p.m. To RSVP for this event call Komen Southern Nevada at 702-822-2524.

“Komen Southern Nevada is a non-profit that is close to many of our employees’ hearts,” said Mikaela Clough, manager of S. Rainbow Grimaldi’s Pizzeria. “Raising funds for an organization that is vital to our community is our way of giving back and we hope that many people will come out and show support.”

“With so many very worthy charitable organizations in our amazing city, we are tremendously grateful to be chosen by Grimaldi’s Pizzeria to be a beneficiary of their fundraising efforts,” said Stephanie Kirby, Executive Director of Komen Southern Nevada. “Las Vegas is a large city based on population, but we are made up of people who feel so strongly about caring for our community and, more importantly, caring for others in our community. Grimaldi’s is a prime example of a business that is determined to make a positive difference.”

About Grimaldi’s Pizzeria:
In the world of pizza, Grimaldi’s is an institution that has garnered more awards than any other pizzeria in the country with more celebrity sightings than most 5-star restaurants. Using only the freshest ingredients, a “secret recipe” pizza sauce, handmade mozzarella cheese and dough, Grimaldi’s serves traditional pizza (as it began in Naples, Italy) in an upscale yet casual, family oriented pizzeria. The intense heat of the oven evenly bakes the pies to create Grimaldi’s famous crispy and smoky thin crust that Zagat has voted best pizza year after year. Grimaldi’s Pizzeria has five locations in Las Vegas and one in Sparks, Nev. Las Vegas locations include The Shoppes at The Palazzo, Rainbow and 215, Boca Park Fashion Village The Fashion Show Mall and Richmar Plaza. The Sparks restaurant is located in The Legends at Sparks Marina.

For more information on Grimaldi’s Pizzeria visit www.grimaldispizzeria.com
“Like” Grimaldi’s Pizzeria on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/GrimaldisPizzeria
Follow Grimaldi’s Pizzeria on Twitter: www.twitter.com/grimaldispizza

About Susan G. Komen of Southern Nevada:

The Southern Nevada Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure® – along with those who generously support the organization with their talent, time and resources – is working to better the lives of those facing breast cancer in our community. Through events like the Komen Southern Nevada Race for the Cure®, we have invested more than $6 million in local breast health and breast cancer projects in Southern Nevada over the past 17 years. Up to 75 percent of net proceeds generated by the Affiliate provide grants for innovative community programs that reduce breast cancer mortality through screening, treatment, education and safety-net services, while the remaining 25 percent supports groundbreaking breast cancer research grants. This year, the Affiliate funded over $837,000 in local breast health programs for the uninsured and underserved in Las Vegas and surrounding areas, while providing $150,000 to breast cancer research.

For more information on Susan G. Komen for the Cure of Southern Nevada visit www.komensouthernnevada.org

Like Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Komen-Southern-Nevada-Race-for-the-Cure/255100881352

Former NAELA President Appointed to Long-Term Care Commission

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi appointed Judith Stein, longtime member, Past President, and Fellow of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA), to the National Commission on Long-Term Care. Leader Pelosi’s other appointments include SCAN Foundation President Dr. Bruce Allen Chernoff, and activist and philanthropist George Vrandenberg.

The 15-member Commission was established by the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (ATRA) to develop a plan to establish, implement, and finance a high-quality long-term care system that ensures long-term care services and supports for individuals with substantial cognitive and functional limitations for older Americans and individuals with disabilities. The Commission’s role is to examine the interaction between Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurers.

Charles P. Sabatino, fellow NAELA member and Director of the American Bar Association (ABA) Commission on Law and Aging, congratulated Stein on this tremendous achievement: “[She is] the foremost and most tireless national advocate for Medicare beneficiaries…this is also a conspicuous achievement in NAELA’s history in having one of its members appointed to such a high-level national body, charged with charting the nation’s course in meeting the long-term care needs of seniors and persons with disabilities. It is also a cause for some real optimism in our future.”

Stein is the founder and Executive Director of the Center for Medicare Advocacy, Inc. She has focused on legal representation of the elderly since beginning her legal career in 1975. From 1977 until 1986, Stein was the Co-Director of Legal Assistance to Medicare Patients (LAMP), where she managed the first Medicare advocacy program in the country. She served as NAELA’s 13th president from June 2000 – May 2001.

She has extensive experience in developing and administering Medicare advocacy projects, representing Medicare beneficiaries, producing educational materials, teaching, and consulting. She is also the editor and co-author of several books, articles, and other publications regarding Medicare and related issues. Stein has been lead or co-counsel in numerous federal class action and individual cases challenging improper Medicare policies and denials.

About NAELA
Members of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA) are attorneys who are experienced and trained in working with the legal problems of aging Americans and individuals of all ages with disabilities. Established in 1987, NAELA is a non-profit association that assists lawyers, bar organizations, and others. The mission of NAELA is to establish NAELA members as the premier providers of legal advocacy, guidance, and services to enhance the lives of people with special needs and people as they age. NAELA currently has members across the United States, Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom. For more information, visit NAELA.org.

New International Federation on Ageing Report Declares Vision Loss No Longer an Inevitable Part of Ageing

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Calls for Investments in Preventive Eye Health to Reduce Social and Economic
Burdens of Vision Loss

The International Federation on Ageing (IFA) today released a new report describing the health, social and economic burdens of vision loss on a global society that is rapidly ageing. The report calls for increased public education and awareness programs, improved public policies and greater integration of preventive eye health interventions into public health systems.

The report, titled “The High Cost of Low Vision: The Evidence on Ageing and the Loss of Sight ,” highlights that vision loss is no longer an inevitable part of the ageing process, as people can now age with strong, healthy vision, given 21st-century innovations in diagnosis, biomedicine, nutrition, technology and preventive care.

“The economic implications are equally huge as we now have it in our grasp to delink vision loss from ageing, which will have great impact on active, productive and more enjoyable ageing. This shift in the traditional perception of ageing is truly transformative,” said Jane Barratt, BSc, MSc, PhD, Secretary General of the IFA. “As 80 percent of vision loss is preventable, it is our ethical responsibility and a public health imperative that we take action now.”

“As the 21st century’s seminal challenge of population ageing leads to increasing prevalence of deteriorating vision, it brings about huge social, personal and economic consequences,” said Kathy Spahn, President and CEO of Helen Keller International. “This report is both timely and critical as a tool for raising awareness of and driving solutions for preventable vision loss, which can have a positive and profound impact on economic growth and the human condition.”

The over-60 population is expected to reach 2 billion by mid-century. As this cohort rapidly grows to become the largest population segment of many societies globally, rates of preventable vision loss are also soaring. Today, 285 million people around the world are visually impaired, including 39 million who are totally blind, and that number will explode without preventive measures. The direct costs of vision impairment worldwide are estimated to reach $2.8 trillion by 2020, and the indirect costs will add another $760 billion.

“IFA’s report highlights the critical need for action and investment in preventive eye health,” said Francisco Rodriguez, MD, Retina and Vitreous Specialist and Scientific Director, Fundación Oftalmológica Nacional in Colombia. “Across the globe, new policies to improve the diagnosis, management and care associated with preventable eye diseases – especially among ageing populations – will go a long way in alleviating the burdens triggered by age-related vision loss.”

“As millions around the world are living longer – bringing about increasing prevalence in visual impairments – global institutions, governments, the scientific and medical communities, payers, patient groups, NGOs and businesses must partner to find innovative solutions to treat and prevent vision loss – one of the greatest challenges of global population ageing,” said Dr. Kemal Malik, Head Global Development at Bayer Healthcare.

The report emphasizes that measures to prevent vision loss are cost-effective and calls for urgent attention in key areas: Download the Executive Summary
Download the Report
Media Contact:
Melissa Mitchell
+1.212.332.3942(T) +1.646.404.1149(M)
mmitchell@globalcoalitiononaging.com
About the International Federation on Ageing
The International Federation on Ageing (IFA)is an international non-governmental organization with a membership base of NGOs, the corporate sector, academia, government, and individuals. IFA aims to generate positive change for older people throughout the world by stimulating, collecting, analyzing, and disseminating information on rights, policies, and practices that improve the quality of life of people as they age.
“The High Cost of Low Vision: The Evidence on Ageing and the Loss of Sight” was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant by Bayer Healthcare to the International Federation on Ageing.

The Home Depot Foundation to Announce Significant Grant to Veterans Village

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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HELP LAUNCH VEGAS LOVES VETERANS CAMPAIGN

WHAT: Fred Wacker, COO of The Home Depot Foundation, will announce the awarding of a significant grant to Veterans Village Las Vegas at a brief ceremony that will also include dozens of associate volunteers from The Home Depot. The Home Depot Foundation, which has been actively engaged in supporting Veterans Village since its inception last year, is increasing its financial support to help complete a comprehensive renovation of Veterans Village’s physical facility, a former Econo Lodge Motel with 120 rooms.

A 103-day fundraising campaign for Veterans Village Las Vegas – VEGAS LOVES VETERANS – will launch that day to encourage locals to donate what they can up to $103 ($1 per day from Valentine’s Day through Memorial Day 2013) – to show support of veterans from all conflicts who have defended our freedoms over the decades. ( www.vvlv.org – click on the Vegas Loves Veterans icon or donate button)

In addition to providing temporary housing for vets and their families, Veterans Village provides a comprehensive roster of services to vets through partnerships with other community organizations and government agencies, including employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events.

WHEN: Thursday, February 14
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.

WHERE: Veterans Village Las Vegas
1150 Las Vegas Blvd. South (Just south of Charleston Blvd. on the west side of the street)
Las Vegas, NV 89104

WHO: Fred Wacker, COO, The Home Depot Foundation
Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman
Las Vegas City Councilman Bob Coffin
Arnold Stalk, founder and visionary, Veterans Village Las Vegas

About Veterans Village:
Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel. It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed. Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need. SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents. www.vvlv.org

About The Home Depot Foundation:
The Home Depot Foundation is dedicated to improving the homes of U.S. military veterans through financial and volunteer resources to help nonprofit organizations. The Foundation has committed $80 million to these efforts over five years. Through Team Depot, the company’s associate-led volunteer program, thousands of Home Depot associates volunteer their time and talents to positively transform neighborhoods and perform basic repairs and modifications to homes and facilities serving veterans with critical housing needs. Since its formation in 2002, The Home Depot Foundation has granted more than $340 million to nonprofit organizations improving homes and lives in local communities. To learn more and see our associates in action, visit www.homedepotfoundation.org.

US Senator Dean Heller, recently appointed member of Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, to Tour Veterans Village Las Vegas Tomorrow

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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WHAT: US Senator Dean Heller will tour Veterans Village Las Vegas tomorrow. Recently appointed as a member of the Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, Heller will learn first-hand about Veterans Village Las Vegas, a comprehensive and highly innovative housing and resource facility for U.S. veterans and their families.

Veterans Village opened in 2012 in a renovated Econo Lodge Motel with 120 rooms. Thanks to the ongoing generosity of the Home Depot Foundation and hundreds of hours provided by Home Depot employees, the facility is undergoing a comprehensive retrofit and update. In addition to providing temporary housing for vets and their families, Veterans Village provides a comprehensive roster of services through partnerships with other community organizations and government agencies, including employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events.

WHEN: Friday, February 1
10:30 – 11:15 a.m.

WHERE: Veterans Village Las Vegas
1150 Las Vegas Blvd. South (Just south of Charleston Blvd. on the west side of the street)
Las Vegas, NV 89104

WHO: US Senator Dean Heller
Sylvia Allen, president, 100 Black Women of Las Vegas
Arnold Stalk, founder and visionary, Veterans Village Las Vegas
About Veterans Village:
Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel. It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed. Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need. SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.

Nine simple ways you can improve your heart health

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Ten minutes a day is all you need to be heart healthy. Walking the dog, knowing your numbers, eating your greens – those are a few heart-healthy things that only Take 10.

Since 1963, to urge Americans to join the battle against heart and vascular diseases, Congress has advised the president to proclaim February “American Heart Month.” To celebrate American Heart Month this year, Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health is offering a variety of educational and screening events and opportunities for disease prevention and to support the fight against heart disease and stroke.

1. Beginning Feb. 1 though Feb. 28, Renown is helping people commit to improve their heart health in just 10 minutes a day. Every day in February, visit the Take 10 tab on the Renown Health Facebook page. From heart-savvy information and healthy recipes to useful apps, Renown will reveal a simple health tip that takes 10 minutes or less. Also enter to win an Ultimate Health Screening Package ($219 value).

2. Friday, Feb. 1, people are encouraged to promote awareness of heart disease by dressing in red on National Wear Red Day.

3. Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 5 and 6, Renown South Meadows Medical Center will host the life-saving services of Life Line Screening, the nation’s largest provider of preventive screenings. The screening event is designed to help local residents identify their risk of stroke, vascular disease and osteoporosis before the life-changing effects of these conditions can occur. The event is from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Northview Conference Room. Call 1-800-690-0295 to schedule an appointment.

4. Throughout February: Low-cost health screenings. These events include a variety of health screenings for cholesterol, diabetes, arthritis, heart disease and more. No appointment required. The schedule includes:

Feb 6, 8 – 10 a.m.: Renown Medical Group, 202 Los Altos Parkway.
Feb 13, 8 – 10 a.m.: 850 Mill St.
Feb 20, 8 – 10 a.m.: Renown Medical Group, 1343 W. Newlands Drive, Fernley
Feb 27, 8 – 10 a.m.: Renown South Meadows Medical Center, Northview Conference Room

5. Saturday, Feb. 9, Renown will participate in the Save a Heart – Simple 7 Health Expo featuring the American Heart Association’s Simple 7, steps to heart healthy living: Get Active, Control Cholesterol, Eat Better, Manage Blood Pressure, Lose Weight, Reduce Blood Sugar and Stop Smoking. The expo takes place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Scheels, Legends at Sparks Marina. The event is open to the public. No RSVP needed.

6. Friday, Feb. 15, at 12 noon, Renown will host a free Online Health Series webinar on the link between gout and heart disease. Renown Health Rheumatologist Malin Prupas, MD, FACP, will be the featured presenter. Register for this webinar at renown.org/onlinehealthseries.

7. Wednesday, Feb. 27, at 12 noon, Renown will host a free Online Health Series webinar on the early warning signs of heart attacks. Karen Meskimen, DNP, RN, will be the featured presenter. Register for this webinar at renown.org/onlinehealthseries.

8. Thursday, Feb. 28, Renown will host its annual Save Your Heart Luncheon featuring Letitia Anderson, MD, FACC. The educational luncheon will be from 12 noon to 1 p.m. at the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa, Paradise Ballrooms D & E. Doors open at 11:30 a.m. Cost is $10 and includes lunch. To RSVP, call 775-982-6483.

9. Friday, March 1, the American Heart Association will host its annual Go Red For Women Luncheon from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa:

Local Leader Larry W. Ruvo to receive national honor and one NV senior to receive $20,000 Horatio Alger scholarships

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans, Inc., is pleased to announce that Larry W. Ruvo is one of 11 individuals selected to receive the Horatio Alger Award in 2013.

The Horatio Alger Award is presented each year to individuals who have overcome obstacles to become successful entrepreneurs or community leaders. Based in Nevada, Larry W. Ruvo is the Senior Managing Director of Southern Wine & Spirits of Nevada. Recipients of this award become lifelong members of the Horatio Alger Association, and they serve as role models for its young scholarship recipients.

The Horatio Alger Association is pleased to announce that 106 students, who hail from every state in the nation, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, have been selected to receive National Scholarships. This is the Association’s top college scholarship, valued at $20,000, to be used toward a bachelor’s degree. It is accompanied by an all-expense-paid trip to Washington, D.C., to attend the annual Horatio Alger award ceremonies. These exceptional students were selected to receive National Scholarships because of the courage they demonstrated in overcoming personal challenges to attain academic success.

The 2013 Horatio Alger National Scholarship recipient from Nevada is:
• Jesus O. Dominguez-Becerra, North Valleys High School, Reno.

Both the Horatio Alger Award recipients and the National Scholarship recipients will be honored in Washington, D.C., during the 66th Annual Horatio Alger Awards Induction Ceremonies on April 4-6, 2013.

“The Association is proud to salute men and women of exceptional achievement with the Horatio Alger Award, and we are grateful to them for joining in our efforts to enable more and more young people to achieve their own versions of the American Dream through higher education,” said Tony Novelly, President and CEO of the Horatio Alger Association.
As a role model, the association will share Larry W. Ruvo’s life experiences with its scholars and the American public. Larry Ruvo began his career at the Sahara and Caesar’s Palace hotels in Las Vegas then went on to be the youngest manager at the Frontier Hotel. He established a liquor distribution company with famed Las Vegas entrepreneur Steve Wynn. He then created Southern Wine and Spirits and currently serves as the company’s managing director. The company is Nevada’s largest wholesale liquor, wine and beer importer and distributor. He is a longtime supporter of numerous charitable organizations. Dissatisfied with the pace of advances made in treating Alzheimer’s, Mr. Ruvo started a charitable organization called Keep Memory Alive, and he was instrumental in building the preeminent Cleveland Clinic LouRuvo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas. With the leadership of Mr. Ruvo, Keep Memory Alive increases awareness and raises funds for the research, management, and treatment of brain disorders at the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health. He has been listed as one of the Most Influential Businessmen of Southern Nevada and received the Governor’s Philanthropist of the Year Award.
The Association is also proud to announce that Joseph Neubauer, Chairman of the Board of ARAMARK Corporation based in Philadelphia, PA, has been selected to receive the 2013 Norman Vincent Peale Award. This award is annually conferred on an association member who has made exceptional humanitarian contributions to society, who has been an active participant in the association, and who continues to exhibit courage, tenacity and integrity. The award is named for Dr. Norman Vincent Peale who provided valuable leadership for the Horatio Alger Association for more than 40 years.

For a complete listing of all the 2013 Horatio Alger Award honorees, please visit http://www.horatioalger.org

The Horatio Alger Association
Founded in 1947, the Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans celebrates those individuals in our society whose determination and hard work have enabled them to overcome life’s obstacles to achieve success. As a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit, the Association provides college scholarships and mentorship to at-risk students who demonstrate courage in the face of adversity and dedication to pursuing higher education. The Horatio Alger Association has awarded almost $100 million to nearly 20,000 Scholars since the inception of its scholarship programs in 1984.

Lyon County moving forward with strategies to increase broadband access and use

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Lyon County, Nevada now has an action plan to make way for greater technology use across the community and pave the way for a brighter economic future. The Technology Action Plan was unveiled as part of Lyon County’s participation in the Connected community engagement program through the Connect Nevada initiative. Thirteen Nevada communities are currently involved in some stage of the Connected program.

The occasion was marked yesterday with a public event at Silver Springs Community Center where the Lyon County Technology Team was presented with its detailed action plan for the future.

“Receiving this Connected community Technology Action Plan is a huge step in the right direction for the future of Lyon County,” said General Manager of the Silver Springs-Stagecoach Hospital District and Lyon County Community Champion Kari Larson. “This plan outlines how we will take specific steps to ensure our community is supporting our current residents and businesses by making sure there is access to the global economy and all the educational, health, government, and other countless benefits that quality high-speed Internet allows.”

Participation in the Connected program means Lyon County has gone through an extensive assessment of its overall broadband and technology innovation. The Technology Action Plan sets general community-wide broadband connectivity requirements to be worked toward that will support economic development and residential quality of life. Lyon County’s top goal from the new plan is to increase broadband access throughout the county. The new plan gives the community step-by-step action items to make sure that goal is met. The plan will also support growing digital literacy through future broadband expansion and programs that will ensure the community maintains widespread Internet access, adoption, and use.

“This Connected Technology Action Plan is a big key to success for both the present and the future of Lyon County,” said Connect Nevada Program Manager Lindsey Niedzielski. “Lyon County is paving the way with this Technology Action Plan for a bright and prosperous future. The new plan means this community is serious about making sure it’s ready to benefit from all the economic and lifestyle opportunities that the digital age provides. It’s all part of Nevada’s solid plans for future growth.”

The Connected program is part of the Connect Nevada initiative funded by the U.S. Department of Commerce NTIA State Broadband Initiative (SBI) program. Connect Nevada is working to facilitate the access, adoption, and use of technology throughout the state to create a better business environment, more effective community and economic development, improved healthcare, more efficient government, enhanced education, and improved quality of life. Residents are encouraged to get involved by joining their local Connected technology team and using the free Every Community Online program offered by Connect Nevada to get training in computer and Internet skills which makes them eligible for discounted computers and home Internet service.

About Connect Nevada: The Governor’s Office and the Nevada Broadband Task Force are leading the initiative to increase broadband Internet access, adoption, and use across the state. Connect Nevada is a nonprofit organization that was commissioned by the state to work with all Nevada broadband providers, create detailed maps of current broadband coverage, and coordinate efforts with other Federal grant award recipients in the state. Connect Nevada is now supporting the development of a statewide plan for the deployment and adoption of broadband. The goal is to spread high-speed Internet across the state and make sure all Nevada residents have access to its life-changing benefits. For more information visit: www.connectnv.org.

Jewish War Veterans Come Together to Help Veterans Village Las Vegas

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Veterans Village Las Vegas, is a comprehensive housing and resource facility for U.S. veterans and their families and located in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel on Las Vegas Boulevard, has a new support group – more than 60 members of the Jewish War Veterans Murray L. Rosen Post 64. According to Senior Vice Commander Steve Seiden, the group recently signed a Memo of Understanding with Veterans Village to establish a formal working relationship. The group’s Edward Kline Memorial Homeless Veterans Fund, Inc. will underwrite housing at Veterans Village, as its funds allow, for vets and their families who need temporary housing and other critical services.

“Our group, which is comprised primarily of war veterans who served in all conflicts since WWII, developed an Independence Day Program several years ago to help find housing for homeless vets and their families,” Seiden said. “But given limited resources in the community, particularly for disabled veterans with families, we could only do so much. As we formulated a plan to enlarge our scope and our efforts, we became aware of Veterans Village. Ever since our first visit to Veterans Village, we have been meeting regularly with its founder, Arnold Stalk, and directing much of our efforts and donations to supporting this remarkable public/private partnership that does so much to help those who have defended our freedoms.”

Seiden, who also serves as president of the Edward Kline Memorial Homeless Veterans Fund, Inc., formerly referred to as the Independence Day Program, says most of its members are between 65 and 80 years of age with a few in their 90s, but the group also has younger members who served in the Korean and Vietnam wars. “We are actively recruiting younger members who share our passion for helping veterans and to continue our good work for years to come,” Seiden said.

Veterans Village opened in 2012 in a renovated Econo Lodge Motel with 120 rooms. Thanks to the ongoing generosity of the Home Depot Foundation and hundreds of hours provided by Home Depot employees, the facility is undergoing a comprehensive retrofit and update. In addition to providing temporary housing for vets and their families, Veterans Village provides a comprehensive roster of services through partnerships with other community organizations and government agencies, including employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events.

According to Arnold Stalk, Veterans Village founder and visionary, the contributions of the Jewish War Veterans are especially meaningful. “The group’s deep understanding of the challenges often faced by war veterans fuels their passion and enthusiasm for doing all they can to help,” Stalk said. “When members of the Jewish War Veterans visit us, they always put a smile on the faces of our residents. We are grateful for their support and appreciate their contagious enthusiasm for helping veterans.”

“There are all sorts of resources there,” said Seiden of the an all-encompassing facility that provides basic necessities like food and medical services, but also specialized services for those with substance abuse and other conditions. “For vets, Veterans Village is much more than just a roof over their head,” Seiden said. “It’s a place to heal and get critical help for success in the future. We’re excited about our relationship with Veterans Village. “

About Veterans Village:
Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel. It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed. Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need. SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.

Natalie Cole to Headline at Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc. GENERATIONS Concert to Raise Funds for Music Education

February 16, 2013 by · Comments Off on Natalie Cole to Headline at Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc. GENERATIONS Concert to Raise Funds for Music Education
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Nine-time GRAMMY® award-winning singer and songwriter Natalie Cole will headline at the second annual GENERATIONS, a Nat King Cole Generation Hope Inc. concert benefit to raise funds for music education on Friday, March 1, 2013 at the Keith C. and Elaine Johnson Wold Performing Arts Center at Lynn University in Boca Raton, Florida (the venue of the final 2012 Presidential Debate).

Twin daughters of music legend Nat King Cole, Timolin and Casey Cole of Boca Raton, launched Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc. to honor the legacy, music and life of their father Nat King Cole in 2008 after learning of budget cuts in public schools directly affecting the arts. Since that time, donations in excess of $66,000 have benefited more than 5,000 children with “the greatest need and fewest resources” in Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties.

“Our family history is one of musical excellence and charitable giving,” said Timolin Cole. “Our father was a trailblazer in the music industry and will live forever through his style, grace and unforgettable music. Our mother Maria, also an entertainer, sang with Duke Ellington and was known for supporting multiple causes throughout her life. By giving students the opportunity to enhance their musical talents and abilities, our family’s legacy lives on.”

Casey Cole added that “In keeping with that legacy, the concert will showcase generations of musical greatness, including performances by our sister Natalie Cole, students from the Nat King Cole Generation Hope Summer Strings Camp, and local teen performance artists Andrew Foreman and Zoe Fromer.”

“We believe that every child should be exposed to music education,” continued Timolin. “Studies prove that participation in school music has a positive impact on areas considered outside the realm of music including dexterity, coordination, self-discipline, self-esteem, thinking skills, listening skills, and personal expression.”

This past summer 105 students from 7 Title 1 Palm Beach County schools were transported to Lynn University in Boca Raton to attend the inaugural Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc. Summer Strings at Lynn University, a camp that provided elementary students without means an opportunity to receive the highest quality string instruction. Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc., the School District of Palm Beach County and Lynn University Conservatory of Music worked together to make this week-long program happen with Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc. funding the cost of running the camp, the school district providing transportation and lunches for the campers and the university donating the space. Students received small group section instruction and private lessons with Lynn’s conservatory students serving as their mentors. The week-long camp culminated in a concert performed in the Keith C. and Elaine Johnson Wold Performing Arts Center.

“Plans are currently underway to expand the camp program next year based on fundraising from this GENERATIONS Concert,” noted Casey. “While giving has been predominantly in Palm Beach County, the organization has supported programs in Broward and Miami-Dade Counties with a goal to replicate successful programs, like our recent Summer Strings opportunity, across the country.”

The GENERATIONS concert event begins at 7:00 p.m. with a reception hosted by Celebrity Cruises featuring music performed by students from the Lynn Conservatory of Music and an ensemble of children they mentored during Nat King Cole Generation Hope Summers Strings and a silent auction that will include a 4-foot x 3-foot original painting of Nat King Cole by Salvatore Principe, a vintage handbag from the private collection of Maria Cole, wife of Nat King Cole and mother of the Cole sisters, Natalie, Timolin and Casey; and a limited edition print of the legendary artists who performed and recorded “We Are The World”, including Michael Jackson, Quincy Jones, and Diana Ross with each artist’s signature and portrait, along with the musical score of the song. At 8:00 p.m. the attendees will enjoy music from the talented, local youth performers Andrew Foreman, Zoe Fromer and pianist Jermaine Teague, followed by the performance by headliner Natalie Cole.

VIP tickets priced at $350 include premier seating, open bar at the Celebrity Cruises pre-concert reception, a private meet-and greet with performers, and post-event dessert reception; Donor tickets priced at $150 include priority seating and two drink tickets for the Celebrity Cruises pre-concert reception; and General Admission tickets priced at $75 with cash bar at Celebrity Cruises pre-concert reception are available, but limited.

GENERATIONS Concert sponsors include Silver Sponsor Celebrity Cruises; Bronze Sponsors Allied Health Institute and West Boca Medical Center; Patron Sponsor Florida Power & Light; Partners Boca Raton Bridge Hotel, Cruisin-America, Kaye Communications, Inc., Lynn University and SmartCruiser.com; Media Sponsors The Boca Raton Observer, The Boca Raton Tribune, Seaview Radio and LivingFLA.com.

The mission of Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc., a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, is to provide music education to children with the greatest need and fewest resources. It is accomplished by funding programs that provide for instruction, mentoring and resources. Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc. accepts grant applications throughout the year, which are reviewed by its Board of Directors and grants are awarded twice yearly based on the merit of application and availability of funds. Organization board members include Timolin Cole, president; Casey Cole, vice president; Robin Coven – Levin HomeCare; Rainford Knight – Florida Institute of Finance, LLC; Toni Mastrullo – Telecom Resources of America, Inc.; Sharon Gordon Mullane, Esq.; Thais Piotrowski – Ameriprise and Milana Walter.

To purchase benefit concert tickets visit natkingcolefoundation.org/concert or call 561-237-9000. For more information on Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc., call 561-213-8209 or email info@natkingcolefoundation.org.

No more “empty nest”: middle-aged adults face family pressure on both sides

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The “empty nest” of past generations, in which the kids are grown up and middle-aged adults have more time to themselves, has been replaced in the United States by a nest that’s full – kids who can’t leave, can’t find a job and aging parents who need more help than ever before.

According to a new study by researchers at Oregon State University, what was once a life stage of new freedoms, options and opportunities has largely disappeared.

An economic recession and tough job market has made it hard on young adults to start their careers and families. At the same time, many older people are living longer, which adds new and unanticipated needs that their children often must step up to assist with.
The end result, researchers suggest, are “empty nest” plans that often have to be put on hold, and a mixed bag of emotions, ranging from joy and “happy-to-help” to uncertainty, frustration and exhaustion.

“We mostly found very positive feelings about adults helping their children in the emerging adulthood stage of life, from around ages 18 to 30,” said Karen Hooker, director of the OSU Center for Healthy Aging Research.

“Feelings about helping parents weren’t so much negative as just filled with more angst and uncertainty,” Hooker said. “As a society we still don’t socialize people to expect to be taking on a parent-caring role, even though most of us will at some point in our lives. The average middle-aged couple has more parents than children.”

The findings of this research were just published in the Journal of Aging Studies, and were based on data from six focus groups during 2009-10. It was one of the first studies of its type to look at how middle-aged adults actually feel about these changing trends.
Various social, economic, and cultural forces have combined to radically challenge the traditional concept of an empty nest, the scientists said. The recession that began in 2008 yielded record unemployment, substantial stock market losses, lower home values and increased demand for higher levels of education.

Around the same time, advances in health care and life expectancy have made it possible for many adults to live far longer than they used to – although not always in good health, and often needing extensive care or assistance.

This study concluded that most middle-aged parents with young adult children are fairly happy to help them out, and they understand that getting started in life is simply more difficult now. Some research has suggested that age 25 is the new 22; that substantially more parents now don’t even expect their kids to be financially independent in their early 20s, and don’t mind helping them through some difficult times.

But the response to helping adult parents who, at the same time, need increasing amounts of assistance is not as uniformly positive, the study found – it can be seen as both a joy and a burden, and in any case was not something most middle-aged adults anticipated.

“With the kids, it’s easy,” is a general purpose reaction. With aging parents, it isn’t.

“My grandparents died younger, so my parents didn’t cope with another generation,” one study participant said.

Many middle-aged people said it was difficult to make any plans, due to disruptions and uncertainty about a parent’s health at any point in time. And most said they we’re willing to help their aging parents, but a sense of being time-starved was a frequent theme.
“It brings my heart joy to be able to provide for my mom this way,” one study participant said. “There are times when it’s a burden and I feel resentful.”

The dual demands of children still transitioning to independence, and aging parents who need increasing amounts of care is causing many of the study participants to re-evaluate their own lives. Some say they want to make better plans for their future so they don’t pose such a burden to their children, and begin researching long-term care insurance. Soul-searching is apparent.

“I don’t care if I get old,” a participant said. “I just don’t want to become debilitated. So I would rather have a shorter life and a healthy life than a long life like my mom, where she doesn’t have a life. She doesn’t have memories. Our memories are what make us who we are.”

An increasing awareness of the challenges produced by these new life stages may cause more individuals to anticipate their own needs, make more concrete plans for the future, reduce ambivalent approaches and have more conversations with families about their own late-life care, the researchers said in their study.
About the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences: The College creates connections in teaching, research and community outreach while advancing knowledge, policies and practices that improve population health in communities across Oregon and beyond.

National Surgical Association Comes to Las Vegas

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) is hosting its 71st Annual Scientific Conference in Las Vegas on February 11-14, 2013 at Mandalay Bay Resort & Conference Center. ACFAS is a professional society of more than 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons dedicated to promoting the art and science of foot, ankle, and related lower extremity surgery; addressing the concerns of foot and ankle surgeons; and advancing and improving standards of education and surgical skill.

This year’s conference will bring about 1,500 surgeons and 150 exhibiting companies to the city of Las Vegas and we are looking forward to the Las Vegas experience! During the conference our surgeons will discuss the latest trends and procedures in foot and ankle surgery to help improve the health and quality of life for patients. Three of those topics have been turned into consumer-aimed press releases for distribution during the conference. The three press releases, which are embargoed until the conference, include:
Smoking and Bone Healing – A Risky Combination: Smokers take nearly 50 percent longer to heal after surgery than non-smokers. For every non-smoking patient whose bones heal normally, four smokers will experience non-union, or failure of the bone to mend. Surgeons discuss ways to treat this challenging patient population.
Lisfranc Injury – Easy to Miss, Hard to Get Over: Left untreated, this little-known and often overlooked foot injury can lead to serious long-term problems like osteoarthritis, chronic pain and even foot deformities. Surgeons assess the best treatment options for this complex injury that seems to be afflicting more and more professional athletes.

Pediatric Flatfoot Deformity – A Cause for Alarm? Left untreated, pediatric flatfoot poses a serious developmental threat to children. Foot and ankle surgeons re-examine the best course of treatment for optimal long-term health.
Please contact Tracy Hulett or Melissa Matusek if you are interested in receiving advance copies of these embargoed releases, or if you are interested in setting up interviews/photo opportunities with the College’s physician media spokespeople. You can reach us by e-mail at the below addresses or by phone at 773-693-9300. You can also visit FootHealthFacts.org, the College’s patient education website for more valuable foot and ankle health information.
Thank you and we hope to see you in Vegas!
Tracy Hulett
Manager, Public Relations and Communications
tracy.hulett@acfas.org
Melissa Matusek
Director of Marketing and Public Relations
melissa.matusek@acfas.org

Research Suggests Massage Therapy Is Effective For Health Conditions In People Of All Ages

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Massage Therapy Shown to be Beneficial for Enhancing Immune Function in Preterm Infants, Decreasing Blood Pressure and Improving Stability in Older Persons and Reducing Stress in Cancer Patients.

People of all ages are beginning to understand the many benefits of massage therapy, including the role it can play in overall health and well-being. Recent research compiled by the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) suggests that massage can enhance the immune function in preterm infants, decrease blood pressure and improve stability in older persons, as well as reduce stress and anxiety in cancer patients.
Massage Therapy for Improved Immune Function and Weight Gain in Preterm Infants
Research[1] published in Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), showed that for stable, preterm infants, daily massage therapy is positively associated with higher natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity and weight gain. American Massage Therapy Association President, Cynthia Ribeiro, says of the study, “This research demonstrates that massage therapy can benefit preterm infants by enhancing immunity and stimulating growth. Parents of preterm infants are encouraged to speak with a certified massage therapist to learn more about certain techniques designed to aid in their child’s development.”
Massage Therapy for Improvements in Balance, Neurological, and Cardiovascular Measures in Older Adults
Research[2]published in the International Journal of Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (IJTMB ) found that older adults who receive massage therapy for up to six weeks could benefit from decreased blood pressure and improved stability. “This study suggests that regular massage therapy can produce several advantages for the older generation, including a relaxation affect for the entire body, lowering blood pressure, decreasing stress and improving balance, amongst other things,” says American Massage Therapy Association President, Cynthia Ribeiro.
Massage Therapy for Decreasing Stress in Cancer Patients
Research[3] published in BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care indicates that massage therapy can have a positive influence on the quality of life of people suffering serious illnesses such as brain cancer. The American Massage Therapy Association acknowledges these study results, which suggest that massage therapy can improve physical as well as emotional well-being in patients with late stage disease and when used in combination with standard care, massage can help reduce stress, anxiety, pain and fatigue.
View AMTA’s Research Roundup Volume 2 online
Visit AMTA’s Find a Massage Therapist® to find a qualified massage therapist in your area.
Research Roundup, Volume 1
AMTA issued its first research roundup in 2012 which also highlighted the growing body of evidence showing that massage therapy can be effective for a variety of health conditions, including:
• Osteoarthritis of the knee
• Inflammation after exercise
• Chronic low-back pain
• Fibromyalgia
View this research in further detail.
Massage Therapy Facts
• Between July 2010 and July 2011 roughly 38 million adult Americans (18 percent) had a massage at least once
• 75 percent of American’s surveyed claim that their primary reason for receiving a massage was medical (43 percent) and stress (32 percent) related
• 89 percent of individuals believe that massage can be effective in reducing pain; with 29 percent of respondents admitting they have used massage therapy for pain relief
• 50 percent of people claim their doctor has either strongly recommended or encouraged them to get a massage
Visit AMTA’s research section for more information from our consumer and industry fact sheets.
About AMTA
The American Massage Therapy Association® (AMTA®) is a professional association of more than 56,000 members. AMTA professional members have demonstrated a level of skill and knowledge through education and/or testing and must meet continuing education requirements to retain membership. AMTA provides information about massage therapy to the public and works to improve the professional climate for massage therapists. The association also helps consumers and healthcare professionals locate qualified massage therapists nationwide, through AMTA’s Find a Massage Therapist® free national locator service available at www.findamassagetherapist.org.
[1] Ang J, Lua J, Mathur A, et al. A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial of Massage Therapy on the Immune System of Preterm Infants. Pediatrics. 2012; 130(6):e1549-58.
[2] Sefton JM , Yarar C, Berry JW, et al. Six weeks of massage therapy produces changes in balance, neurological and cardiovascular measures in older persons. International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork.2012; 5(3):28-40.
[3] Keir SM and Saling JR. Pilot study of the impact of massage therapy on sources and levels of distress in brain tumour patients. BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. 2012; 2:363-36.
For more information, contact:
Bob Szafranski
Edelman, 312.240.2687
Bob.Szafranski@edelman.com
or
Caroline Dowdy
Edelman, 312.240.2801
Caroline.Dowdy@edelman.com

Healthy Aging: Up2Me

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Healthy Aging: Up2Me – January 18, 12:30 – 3:00 PM
Join us for this proven six week program helping caregivers and individuals with chronic diseases set goals and develop skills for success. Free and open to the public, advance registration required. Contact Susan, 483-6023, hirschs2@ccf.org

Lunch & Learn
Wednesdays, 12 noon – 1 pm
888 W. Bonneville Avenue, Las Vegas
Bring your lunch, drink & dessert provided; open to the public

Jan 9: Yoga for Everyone!
Marilyn Kovach and Sandy Rickards
Yoga can exercise our body, mind and spirit. Learn simple techniques that can be used to promote increased flexibility and provide a break from everyday stresses.

Jan 16: Understanding Complementary Therapies
Lisa Browder, RA, ICA, CR, Complementary Therapies Manager, Nathan Adelson Hospice
Increase your understanding of techniques that can be used to promote health and wellbeing.

Jan 23: Getting Your Legal and Financial Ducks in a Row
Kim Boyer, Certified Elder Law Attorney
This presentation will provide an overview of common legal documents such as durable power of attorney, wills and trusts as well as benefits programs to help cover the cost of care.

Jan 30: Super Aging – The Science Behind Successful Brains
Sarah Banks, PhD, Neuropsychologist, Cleveland Clinic
Most people experience some cognitive decline with age, it’s normal. But others show no real decline: What makes these superagers different?

Cleveland Museum of Art Series
Dynamic conversations about art through videoconferencing
All art education programs are held at the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health Library, 888 W. Bonneville Avenue and open to the public.

L’Art de L’Afrique
January 15, 11:00 – 12:00 Noon
Explore the rich history and traditional arts of former French colonies including Mali, The Democratic Republic of Congo and The Cote d’Ivoire. Styles, materials, techniques and functions of art works will be discussed.

Contact Susan Hirsch, 483-6023 or hirschs2@ccf.org for additional information.
Support Groups
MEMORY LOSS SUPPORT GROUP
Wednesdays, 1 pm-2:30 pm
Meetings are held weekly for adult members who provide care for loved ones with memory loss.
Contact: Donna Munic-Miller 483-6035, municd@ccf.org
PARKINSON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP: January 8, 12 noon -1 pm
(Held the 2nd Tuesday of every month)
Separate groups for early stage individuals and adult family members.
Contact: Jennifer 483-6036, gayanj@ccf.org

HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP: January 22, 12 noon -1 pm
(Held the 4th Tuesday of every month)
Separate groups for gene positive individuals (asymptomatic and early stage) and adult family members.
Contact: Jenna 483-6054, clifforj@ccf.org

The 20 Pearls Foundation Inc. Presents An Evening with Violin ‘Soul-o-ist’ Karen Briggs In Support of the HerShe Group Foundation, Inc.

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The 20 Pearls Foundation Inc. Presents An Evening with Violin ‘Soul-o-ist’ Karen Briggs
In Support of the HerShe Group Foundation, Inc.

Thursday, January 31, 2013, 6:30 p.m.
The Smith Center for the Performing Arts
Tickets are $65 & $70, plus any additional service fees
To purchase tickets, please visit The Smith Center Box Office, call 702.749.2000, or visit http://www.thesmithcenter.com

Las Vegas – January 07, 2013 – The 20 Pearls Foundation Inc., is the charitable arm of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Theta Theta Omega Las Vegas Chapter, is proud to present “An Evening with Violin ‘Soul-o-ist’ Karen Briggs,” a concert in support of the HerShe Group Foundation, Inc., an organization preparing girls in foster care for successful transition into adulthood.

Karen Briggs is a world renowned violinist who has earned the nickname “The Lady in Red” by her adoring fans after extensively touring with celebrated instrumental musician Yanni and joining him on his critically acclaimed and live multi-platinum recorded album Yanni Live at the Acropolis (1993) which became one of the top selling PBS specials of all time and broadcast in 65 countries. Her musicianship is reflective of her exposure to countless music genres including jazz, gospel, Latin, classical, African and Middle Eastern. She is a highly sought after featured soloist who has perfected the melismatic style captivating audiences at Carnegie Hall, Royal Albert Hall, the Apollo Theater, and the Kennedy Center.

Briggs has collaborated with many influential musicians including Wynton Marsalis, Swinging into the 21st (2012) and Selections from Swingin’ into the 21st (2011); Ledisi, Lost & Found (2007); Kenny Loggins, More Songs from Pooh Corner (2000); Vertu’, Stanley Clark, Lenny White and Richie Kotzen (1999); Diana Ross, Every Day Is a New Day (1999); and Kirk Franklin, Donnie McClurkin and Yolanda Adams, The Hopeville Tour/DVD (2009), to name a few.

She began her professional career with the Virginia Symphony Orchestra after graduating from Norfolk State University in Norfolk, Virginia. Several years later she released her self-titled debut album Karen (1992), her sophomore album Amazing Grace (1996), followed by Soulchestral Groove (2009).
Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. Seating is at 6 p.m., showtime is 6:30 p.m. The Smith Center Box Office is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. and is located on the west entrance of Reynolds Hall at 361 Symphony Park Avenue.

About the 20 Pearls Foundation, Inc.
The 20 Pearls Foundation, Inc. is a nonprofit organization committed to serving the Las Vegas community in support of educational achievement, scholarship programs, and philanthropic endeavors. The Foundation, in partnership with Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Theta Theta Omega Las Vegas Chapter, also supports other programs for all segments of the public including cultural and historical activities and community and health services. The 20 Pearls Foundation is a 501(c)3 charitable organization. For more information please visit 20 Pearls Foundation, Inc.

About the HerShe Group Foundation, Inc.
The HerShe Group Foundation, Inc. was founded in 2004 by Kenadie Cobbin Richardson to help transform the lives of girls who have been neglected, abused and abandoned. Its mission is to prepare youth in foster care to successfully transition into adulthood through the performing arts, mentoring, college and career readiness, leadership training and exposure to extraordinary experiences. For more information please visit www.hershegroup.org.

###

For information regarding The 20 Pearls Foundation, Inc., please contact:
Kim Martin
702-526-6426
Kim457@cox.net

For information regarding the HerShe Group Foundation, Inc., please contact:
Kenadie Cobbin-Richardson
(310) 641-4400 office
kenadie@hershegroup.org

For information regarding Karen Briggs, please contact:
Winston Sanders
702-242-8944
winstonzanders@yahoo.com

The Dr. Miriam & Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus Presents a Free Parenting Workshop from World-Renown Psychologist

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The Dr. Miriam & Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus Presents a Free Parenting Workshop from World-Renown Psychologist New York Times Best Selling Author Michael G. Thompson, Ph.D. Provides a Practical Guide to Raising Healthy, Secure Children

Las Vegas – Jan. 8, 2012 –The Dr. Miriam & Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus is offering a free Parenting Workshop hosted by world-renowned psychologist specializing in children and families, Michael G. Thompson, Ph.D. On Sunday, Jan. 13 from1 – 3 p.m., 400 parents will have the opportunity to hear from this best selling author and sought after speaker who has appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show, The Today Show, CBS 60 Minutes, ABC 20/20, Good Morning America, and The Early Show. Thompson’s workshop is titled Pressured Children, Worried Parents: A Conversation about Parenting in 2013: managing you and your child’s expectations and emotions with regards to adolescence, friendship development, popularity and social cruelty.

“This is Michael Thompson’s fourth visit to our school and he is back by popular demand,” said Paul Schiffman, head of school of Adelson Educational Campus. “As a celebrated psychologist, he provides parents with wisdom, guidance and humor through all the tough decisions they make. We look forward to hearing his insight on Jan. 13.”

Michael Thompson, Ph.D. is a consultant, author and psychologist specializing in children and families. He is the supervising psychologist for the Belmont Hill School and has worked in more than five hundred schools across the United States, as well as in international schools in Central America, Europe, Africa and Asia.

He and his co-author, Dan Kindlon, wrote the New York Times best-selling book, Raising Cain: Protecting the Emotional Life of Boys (Ballantine Books, 1999). He is the author of Homesick and Happy: How Time Away from Parents Can Help a Child Grow, Speaking of Boys: Answers to the Most-Asked Questions about Raising Sons Ballantine, 2000), and co-author (with Catherine O’Neill Grace and Larry Cohen, Ph.D.) of Best Friends/Worst Enemies: Understanding the Social Worlds of Children (Ballantine, 2001) and Mom, They’re Teasing Me: Helping Your Child Solve Social Problems (Ballantine, 2002.) About Best Friends, Worst Enemies the Publishers Weekly review declared, “Not since Dr. Spock and Penelope Leach has there been such a sensitive and practical guide to raising healthy children.” The Pressured Child: Helping Your Child Achieve Success in School and in Life (with Teresa Barker, Ballantine, 2004) was written to help parents understand the complex journey of children through school, from Kindergarten through senior year. His third book on the psychology of boys, entitled, It’s a Boy!: Understanding Your Son’s Development from Birth to Eighteen, was published in 2008. It focuses on the importance of undirected, free play in the lives of boys. He is presently writing a new book about summer camps and schools trips entitled, Homesick and Happy: How Children Change and Grow When They Are Away from Their Parents.

A dedicated speaker and traveler, Michael Thompson has appeared on The Today Show, The Oprah Winfrey Show, ABC 20/20, CBS 60 Minutes, The Early Show and Good Morning America. He has been quoted in the New York Times, The Washington Post, Newsweek, Time and U.S. News and World Report and has been a guest on NPR’s “Morning Edition” with Susan Stamberg, “Talk of the Nation” with Ray Suarez and the Diane Rhem Show. He wrote, narrated and hosted a two-hour PBS documentary entitled “Raising Cain” that was broadcast nationally in 2006.

Dr. Thompson serves on the board of the American Camping Association and is on the Advisory Board of Parent Magazine. Dr. Thompson lives in Arlington, Massachusetts. He is married to Dr. Theresa McNally, a psychotherapist, and is the father of Joanna, 26, and Will, 20.

About The Dr. Miriam & Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus
The mission of The Dr. Miriam and Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus is to instruct and inspire new generations of students who will draw strength from a rich Jewish heritage, use their knowledge, values and vision to fulfill their own potential, and build a better world. Adelson Educational Campus was originally founded in 1980 and now educates children from 18 months through 12th grade. Adelson Educational Campus accepts students of all faiths and affiliations and offers a drug-free commitment to its students and faculty. Adelson Educational Campus is located at 9700 West Hillpointe Road in Summerlin. For more information please call (702) 255-4500 or visit www.adelsoncampus.org or Facebook/Adelson Campus

Springs Cafe Announces the First Cooking Workshops for 2013 – Presented by the Culinary Academy of Las Vegas

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Las Vegas- January 9, 2013 – The Culinary Academy of Las Vegas is kicking off the New Year with the first set of Springs Cafe Cooking Workshops for the 2013 season. Learn how to cook with gourmet vegetables found at the local farmers markets and master the many uses of fresh herbs and tomatoes from the experienced chefs of the Springs Cafe. Cooking demonstrations include plenty of scrumptious samples, recipes, and discussion with questions from attendees encouraged.

All classes are located inside Springs Cafe at Springs Preserve, 333 S. Valley View Blvd. at US 95. Reservations are required. Space is very limited. For more information and to register please call (702) 822-7700.
WHEN: Third Saturday of the month, 10 a.m.-Noon

COST: $30 members, $40 non-members per workshop
Member bonus: $75 all 3 three workshops purchased together
CLASS SCHEDULE
January 19: Exploring Gourmet Vegetables
Explore gourmet vegetables, seasonal cooking, and the rare delicacy of truffles and truffle oil. Discover produce only found at local farmer’s markets; Chefs will create a dish from the fresh produce as well as vegan and non-vegan vegetable curry with crispy tofu and Thai basil.
February 16: Herbs Everywhere
Learn how to make herb-infused oils including rosemary, thyme, basil and cilantro in addition to learning how to create an herb-crusted pork loin, white bean ragout and wilted spinach with preserved lemon. There will be an abundance of flavorsome samples and great recipes to try at home.

March 16: Attack of the Killer Tomatoes
Tomatoes are a killer taste sensation. Learn to create fresh salsas like pico de gallo, salsa verde and salsa roja. Become a pro at whipping up marinara and turning it into Bolognese sauce, and then create regional favorites- spicy tomato gazpacho and fried green tomatoes with Cajun remoulade.

About Culinary Academy of Las Vegas
Founded in 1993, Culinary Academy of Las Vegas (formerly the Culinary Training Academy), the country’s leading nonprofit culinary and hospitality training institute, was developed through a joint labor-management trust representing private sector employers, the Culinary Union Local 226 and the Bartenders Union Local 165. The Academy is licensed by the Nevada Commission on Post-Secondary Education and trains several thousand students per year for participating employers in the hospitality industry. Offerings include a 50-seat bistro-style restaurant, Westside Bistro, and a 400-seat banquet and events center located at the 710 West Lake Mead Blvd. campus. The Academy is the caterer of record for The Smith Center for the Performing Arts and operator of the cafe and catering services at Springs Preserve. Culinary Academy of Las Vegas is an equal opportunity employer/program. For more information, call 702.924.2100 or visit www.theculinaryacademy.org. Stay up to date on happenings on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and YouTube.

City Of Las Vegas February 2013 – Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle! Most facilities will be closed Feb. 18 for holiday observance.

Co-ed Fall Flag Football Registration Opens (ages 6-14)
Register Jan. 7-March 1 at city community centers listed below for league play March 16-May 11.
Cost: $75 per person, includes NFL team jersey and shorts.
Cimarron Rose Community Center, 5591 N. Cimarron Road, (702) 229-1607.
Veterans Memorial Leisure Services Center, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.
A birth certificate is required to register. Volunteer coaches are needed. Cost includes post-season tournament. No games will be scheduled for Saturday, March 30.

Ward 5 Coffee With The Councilman
Thursday, Feb. 7, 9 to 10 a.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Starbucks, 751 N. Rancho Drive, at Bonanza Road.
Join Ward 5 Councilman Ricki Y. Barlow for coffee and conversation about your ideas to improve Ward 5 and Las Vegas.

Ward 1 Fit Family Health Festival & Trail Walk (all ages)
Saturday, Feb. 9, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Free admission. T-shirts available for the first 100 attendees. Raffle tickets for sale.
Pioneer Park, 7449 Braswell Drive.
Join the Outside Las Vegas Foundation, Weight Watchers and the city of Las Vegas for a fun health festival for the whole family. Enjoy a community expo with health and outdoor vendors in the park as well as trail walks to nearby parks. Learn about many fun ways to get active and healthy in our community. Contact Robin at (702) 229-6405 for more information.

Raptor Play Park Grand Opening (all ages)
Saturday, Feb. 16, 10 a.m. to noon.
Thunderbird Family Sports Complex, 6105 N. Durango Drive at Tropical Parkway.
Bring the family out to experience the free red, white and blue opening of the Raptor Play Park. This new phase to the park will add landscaping and turf areas, lighted sidewalk extensions, a picnic shade shelter, site furnishings, off-site improvements and a scaled F-22 Raptor Stealth Fighter Jet exhibit. Light refreshments will be offered while supplies last.
Las Vegas Mayor’s Cup International Showcase (U14-U19)
Saturday-Monday, Feb.16-18. (Team check-in Feb. 15.)
Free admission for spectators. $1,000 team entry. Team registration closed Dec. 28, 2012.
Bettye Wilson Soccer Complex, 7353 Eugene Ave., and other Las Vegas fields to be announced.
The largest international youth soccer tournament in the country will take place in Las Vegas Presidents’ Day weekend, Feb. 16-18. More than 6,000 soccer players ages 14 to 19, from at least 11 foreign countries and 28 U.S. states, will square off in soccer fields around the valley. The event is co-hosted by the city of Las Vegas and the Downtown Las Vegas Soccer Club, and is expected to attract college soccer coaches and recruiters from across the country to scout for both male and female athletes. Spectator admission and parking are free at all games.

Matches will be played from 8:45 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. See the website for specific field locations, times and match-ups. Medals and trophies will be presented to winning teams following each championship game, beginning about 11 a.m. Monday and continuing to approximately 4 p.m. Accepted teams, player profiles, college coaches expected to attend, tournament schedule and program, participating hotels, and more information is available on the event website at www.LVMayorsCup.com.

Free Community Garden Class at Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs
Saturday, Feb. 23, 9 to 11 a.m.
Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road, (702) 229-8100.
Join Ward 6 City Councilman Steve Ross and Dr. Angela O’Callaghan of the Nevada Cooperative Extension for a free class, “Growing in Small Places.” Learn how to plant herbs, vegetables and fruits in small areas or containers.

Adaptive Recreation

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 6 p.m. Closed school district staff development days and holidays.
Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.
East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Participants will enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed school district staff development days and holidays.
Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Call (702) 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence.
# # #
Media Contact:
Margaret Kurtz
Public Information Officer
City of Las Vegas
495 S. Main St., 7th Floor
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702) 229-6993
Cell (702) 249-1828
E-mail: mkurtz@lasvegasnevada.gov

Five Physicians Honored for Outstanding Care of Patients Near the End of Life

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Leaders who develop palliative care best practices receive 2013 Hastings Center Cunniff-Dixon Physician Awards.

(Garrison NY, January 15, 2013) Five physicians who have distinguished themselves in caring for patients near the end of life have been named recipients of the 2013 Hastings Center Cunniff-Dixon Physician Awards.

“The Hastings Center Cunniff-Dixon Physician Awards are in their fourth year, and the winners continue to exemplify excellence in doctoring for people with advanced illness,” said Richard Payne, M.D., Esther Colliflower Director of the Duke Institute on Care at the End of Life and a member of the selection committee. “They serve as beacons in their communities by being role models of quality comprehensive care.”

The awards were made in three categories: a senior award and a mid-career award of $25,000 each and three early-career awards of $15,000 apiece. Each recipient has been exemplary in one or more of four areas: medical practice, teaching, research, and community.

The Cunniff-Dixon Foundation, whose mission is to enrich the doctor-patient relationship near the end of life, funds the awards. The Hastings Center, a bioethics research institute that has done groundbreaking work on end-of-life decision-making, cosponsors the awards. The Duke Institute on Care at the End of Life oversees the selection process.

“Establishing high-quality end-of-life care has been a priority for The Hastings Center during its four-decade history,” said Mildred Z. Solomon, president of The Hastings Center. “The outstanding work of these physicians illustrates what we aim to promote in the care of all patients with advanced illness throughout the nation. The compassion and skill of these doctors are making a profound difference to patients and families, and we are enormously proud to honor them.”

The 2013 recipients are:
Senior Physician Award: Charles G. Sasser, M.D., FACP, FAAHPM, director of palliative care services at Conway Medical Center in Conway, S.C. He is a pioneer in palliative care who has been a model and mentor to generations of palliative care providers. Under his leadership, Conway established the first interdisciplinary team for palliative care services in South Carolina – a team that included nurses, social workers, pastors, and physicians. Colleagues praise the value he places on doctor-patient discussions and his mentorship of colleagues from all specialties and practices of medicine.

Mid-Career Physician Award: Daniel C. Johnson, M.D., FAAHPM, national physician lead for palliative care at Kaiser Permanente’s Care Management Institute, as well as director of Palliative Care Innovations and Development at Kaiser Permanente-Colorado and director of the Life Quality Institute in Denver. Dr. Johnson led the expansion of services at Kaiser Permanente-Colorado, partnering with local organizations to more than quadruple patient and family access to end-of-life care. At the Life Quality Institute, an organization dedicated to advancing palliative care through education, he oversaw the development of its award-winning education program for medical students, residents, and other health professionals.

Early-Career Physician Awards:
Drew Rosielle M.D., a palliative care physician and program director for the Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellowship at the University of Minnesota Medical Center in Minneapolis, for his commitment to evidence-based palliative and end-of-life care and education.

Jane de Lima Thomas, M.D., a palliative care physician and associate director of the Harvard Palliative Medicine Fellowship Program at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, for her leadership and impact on the development of the field of palliative care through training and modeling excellence in palliative care practice.

Alen Voskanian, M.D., regional medical director, VITAS Innovative Hospice Care, Torrance, Calif., for his effort to expand and develop innovative models of ambulatory palliative care and to raise awareness of the benefits of palliative and end-of-life care through work with government agencies and professional organizations.

The prize recipients were selected by a committee convened by The Hastings Center. In addition to Dr. Payne, the committee consisted of Thomas P. Duffy, M.D., of Yale University; Kathleen M. Foley, M.D., of Weill Medical College of Cornell University and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; and Larry R. Churchill, Ph.D., of Vanderbilt University.

Civil Air Patrol’s first Spaatz award recipient dies

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Civil Air Patrol’s first Spaatz award recipient dies after distinguished public service career
Decorated CAP cadet from Michigan became a skilled Air Force combat pilot who flew with the Thunderbirds and served as a trusted congressional aide

MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, Ala. – Douglas C. Roach, the first recipient of Civil Air Patrol’s highest cadet award, the General Carl A. Spaatz Award, died Jan. 11 at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C., from complications related to cancer. He was 70.
“The Spaatz Association wishes to express its deep regret and condolences in the passing of Doug Roach,” said retired U.S. Air Force Lt. Gen. Ted Bowlds, the association’s president. “As the first Spaatz award recipient, Doug certainly set the standard in the qualities represented in all Spaatz recipients that followed. We have him and his family in our thoughts and prayers.”
Roach made Civil Air Patrol and Spaatz history as a Michigan Wing cadet in the 1960s. He was born in Romulus, Mich., on Nov. 18, 1942.
“Doug was handpicked by Jack Sorenson (CAP’s cadet program leader at the time) to be tested for the first Spaatz,” said Col. Larry Trick, a Spaatz recipient and former president of the association. “Jack noticed Doug in 1962 at the National Cadet Competition, where he was commander of the Michigan Wing drill team that won the competition that year.”
Trick said the Spaatz test in its infancy was handwritten, with mostly essay-type questions. Today the test has evolved into a more sophisticated, multi-step process, but the Spaatz award remains the most coveted of CAP’s cadet honors.
Named after the first chief of staff of the Air Force and the first chairman of the CAP National Board, the Spaatz award is presented to cadets who demonstrate excellence in leadership, character, fitness and aerospace education. Cadets typically qualify for the award after devoting an average of five years to progress through 16 achievements in the CAP Cadet Program.
Once a cadet achieves the award, he or she is entitled to the grade of cadet colonel. On average, only two cadets in 1,000 earn the Spaatz award. Since the award’s inception in 1964, CAP has presented the Spaatz award to less than 1,900 cadets.
Roach became a highly decorated officer and skilled U.S. Air Force pilot. After flying 516 combat missions during several tours in Vietnam between 1969 and 1972, he was a pilot with the Air Force flight performance team, the Thunderbirds, from 1973-75. He began with the aerial demonstration team flying Thunderbird #6 when the team flew the F-4 Phantom and he served as the team’s logistics officer. Roach retired from the Air Force with the rank of colonel.
Despite the notoriety he gained above the clouds in the Air Force, Brig. Gen. Richard L. Anderson said Roach was grounded in the achievements of his youth, which included his “place of honor in the annals of CAP history” as the first Spaatz recipient.
“I remember meeting Doug for the first time at a Spaatz Association event soon after the organization was created in the mid-1990s,” said Anderson, past president of the association and former CAP national commander who now chairs the organization’s Board of Governors. “Although Doug’s professional military and congressional staff career precluded his remaining active in CAP, he remained dedicated to the purposes of the CAP Cadet Program and attributed CAP with his later accomplishments in life.”
“He was a hero to me and many cadets in the ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s,” said Trick. “Often, we would see him on the Hill during National CAP Legislative Day. He always had a great smile and handshake for the cadets.”
Roach earned a bachelor’s degree in government at the University of Michigan and, after his distinguished service in the Air Force, a master’s degree in national security studies from Georgetown University.
He continued his career of public service on Capitol Hill, most recently as the longtime staff director for the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Tactical Air and Land Forces.
In his obituary this week, Congressional Quarterly’s Roll Call said Roach was a cornerstone of every defense authorization law since 1991, whether as a professional staff member on the veteran defense panel, or its staff director since 2001.
“His work was key to developing the smart weapons we use today,” said Trick.
The longtime congressional aide also was noted for serving both Democrats and Republicans, working through important national security legislation. In the Roll Call obituary, Rep. Michael R. Turner, the Ohio Republican who chairs the Tactical Air and Land Forces panel, said, “Doug Roach was a trusted counselor to members on both sides of the aisle for many years. He always gave us his best advice, regardless of party interest or agenda.”
Roach’s boss, House Armed Services Committee Chairman Howard “Buck” McKeon, R-Calif., called him “a selfless servant and true hero.”

Civil Air Patrol, the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, is a nonprofit organization with more than 61,000 members nationwide, operating a fleet of 550 aircraft. CAP, in its Air Force auxiliary role, performs 90 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and is credited by the AFRCC with saving an average of 80 lives annually. Its volunteers also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. The members play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to nearly 27,000 young people currently participating in the CAP cadet programs. CAP received the World Peace Prize in 2011 and has been performing missions for America for 71 years. CAP also participates in Wreaths Across America, an initiative to remember, honor and teach about the sacrifices of U.S. military veterans. Visit www.gocivilairpatrol.com or www.capvolunteernow.com for more information.

Contact info: Julie DeBardelaben – jdebardelaben@capnhq.gov – 334-953-7748, ext. 250
Steve Cox – scox@capnhq.gov – 334-953-7748, ext. 251

City of Lights and Gamble-Aires Have Officially Merged To Unite Men’s Barbershop Singing in Southern Nevada

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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City of Lights and Gamble-Aires Have Officially Merged To Unite Men’s Barbershop Singing in Southern Nevada

Las Vegas¡¦ Gamble-Aires and City of Lights barbershop choruses have joined hands in a merger that creates a new, enlarged choral dimension for this unique American musi-cal art form in Southern Nevada.
The union, which has been approved by the parent Barbershop Harmony Society¡¦s (BHS) Far Western District (FWD), could create an 80-man chorus of all ages. Effective date of the merger is Jan. 1, 2013.
¡§The merger brings more than 65 combined years of the two chorus¡¦ rich barbershop experience to the Valley¡¦s performing Musical Arts Community,¡¨ said Gamble-Aires Pres-ident Larry Litchfield.
¡§Our plans are to expand our unique barbershop sound and grow our fan base through-out the Valley. In addition, the joining of the two chapters will enhance our mission of en-couraging barbershop singing as an educational tool for our local schools.¡¨
The City of Lights¡¦ Las Vegas Metro Chapter was chartered by the BHS in 1998, un-der sponsorship of the Las Vegas Chapter.
The Las Vegas Chapter — home of its Gamble-Aires, Nevada¡¦s original barbershop chorus — was chartered in 1960 by the then Society for the Preservation and Encourage-ment of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America, Inc. — now the BHS.
The two separate chorus names will be retained until year end, when a new name for the combined chorus will be announced.
“The City of Lights Chorus is proud to be a part of this effort to strengthen barbershop singing in Southern Nevada,¡¨ said Martin Judd, president of the Las Vegas Metro Chapter.
¡§By uniting our two chapters into one new and larger organization, we hope to signifi-cantly increase the exposure of our unique singing style to a broader segment of Southern Nevada. We will create the opportunity to present even bigger and better shows and other performances to Valley residents. The two choruses sang together at the Gamble-Aires¡¦ 50th anniversary celebration in May, 2010 and the sound was enthusiastically applauded by the large audience. This is an opportunity to make that sound permanent.”

OVER A HALF-CENTURY OF BARBERSHOP HARMONY
Media Contact: FRED GREEN — (702) 525-9484 (c) „R poolvacman@gmail.com
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 22, 2012
The following members of both current Chapters were elected to the new Board of the merged chapter, they are: Steve Salmon, President; Larry Litchfield, Immediate Past President; Ivan Lambert, Secretary; Wes White, Treasurer; Albert Weiss, Music VP; Dennis Johnson, Membership VP; Fred Green, PR/Marketing VP; Larry Peckhart, Pro-gram VP; Ross Marty, Chorus Manager; and Bill Lusk and Randy Preston, Members-at-Large. They will assume office on Jan. 1, 2013.
Barbershop harmony is a musical genre that originated in the early 1900s during the Tin Pan Alley era with vaudeville and minstrel singers. Barbershop today ¡V with its ex-panding popularity (for some men it¡¦s a devoutly intense musical passion) ¡V is regarded as a vibrant and original ¡¥USofA¡¦ art form of distinctive a cappella vocal harmony and chord-ringing overtones. Currently, there are more than 600 BHS chapters nationwide with a membership of more than 25,000.
The Gamble-Aires chorus meets at 7 p.m. on Thursdays in the Good Samaritan Lu-theran Church, 8425 W. Windmill, east of S. Durango Drive, and south of the 215 Belt-way (in the 89113 zip code).
The City of Lights chorus meets at 7 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Bright Angel Church of Christ, 8570 Bright Angel Way, north of Ann Road and west of Durango (in the 89149 area code).
Both chapters are 501(c)(3) educational, tax exempt nonprofit organizations. This nonprofit designation will be carried over to the new consolidated chapter.
The combined chorus will meet at the Gamble-Aires¡¦ location on Thursdays at 7 p.m. Guests are always welcome!
For more information about either chapter, visit www.cityoflightschorus.com or www.gambleaires.com.

Renown Provides Advanced Training for Healthcare Professionals

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Renown Provides Advanced Training for Healthcare Professionals

RENO, Nev. (Oct. 30, 2012) – Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health is teaming up with the Nevada Academy of Family Physicians (NAFP) to provide advanced training for healthcare professionals across northern Nevada this weekend in a three-day educational conference.

The 23rd Annual Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine Conference will be held at the Resort at Squaw Creek in Olympic Valley, Calif., Friday through Sunday, Nov. 2 – 4. This continuing medical education program is designed for internal medicine and family physicians, hospitalists, cardiovascular specialists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, pharmacists, nurses and all other physicians and healthcare personnel.

Topics include the most recent advances and current established guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, stroke and diseases or problems associated with heart disease.

The conference is sponsored by Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health. For more information and to register for the conference, visit renown.org/UpcomingEvents. Registration will also be available at the conference. To download a copy of the event program, click here.

About the Nevada Academy of Family Physicians:
The NAFP promotes the profession of family practice by preserving the scope of practice, promoting primary care research and encouraging family physicians to assume leadership roles. The NAFP works as an advocate for family physicians and their patients to various government and non-governmental organizations affecting healthcare access and delivery.

About Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health
Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health has more than 30 years of recognition as the region’s leader of heart and vascular care. More heart procedures are performed at Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health than anywhere else in northern Nevada. Renown’s heart physicians have access to sophisticated diagnostic and surgical equipment such as the D-SPECT camera that detects heart attacks faster, the da Vinci® S HD™ Robotic Surgical System, 64-slice CT scanner, nuclear medicine, MRI and cardiac catheterization so patients can be diagnosed and treated quickly. For more information, visit renown.org/heart.

Where to Find Your Retirement-Planning Confidence

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Where to Find Your Retirement-Planning Confidence

(Family Features) With the leisure and reward of retirement a few short years away, the majority of baby boomers – born between 1945 and 1966 – are confident they have adequately planned and saved for their golden years. This is according to new research from investing services company Scottrade, Inc., which also found that 56 percent of baby boomers expect to fully retire between the ages of 55 and 74.

DIY Retirement Planning
Overall, 72 percent of Americans report a strong level of confidence in their ability to plan their own retirement. That confidence comes from two actions: discussing retirement plans and savings strategies with others, and monitoring the news. Thirty-nine percent also said their self-assurance came from the fact that they preserved most of their retirement savings through the economic downturn.

“More online and in-person investment education opportunities are available to Americans than ever before,” said Kim Wells, Scottrade’s executive director of product development and chief marketing officer. “The availability of easy-to-use online trading and investing tools is empowering investors to build their portfolios and take charge of their financial futures themselves.”

Retirement Fund Trends
Scottrade’s research found that more than half of Americans, at 55 percent, are actively planning their retirement without the help of an advisor. This do-it-yourself action plan seems to be working. The majority of Americans did not see the value of their retirement accounts decline last year, and 73 percent reported the value of their retirement accounts either increased or stayed the same.

For Americans who saw a decline in their account value, 67 percent expect to recover those losses within 10 years. In response, a growing number of Americans are looking to save more in order to rebuild their retirement accounts, and 35 percent of Americans plan to save up to 10 percent more.

Staying on Track
For those who are uncertain whether they’re contributing enough to their retirement fund, online calculators make it easy to determine how much should be contributed annually, based on age, income and retirement plan. Check out the retirement calculator in Scottrade’s online Knowledge Center at www.scottrade.com, to help determine how much to save for retirement.

Learn more about self-directed investing at www.scottrade.com, and find more information on the Scottrade 2012 American Retirement Study at http://about.scottrade.com/.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Global Vitamin D Interactive Map Illustrates Vitamin D Insufficiency Among U.S. Population and Worldwide

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Worldwide: Rates of vitamin D insufficiency are higher among women than men with older women being at most risk for developing osteoporosis.

The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) has launched an interactive global map of vitamin D status, which presents a snapshot of vitamin D levels worldwide. The map and accompanying publication1 confirm that vitamin D insufficiency is a major public health issue in both the developing and industrialized world, with more than one third of all the populations studied, showing insufficient levels of vitamin D2.

Osteoporosis is a serious chronic disease which affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Vitamin D improves bone mineral density, which lowers risk of fracture, while also improving muscle strength, balance, and leg function which decreases the risk of falling and sustaining a fracture in the first place. As a consequence, vitamin D insufficiency has been linked to a higher risk of osteoporotic fractures. Studies show that adequate vitamin D intake can reduce the risk of falls and fractures by around 30 percent3.

Additional key findings include:
„h Older people are especially at risk for vitamin D insufficiency, including older women who are a risk group for osteoporosis, and those living indoors in institutionalized care;
„h Overall, insufficient vitamin D levels were detected in more than one third of the study population4;
„h Vitamin D insufficiency affects both the developing world and industrialized world;
„h The main source of vitamin D is sunlight, but even in sunny countries, vitamin D levels are generally low and below recommended levels (taking India as example: a sunny country; yet, with low vitamin D status);
„h It is estimated that 50-70 percent of the European adult population have insufficient levels of vitamin D.
1 A Global Representation of Vitamin D status in healthy populations, Wahl et al. Archives of Osteoporosis, August 2012
2 Understood as mean 25 (OH)D values below 50 nmol/l
3 A pooled analysis of vitamin D dose requirements for fracture prevention. Bischoff-Ferrari HA et al New England Journal of Medicine. 2012.
4 Blood levels below 50 nmol/l considered as insufficient

In the U.S., approximately 30 percent of the study population had sub-optimal vitamin D levels, rising to around 70 percent among participants with darker skin color, highlighting skin color as a risk factor for vitamin D insufficiency. Overall the U.S. vitamin D status was significantly higher compared to other regions, which may in part, be attributable to the routine fortification of foods with vitamin D (such as milk, juice and cereals).

The map has also created a very clear picture as to where the vitamin D insufficiency knowledge gaps exist and where further research is required. Dr. Eggersdorfer added, ¡§There is far too little data available, for example, in relation to adolescents and young people, and across the developing world in general. These maps are an important starting point, but it is essential that research continues to better understand the scale of vitamin D insufficiency.¡¨

DSM joins IOF in calling on healthcare policymakers to raise awareness of vitamin D insufficiency and to take action to ensure intake of recommended vitamin D levels, including through safe and effective measures such as food fortification, access to proper supplements and better consumer education.

Additional country findings include:
„h In Germany 57 percent of men and 58 percent of women had vitamin D status below recommended levels, rising to 75 percent among 65-79 year olds
„h U.K. studies focused on older people reveal that nearly two thirds of women (57 percent), and half of men (49 percent) are not getting enough vitamin D
„h In the Netherlands, around half of all study participants had sub-optimal vitamin D levels
„h The Middle East revealed lower vitamin D status compared to Europe which could result from cultural factors such as clothing and lifestyle
„h Asia showed a widespread insufficient vitamin D status across different countries, with a few exceptions (vitamin D status was ranked desirable in Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam)
„h Most regions offer some data, however no information was available for Central America, South America (except Brazil) and much of Africa
„h The most striking data gaps were found in children and adolescents
DSM ¡V Bright Science. Brighter Living..

Royal DSM is a global science-based company active in health, nutrition and materials. By connecting its unique competences in Life Sciences and Materials Sciences DSM is driving economic prosperity, environmental progress and social advances to create sustainable value for all stakeholders. DSM delivers innovative solutions that nourish, protect and improve performance in global markets such as food and dietary supplements, personal care, feed, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, automotive, paints, electrical and electronics, life protection, alternative energy and bio-based materials. DSM¡¦s

More information can be found at www.dsm.com

Ophthalmologists Offer Sight-Saving Eye Care to Prevent Blindness

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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EyeCare America promotes vision loss prevention in U.S. through no out of pocket-cost eye exams and care

According to the World Health Organization, nearly 180 million people suffer from blindness or visual impairment globally, yet 75 percent of blindness could be prevented or treated with sight-saving eye care. In observance of World Blindness Awareness Month, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, urges the public to make eye exams and care a top priority to maintain their healthy vision.

A variety of problems are responsible for blindness around the world, and the leading causes of blindness and vision loss in the United States are age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataracts, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. More than two-thirds of visually impaired adults in the U.S. are age 65 or older. The number of Americans with age-related eye disease is expected to double within the next three decades unless something is done to reverse the trend.

To better prevent blindness in the U.S., EyeCare America encourages seniors to visit www.eyecareamerica.org to find out if they qualify for an eye exam and up to one year of care at no out-of-pocket cost. EyeCare America matches eligible patients age 65 and older with an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor – who will provide a comprehensive medical eye examination.

“Regular eye exams are imperative to detect and treat eye diseases and prevent serious vision loss,” said Richard P. Mills, M.D., chairman of EyeCare America. “This is especially true for people age 65 and older who are at increased risk for eye diseases. That’s why EyeCare America is so focused on providing access to eye care, and we hope that fewer people will suffer from preventable causes of blindness as a result.”

EyeCare America is made possible through the generous support of the Knights Templar Foundation, Genentech and Alcon. To see if you or a loved one is eligible, visit the online referral center at www.eyecareamerica.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

Dr. Quinn Pauly Joins Premier Care at Renown Medical Group

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Dr. Quinn Pauly Joins Premier Care at Renown Medical Group

To help meet the need of patients in northern Nevada seeking more convenience and greater access to their primary care physician, Renown Medical Group is pleased to announce the addition of Quinn Pauly, M.D. as a new Premier Care physician.

Dr. Pauly is board certified in family medicine. He received his medical degree from the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine and completed his residency at Natividad Medical Center in Salinas, Calif.

The Premier Care Program, first introduced to the region through Renown Health last October, offers patients greater access to their primary care physician beyond traditional scheduled office visits. The program is based on a national trend and is made possible through a reduced practice size.

“Patients are requesting enhanced access and expanded personalized care,” said Larry Trilops, vice president of Ambulatory Services at Renown Health. “This program allows us to meet customer demand.”

What’s the difference?
Renown Medical Group offers same or next day appointments with your doctor if he’s available or another doctor, within Renown’s Medical Group consisting of more than 80 providers and 15 locations, if he’s not.

In contrast, the Premier Care program offers more access through a reduced practice size. With monthly membership fees (not covered by insurance) ranging from $35 – $55, you may communicate directly with your primary care physician 24/7, including weekends.

“My focus has always been to take time to listen to my patients so I can attend to their healthcare needs thoroughly,” Dr. Pauly said. “I enjoy getting to know my patients and their families and strive to give my patients personalized, compassionate care”.

Key Premier Care Benefits include:
• A smaller, low volume practice.
• Convenient appointments with your dedicated Premier Care physician with little to no waiting guaranteed.
• Online communication directly with your physician, regarding scheduled appointments, sick visits or general medical advice, with a response within 24 hours, seven days per week.
• Extended office time for appointments.

For more information about Premier Care, please visit renown.org/premiercare or call 775-982-8265.

About Renown Medical Groups
Renown Medical Group has more than 80 providers at 15 locations including Reno, Sparks, Fernley and Silver Springs.

Earlier this year, Renown announced awards that recognized two Renown Medical Group sites for initiatives for excellence in patient quality. In 2010, Renown became the first NCQA recognized Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) in Nevada, and in 2011, Renown became the fourth organization in the country to be recognized as a Level III PCMH under the new 2011 standards.

Renown Medical Group physicians provide preventive care and health education for all ages and treat most common illnesses and injuries including colds, flu, and aches and pains. They also coordinate their patients’ medical care including checkups, immunizations, referrals to specialists, lab and x-ray services and hospital admissions. Physicians see patients by scheduled appointment. Medical Group locations accept most insurance plans, including Hometown Health, UnitedHealthcare, Anthem Blue Cross/Blue Shield, Cigna, Great West, Coventry/First Health, Humana, Principal, Tricare and Medicare.

For added convenience, Renown Medical Group is the only primary care provider in the region that offers a secure, online venue for patients to manage their healthcare. With MyChart, patients can schedule and keep track of appointments, obtain certain test results and request prescription refills 24 hours a day. To sign up, ask a Medical Assistant for your access code at your next office visit. Same-day appointments are available by calling 982-5000, Monday through Thursday between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m., and Fridays between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. For more information, visit renown.org/medicalgroup.

Renown Health News Update – October 2012

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Renown Health News Update – October 2012
Renown Health is committed to providing media with the latest news and events, national health trends and observances. Subject matter experts are available to discuss the following topics. Please contact Dan Davis at 775-982-6370 or ddavis2@renown.org to schedule an interview. Photos and video can also be made available.

INSIDE RENOWN HEALTH
• Pinterest – Renown Health has launched a Pinterest page featuring boards like Kidtastic Art, No Place Like Home and Passion for Purple. Renown’s Motivated Mommies board features pins from healthy and active moms who maintain a balance between work, parenting and self. If you know someone who fits this description, nominate them to participate by sending an email to support@renown.org.
• Flu Shots Available – As winter begins, so will an increase in cold and flu sicknesses. To keep from catching the flu virus, people should protect themselves with flu shots. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that everyone six months and older get a flu vaccine each year. A Renown representative is available to speak about ways to prevent the flu virus and other methods to keep from getting sick.
• Komen Race for the Cure – Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer and the fifth most common cause of death. To help spread awareness and raise funds, Renown Health’s team Renown Racers will raise money and participate in the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. Renown also offers preventative measures for women in the community. Screening and self breast exams are imperative to all women and should be discussed with a doctor. A medical expert is available to talk about the importance of early detection.

NATIONAL TRENDS LOCALIZED
• Halloween Tips and Tricks – As Halloween approaches, parents should prepare for a safe and healthy evening of trick or treating. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest offering nutritious snacks, limiting the number of treats children eat and ensuring that costumes and makeup are safe for children to wear. A Renown representative can discuss ways to make this Halloween night safe and fun for kids.
• Survival from Heart Attacks on the Rise – Death due to heart attacks is on the decline in the United States. Some doctors believe this trend is due to changes in healthcare and increases in medical technology. At Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health, leading edge physicians and technology help community members stay healthy and recover quickly if heart problems occur. A Renown representative is available to discuss ways to prevent heart attacks and to improve survival chances if one occurs.
• Paleo Diet – The Paleolithic Diet and other elimination diets like it have become increasingly popular as a way to lose weight quickly. Yet, once an individual stops dieting, he or she is likely to gain back most of the weight lost. A Renown representative is available to discuss more effective ways to lose weight and keep it off.

IMPORTANT HEALTH DATES/OBSERVANCES
• National Health Education Week – National Health Education Week is Oct. 15 to Oct. 19. This celebration focuses national attention on a major public health issue. This year’s health issue is “Adolescent Health: Planting Seeds for a Healthier Generation,” which aims to improve the health and future of America’s youth. A Renown representative is available to discuss ways to keep children healthy both physically and mentally.
• National Physical Therapy Month – October is dedicated to recognizing the important roles of those medical professionals who keep us moving. At the CARF accredited Renown Rehabilitation Hospital, physicians and physical therapists provide quality care to patients helping them to get back to their lives. A Renown Rehab representative can discuss how physical therapy helps people return to the quality of life they desire.
• Respiratory Care Week – Respiratory Care Week is Oct. 21 to Oct. 27. The week is dedicated to respiratory care professionals, and it is designed to bring awareness to the lung diseases like CDP and asthma. At Renown, the department of Respiratory Care Services dedicates itself to patients ensuring they receive the treatment necessary to manage their diseases. A Renown representative is available to discuss ways to manage respiratory diseases and treatment options available at Respiratory Care Services.

City Of Las Vegas November 2012 Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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City Of Las Vegas November 2012
Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle! Most facilities are closed Nov. 12, 22 and 23 for holiday observance.

“Souper” Family Swim Day (all ages)
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Cost: One can of soup or other canned goods If you bring more than one item, you will receive an additional one-day pass to use any day during open swim.
Municipal Pool, 431 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6309.
No school — come to the pool! Canned goods will be donated to a local food bank. Regular fees apply without donation.

E! Club (ages 6-13)
Friday, Nov. 16, 6 to 9 p.m.
Cost: $25 per child.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Parents can enjoy a night on the town while children enjoy a fun evening of activities.

Ward 4 Free Holiday Movie in the Park (all ages)
Friday, Nov. 30, 6:30 p.m.
Police Memorial Park, 3250 Metro Academy Way.
Enjoy the family movie, “The Grinch,” featuring Jim Carrey, as well as free holiday crafts, hot chocolate, candy canes, popcorn and cookies, while supplies last. Get your picture taken with the Grinch for free.
Please dress warmly and bring a blanket or chair to sit on; movie will be outside on the grass.

Adaptive Recreation
Adaptive Cycle Club (all ages)
Saturday, Nov. 3, 9 to 11 a.m. or 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Cost: $2 per person.
Wayne Bunker Family Park, 7351 W. Alexander Road, at Tenaya Way.
Call (702) 229-4796 to reserve your spot in the early or late session. Adaptive cycles provided.

Project D.I.R.T. Tent Camping (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Saturday-Sunday, Nov. 10-11, 11 a.m. Saturday to 11 a.m. Sunday. Advance registration required.
Cost: $30 per person.
Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road, (702) 229-8100.
Meet at Floyd Lamb Park to enjoy tent camping, hiking and fishing. Call (702) 229-4796 for registration and information. Cost includes meals and tent. Bring your own sleeping bag.
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Paralympic Sport Free Activity Nights (kindergarten-grade 12)
Wednesday, Nov. 14, 5 to 8 p.m.
Rancho High School, 1900 Searles Ave.
Register at main school entrance. Call (702) 229-4796 or e-mail jfoster@lasvegasnevada.gov for additional information and locations.

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed staff development days and holidays.
Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Call (702) 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence.

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m. Closed Nov. 6, 12, 22-23.
Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Participants will enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

Wheelchair Athletes Open Gym (high school-adult)
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., excluding Nov. 22.
Fee: $2 per practice.
Fremont Middle School Gymnasium, 1100 E. Saint Louis Ave.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Wheelchair Basketball Practice (high school-adult)
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. No practice Nov. 22.
Fee: $20 per person.
Fremont Middle School Gymnasium, 1100 E. Saint Louis Ave.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Quad Rugby Team Practice (high school-adult)
Fridays, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. No practice Nov. 23.
Fee: $20 monthly
Chuck Minker Sports Complex, 275 N. Mojave Rd.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

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Blindness and Vision Loss Spike by 23 Percent in the U.S.

September 24, 2012 by · Comments Off on Blindness and Vision Loss Spike by 23 Percent in the U.S.
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

American Academy of Ophthalmology Urges Seniors to Save their Sight through Prevention and Early Detection

Blindness and vision impairment are on the rise in the United States. A recent report by Prevent Blindness America indicates that, since the year 2000, incidence of blindness and vision impairment has increased by 23 percent among Americans age 40 and older.[i] However, most blindness in this country is preventable with proper eye care. The American Academy of Ophthalmology and EyeCare America urge Americans to get regular eye exams to better prevent and detect sight-stealing eye diseases.

Rising rates of age-related eye diseases and conditions are largely to blame for the increase in vision loss. Four of the most common causes of vision loss are diabetic retinopathy, where blood vessels in the retina swell or become blocked due to diabetes; age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a breakdown of the eye’s macula; glaucoma, an eye disease that damages the optic nerve; and cataracts, in which the eye’s lens becomes clouded. These conditions have shown a marked increase over the past 12 years:
• The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy increased by 89 percent.
• The frequency of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) increased by 25 percent.
• The incidence of glaucoma increased by 22 percent.
• The number of people affected by cataracts increased by 19 percent.[ii]
As baby-boomers continue to age, the incidence of age-related eye disease is also expected to continue to increase. Currently, people age 80 and older constitute only 8 percent of the population, but account for 69 percent of all cases of blindness.[iii] Early detection and treatment by an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor – may help prevent and in some cases, such as cataracts, even reverse vision loss.

Many seniors age 65 and older may qualify for an eye exam and up to 1 year of care at no out-of-pocket-cost through EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. EyeCare America matches qualifying patients age 65 and older with an ophthalmologist who provides a comprehensive medical eye examination. EyeCare America is co-sponsored by the Knights Templar Eye Foundation, Inc, with additional support from Alcon. To see if you or a loved one is eligible, visit the online referral center at www.eyecareamerica.org.

“Regular eye exams are imperative to detect and treat eye diseases and prevent serious vision loss,” said Richard P. Mills, M.D., chairman of EyeCare America. “This is especially true for people age 65 and older who are at increased risk for eye diseases. That’s why EyeCare America is so focused on providing access to eye care, and we hope that fewer people will suffer from preventable causes of blindness as a result.”

To learn more about EyeCare America or to find out if you or a loved one qualifies for the program, visit www.eyecareamerica.org. Learn more about eye diseases and conditions, and keeping your eyes healthy at www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® public education program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision, by providing the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. Visit www.geteyesmart.org to learn more.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. Since its inception, EyeCare America has helped more than 1.7 million people. More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging Launches InvestigAge for Aging Services & Seniors Housing Industry

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Mather LifeWays announces the launch of a new online experts forum for the seniors housing/aging services industry, called InvestigAge.

Developed by Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging, InvestigAge is anticipated to be a key resource for senior living/aging services providers, professionals, developers, and investors, as well as for researchers and other stakeholders with interests in the field of aging. InvestigAge will highlight current findings and trends impacting housing and services for older adults.

The InvestigAge Editorial Board, consisting of 12 recognized industry leaders and researchers, will provide brief summaries of original research papers and reports.

Different than an abstract, which merely describes overall findings of a study, the annotated summaries will include a synopsis of the research, as well as a critical evaluation or analysis to help the reader interpret and apply the results.

“We see InvestigAge as a synergistic means to bridge scholarly research and industry practice,” said Linda Hollinger-Smith, PhD, RN, FAAN, vice president, Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging, who led the development and implementation of the launch.
“InvestigAge is just what the field needs around evidence-based research,” said Larry Minnix, president and CEO, LeadingAge. “We value this new tool for disseminating valuable research to senior living providers who are looking for a comprehensive resource to help inform their strategies and move our industry forward.”

Users will have access to InvestigAge online at any time with a login and password; in addition, they will receive a monthly e-newsletter highlighting new articles.

“InvestigAge will bring together key research, reports, and other original resources in a way that will be accessible in one place — rather than requiring extensive online or library searches,” said Mary Leary, CEO and president, Mather LifeWays.

Given Mather LifeWays’ strong reputation as a source of information about aging well through its successful 10-year history of the consumer-oriented Aging in Action online website and e-newsletter, with more than 13,000 subscribers, this highly-anticipated resource will benefit the aging services professional field as well. For more information, or to register for InvestigAge, visit online at www.investigage.com.

Based in Evanston, Illinois, Mather LifeWays www.matherlifeways.com is a unique, non-denominational not-for-profit organization founded 70 years ago to serve the needs of older adults. Dedicated to developing and implementing Ways to Age WellSM, Mather LifeWays creates programs, places, and residences for today’s young-at-heart older adults. Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging is the research and education arm of Mather LifeWays, and serves as a thought leader in the field of aging by designing and conducting national applied research, pilot demonstration projects, and education initiatives.

CONTACT: Lori Keenan, +1-847-902-2905, Lori@SmarthinkingPR.com

Renown Health Board Member and Volunteer Recognized with NHA Awards

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Lawson Fox, Renown Health board member, and Dinah O’Brien, Renown Health volunteer, were presented with awards at the Nevada Hospital Association (NHA) annual Membership Meeting Awards Luncheon late last week at the Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe. Fox received the Award for Trustee Excellence and O’Brien receive the Excellence in Volunteerism Award.

The two awards recognize one urban hospital and one rural hospital trustee and volunteer who have made an exemplary commitment to his/her hospital and contributions to improve his/her hospital’s service to its patients and community. Since their establishment, these awards have recognized a number of distinguished health care leaders throughout Nevada.

Fox has served on Renown Health boards for more than 8 years. During his tenure, he has overseen the implementation of quality tracking mechanisms for delivering quality care in the emergency departments of Renown Regional, Renown South Meadows Medical Center and the health network in general. In addition, his efforts of monitoring employee survey data have helped to provide consistent exceptional patient experiences.

O’Brien has been the volunteer coordinator of the Pet Therapy Program at Renown Health since the Healing Arts Program began more than 16 years ago. She is also a Volunteer Patient Visitor, a program that began in September of 2011 designed to empower volunteers to help with the patient experience.
In addition, she considers her years at the main reception desk at Renown Regional among her most significant contributions.

“Lawson and Dinah’s support throughout the community is truly a gift to northern Nevada. They are tremendous assets here at Renown,” said Jim Miller, president and CEO of Renown Health. “These honors are well deserved and both Lawson and Dinah should be commended for the genuine difference they have made and the many lives they have touched.”

In addition to individual awards, both Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center received NHA awards for quality. These awards mean medical professionals working at Renown South Meadows and Renown Regional provided treatment known to get the best results for patients.

Formally established in 1960 and incorporated in 1971, the Nevada Hospital Association (NHA) is a not-for-profit, statewide trade association representing 100 percent of Nevada’s acute care hospitals along with psychiatric, rehabilitation and other specialty hospitals as well as health-related agencies and organizations throughout the state. Allied with the American Hospital Association, NHA is an independent organization headquartered in Reno, Nevada. As a membership organization, NHA serves as a statewide resource and leader in promoting public understanding of, and support for, the health care system serving Nevada’s communities. In addition, NHA serves its members by providing education, information and representation and by serving as a catalyst in collaborative efforts to produce quality, adequately financed health care in Nevada.

Active Aging Week

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events 

Montara Meadows, an independent senior living community in Las Vegas, welcomes area seniors to participate in free national Active Aging Week seminar on Sept. 25.

Montara Meadows, www.montarameadows.com, is located at 3150 E. Tropicana Avenue in Las Vegas.

Active Aging Week, founded by the International Council on Active Aging (www.icaa.cc), promotes healthy lifestyles for seniors through a variety of enriching, educational, and inspiring events. The 2012 theme is “Many journeys, many destinations” and will be held throughout the country in late September.

• Tuesday, Sept. 25 at 10 a.m.: Let’s Talk Seniors® seminar on healthy aging

To RSVP, or to learn more, please call Montara Meadows at 702-435-3150.

*Active Aging Week is a registered trademark of International Council on Active Aging. Holiday Retirement is not affiliated with any health care provider and does not provide or coordinate any care services. Residents are welcome to obtain services from any provider of their choice.

Introducing the Circle of Life Hospice Foundation Thrift and Gift Boutique Theater

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General, Press-Media Releases 

Circle of Life Hospice Foundation Thrift and Gift Boutique Theater

Established in the Fall of 1999, Circle of Life Hospice seeks to become one of Nevada’s most respected human services organizations. Their aim is to assist patients with their human needs, their relationship with those they love, their greater power, their spirit and themselves.

It is the cause of the Circle of Life Hospice Foundation, the non-profit “sister” organization to the Circle of Life Hospice, to raise funds through charitable giving and charitable events necessary to improve end-of-life care through research, education, services and facilities that would otherwise be unavailable. Circle of Life Hospice Foundation is grounded in the belief that life and death are but one. Death is a natural part of life and as with any part of life, dying is a time for love, personal growth and healing. Because of the nature of hospice care, these efforts have been primarily focused on those who are terminally ill and the loved ones who support them. It is the goal of the Circle of Life Hospice Foundation to extend the services and philosophy provided in hospice care to the entire community.

The Circle of Life Hospice Foundation Thrift and Gift is a not-for-profit 501C3 tax exempt organization devoted to providing information, education, and conscientious conversation on hospice and other mind-body-spirit healing services within our community and throughout the world. It is the vision of Founder Deb Girard, and with assistance from Gayle Johnson, Director of Operations, to equip Northern Nevada with a comfortable way for loved ones to let go of “gently used” belongings of those who have passed. Revenue generated by the resale of such items will be given directly back to the community through coordination with other local support services. Additionally, the Circle of Life Hospice Foundation Thrift and Gift Boutique Theatre is a community center hosting a local artists’ gallery, a gathering place for intentional social interaction, theatrical educational performances and health resource classes.

Learn how you can help with goods, services, volunteer opportunities, and your tax deductible donations by calling 775-622-1759 or visit the website www.colgift.org

Online press release:  http://www.pr.com/press-release/443442

Cleveland Clinic September calendar of social services and education programs

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

September calendar of social services and education programs for individuals, caregivers and family members impacted by brain diseases. All of these programs are open to the community and offered free of charge.

Healthy Aging: Up2Me – New Session Begins on September 28, 12:30 pm – 3:00 pm
Join us for this proven six week program helping caregivers and individuals with chronic diseases set goals and develop skills for success. Free and open to the public, advance registration required. Contact Susan, 483-6023, hirschs2@ccf.org

Lunch & Learn
Wednesdays, 12 noon – 1 pm
888 W. Bonneville Avenue, Las Vegas
Bring your lunch, drink & dessert provided; open to the public

Sept 5: What You Need to Know Before a Hospital Stay, Rose O’Donnell-Barker, RN BSN, Valley Hospital Medical Center
A hospital stay can be stressful for anyone. For those with Alzheimer’s or other memory disorders, being in an unfamiliar environment presents unique challenges. Learn strategies to address issues that can arise for patients and caregivers during a hospital stay.

September 12: Understanding Grief & Loss, Esther Langston, PhD, Professor Emeritus, UNLV School of Social Work
This presentation will explore grief and loss over the life span and increase our understanding of how we are affected as individuals and caregivers.

Sept 19: Tea Time & Spices of Life, Kristopher Hightower, Keep Memory Alive Café
A conversation about teas and spices of the world and their benefits. Tasting and samples!

Sept 26: Special Social Service Programs: CarePRO & Health Aging: Up2Me, Susan Solorzano, Pam Fine & Patti Nixon
Join us for this presentation on two special social service programs which have been proven to be effective: 1) CarePRO which provides education and support for dementia caregivers and 2) Healthy Aging: Up2Me, a 6 week program helping caregivers and individuals with chronic illness to set goals and develop skills for success.

Cleveland Museum of Art Series
Dynamic conversations about art through videoconferencing
All art education programs are held at the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health Library, 888 W. Bonneville Avenue and open to the public.

Ancient American Art: The Aztec and their Ancestors
September 4, 11:00 am – 12:00 noon
Learn about the art of selected cultures in ancient Mesoamerica. Ceramic, gold and stone objects will be examined to shed light on religion and rulership among the Aztec, Maya and other cultures.

Self Portraits
September 18, 11:00 am – 12:00 noon
Our self image influences many elements including our perspective, decision-making and daily experiences. We will explore ways in which artists from Rembrandt to Picasso represent themselves through their personal statements, historical moments and other approaches.

Contact Susan Hirsch, 483-6023 or hirschs2@ccf.org for additional information.
Support Groups
MEMORY LOSS SUPPORT GROUP
Wednesdays, 1 pm-2:30 pm
Meetings are held weekly for adult members who provide care for loved ones with memory loss.
Contact: Donna Munic-Miller 483-6035, municd@ccf.org
PARKINSON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP: September 11, 12 noon -1 pm
(Held the 2nd Tuesday of every month)
Christopher Borsellino, MA Ed of Deaf, MS/CCC-SLP from Speech Logic is guest speaker. Early stage group and adult family members meet together in the Library.
Contact: Jennifer 483-6036, gayanj@ccf.org

HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP: September 25, 12 noon -1 pm
(Held the 4th Tuesday of every month)
Separate groups for gene positive individuals (asymptomatic and early stage) and adult family members.
Contact: Jenna 483-6054, clifforj@ccf.org

Medical Alert Provider Rescue Alert of California(TM) Announces Improved Senior Blog Rescue Alert of California

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

Medical Alert Provider Rescue Alert of California(TM) Announces Improved Senior Blog
Rescue Alert of California™, has announced a newly updated senior blog in an effort to improve the user-experience for their network of seniors and caregivers.

Rescue Alert Medical Alert System
We want to provide the vital information on eldercare and senior health in an easy-to-find, user friendly way so that more people benefit from this valuable information.
Rancho Santa Margarita, California (PRWEB) August 23, 2012

Medical alert provider Rescue Alert of California,™ in a continued effort to provide helpful resources and information on a variety of health and safety topics for seniors, has announced a restructure of it’s senior blog. Rescue Alert of California’s™ enhanced blog is one place to find information on everything from changes in Medicare to flu shots to retirement.
“Our website is an important tool for us and for our customers,” said Lindsey Brewster of Rescue Alert of California™. “we want to provide the vital information on eldercare and senior health in an easy-to-find, user friendly way so that more people benefit from this valuable information.”
Rescue Alert of California™ has improved its senior blog by adding more resources, in a variety of categories such as senior safety, health, technology, medical alert systems, caregiver resources, and senior assistance. There is now more content, and easier navigation, so that seniors and caregivers can find what they want to know with ease and efficiency.
About Rescue Alert of California™:
Rescue Alert of California™ has been enabling senior citizens to live safe, happy and independent lives through education and quality medical alert systems for over a decade. They offer EMD certified responders available 24 hours a day, and the peace of mind that comes with knowing that help is available at the push of a button.
To view the resources available for seniors and caregivers, visit our website:
http://rescuealertofca.com
To join a supportive network of senior resources and experts in the field, follow us on Twitter @rescuealertofca, or “Like” us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/RescueAlertofCA

Community Partners for Better Health 8th Annual Choose and Move Festival

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

Community Partners for Better Health (CPBH) is hosting the 8th Annual Choose and Move Festival on Saturday, September 8, 2012, from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., at the Doolittle Community Center, 1950 North J Street, Las Vegas, Nevada. We invite you to join us as an exhibitor at this educational, interactive, and fun event. The festival has proven to be a very popular event for health care providers, health care agencies and Southern Nevada residents. With more than 200 participants last year, we anticipate new additions will draw over 300 people to the event.

The festival encourages our community to adopt healthier lifestyles especially when it comes to regular physical activity and selecting more nutritious foods. Festival planners include the Southern Nevada Health District, City of North Las Vegas, Governor’s Office for Consumer Health Assistance, Clark County Fire Department, 100 Black Men-Las Vegas Chapter, Las Vegas Metro Police Department, American Lung Association, HealthInsight, Nathan Adelson Hospice and numerous other community stakeholders. The festival will feature a variety of free and low-cost health screenings, healthy food demonstrations and information, and free physical activity classes including African dance, belly dance, Latin dance, hula, and Zumba. Additionally, we are working with Jump for Joy Foundation to offer physical activities for our younger attendees.

Attached you will find an exhibitor registration form. We truly appreciate your consideration to participate in the event. We believe that you will find involvement beneficial to your organization’s mission and to the community you serve. You are a valuable resource in helping our community citizens live healthy lives and make positive health choices. The planning committee is developing a strategy to engage attendees more fully with vendors. Look for more on this in July.

If you have questions, please call Community Partners for Better Health, at 702- 256-2724 or Jackie Knudsen, Choose & Move Co-Chairman at 702-755-9035 or email: jacqueline.knudsen@emeritus.com

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 – Recreation, Adaptive Recreation, Sports & Community Special Events

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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City Of Las Vegas October 2012 – Recreation, Adaptive Recreation, Sports & Community Special Events

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle! Most facilities are closed Oct. 26 for holiday observance.

Ward 5 Coffee With The Councilman
Thursday, Oct. 4, 9 to 10 a.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Starbucks, 751 N. Rancho Drive, at Bonanza Road.
Join Ward 5 Councilman Ricki Y. Barlow for coffee and conversation about your ideas to improve Ward 5 and Las Vegas.

Ward 4 Walk & Roll For ALS (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 13, 6 a.m. registration. 5K begins 8 a.m., Walk begins 8:15 a.m.
Cost: $25 minimum donation to participate in walk; $35 for runners ages 18+; $25 runners ages 5-17; free for under age 5.
Police Memorial Park, 3250 Metro Academy Way, at Cheyenne Avenue.
Sign up your team at http://als.kintera.org/WalknRoll. Call (702) 777-0500 for more information.

Ward 2 Trunk or Treat Car Show and Free Kid’s Halloween Festival (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public. There is a fee for vendors and car show participants.
Veterans Memorial Leisure Services Center, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.
Please join Councilman Bob Beers for a fun day filled with music provided by DJ Brando, along with Halloween activities for the kids, including craft projects, costume contest, games, face painting and jump houses. Kids have the opportunity to “trunk or treat” at the cars decorated for Halloween in the car show. Help pick the spookiest! All makes, models and years welcome in the car show. Vendors are welcome. The event is sponsored by Ward 2 Councilman Bob Beers.

Contact John Bear at 229-2420 or e-mail to jbear@lasvegasnevada.gov, if you want to register your car in the show, become a vendor at the event, or volunteer to help. Early registration for the car show is $25 and is due by Thursday, Oct. 4. You also can register a car in the car show on the event date for $35. The vendor fee is $25, which includes a table.
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Free Ward 6 Shredding Event
Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to noon.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive.
Bring your documents that need to be shredded. Complimentary shredding takes place in the Centennial Hills Community Center Active Adult Center parking lot. Limit of five boxes per vehicle. This is a safe and convenient way to get rid of old documents.

Movie at the E! (all ages)
Friday, Oct. 19, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
East Las Vegas Community Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Enjoy a family movie in the plaza. This will be a perfect chance for the family to relax and enjoy a safe and special night under the stars. Bring low folding chairs for your comfort.

E! Club (ages 6-13)
Friday, Oct. 19, 6 to 9 p.m.
Cost: $25 per child.
East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Avenue, (702) 229-1515.
Parents can enjoy a night on the town while children enjoy a fun evening of activities.

Ward 1 Trunk or Treat (all ages)
Wednesday, Oct. 24, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
Anthem Institute Parking Lot, 2320 S. Rancho Drive, at Sahara Avenue.
Enjoy a community celebration with trick-or-treating, jump house and more, hosted by Anthem Institute and co-sponsored by the city of Las Vegas.

Howling Halloween Carnival (all ages)
Thursday, Oct. 25, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
Doolittle Community Center, 1950 N. J St., (702) 229-6374.
There will be a costume contest, games, drawings and candy for the kids. There will also be a Haunted Hallway designed to frighten all who enter.

Las Vegas Mayor’s Cup International Tournament
Friday-Sunday, Oct. 26-28.
Free for spectators. Advance registration required for teams.
Bettye Wilson Soccer Complex, 7353 Eugene Ave., and other parks.
For teams ages 8-15. This soccer tournament is co-hosted by the city of Las Vegas and the Downtown Las Vegas Soccer Club. This top-ranked event drew teams from 11 different states, as well as Canada and Mexico last year. Teams are guaranteed three games. Individual awards are offered for 1st and 2nd place. The entry fee is only $515 for U8-U10 and $735 for U11-U15. Entry deadline is Sept. 6. For more information, go online to www.lvmayorscup.com.
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Adaptive Recreation

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed staff development days and holidays.
Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Call (702) 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence.

Wheelchair Athletes Open Gym (high school-adult)
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., through December.
Fee: $2 per practice.
Fremont Middle School Gymnasium, 1100 E. Saint Louis Ave.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m. Closed Oct. 12, 26.
Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.
East Las Vegas Community Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Participants enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

Adaptive Cycle Club (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 6, 9 to 11 a.m. or 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Cost: $2 per person.
Wayne Bunker Family Park, 7351 W. Alexander Road, at Tenaya Way.
Call (702) 229-4796 to reserve your spot in the early or late session. Adaptive cycles provided.

Helter Skelter Quad Rugby Tournament
Oct. 12-14, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday.
Free for spectators.
Dula Gymnasium, 441 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6307.
Six teams from across North America will compete for medals for first through third place. Teams will include: Las Vegas Sin City Skulls; Northern California Quake; Sierra Strom from Reno/Sacramento; University of Arizona Wildcats; Boise Idaho Bombers; and the Ottawa Stingers from Canada. Spectators are welcome. Call (702) 229-4796 or e-mail jfoster@lasvegasnevada.gov for more information.
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20th Annual Disability Awareness Day (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Free admission and lunch.
Pioneer Park, 7449 Braswell Drive.
Attend a free “Work Incentives Seminar on Ticket to Work & Employment for SSI/SSDI Beneficiaries Age 14 to 64.” This seminar will be held from 10 to 11:30 a.m. in conjunction with Disability Awareness Day. Also enjoy live entertainment, a free wheelchair safety check and a free lunch. Call (702) 889-4216 to reserve your space.

Free Paralympic Sport Activity Nights (kindergarten-grade 12)
Wednesday, Oct. 17, 5 to 8 p.m.
Rancho High School, 1900 Searles Ave.
Register at main school entrance. Call (702) 229-4796 or e-mail jfoster@lasvegasnevada.gov for additional information and locations.

Quad Rugby Team Practice (high school-adult)
Friday, Oct. 19, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Minker Sports Complex, 275 N. Mojave Road, (702) 229-6563.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Sunrise Health Events

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

Sunrise Hospital:

• Lunch and Learn: Effective Nutrition for Wellness
• Tuesday, September 11, 2012 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Located at the Sunrise Hospital H2U Office:
3131 LaCanada Street, suite 107
Las Vegas, NV 89109
Registration is required for this FREE, informational event. Please call 702-233-5300 to register.
• Physician Dinner Lecture on the Signs and Symptoms of a Stroke
• Tuesday, September 25, 2012 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Sunrise Hospital Auditorium
3186 S. Maryland Pkwy
Las Vegas, NV 89109
Registration is required for this FREE, informational event. Please call 702-233-5300 to register.

Mountain View Hospital:

• Lunch and Learn: Prostate Health and YOU – Robotics vs. Radiation
• Thursday, September 13, 2012 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
H2U MountainView Office, located at:
3150 N. Tenaya Way, suite 114
Las Vegas, NV 89128
Registration is required for this FREE, informational event. Please call 702-233-5474 to register.
• Total Joint Patient Education Seminar
• Wednesday, September 19, 2012 from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.
• MountainView Hospital First Floor Classroom
3100 N. Tenaya Way
Las Vegas, NV 89128
Registration is required for this FREE, informational event. Please call 702-233-5474 to register.
• Heart Murmur Clinic
• Saturday, September 22, 2012 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
MountainView Medical Office Building, located at:
3150 N. Tenaya Way, suite 140
Las Vegas, NV 89128
• Please wear comfortable, loose clothing for the screening portion of this event.
Registration is required for this FREE, informational event. Please call 702-233-5474 to register.

Southern Hills Hospital:

• Lunch and Learn: Six Keys to Helping Secure Your Financial Future
• Thursday, September 13, 2012 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Southern Hills Hospital First Floor Education Room, located at:
9300 W. Sunset Road
Las Vegas, NV 89148
This event is FREE – registration is required by calling 702-880-2700 at least two days before the event date.
• Dinner with Nathan Adelson Hospice: Understanding Hospice Care
• Tuesday, September 25, 2012 from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Southern Hills Hospital First Floor Education Room
9300 W. Sunset Road
Las Vegas, NV 89148
This event is FREE – registration is required by calling 702-880-2700 at least two days before the event date.

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August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
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The Nevada Senior Guide is your comprehensive resource directory for seniors and those who support them.

Are you looking for something in particular?  

An assisting living facility in a certain area, perhaps?  

Whatever it is, just let us know by filling in the form you see below and we will do our very best to help!

Your Name

Your Email

Your Telephone Number

How can we help you?
* Important Note: If you wish us to send you a physical copy of the Nevada Senior Guide, please provide your postal address, including zip *

 

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COMPLETE SENIOR GUIDE LISTING

Homes

Apartments & Independent

 Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing & Memory Care

Health & Home Care

Services

Leisure


 

The Nevada Senior guide provides information about homes, health, services and leisure activities.

Featuring wonderful health care providers such as Circle of Life:

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The print version of Nevada Senior Guide is free and is available throughout Las Vegas, Henderson, Green Valley, Boulder City, North Las Vegas, Pahrump and Summerlin.

 






The Nevada Senior Guide contains the Senior Services Directory including government and non-profit agencies that offer services to seniors in Nevada. These services include food and housing assistance, transportation for medical appointments and other life enhancing services.

A Level of Care Directory is included to assist in the selection of appropriate services in assisted living faculties.

Previously known as the Las Vegas Senior Guide, Mathis began the publication in 2001 because she recognized the need to inform seniors about services that were available to them. It is distributed in Von’s Grocery Stores, Whole Foods Grocery Stores, all libraries and hospitals through-out southern Nevada.

 


 

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Our Mission Statement:  To Publish the most popular, user friendly, visible, results-based, free publication & website

The publication is filled with informative articles that relate to Senior issues including health care, home health and leisure activities.

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“Seniors are a unique group because they have so many needs that aren’t met as easily as those of the younger generations,” Mathis stated. “They are the largest percentage of our country’s population and are always looking for resources and good deals, no matter what their income level. The directory is also useful to baby boomers who can use it to find resources for their aging parents.”

“I do not know of any other advertisement that gives you so much for the price and not only produces results, but also has a staff that goes out of its way to help their advertisers through education and networking. Megan and her staff WANT you to be successful. To not advertise in Nevada Senior Guide is like giving your competition referrals.”  – Mark A. Simmons, QDCS, Exploring Life Transitions, Memory Care Consultant

 

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Nevada-Senior-Guide Referral Directory – Northern Nevada

Better Business Bureau of Northern Nevada

4834 Sparks Blvd. Ste. 102, Sparks, NV 89436

(775) 322-0657, www.reno.bbb.org

BBB helps consumers find business & charities                 they can trust. Call for additional help.

 

Nevada Rural Housing

Weatherization Assistance Program,

Section 8 Info. Call for hours and directions.

775-887-1795, Carson City

 

Parkinson’s of Nevada – Veterans Hospital

975 Kirman Ave., Reno, NV 89502

1-775-328-1715 OR

1-888-838-6256 x 1715

Referrals, Support group info, Counselling,                       Education programs

 

Veteran Affairs of NV

1-800-827-1000 – Reno

1-800-273-8255 Opt 1 Hotline

Suicide Prevention, Military. www.Va.gov

Nevada-Senior-Guide Multiple Services Directory – Northern Nevada

Access to Healthcare Networks

Discounted Dental and Vision Program

4001 S. Virginia St., Ste F, Reno, NV 89502

(775) 284-8989, 1-877-385-2345 HELP

Affordable Dental and Vision Care, SHIP,

Medical, Massage therapy

www.accesstohealthcare.org

Catholic Charities of N. Nevada & St. Vincent                     Program

500 E. 4th St., Reno, NV 89512, 775-322-7073

Dining room free lunch, 11:30am – 12:30pm.
No Sundays. Pantry, Housing assistance,
Assist low income residents. Call for

additional resources.

 

Community Health Program/Urban Indians                            Outreach

745 W. Moana Ln., Ste. 375, Reno, NV 89502

775-788-7600

Education, Behavior and domestic violence                           counseling, AA and substance abuse

programs. Calll for info.

 

Community Services Agency

1090 E. 8th Street, Reno, NV 89512

(775) 786-6023, Ext. 206, www.csareno.org

Weatherization program, work force

programs, food assistance, HeadStart

 

Discounted Healthcare –

www.AccessToHealthcare.org

Discount plan

 

ALS of Nevada

4220 S. Maryland Pkwy., Bldg. B, Ste. 404

Las Vegas, NV 89119, 702-777-0500

Respite, Support Groups. Call for Hours.

 

Easter Seals of Southern Nevada

6200 West Oakey Blvd., Las Vegas, NV 89146

(702) 870-7050, www.eastersealssn.org

Respite Care, Assisted Care,Referral,

Handicap Day Care, Assisted Technology,

Adult Day Services

 

Family Resources

1950 Villanova Dr., Reno, NV 89562

(775) 321-3185, www.Washoe.k12.nu.us

Referrals to counsling. Assist with food                              stamps and energy assistance applications.
Call for appointments and hours.

 

Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada

775-355-0600, Call for additional info

Serving the Native Americans of Nevada,                                ITERC Program, Domestic violence, Native                    workforce, Appellate court assistance, Wick                      Program, Elders Program, HEADSTART

 

Mini-Medi File – REMSA

450 Edison Way, Reno NV 89502

Free portable wallets, including personal                           medical history and emergency contact

information, instruction sheet and

immunization card.

 

Nevada Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)

1820 E. Sahara Ave., Las Vegas, NV 89104

(702) 486-3403, 1-888-838-7305

Medicare fraud and abuse prevention project

Nevada State Contractors Board

9670 Gateway Drive, Ste 100, Reno NV 89521

(775) 688-1141, www.nscb.nv.gov

Regulatory agency promoting quality

construction by Nevada licensed contractors.                   Provides contractor license verifications,

assistance with contractor workmanship

issues and homeowner education

regarding unlicensed contractors.

 

North East Community Center

1301 Valley Rd., Reno, NV 89051

775-334-2262. Senior activities, Call for details

 

Renown Rehabilitation Hospital

1495 Mill St., Reno, NV 89502

775-982-3500 Washoe County

www.renown.org

Inpatient Rehab, Skilled Nursing,

Pain Management/Clinic

 

Senior Companion Program of N. Nevada

& Elvirita Lewis Respite Voucher Program

1380 Greg Street, Ste. 212, Sparks, NV  89431

775-358-2322, Mary Brock, Director

 

Washoe County Senior Law Project

1155 E. 9th Street, Reno, NV 89512

(775) 334-3050 or (775) 284-3491

Legal assistance to persons 60 years & older.

Washoe Residents. Call for hours.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Financial Assistance Directory – Northern Nevada

CARE Chest of Sierra Nevada

7910 N. Virginia Street, Reno, NV 89506

(775) 829-CARE (2273), www.carechest.org

Provides low interest loans for people with

disabilities, assisted technology, medical

equipment, Rx assistance, Independent

Living Program, Call for Additional Referrals,
Wellness education programs

Energy Assistance Program

2527 N. Carson St., #260, Carson City, NV 89706

(775) 684-0731, www.welfare.state.nv.us

Low income – call for info regarding utilities

Financial Guidance Center

3100 Mill Street, #111, Reno, NV 89502

(775) 337-6363 Toll free 1-800-451-4505

www.ccanevada.org. Assisting with financial                        goals through counseling & education. Call for hrs.

 

Reno District Welfare Office

4095 S. Virginia St., Reno, NV 89502

775-684-7200. Call for Info

Senior Law Project-Washoe County Residents

204 Marsha Ave., Ste. 101, Reno NV 89509                            (775) 284-3491 Call for other locations.

Provides services pertaining to consumer                             debt, garnishment, attachment and advice                  regarding small claims actions, Government                                benefits, estate planning, housing issues,                   guardianship, foreclosure assistance, Pro                          Bono program

 

Social Security Administration

1170 Harvard Way, Reno, NV 89502

1-888-808-5481 OR 1-800-772-1213

www.socialsecurity.gov, Call for benefits & hours.

 

The Salvation Army CORPS.

1931 Sutro Street, Reno, NV 89512

(775) 688-4555 Donation pick up service.                               Food, Clothing, Adult Rehab, Job Opportunities

 

The Salvation Army

661 Colorado Street, Carson City, NV 89701

(775) 887-9120

Crisis intervention, disaster response,                                   emergency food, and referral, Social Services

 

Washoe County Assessor’s Office

1001 E. Ninth Street, Bldg. D, Reno, NV 89512

(775) 328-2277, www.co.washoecounty.us

Veterans exempt discount. Disabled Vets,                              Blind Persons and Surviving Spouse

Nevada-Senior-Guide Education Directory – Northern Nevada

Center for Healthy Aging, Larry Weiss, PhD

11 Fillmore Way, Reno, NV 89519

775-376-3210, larry@addinglifetoyears.com

Life Line, Emergency Response & RX Programs,

Provide life span respite training, OASIS                               CATCH, Healthy Habits, Elder Gap

 

Community Health Program/Urban Indians                            Outreach

745 W. Moana Ln., Ste. 375, Reno, NV 89502

1-775-788-7600

Health promotion, AIDS education

 

Continuing Education, UNR

18600 Wedge Pkwy., Reno, NV 89511,

(775) 784-4046. www.olli.unr.edu – Info and                          Locations. Lifelong Learning Institute                            Program for Retirement, Extended studies.

 

Downtown Reno Library

301 South Center St., Reno, NV 89501

775-327-8312. Please call for hours.

 

Moments of Memory, Lynette Schweigert

775-848-4757, momentsofmemory@charter.net

www.momentsofmemory.org. Art classes for                       those with Alzheimer’s & other dementias

 

Nevada Geriatric Education Center

Patricia Swager, M.Ed.

411 W. Second St. / MS #150, Reno, NV  89503

775-327-2285, www.medicine.nevada.edu/ngec

Continued education

 

Truckee Meadows Community College Education

5270 Neil Rd. #216, Reno, NV 89502

(775) 829-9010

Silver College 65+; Computer/Internet,                                Wellness, Creative Writing, Digital Camera’s &           Photography, Call for additional activities

 

Washoe County Senior Center Library

1155 E. 9th Street, Reno, NV 89512

(775) 328-2586. Open Tues-Fri, 9am-1pm

Large print, DVD (No VHS available), computers

Nevada-Senior-Guide Volunteer Opportunities Directory – Southern Nevada

American Diabetes Foundation

702-369-9995, www.diabetes.org/volunteer

Blind Center of Nevada

(702) 642-6000, Call for info

 

Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada

702-382-0721.

Opportunities available for volunteers

 

Clark County Library District

(702) 734-7323 – Looking for volunteers

 

Comfort Hospice Care

6655 W. Sahara, #B 114, LV, NV 89146

Contact – Debbie Gregory. Volunteers to work                  with terminally ill patients and their families

 

DISCOVERY Children’s Museum

(702) 382-3445

www.DiscoveryKids.org

Volunteers help on the museum floor

during school tours and other fun-filled

museum events. Volunteers can also provide                        mentoring and tutoring to our teenage

volunteers. Hrs: 10am-5pm, Sun Noon-5pm

 

Family Home Hospice

8655 S. Eastern, Las Vegas, NV 89123

(702) 560-2853. Varied volunteer

opportunities. Pays standard mileage rate.

 

Foster Grandparent Program Catholic Charities

(702) 382-0721. Volunteers provide mentoring,
tutoring to children in day care centers,                              schools & protective services.

Helping Hands of Henderson

702-616-6554. Volunteers to help with

transportation for seniors to doctor

appointments, grocery shopping and errands

Helping Hands of Vegas Valley

2320 Paseo Del Prado Bldg. B #204

LV, NV 89102, (702) 633-7264, www.hhovv.org

Referral Service, Education, Respite Care,                          Volunteer Transportation, The Pantry,

Wheelchair van available

 

Infinity Hospice Care

6330 S. Jones Blvd., Las Vegas, NV 89118

Contact Nikki Ellis 702-880-7002

Volunteer.lv@infinityhospicecare.com

 

Lend a Hand

(702) 294-2363

Opportunities available for Volunteers

 

Medicare S.H.I.P.

702-486-3478. Receive training in Medicare                          benefits & assist with questions and problems

 

Nevada SMP – SR Medicare Patrol

(702) 486-3403, 1-888-838-7305

Medicare Fraud and abuse prevention project

 

Safe House

(702) 451-4203. Volunteers to help with elder                    abuse & domestic violence

 

Senior Companion Program/Catholic

Charities of Southern Nevada

(702) 382-0721. Volunteers provide

companionship to homebound seniors

 

S. Nevada American Cancer Society

6165 S. Rainbow Blvd., LV, NV 89118

(702) 891-9009. Need drivers to take cancer                        patients to and from treatments. Also, other               opportunities available.

 

The Center

702-733-9800. Volunteers needed for the
information desk, event staffing,

administrative tasks and more.

 

Three Square Food

4190 N. Pecos Rd., Las Vegas, NV 89115

(702) 644-3663. Volunteers welcome

8am-5pm

Nevada-Senior-Guide Transportation Directory – Southern Nevada

American Cancer Society

6165 S. Rainbow Blvd., LV, NV

Provides free rides for cancer patients to and
from treatments. To schedule, call Road to
Recovery Program 1-866-949-1518.

For Emergency: 1-800-227-2345

 

CAT – Ride

600 S. Grand Central Pkwy., LV, NV 89101

Para-Transit (702) 228-4800 or Info (702) 228-7433

Discount Fares, must be 60 and older. 7am-6pm

 

Helping Hands of Henderson

102 E. Lake Mead Pkwy., Henderson, NV 89015

(702) 616-6554. Transportation, Community                          Research, Referrals, Senior Ride Program:                             60+, Henderson Resident

 

Helping Hands of N. Las Vegas

3640 N. 5th St., Ste., 130, N. LV, NV 89032

(702) 649-7853 – To schedule for doctor                               or misc. rides

 

Helping Hands of Vegas Valley

2320 Paseo Del Prado, Bldg. B #204, LV, NV                        89102, (702) 633-7264 x 28, www.hhovv.org

Volunteer Transportation

 

Martin Luther King Senior Center

2420 N. Martin Luther King Blvd., #B Bldg.

N. LV, NV 89032 (702) 636-0064 x 229

Call for details.

 

Senior Lifeline

2309 Renaissance Dr., #B, LV, NV 89119

Next Page »

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!