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elder care | Nevada Senior Guide

MorningStar Senior Living – Nevada Senior Guide

http://www.morningstarseniorliving.com/communities/morningstar-of-sparks/

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At MorningStar, it’s in the air.  In the very chemistry of the place.  You can feel it.  You can see it with your own eyes, every day:  our staff flat out loving our residents, loving them like they do their own moms and dads.

Ken Jaeger, founder of MorningStar, proved his acumen for the senior living industry through 15 years of executive roles, garnering experience in acquisitions, construction and management.

In 2003, an idea began to take shape, a pressing dream to create his own brand of senior living defined by the human touch.  “I wanted to re-create my grandmother’s house, a place where one can go and feel a sense of family.”

Ken had specific designs on how to foster the ultimate environment for the well being of seniors.  Out of these convictions, he established three precepts for MorningStar:  Honor God.  Value All Seniors.  Invest generously in his team.

From his first home in Denver, MorningStar Assisted Living of Littleton, the difference was manifest: all the amenities of a five-star resort infused with the warmth of a real home.

And now, ten years and 12 homes later, MorningStar has become a landmark name in senior living.

From independent living to assisted living, from basic care through Alzheimer’s support, MorningStar’s continuum of service allows residents to extend their stay until a diagnosis calls for 24-hour nursing.  Through Respite Care and Day Programs, MorningStar also opens its homes for short-term stays.

Our website offers even more about the MorningStar difference.  There you’ll read about WellStar, our signature program which encompasses the physical, social, spiritual and intellectual sides of wellness.  You’ll see a gallery of our award-winning architecture and gracious design.  And find a Decision Guide that helps families understand & navigate the complex world of senior living, complete with downloadable templates.  Read especially “Testify to Love,” which captures the sentiments of residents, their families and our staff as to why we do what we do and the impact we have.

We see our residents as heroes—men and women who have exacted out of life all its triumphs and trials, who in raw courage and tenacity have invested their days.  Seniors are a testimony to the colossal events in history.  They’ve witnessed world wars and the worldwide web—all in one glorious sweep.  If anyone deserves honor and respect, it is our seniors.  This is MorningStar’s high and chosen calling.

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MorningStar Senior Living of Sparks, 2360 Wingfield Hills Drive, Sparks, NV  89436
Phone:  775-626-5665

Nevada Senior Guide – Visiting Angels Reno

April 26, 2014 by · Comments Off on Nevada Senior Guide – Visiting Angels Reno
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Homecare, Reno, Support Services 

www.visitingangels.com/reno

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Visiting Angles, serving Reno, Sparks and the surrounding communities

 

Why Elderly Care by Visiting Angels

At Visiting Angels, we realize it is never easy bringing someone into your home to provide elderly care services.  That’s why we strive to make staying at home a positive experience.  We do this by allowing you to select your caregiver from a group of experienced  elderly care providers, allowing you to maintain your schedule and providing you or your loved one with personalized elderly care services.

 

You Are In Charge – We’re On “Your” Schedule

With Visiting Angels, you’re in charge of everything.  Your Visiting Angels elderly care provider will not dictate to you what your schedule is to be (i.e. what time to get up, when to bathe, meal schedules, etc.).  It is our job to adjust to your schedule and to see to it that you remain comfortable in your home.  Visiting Angels – Senior Home Care at its Best!

 

Bonded, licensed and insured

Your locally owned and operated Visiting Angels office is licensed by the state of Nevada and is insured and bonded.  This can give you the peace of mind that a trustworthy elderly care provider will be in your loved one’s home.

 

Monitoring is essential

At Visiting Angels’ we continually monitor our elderly care providers through our system of continued personalized contacts.  Through telephone check-in’s and home visits, we will be checking regularly with your loved one.  We want to ensure that our elderly care recipients receive the best possible care.

 

Tailor your care to your needs

No two people are the same.  Therefore their elderly care needs are going to be very different.  Whether you need respite care, in home care, part time or full time care, or care at an assisted living facility, Visiting Angels can provide an experienced elderly care provider that is right for you.  Our agency tailors your program of elderly care based on your needs.  Your elderly care program is flexible and you can change the program as different needs arise.  We will also work along with any home health agency or nursing agency that may be assisting your loved ones after a recent hospital stay.

 

Visiting Angels Reno

The Visiting Angels office located in Reno Nevada is locally owned and operated by Monica and Robert Pence.  For additional information on how we can help you or a loved one, please contact our office at 775-852-4663 or visit our website at www.visitingangels.com/reno.  We look forward to assisting you with your care needs.

AARP Report Highlights Need for Innovative Long-Term Care for the Aging Baby Boomer Population; Japan’s Technological Secrets May Hold the Answers

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

A newly published AARP report illustrates a profound demographic shift that will have consequences for decades to come, particularly in the senior living and long-term care industry. Baby boomers are entering their retirement years, while the ratio of potential family caregivers to those who require long-term services and support is beginning to drop. Fewer available caregivers will mean the senior living industry must rapidly adapt to a surging market. The AARP’s full report is available here: http://bit.ly/156phYi

Family caregiving is a low-cost but often burdensome approach to elder care. Becoming a primary caregiver often involves leaving behind a career, among other sacrifices. Plus, these well-intentioned caregivers may not have the expertise necessary to provide the level of care needed by an aged parent. Adults in these roles often feel enormous pressure and stress, sometimes even resentment. At any rate, the nation’s changing demographics will make today’s family caregiving situation far different in the near future.

Between 1990 and 2010, there were about 7 potential caregivers for every one person aged 80-plus. That ratio is at the start of a freefall that will force society to change the way it cares for its elderly members. By 2030, the ratio of caregivers to elderly will be 4 to 1. All remaining baby boomers will have reached their years of highest risk (80+) by 2050, when the caregiver ratio will have plummeted still further to 3 to 1.

Kevin Williams, president of SeniorMarketing.com, suggests innovative thinking will be required to bridge this care gap: “Naturally, with fewer family caregivers available, the responsibility will largely shift to senior living communities, care agencies and already overextended government programs. But it will take more than simply building more communities or training more staff—assuming an adequate number of candidates are even available. Technological innovation may be the silver bullet to raise the standard of living for aging boomers, improve efficiency, and reduce costs.”

The nation of Japan, which has the greatest life expectancy and one of the oldest average populations in the world, has recently experienced a demographic transition of its own. Recently, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare put out a call for 2 million new professional caregivers, but only received 1.3 million eligible candidates. With low birth rates being the norm, that shortfall will only increase. A tech-savvy society to begin with, the Japanese have embraced robotics and automation as a solution to the elder care issue. Motorized, assistive devices can help older individuals perform tasks themselves, while automated pill dispensers can prevent dangerous medication mistakes. A recent blog post on The Economist explained Japan’s inventive approach to the elder care dilemma: http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2013/05/automation-elderly

Williams concluded: “This demographic shift is a great challenge but also a great opportunity. Forward-thinking, entrepreneurs will be leading the way in this new environment. Technology to assist with daily tasks, provide medical care, monitor, and connect seniors to loved ones is advancing at a faster pace every year. It’s not unreasonable to predict that the future will witness even better care for our future seniors.”

About SeniorMarketing.com

Baltimore-based SeniorMarketing.com was created with twin goals in mind. First, the company helps connect caregivers and seniors with local, affordable care options. Second, the company increases income for senior living communities and health care agencies.

Contact:

Kevin M. Williams, President
SeniorMarketing.com
5024 Campbell Blvd., Suite D-3
Baltimore, MD 21236
Phone: 1-888-523-3311

Treat them like a person, not a patient

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Treat them like a person, not a patient

New living systems developmental model of care shifts the focus of treating Alzheimer’s disease and other debilitating illnesses

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. – Donald H. Ford observed that advanced Alzheimer’s patients, like his mother-in-law, are typically bored and lonely, and often depressed, frightened or angry.  His professional knowledge convinced him it didn’t have to be that way.  When Alzheimer’s struck his wife, he created a scientifically based alternative form of Alzheimer’s care that enabled her to still have a satisfying life.
Ford shares this revolutionary plan he used with his wife, Carol in the new book Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey: Treat Them Like a Person, Not a Patient. He is an experienced psychology professional and developed a living systems developmental model for care that incorporates an individual’s humanity. It helps patients live a meaningful and pleasurable life, despite their limitations. Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey is a guide for caregivers of senior citizens with serious limitations to improve their care receivers’ quality of life.
“Traditional medical model caregiving focuses on what’s wrong with a person and tries to fix it. However, when what is wrong can’t be fixed, the caregiver can’t succeed and that’s discouraging,” Ford says. “In Our developmental model of care, the focus is on what the person can still do and on designing experiences from which they get satisfaction.”
As people continue to gain more awareness of Alzheimer’s disease and other seriously debilitating diseases, plans like the model in Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey become more relevant. Based on his professional research, Ford believes that a person always functions as an integrated unit, so a model was needed that combined the biological, psychological, behavioral, social and contextual aspects of a person’s patterns of behavior when planning for elder care. Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey asks society to adopt the view that it is not enough to focus on keeping senior citizens alive and “warehousing them” until they die.
Ford’s plan in Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey is a person-centered quality of care focus.  It replaces the traditional medical emphasis on what is wrong with the person with a positive emphasis on using their remaining capabilities to create a satisfying life, despite limitations.

 

Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey: Treat Them Like a Person, Not a Patient
By Donald H. Ford
ISBN: 978-1-3008-0321-8 (sc); 978-1-3009-9178-6 (e)
Softcover, $26.55
Ebook, $8.99
Approximately 564 pages
Available at www.LuLu.com, www.amazon.com and www.barnesandnoble.com.

 

About the author
Donald H. Ford earned a Bachelor of Science, Master of Science and doctorate degrees in mathematics and psychology from KansasState and PennsylvaniaStateUniversities.  He spent the first 10 years of his career creating a new kind of psychological and developmental services program at PennState for students and their families.  Then PennState asked him to create a new kind of college called Health and Human Development.  It stimulated other universities to develop similar colleges.  After 10 years as Dean, he resigned and returned to his first love of teaching, scholarly and professional work.  He published seven books about psychotherapy and human development.

Senior Citizen Medical Alert Systems and Fall Detectors by Angelo Losavio

July 1, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

If you are looking for a medical alert system to protect an elderly loved one, be sure to do your homework.  There are a lot of companies out there that offer personal emergency response systems with a number of features and benefits that are very useful and others with serious limitations.  For example medical alert phones may be a practical solution for your elderly loved one if they are comfortable with the technology and you believe that they are not in a great risk of falling in becoming incapacitated. A medical alert phone is more or less a wireless phone that you can program with an auto dial feature.  It allows the user to carry the telephone around and be able to present auto dial button and be connected with friends, relatives or emergency response professionals but it does require them to be able to access the telephone, operate the telephone and communicate with the person that they’re calling.

The trouble with these medical alert phones is that in the event of a sudden illness, fainting or slip and fall the elderly user may not be able to find, use or even remember that they have the phone.  On the plus side, these systems are cheaper than medical monitoring systems as there is no monthly monitoring service to pay for.  By getting your senior citizen a reliable mobile phone and preprogramming personal contact numbers into autodial you pretty much accomplish the same effect. We’re not knocking these phones we just want to point out that while they give the user access to a telephone service remotely the system is only as strong as its weakest link.

When an elderly person falls chances are they are going to be disoriented.  If they are too confused to find and operate a remote medical alert phones they will not be able to use this system to summon help.

A more practical solution is a medical alert system that can be activated using a pushbutton that is worn around the neck as a pendant or on the wrist like a watch. These medical alarm systems will allow your parent to maintain an independent lifestyle because you’ll have the peace of mind of knowing that they can get help simply by pushing a button.

A typical medical alert system has a transmitter which is worn by the user and receiver located somewhere in the house.  The range on these devices generally will cover the interior of an average home but they will not provide any protection once you go outside their radio range. Some systems will alert the monitoring station when the signal is lost in the call will be placed to the home to determine if everything is all right.

The basic system operates under the scenario that the elderly person falls and is unable to get up to reach a phone to call for help. By pushing the panic button on the pendant or wristwatch transmitter a coal box is activated in the house which connects the caller to the monitoring station. The monitoring agent speaks with the user to determine how to best help remedy the situation. If the user is coherent and able to give instructions to the monitoring station those instructions will typically be followed. If the caller can’t be reached or understood, the monitoring station will then follow a predetermined emergency call protocol which may include calling 911 responders, relatives, friends and next-door neighbors.

The worst-case scenario is that an elderly person falls and becomes unconscious, or they suffer a stroke. In this state they are unable to push a panic button. That’s where an auto fall detector can be the difference between life and death.  A senior monitoring system with a fall-alert feature should, in theory, create an alarm at the monitoring station which will prompt an operator to contact the user to see if everything is all right.

Other more elaborate monitoring systems can actually provide richer detail and true fault detection. Sometimes when people fall they don’t fold face down and make a loud thump on the ground.  Sometimes they simply slumped down slowly to the floor or chair.  Most fall detection systems are only activated if the device is violently jarred. A more subtle and advanced system will be able to detect the positioning and inactivity as well as changes in body functions to alert the monitoring station.

These more advanced monitoring systems that are able to monitor heart rate, skin temperature and mobility are slightly more expensive but offer much more protection. The downside is that the device that monitors bodily functions must be worn around the chest and some users may find this too invasive.

There are no simple solutions to providing total safety to a senior citizen living at home.  All medical monitoring and emergency response systems for aging people have their pluses and minuses.  A system that may be right for your grandmother may not work for your grandfather. It’s important that you study the features and benefits of all the top brands to decide which features you can live with and which ones are not worth paying for.

If you’ve had personal experience with a monitoring service that you’d like to recommend or suggest that we take a critical look at please get in touch by leaving a comment below.

Lifestation – Senior Monitoring Service

myHalo – Medical Monitoring – True Fall Detection and Medical Monitor

VRI Medical Alert Systems

Freedom Alert – Medical Alert Phone

Wellcore Personal Emergency Response

Philips Lifeline with AutoAlert

Brickhouse Alert Fall Detection Device

Response Link Medical Alert

Life Guardian Medical Alarm System

Connect America Medical Alert

Find support and discover how you can give your elderly loved one the care they deserve – without burning out or going broke – by visiting ElderKind.com. This site will help make caring for that special senior citizen less stressful. Get fast, free and easy access to elder care resources at ElderKind.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Angelo_Losavio

 

Memory Loss in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

June 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many senior citizens experience some form of memory loss. Still, there are differences between mild forgetfulness and more serious memory problems. And, it is important that senior citizens and those involved in their elder care address problems with memory, as it may be a sign of a more serious condition.

Mild Forgetfulness

As we age, we lose some of the sharpness of memory we had when we were younger. We may notice that it takes longer to recall facts or information, learn new things, or find or identify familiar objects. In general, these are all signs of mild forgetfulness rather than a more serious medical problem. If you are becoming worried about your memory, schedule an appointment with your doctor to rule out larger problems. Many activities can sharpen your mind and memory, such as picking up a new hobby, visiting friends, eating well, and exercising.

Some more tips for helping your memory are listed below:

 

  • Learn a new skill.
  • Volunteer in a local school, hospital, place of worship, or somewhere else in your community.
  • Spend a lot of time with loved ones.
  • Make use of memory tools such as large calendars, agendas, and notes to yourself.
  • Make an effort to put your wallet, purse, keys, or glasses in the same place each time you set them down.
  • Get ample rest.
  • Exercise and eat a healthy diet.
  • Avoid drinking a lot of alcohol.
  • Seek help if you feel depressed for an extended period of time (more than two weeks).

 

You can also make use of the following:

 

  • Large calendars
  • Agendas for each day
  • Notes about safety in the home
  • Directions for using common items around the house

Serious Memory Problems 

More serious memory problems disrupt your ability to carry on normal activities like driving, shopping, or handling money. Some signs of a serious memory problem include:

 

  • Repeating the same questions over and over.
  • Getting lost in a usually familiar place.
  • Being unable to follow directions.
  • Experiencing confusion about time, people, or places.
  • Taking poor care of yourself (eating poorly, forgetting to bathe, or engaging in unsafe actions or activities).

Causes of Serious Memory Problems 

Medical conditions. Certain medical conditions can lead to serious memory problems that should disappear after treatment. Some things that can cause memory problems are bad reactions to certain medications, depression, dehydration (insufficient amount of fluids in the body), poor diet (insufficient vitamins and minerals), minor head injuries, and thyroid problems. These are all serious medical conditions that should be handled by a physician.

Emotional problems. When senior citizens have certain emotional problems, serious memory problems may develop. Sadness, loneliness, worrying, or boredom can cause confusion and forgetfulness. An active lifestyle, visiting with loved ones, and learning new skills can be helpful, but it may be necessary to seek the help of a doctor or counselor for treatment. If this is the case, getting proper help should minimize memory problems.

Alzheimer’s disease. This disease also causes problems with memory. It begins slowly, but the symptoms get progressively worse as the brain changes. Although it may appear to be mild memory loss at first, people with Alzheimer’s get to a point at which it’s difficult to think clearly. Everyday activities like shopping, driving, cooking, and carrying on a conversation become complicatedTaking medication during the early or middle stages of Alzheimer’s disease can delay memory loss and can be of great help if you have trouble sleeping or are worried or depressed.

Multi-infarct dementia. This is another disease that causes memory problems, where symptoms often appear abruptly. Memory loss and confusion associated with this disease come about through small strokes or short periods of decreased blood flow to the brain. Preventing additional strokes can maintain or improve memory after a stroke, but having more strokes generally leads to more memory loss. To prevent strokes and multi-infarct dementia, maintaining a healthy blood pressure is key.

Diagnosing Serious Memory Problems

As with all health concerns, if you have cause to worry about your memory, you should see your doctor. Be prepared to have a complete checkup if your doctor thinks it is necessary. This checkup may include tests to check memory, problem solving, counting, and language skills, and your doctor may need to take a CAT scan of your brain. A CAT scan is helpful because it shows normal and problem areas in the brain and can help to identify a problem. When your doctor comes to a conclusion as to what is causing your memory problems and makes a diagnosis, ask which treatment options are best for you.

Support

Friends and family members can provide support to help you cope with memory loss. They can help you exercise, visit friends, and continue daily routines and activities. They can also remind you of the time, your location, and what is going on around you.

If memory problems progress to the point that you have difficulty taking care of yourself, in home care for senior citizens can be helpful. Home health care aides can assist with personal care, meal preparation, and health management. And they provide services according to your need, from a few hours a week to 24-hours a day.

The Caring Space
http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

 

Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads

June 5, 2013 by · Comments Off on Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads
Filed under: Articles 

Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads

BOSTON, May 2, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Mother’s and Father’s Day celebrations are approaching, yet millions of adult children care for parents year round while on the brink of burnout.  Catapulted into the accidental caregiver role without warning, stressed-out kids are doing their best to hold life together when everything seems to be falling apart.

Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom issues a timely warning. “You must seek support as a caregiver.  The life you save may be your own.”

Bloom offers practical coping strategies to help family caregivers recharge their energy and avoid burnout during a free monthly Caregiving Power Hour.  During these tele-sessions, caregivers get tactical solutions to get through the week ahead.  Bloom wants to inspire and train caregivers to provide quality support for their loved ones while fully living their own lives.

“It’s coaching, community, and caring in the gift of an hour of sacred time that can really make a difference,” Bloom says.

Bloom knows the stressful caregiving journey well.  He served as the primary, live-in caregiver for his parents during their final years.  His father passed away in 2009 and, after a courageous battle with cancer, Bloom’s mother passed away in his loving arms on Mother’s Day 2012.

“Caregivers put the well-being of loved ones first which can mean putting their own needs and plans on the back burner.  The regret for career or life enhancing opportunities not taken can be a bitter pill to swallow,” Bloom says.

He honors the legacy of his parents by sharing key steps along the roadmap to caregiving without regret.

  1. Release Crisis Mode. Stop being a victim to circumstances so you feel stronger and become laser-focused to meet your family’s needs.  Supporting loved ones through medical challenges is overwhelming and scary.  When you become aware that feeling like a victim or in a state of crisis is a mindset, you can successfully shift back into taking control and positive action.
  2. Overcome Conflict.  Communicate and cope with calm and clarity. Otherwise, you will crash while riding the emotional roller coaster associated with disability or disease. Mastering your own trigger points for anger and frustration will lead you to deal effectively with the most challenging people and circumstances in your life.
  3. Achieve Buy-In. Motivate others to contribute based upon their individual abilities, preferences, and talents so your loved one receives the most satisfying support possible.  Giving others choices for how they can serve will foster their desire to gladly help on a regular basis.
  4. Deliver Greatness and Compassion in Equal Doses.  Become the inspiring caregiver that people cheer for and gladly support in meaningful ways.  Let your compassion shine through in all actions as you support your loved one.  Devote equal time for self-care so you have the energy to let your best shine through even during tough times.
  5. Magnetize and Motivate Talent. Create an atmosphere that attracts and retains the best people to join your loved one’s care team and experience brilliant performance.  Stay positive and open to the opinions of others so you can facilitate options for the best care and support.
  6. Access Intuition.  Trust your instincts and let your care and dedication guide your decisions.  Share any concerns and questions with key support professionals.  It is better to explore a concern that proves to be okay rather than ignore something that could be life threatening.
  7. Put Chocolate in Your Pill Box.  Find ways to fuel your soul so you can thrive during the caregiver journey and develop the passion and purpose for your life beyond caregiving.  Dose yourself regularly to avoid burnout while creating enduring satisfaction and success.

About Certified Professional Coach and Energy Leadership™ Master Practitioner A. Michael Bloom

Since 2011, A. Michael Bloom has revitalized the careers of hundreds of family and professional caregivers with practical, tactical soul-saving coping strategies that support them in saving lives – including their own.  An in-demand New England speaker, workshop leader, and coach, Bloom has influenced hundreds of caregivers to follow a roadmap to avoid burnout and recharge their caregiving energy.  The author of the forthcoming book, The Accidental Caregivers Survival Guide: Your Roadmap to Caregiving Without Regret, Bloom welcomes media interviews, speaking engagements, and the opportunity to inspire caregivers around the world via his monthly Caregiving Power Hours.  Learn more at http://www.bloomforcoach.com/powerhour/.

Senior Citizen Assisted Living Facilities by David Crumrine

May 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Assisted living is an alternative living arrangement for senior citizens requiring moderate elder care, including help with activities like eating, getting dressed, bathing, and using the bathroom as opposed to the more intensive care provided in nursing homes. This type of care serves as an intermediate between in home care for the elderly and the elder care provided by a nursing home. Facilities for this type of living may be in connection with retirement communities, nursing homes, home health care agencies, or complexes for senior citizens, or they may be separate facilities. This type of elder care is known by many names, such as residential care, board and care, congregate care, and personal care.

Assisted Living Facilities

When looking for an assisted living facility, you can usually expect to have your own room or apartment, provided meals, a staff of caregivers for support, and some or all of the following services:

  • housekeeping and laundry
  • security
  • recreational activities and exercise
  • transportation
  • guidance and monitoring of health care
  • reminders about or help taking medication
  • support with dressing, bathing, and eating

Choosing the Right Assisted Living Community

 

With these ideas in mind, it is important to choose the right facility for you. Each facility may have different ideologies of caring for the elderly, so not every facility may be a match for the kind of care and services you are looking for. When searching for elder care in an assisted living facility, there are a number of ways to determine whether a certain place will provide you with the comfort, security, and level of care you need:

  • Think about your future needs and determine whether the facility can provide the right kind of care for those needs.
  • Figure out whether the facility is near family, friends, and shopping centers or other businesses you’d like to walk to.
  • Are there admission and retention policies that do not allow people with severe cognitive impairments or physical disabilities to live there?
  • Is there a written statement of the philosophy of elder care of the facility, and do you agree with it?
  • Make more than one trip to each facility you are considering, sometimes unannounced.
  • Try to make some of those trips during mealtimes to check out the quality of food and service to the residents.
  • Take note of interactions between residents and those providing the elder care.
  • Ask whether each facility offers social, recreational, and spiritual activities based on your interests.
  • Talk to residents.
  • Find out what kind of training caregivers receive and how often they are trained.
  • Review state licensing reports.

Researching Assisted Living Centers

 

If you have concerns after performing some of the preceding suggestions-or if you would simply like to be thorough in your search-you may also wish to consider the following:

  • Call your state’s long-term care ombudsman as well as the local Better Business Bureau to ask about recently issued complaints against the facilities you are considering.
  • If a facility is connected to a nursing home or home health care agency, you may want to find out more its counterpart. You can find information about nursing homes on the Medicare website (www.medicare.gov/nhcompare/home.asp).

Assisted Living Financial Considerations for Seniors

 

Another aspect of assisted living facilities to consider is cost. Assisted living is generally less expensive than nursing home care, but more expensive the in home care for the elderly. The usual range is anywhere from $10,000 per year to over $50,000 per year, so it is important to know what you can afford and how much each facility costs. Another thing to know is that there may be fees not included in the basic rate. It will be helpful to figure out how much extra you will have to pay to live in a certain home.

Insurance may help cover some of these costs, but usually charges are covered primarily by the senior citizens who decide to live in these residences or family members responsible for their elder care. Some facilities also offer financial assistance programs, which you may want to inquire about.

Medicare does not cover the costs of these residences or the elder care provided there. Medicaid-the joint federal and state program that helps senior citizens and people with disabilities pay for health care when they are unable to afford it-may cover the service component of assisted living in certain states.

It is important to consider the different options in elder care. If cost is a concern, it may be helpful to consider in home care for senior citizens. This type of elder care may provide sufficient care for your needs in the comfort of your own home. If the degree of elder care provided by in home care or an assisted living facility does not meet your needs, consider a nursing home.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

Depression in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Depression is a medical condition that is characterized by feeling down,  depressed, or hopeless; low self-esteem; and loss of interest in things one used  to enjoy. Senior citizens are prone to life-altering changes that can lead one  to feel depressed. Dealing with the trials life throws at us such as, loss,  change, loneliness, or a chronic medical condition can be quite overwhelming.  Still, depression is not a “normal” part of aging. Like heart disease or  diabetes, depression is a medical condition and it can be treated with  medication and therapy. Treatment is effective at alleviating symptoms within a  few weeks in at least 80 percent of people.

It is important that senior citizens and those providing their elder care  understand the symptoms of depression. If you think you or someone you know may  be suffering from depression, identify your symptoms by using the checklist  provided below. Then, if necessary, seek assistance. For senior citizens, the  most frequently used resource is a family doctor. Bringing a trusted friend or  relative may help ease any anxiety when going to an appointment. Understand that  your doctor may suggest a checkup and begin treatment or refer you to a mental  health specialist.

Before you say, “I’m okay”….

Do you feel:

  • Anxious or “empty”
  • Guilty or useless
  • Agitated or irritable
  • Less interested in things you used to enjoy
  • Like no one loves you
  • Life is not worth living

Or if you are:

  • A change in sleeping habits
  • A change in eating habits
  • Persistent headaches, stomach aches, or pain

Remember that these  may be real symptoms of a real medical condition that can be effectively  treated. Talk to your doctor today. Though many senior citizens suffer from  depression, feeling depressed is not a normal part of aging.

 

Health and Wellness tips

There are many measures senior citizens can take to help relieve the symptoms  of depression. Those involved in the elder care of senior citizens experiencing  depression should encourage the senior to follow these tips and improve their  wellbeing.

Check your medications. Senior citizens often take many  medications. Some medications, including those for sleep, blood pressure, and  nervousness, may affect mood. Talk with your doctor about each of the  medications you are taking. Be sure to include all over-the-counter medicines,  vitamins, and herbal supplements to minimize the chances of having side  effects.

Limit alcohol consumption. Alcohol use can bring about  depression. And, when alcohol and drugs are combined, interactions that lead to  depression can occur.

Stay connected. Sometimes, senior citizens find it more difficult  to get out and stay connected with others. Still, talking with friends and  family members, getting a pet, or even finding a new interest or hobby can help  one through this tough time.  Get involved in activities you take pleasure  in, such as reading a good book, going to a ballgame or a taking a class in a  subject that interests to you.

Be active. Physical activity can improve physical and mental  wellbeing. Though some senior citizens believe they cannot exercise, there are  activities like walking, gardening, or working out (even if one is in a  wheelchair) that can be helpful. Make a goal of 30 minutes of activity 5 days a  week. If you have not taken part in physical activity in a while, be sure to  check with your doctor and get his OK before you begin.

Eat healthy and drink plenty of fluids. Choose healthy snacks  like fruits, vegetables, yogurt, or nuts to increase your nutrition and energy.  Also, try to eat well-balanced meals.  Some senior citizens suffer from  loss of appetite and weight loss; if you have experienced either of these,  consult your doctor.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects  caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for  families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking  employment.

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Senior Citizens Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, and Arthritis – Causes and Treatments By David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

“Arthritis” does not mean only that someone has stiff, aching joints. Many types of arthritis exist, each with its own symptoms and treatments. Most types are chronic, meaning that they can be a source of discomfort for an extended period of time. Arthritis can afflict joints almost anywhere in the body and may cause changes you can see and feel, including swelling, warmth, and redness in the joints. It can last for a short time but be very painful or continue for a long time with less pronounced results while still damaging the joints.

Arthritis is extremely common in the United States, especially among senior citizens. Still, there are many steps they and those providing care for the elderly can take to relieve the different types of arthritis. The most common types in this population are osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and gout.

Osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis in senior citizens and begins when cartilage, the type of tissue that pads joints, begins to wear away. This can eventually cause all the cartilage between bones to wear away, forming painful rubbing of bones against each other. This type of arthritis is most common in the hands, neck, lower back, knees, and hips.

Symptoms of OA can range from stiffness and mild pain that accompanies exercise or bending to severe pain in the joints even in times of physical rest. OA can also cause stiffness during times in which you haven’t used specific joints in a while, like when you’re on a long car ride, but this stiffness usually goes away when you move your joints again. OA can eventually lead to problems moving joints and sometimes to developing a disability if the areas affected are the back, knees, or hips.

Aging is often the greatest risk factor for developing OA. Other factors depend on the area of the body afflicted-for instance, OA in the hands or hips may be caused by genetic factors; OA in the knees may be caused by being overweight; and injuries or overuse of joints in the knees, hips, and hands may lead to OA.

Rheumatoid arthritis.

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) differs from OA in that it’s an autoimmune disease, meaning that your immune system attacks and damages the lining of a joint as if it were an injury or disease. RA leads to inflammation of the joints, which causes pain, stiffness and swelling, sometimes in multiple joints at once. It may be severe enough to prevent you from moving a certain joint. Senior citizens with RA may often experience fatigue or fever. You can develop RA at any age, and it’s more common in women.

RA can afflict almost any joint in the body and is often symmetrical, meaning that if you have RA in a specific joint on one side of your body, you probably experience RA in the same joint on the other side of your body. RA can damage not only joints, but also the heart, muscles, blood vessels, nervous system, and eyes.

Gout.

Senior citizens with gout experience the most severe pain relative to many other arthritis patients. An attack begins when uric acid crystals form in the connective tissue or joint spaces, leading to swelling, stiffness, redness, heat, and pain in the joint. Attacks often follow eating foods like shellfish, liver, dried beans, peas, anchovies, or gravy. Drinking alcohol, being overweight, and taking certain medications may worsen the symptoms. In senior citizens, using certain medications to lower blood pressure may also be a risk factor for a gout attack.

Gout is most common in the big toe, but it can occur in other joints such as the ankle, elbow, knee, wrist, hand, or other toes. Swelling may cause discoloration and tenderness due to skin stretching tightly around the joint. If you see a doctor during an attack, he or she may take a sample of fluid from the affected joint.

Other forms of arthritis.

Other forms include psoriatic arthritis  in patients who have psoriasis; ankylosing spondylitis, which mainly affects the spine; reactive arthritis, which occurs as a reaction to another illness in the body; and arthritis in the temporomandibular joint, the point at which the jaw attaches to the skull.

Arthritis Symptoms and Warning Signs.

Senior citizens and those providing their elder care should look out for the following symptoms as they may be indications of arthritis:

  • lasting joint pain
  • swelling in a joint
  • stiffness in a joint
  • tenderness or pain when touching a joint
  • difficulty in using or moving a joint normally
  • warmth and redness in a joint

 

Any of these symptoms lasting longer than two weeks should be addressed by a physician. If you experience a fever, feel physically ill, have a suddenly swollen joint, or have problems using a joint, a doctor should be contacted sooner. You will have to answer questions and go through a physical exam. Before suggesting treatment options, your doctor may want to run lab tests and take X-rays.

Arthritis Treatment.

Some common treatment options exist even though each type of arthritis is treatedsomewhat differently. Rest, exercise, eating a healthy diet, and becoming educated about the right way to use and protect the joints are key to minimizing the effects of arthritis. Proper shoes and a cane can minimize pain the feet, knees, and hips while walking, and some technology exists for helping open jars or bottles, turn doorknobs more easily, and otherwise improve quality of life in senior citizens with arthritis.

Additionally, some medications can lower the pain and swelling. Acetaminophen (in Tylenol) and some NSAIDs are sold over-the-counter and can ease pain. Other NSAIDs must be prescribed. It is important for senior citizens and those providing their in home care to pay attention to the warnings on both prescribed and over-the-counter drugs and to ask a doctor about how to properly and best use over-the-counter medicine to treat arthritis. The FDA also has information about many medications.

Some treatment options are specialized for individual types of arthritis.

Osteoarthritis Treatment.

There are medicines to help senior citizens with pain associated with OA, and rest and exercise may ease movement in the joints. Managing weight is also important. If one experiences OA in the knees, a doctor can provide shots in the knee joint, which can help to move it without as much pain. Surgery may also be an option to repair or replace damaged joints in senior citizens.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatments.

Treatment can diminish the pain and swelling associated with RA and cause joint damage to slow down or stop. One will feel better overall, and it will be easier to move around. On top of pain and anti-inflammatory medications, a doctor might prescribe DMARDs, which are anti-rheumatic drugs that can slow damage from RA. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, can minimize swelling while waiting for DMARDs to kick in. Additionally, biogenic response modifiers block the damage inflicted by the immune system and help people with mild to moderate RA when other treatments have failed to work properly.

Gout Treatment.

If you’ve gone through a gout attack, talk to a doctor to discuss possible causes and future prevention of attacks. Work together with your doctor and other elder care providers to plan and execute a plan for prevention. Commonly, NSAIDs or corticosteroids are recommended for an acute attack. This treatment diminishes swelling, allowing you to feel better fairly shortly after treatment. Usually, the attack fully stops within a few days. If one has experienced multiple attacks, a doctor may be able to prescribe medication to prevent further attacks.

Exercise can help Arthritis.

In addition to taking the proper medication and allowing your joints to rest, exercise can help senior citizens to stay in shape, maintain strong muscles, and control symptoms of arthritis. Daily exercise like walking or swimming keeps joints moving while lessening pain and strengthening the muscles around joints. Before starting any new exercise program, it is important to discuss options with your physician.

Three types of exercise are the best for senior citizens with arthritis:

  • Range-of-motion exercises reduce stiffness, improve flexibility, and keep joints moving. Activities like dancing fit into this category.
  • Strengthening exercises strengthen muscles, which improves support and protection to your joints. Weight training fits into this category.
  • Aerobic or endurance exercises improve health in the heart and arteries, prevent weight gain, improve how your body works overall, and may decrease swelling in some joints. Riding a bike fits into this category.

Other things to do to manage Arthritis.

 

On top of exercise and weight control, a number of other methods may help senior citizens ease the pain around joints. Applying heat or cold to joints, soaking in a warm tub, or swimming in a heated pool may help you feel better and move your joints more easily.

Surgery may be an option when damage has become disabling or when other treatment options have not adequately diminished pain. With surgery, joints can be repaired or replaced with artificial ones. Commonly, arthritic knees and hips are replaced.

Unproven remedies.

Many senior citizens with arthritis try treatments that have not been tested or proven to help. Some are harmful, like snake venom, while others are harmless yet unhelpful, like copper bracelets.

Here are a few ways to determine whether a treatment is unproven:

  • The remedy is said to work for all types of arthritis and other diseases
  • Scientific support is from only one research study
  • The label doesn’t include directions or warnings of use

Areas for further research.

 

Studies suggest that acupuncture could ease OA pain in some senior citizens. Dietary supplements such as glucosamine and chondroitin are also under investigation and may reduce OA pain. More research is needed to determine whether these types of treatments actually work to reduce symptoms and damage to joints.

Talk to your doctor and others involved in your elder care.

Try not to make light of your symptoms by telling yourself that joint pain or stiffness is simply caused by aging normally. Your doctor and other elder care providers can discuss possible treatment options with you to safely minimize your pain and stiffness and prevent more serious joint damage.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

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Healthy Eating, Exercise and Lifestyle Guide For Senior Citizens By David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Healthy Eating and Lifestyle

While it is important for people of all ages to stay healthy, it is especially important for senior citizens to maintain healthy eating habits as well as to stay active which is important in the prevention of chronic illnesses like diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. By practicing healthier living practices, senior citizens can maintain a healthy weight, avoid depression, and stay mentally sharp. Those participating in caring for the elderly should be aware of these healthy living practices and work to both encourage and facilitate them.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a healthy diet includes many different types of food that are rich in nutrients. They have outlined specifically what this eating plan entails at the website.. Because this eating plan is designed specifically for senior citizens, it focuses on the types of foods that are important for preventing common ailments of older Americans like obesity and serious chronic illnesses.

Healthy Eating 101:

By following some of the tips listed, senior citizens can start a healthier lifestyle today:

  • Don’t skip meals. It is important to eat regularly in order to maintain normal metabolism and not become tempted to eat higher fat foods when food is consumed.
  • Eat a diet that is high in fiber. By eating foods like whole-grain breads, beans, vegetables, and fruits, you can lower your susceptibility to diabetes and heart disease.
  • Senior citizens especially should begin to adjust their diet to one that includes less calories and fat because the body will need less as it ages.
  • Calcium and Vitamin D are very important for nutrition and keeping bones strong. You can get this by either getting in at least three servings of dairy every day, or substituting these with soy-based beverages and proteins.
  • Senior citizens will have a harder time absorbing adequate amounts of the B12 vitamin. For this reason, it is important to eat cereals fortified with this nutrient or taking vitamin B12 supplements with meals.
  • Snack the smart way. Senior citizens will want to limit the amount of unhealthy snacking they do which involves foods high in calories and sugars. Instead, keep small portions of dried fruit, peanut butter, or crackers at hand to keep the appetite under control while remaining healthy.
  • Drink plenty of water. Although senior citizens often feel less thirsty then they used to, it is important to stay hydrated by either drinking water or water-based beverages like tea, coffee, soup, and skim milk.

Planning and Preparing Meals

 

Sometimes people find it hard to eat healthily because eating is often a social event which involves many people with different eating preferences and goals. While it is important to be able to enjoy a meal with family and friends, it is also important to maintain your own eating integrity by making sure everyone is on board with your personal healthy eating goals. Friends and family, as well as those providing elder care should facilitate healthy eating, not detour from it. The following tips address ways that senior citizens can maintain the healthy eating habits without sacrificing the social aspect of sharing a meal with others or learning to adjust to a lifestyle that involves eating with less people on a day-to-day basis.

  • Grocery shopping with others. This can be a fun and smart way to control the cost and quantity of food that you consume. If you don’t live with many people, this is a good way to split large-quantity items like potatoes and eggs which you may not be ableto use before expiration.
  • A time saving a smart way to eat healthy is cooking large quantities of food ahead of time and portioning for heating on later dates.
  • A quick way to prepare meals for yourself or for guests involves keeping frozen or canned fruits and vegetables on hand. Draining and/or rinsing canned foods is a good way to lower sodium or calories in foods that are kept in high sugar or high salt fluids.
  • Eating or preparing a meal shouldn’t always be a chore. Trying new recipes or eating outside can be a fun new twist on a meal with someone special.
  • Try to eat with people you enjoy to be around.
  • Some senior citizens have difficulty preparing meals, which is why it is important to become informed about home health care agencies or eldercare facilities that can aid in providing meals. The Eldercare Locator number is 1-800-677-1116.

Loss of Appetite or Desire to Eat

 

There are various reasons for why some senior citizens may not eat as well as they should or lose the desire to eat completely.

If you find that it is difficult to eat well, then it is best to speak with a healthcare provider or someone involved in your elder care about what can be done to help you eat better.

Some senior citizens are unable to eat well due to issues involving the condition of their teeth or issues with dentures. Checking with a dentist about physical pain that occurs when eating or other issues can help with these issues that lead to poorer eating habits.

When senior citizens lose family and friends or become depressed about events in their life, they may lose the desire to eat. In these instances, it is of the utmost importance that these individuals seek help from people they trust like their family, friends, church community, or those assisting with their elder care that will happily help them in finding ways to continue a healthy lifestyle and eating plan.

Some senior citizens complain that the flavor of foods change when they begin to take certain medications. While it is best to consult with a physician about issues surrounding medication, people can also take vitamin supplements with food that will help them stay healthy.

If you have someone who assists with your in home care, ask them to be vigilant about helping you eat healthy. Have them remind you to eat, and ask them to lend you a hand in preparing meals that are good for you.

Healthy Weight

Maintaining a healthy weight is important for being able to function in day-to-day life as well as stay mentally sharp. Senior citizens often lose or gain weigh as they age. If you are unsure about what weight you should maintain, consult your physician.

Health Risks Associated with Being Underweight

  • poor memory
  • compromised immunity
  • osteoporosis (weak bones)
  • decreases strength
  • hypothermia (lowered body temperature)
  • constipation

Health Risks Associated with Being Overweight

  • type 2 diabetes
  • high blood pressure
  • high cholesterol
  • heart disease
  • stroke (lack of oxygen transported to the brain)
  • some cancers
  • gallbladder disease

 

Because healthy weights will differ for everyone, it is important to verify with a physician whether it is healthy for you personally to lose or gain weight.

Staying Active

Participating in regular healthy amounts of physical activity can not only make you feel better, but it can make you less prone to diabetes, heart disease, and colon cancer. Staying active can be difficult for senior citizens, still it is an important part of a healthy lifestyle.

The following are some tips for maintaining a lifestyle that incorporates physical activity:

  • Know what amount of physical activity is appropriate for you. Everyone has different levels of activity that is safe for them, and while remaining active is important, always consult a health care provider about what is right for your lifestyle.
  • Take time to warm up, cool down, or take breaks when participating in a session of increased physical activity.
  • Take it slow. Always start slowly and build up to more intense levels of physical activities.
  • If you experience any pain, dizziness, or shortness of breath during exercise, stop the activity immediately.
  • Drink water.
  • Dress appropriately if you decide to exercise outdoors. Wear warmer clothes during the winter and wear lighter clothes during the summer while applying sunscreen or wearing sunglasses.
  • Wear the correct shoes for the activities that you participate in.

Types of Activity

 

Aerobic activities include activities that increase the heart rate and work the larger muscle groups. You may be able to speak a few words, but would not be able to carry on an entire conversation due to breathing patterns. Some examples of aerobics include:

  • brisk walking
  • water aerobics
  • tennis
  • house work
  • active play with children or pets
  • dancing

 

Begin incorporating small periods of this activity into your schedule during the week while slowly increasing the duration and frequency as time progresses. It is also important to incorporate different types of exercise that focus on balance and flexibility. Becoming used to a lifestyle with regular patterns of aerobic activity can reduce the effects of aging, control weight, lower risk of heart disease, improve flexibility, increase mood and energy, and expand social networks by meeting new people while doing various activities.

Strengthening activities involve the use of muscle groups against resistant forces like when lifting weights or doing yard work that involves lifting, digging, or pushing a lawn mower. This type of activity can keep muscles strong, reduce the need for a cane, reduce risk of bone injury, and help maintain a healthy weight.

Balance activities focus on muscles in specific areas of the body that encourage control as you move through space, reducing the likelihood of falls. This kind of activity could include walking heel to toe, standing on one foot, getting out of a sitting position without the use of the hands, and standing on the tip of your toes. Balance activities can help you stay steady on your feet and reduce the risk of fall and subsequent injury.

Flexibility activities increase the length of the muscles and can include stretching, yoga, and popular exercise programs like pilates. These activities can maintain the felxibility of joints, prevent stiffness, prevent injuries, and lower stress levels in general.

Weight-bearing activities require the muscles to work against gravity where the arms or legs bear the weight of the body. Activities like walking, tennis, and climbing stairs can build and maintain bone mass or reduce the risk of bone fractures.

Some activities incorporate multiple types of strengthening addressed above. What is important is that senior citizens find an enjoyable and do-able activity that will help them incorporate as many benefits as possible which will have far-reaching benefits to their health.

It’s Easy to Stay Healthy

A common misconception is that it takes an excessive amount of time and extra energy to maintain a healthy lifestyle. However, by just taking short walks for ten minutes a time or cleaning the house regularly can be practical ways to incorporate different physical activities into your daily schedule. And remember, staying healthy as a senior citizen will have increasing benefits as you continue to age.

Staying Motivated to Take Care of Yourself

Just because we age doesn’t mean that we are any less stressed by occurrences in life that may make us feel bad about ourselves or decrease our motivation to be good to ourselves. If anything, many of the challenges senior citizens face add stress.  Losing loved ones and friends or having trouble being independent with the added stressed of disease and functioning due to aging can cause depression or lifestyle changes that contribute to bad health. Here are some important tips for being good to yourself when you may not feel motivated due to circumstances out of your control:

  • Get plenty of sleep
  • Stay connected with family and friends
  • Join clubs or other social groups that you enjoy
  • Spend time with people that you enjoy
  • Volunteer at organizations in your community
  • Work a part-time job that isn’t too stressful or demanding
  • Watch a funny movie or find a way to laugh
  • Take up a hobby that you enjoy

 

Most importantly, senior citizens should remember that it is relatively easy and worth-while to maintain a healthy lifestyle as they age. Be sure to keep family, friends, and those involved in your elder care informed of your goals as they can help assist you. And remembering to eat healthy meals regularly, getting in physical activity, getting enough sleep, and being good to yourself are critical for maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

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ElderCarelink.com launches contest to reward family caregivers

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

ElderCarelink.com is hosting the “Share Why You Care” contest that asks caregivers to share stories about their caregiving experiences. Readers vote for their favorite caregiver to win a free spa day and in-home care of their loved one for a day.

January 7, 2013 (VOCUS) Foster City, Calif. – – ElderCareLink.com, a one-stop elder care resource, is hosting a contest this January specifically for caregivers. The “Share Why You Care” contest is designed to give a voice to the approximately 76 million unpaid family caregivers in the U.S. From January 7, 2013 to February 1, 2013 the site encourages these dedicated individuals to share their stories, struggles and memories.

As the first wave of the Baby Boomer generation prepares for retirement, many are finding themselves in caregiving positions because their parents are living longer than ever before. In some cases, plans for a leisurely retirement have been put on hold have so they can be available 24 hours a day, seven days a week for aging loved ones.

“It can be exhausting being responsible for someone else all the time,” explained Vicki DeLuca, spokesperson for ElderCareLink.com. “We want our users and caregivers to know they are appreciated for all they do.”

Caregivers may submit an essay of 300 words or less describing why or how they became a caregiver and what caregiving means to them. Optionally, users may also submit a photo of themselves and those they have cared for. Essay submissions are entered automatically into the competition for a chance to win weekly $50 prizes and the submission with the most votes will be awarded the grand prize of a free spa day and in-home care of their loved one, worth $350.

“Caregivers aren’t always appreciated for all the work they do,” continued DeLuca. “The real value of the ‘Share Why You Care’ contest is that their voices can be heard.”

To see the entries or enter the contest, please visit the contest homepage and follow ElderCareLink.com on Twitter and Facebook.

About ElderCareLink.com
ElderCarelink.com, a one-stop elder care resource, provides a community of support, advice, and caregiving resources for families in need of elder care. To date, ElderCarelink has provided information and assistance to more than one million families nationwide with finding in-home care, assisted living, nursing homes, adult day care, private duty nursing, and care management services. ElderCareLink.com is owned and operated by QuinStreet, Inc. (NASDAQ: QNST), one of the largest Internet marketing and media companies in the world. QuinStreet is committed to providing consumers and businesses with the information they need to research, find and select the products, services and brands that meet their needs. The company is a leader in visitor-friendly marketing practices. For more information, please visit QuinStreet.com

Senior Living – An Ideal Place for Retired Seniors (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Everyone wants to live in peace and happiness even in old age, and senior living options are available for these people. In such a fast-paced world, children usually don’t have time to take care of their ageing parents. If they look for some retirement options, however, things could be easier. For all retired people, retirement communities are a great place to spend their lives in happiness and contentment. For most seniors, independence comes with a lot of difficulties, but for those who find it tough to accomplish their daily chores there are assisted living homes. When people get older and their children are unable to take care of them, there are a variety of senior living options.

Most seniors resist frequent change, so selecting a retirement community has to be done with great care. Most of the assisted living homes are set up so that the residents of the facility can have a better quality of life than they would experience in their traditional homes. It has often being observed that when it comes to elder care, the most important thing is to get exercise and have activities that enhance their lives and promote longevity. Improving the quality of life through senior living is a very real possibility, and this is the top goal of the assisted living homes. These facilities are there for all senior citizens, whether they are retired or not and whether they need assistance or not. After retirement, a lot of people tend to stop taking care of themselves as well and try to keep living on their own, but this stage of life ought to be the most enjoyable one. If you want to enjoy your life, then check into the best retirement community.

For retired people, there are a number of senior living options that can be chosen depending on the needs of the individual. The two main choices after retirement are living with family or moving to a retirement community. The choice of these senior homes depends on the overall health, independence, and mobility. If the aged person does not like going very far, then assisted living homes that are located near shopping areas would be best. As we get older, we try to find activities that will keep us engaged and happy. A lot of senior living facilities organize events for elderly people to share their thoughts.

Active seniors who are independent in their daily lives can opt for a regular retirement community which serves their individual needs. Senior citizens need to understand that staying in senior living is not a social stigma, but is a way to enjoy retired life to the fullest without being dependent on anyone. The ideal place for retired people among all the senior living options is the retirement community because it really caters to the needs of retired people.

Horizon Bay’s retirement communities, Active Adult Communities communities and Assisted Living Community redefine life for seniors where they are respected as individuals and encouraged to live life more meaningfully.

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Finding an Assisted Living Facility Alternative for Your Loved One – Home Care Solutions (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

The following information is available for individuals who are in the process of making a decision about home care or an alternative to assisted living facility living. If your loved one has decided he or she would prefer to remain in the comfort of their own home rather than an elderly living facility, take the time to decide the best in senior care option for your loved one; it’s important to thoroughly research any professional in senior home care provider who will be visiting your home on a regular schedule.

If you’ve decided on home care as an alternative to assisted living facilities, the following information is important to consider before starting your search. First determine which type of services you or your loved one will need. It may be best to consult a physician or hospital discharge planner for assistance in evaluating your loved one’s special needs and care requirements. After acquiring the names of several service providers, take the time to consider their offered services and reputations. Here are a variety of questions to ask senior care providers and other individuals concerning the track record and history of an elderly living facility alternative care provider:

 

  • How long have you been in business as a provider of home care services?
  • How do you select and train your employees?
  • Do you provide nurses and/or therapists who evaluate patient home care needs?
  • Who supervises the provision of care?
  • How do you involve or include the patient and his or her family in care plan development?
  • How do you bill for services?
  • What procedures are in place in case of emergency?
  • How is patient confidentiality handled?
  • Can the home care provider supply a list of references?

 

Before choosing your senior living facility alternative and settling into a home care plan that works for you, remember that a little initial research can go a long way towards making the patient/senior care provider relationship beneficial to all.

An Alternative to Assisted Living Facilities: Assisted Living Care

You want your parent, friend, or loved one to enjoy their freedom and independence for as long as possible, and remain comfortable in their own household. As an alternative to elderly living facilities, home care is becoming a popular choice for seniors, as it enables them to remain in the safety and comfort of their own home, and relieves care giving duties from relatives and family members. Often times, your loved one may need help with activities or tasks that go overlooked-such as opening jars, driving, maintaining a clean household, and bathing. An alternative to assisted living facilities, home care provides support for those in need with personal care and daily activities and can provide part-time, full time, and as-needed support.

However, it’s important to understand that senior living caregivers do not always provide health-related services. Home health providers offer medical care, such as trained nurses or physical therapy services for seniors. Assisted living caregivers assist with non-medical senior care.

As your parents age they may require assistance, but assisted living care enables your parent or loved one to continue living independently for as long as possible.

Consider assisted living care as an alternative to assisted living facilities. Your loved one may only need care for a few hours a day, but their quality of life can improve significantly with in-home assistance. Although this decision may be emotional and challenging, it’s sometimes necessary to keep your loved ones safe, cared for, and comfortable.

Erica Ronchetti is a freelance writer for Visiting Angels, the nation’s leading, network of non-medical, private duty home care agencies providing senior care, elder care, personal care, Home health care, respite care and companion care to help the elderly and adults continue to live in their homes across America. Visit the Visiting Angels website to find out more information on alternatives to assisted living facilities.

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Nevada-Senior-Guide Visiting Angels – Summerlin and Henderson

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care 

www.visitingangels.com/vegas

Las Vegas Home Care, Las Vegas Senior Care and Elder Care

Visiting Angels is the nation’s leading nationally respected network of non-medical, private duty home care agencies providing senior care, elder care, personal care, respite care and companion care to help the elderly and adults continue to live in their homes. We are family owned by Michael and Jackie DiAsio.

With offices in Las Vegas and Henderson, we provide senior home care to these areas and the surrounding communities.

We are one of Las Vegas’ largest and most established home care agencies. In 2012, we completed our 12th year serving Las Vegas and Henderson. During 2012, we again performed over 200,000 care giving hours to our clients and their families. We currently have over 225 screened and trained employees (caregivers.) who have been with us an average of 4 years. We assist of about 450 people each day with our flexible program. In our 12 years, we have provided over 1,750,000 care giving hours of service to our clients and their families.

We are licensed thru the State of Nevada and during our 2012 unannounced Focused State Re-licensure Survey conducted by the State of Nevada’s Bureau of Health Care Quality and Compliance, we had no deficiencies. In addition to our private pay service, we are also a State of Nevada Medicaid Provider and during our 2012 unannounced Program Compliance Review by the State of Nevada’s Division of Health Care Financing and Policy, we obtained an overall score of 98%.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Sunrise Palms – Las Vegas

http://www.sunriseseniorliving.com/

Sunrise Palms Apartments

Sunrise Palms ApartmentsLuxury Apartments…
Affordable Rents1420 Treeline Drive
Las Vegas
702-431-2277

  • 1 & 2-Bedroom Apartment Homes
  • Gated Community
  • Free Resident Shuttle Bus Service (Shopping
    & Entertainment)
  • Emergency Pull Cords
  • Full Size Washer/Dryer in each apartment
  • Microwave & Dishwasher
  • Gas Cooking & Heating
  • Elevator Access to All Floors
  • Sparkling Swimming Pool/Relaxing Spa
  • Computer Center with high-speed internet
  • Library & Billiards
  • Exciting Planned Activities
  • Covered Parking
  • Affordable Rents. Income Restricted
  • Pets Welcome

Office Hours:
Mon-Fri 8-5, Sat 10-5

The Sunrise Difference

There’s no secret to Sunrise Senior Living’s success. Our resident-centered approach allows Sunrise seniors to maintain independence and dignity, even as their needs change.

Sunrise was founded to create senior living that champions quality of life — a mission that has helped to completely redefine senior care in the U.S. We believe that no two people are alike and that no two residents require the same service. Sunrise residents benefit from this principle through the individually tailored care delivered by our team members every day.

Our Story

Our approach to providing the best possible lifestyle for each resident has set Sunrise apart for more than 30 years, and has helped us to become an experienced and innovative provider of senior living services. The Sunrise Story shares how Founders Paul and Terry Klaassen helped transform traditional views on elder care through their belief in individualized, resident-centered care.

Rocking Chairs

The Sunrise Signature Experience

From our room layouts and interior decor to our designated care managers and community pets, Sunrise takes great care to incorporate details that enhance quality of life for seniors. Learn more about Sunrise Senior Living’s holistic approach to creating a warm and welcoming environment through the The Sunrise Signature Experience.

Sunrise Signature Dining

The Sunrise Signature Dining Program is designed for the unique nutritional needs of older adults. Our community chefs incorporate fresh, flavorful ingredients into traditional, favorite recipes and tastes from around the world. Sunrise’s Assisted Living, Independent Living, Memory Care and Short-Term Stay residents all enjoy three delicious, well-balanced meals served daily featuring a variety of menu choices and snacks available throughout the day.

To incorporate elements of Sunrise Signature Dining at home and learn the latest news on senior nutrition, visit the Sunrise Senior Eats Blog or subscribe to our RSS feed.

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!