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Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias

June 12, 2016 by · Comments Off on Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias
Filed under: General 

Australian business is starting to see the light when it comes to their hiring policies for mature aged employees, and the positive impact they can have on the workplace. A brief visit to main street shopping centre and you will begin to see a few more weathered faces at work than you would have seen a few years ago.

However, if you scratch below the surface, you begin to see this trend still has a long way to play out. A few older workers get hired into the senior ranks where experience and maturity are greatly valued, more older workers are now being hired at the lower end of the corporate scale into unskilled roles, however the numbers being hired into the mid tier ranks remains low.

This barbell approach to hiring mature workers at the top and bottom of an organisation reflects an ongoing bias that remains difficult to overcome. A company is a microcosm of society, and in a perfect world employers should (within reason) seek diversity in the workplace and value skill, experience and aptitude, regardless of age, race or gender.

Unfortunately, we live in a far from perfect world. When it comes to mature aged workers they tend to be penalised on two fronts. Often the first to be made redundant in uncertain economic times, this setback is then compounded when they are regularly overlooked for someone younger as they begin searching for a new job.

As a result of these two biases towards mature aged job seekers, once out of work, the journey back can often be long and arduous. This is reflected in RBA statistics which indicate long-term unemployment at approximately 40% for those aged 45-64, compared to about 25% for those aged between 25 and 44.

So what are the reasons employers provide for not hiring mature aged workers? Typically, reasons include being overqualified or over-experienced. Taken at face value being overqualified or experienced might not seem so bad, but when you hear the same reason trotted out time and again, it becomes less palatable.

Openly negative feedback from employers tend to include perceptions that mature aged workers are not as IT savvy, do not possess the latest skills, or are not as flexible as their younger counterparts. While these reasons may hold true in many instances, many of the older job seekers I speak to, believe these are often used as convenient excuses to exclude them.

Employer feedback that you are not likely to hear include concerns about health (and subsequent cost) or worse insecurity. There are many poor managers in the workplace that may be intimidated by the experience a mature applicant brings to the role. Rather than leveraging the knowledge and experience an older worker can bring to the workplace, the insecure hirer is concerned about the potential competition, and the presence of someone who may know more than they do.

Dealing with many of these preconceived concerns and fears remains an ongoing challenge for the mature aged job seeker. Perhaps the following facts should be mandatory reading for hiring managers. These facts debunk many of the concerns and myths that persist in the workplace relating to mature aged workers;

    • Mature aged workers can deliver cost savings to employers through increased retention rates. For example, workers over 55 are five times less likely to change jobs compared to workers aged 20-24, reducing both recruitment and training costs. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006)Labour Mobility Survey,
    • Mature workers can deliver an average net benefit of $1956 per year to their employer compared to other workers due to high retention rates, lower rates of absenteeism, decreased recruitment costs and greater return on investment.Business, Work and Ageing (2000) Profiting from Maturity: The Social and Economic Costs of Mature Age Unemployment
    • Australians are living longer and are healthier.2005 ABS survey found the proportion of Australians aged 55-64 reporting their health as ‘good’, ‘very good’ or ‘excellent’ was 75.5% – an increase of four per cent since 1995. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006) National Health Survey: Summary of Results, 2004-05
    • Mature workers were the least likely group to take days off due to their own illness or as a carer. In the two week period prior to the survey nearly half the number of mature workers had days off compared to workers aged 25-34. ibid
    • ABS data shows that Australians aged 55-64 are the fastest growing users of information technology. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2005) Year Book Australia,
  • Australian Health Management which examined the daily work habits of 4000 employees found that workers aged 55 years and over performed at their best for approximately seven hours out of an eight-hour day-an achievement that other workers in the study were unable to match. Australian Health Management (2006), Baby boomers give employers a bang for their buck

While government has been doing its part to address mature aged unemployment through initiatives like DEEWR Experience+, the introduction of the Age Discrimination Act (2004) and appointment of an Age Discrimination Commissioner, it remains imperative that older job seekers directly address some of these age bias issues themselves if they are to enhance their prospects for employment.

Following are some helpful hints that mature aged workers can utilise to make themselves more appealing to employers and thus improve their chances of a speedy return to the workforce;

Government or Community Assistance– Take advantage of government or community based initiatives and assistance. There is a considerable amount of free information and assistance available, and I would strongly recommend looking into these resources. For example, the DEEWR “Experience+” initiative provides free career planning and advice for over 45’s until June 2016, along with an Assistance Program delivering refresher and basic training in IT and social media applications.

Value Proposition– Whether writing your resume or cover letter, or sitting in an interview, ensure the focus of discussion clearly remains on the value that you can bring to an organisation. Discuss how you can help, what you have done in the past and what you can deliver going forward. Outline how your experience might bring special insights and perspectives that other candidates may not possess.

Training– Undertake relevant training or up-skilling. Keeping ‘up to date’ is critical if you expect serious consideration for any position, especially if there is a technical element. The benefit will be that an employer will see that you have not fallen behind and therefore will not require retraining, along with any associated cost.

Resume– You will need a properly structured and well written resume to be considered for most roles. Use an appropriate resume style that is tailored to your strengths, skills and experience. Also ensure primary focus of your resume is on the last 5-10 years (include older information where pertinent). Think about getting assistance from a professional resume writer, whocan add significant value if you are looking to ‘get it right the first time’.

Age Bias – To counter potential impact of age bias, you will need to carefully address the following with any potential employer;

Health– Don’t hesitate to communicate your good health and fitness to potential employers at opportune moments. Inform them if you play sport, run, walk or go to the gym regularly. This should allay any potential concerns about health.

IT Savvy –Take every opportunity to indicate your IT capability. Whether it’s your ability to use specialised systems, the MS Office suite or even your use of Facebook or Twitter, this will highlight your ability to embrace new technology.

Adaptability – Highlight your adaptability in the workplace, providing actual examples where appropriate. If you don’t know something, indicate you are keen to learn (and not that you wouldn’t know where to start). Highlighting your adaptability will help to dispel concerns of rigidness and inflexibility.

Team Player –Communicating that you work well as part of a team is critical. It shows a willingness to take direction and work for the common good, and can present you as less threatening, especially if the hirer feels concerned by a mature more experienced candidate.

Be Positive –Though you need to be fully prepared to discuss negative issues, make every attempt to keep the discussion on a positive footing. Unless specifically requested, there is no need to volunteer information of a negative nature.

While industry is beginning to see the light when it comes to acceptance of mature aged workers, the pace of change remains slow. While providence is on the right side due to the ageing Australian population and the inevitable necessity to hire older workers, the fact remains that age discrimination is still entrenched in much current thinking.

As a result, dealing with age bias will continue to be a challenge for the foreseeable future. However with the combination of positive government policy, changing attitudes and a proactive attitude to making oneself more appealing to employers (as outlined above), the situation is not without promise.

Honing your individual approach and message will take time and effort. To strike the right balance the mature job seeker will need to walk a fine line between sounding experienced, but not old, adaptable, but not inflexible and appear keen, not desperate. There is no magic formula for success except practice, perseverance and occasionally seeking help where necessary.

A.J. Bond, is the proprietor of Absolute Resume Writing Services ( http://absoluteresume.com.au ), an Australian based consultancy specializing in the provision of Resume and Cover Letter writing services.

Absolute Resume assists a broad range of job seekers to find their preferred roles, including mature aged job seekers, individuals out of work for a period of time and those made redundant.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7334746

How to Talk to Aging Parents About Senior Housing

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

One in three adults ages 65 and older will fall each year. Use this podcast to learn how to talk to aging parents about senior living before an accident occurs.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in three adults ages 65 and older fall each year. Of these falls, 20–30 percent result in debilitating injuries limiting seniors’ ability to live on their own. It is more important than ever for seniors and their adult children to plan for senior living accommodations—before an accident occurs.

Of course, the conversation about senior living can be emotional and taxing for aging parents. Seniors may view the change as a loss of independence, and it can be difficult to think about leaving their home and existing lifestyle to join a new community.

In a recent podcast from MySilverAge.com, Lisa Holland—regional director of quality improvement at be.group, a nonprofit provider of California senior living communities—offers expert tips to ease these challenges and strategies to help start the conversation. Holland explains how to approach the subject respectfully and sensitively, and how to offer the right support for each parent’s unique needs.

To hear all of Holland’s tips on talking to aging parents about senior living, including whom to include in the discussion and ways to prepare for potential responses, visit: www.mysilverage.com/thetalk.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

Staying Safe on the Road: Senior Driving Guide

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Learn the challenges that may keep older adults off the road and find tips for staying safe behind the wheel

According to a recent study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, drivers in their mid- to late-80s have lower overall crash rates than drivers in their early 20s and roughly half as many crashes as teenagers—making them among the safest drivers on the road.

However, fatal crash rates skyrocket for drivers ages 85 and older. In “The Guide to Driving Safety for Older Drivers” from MySilverAge.com, Jake Nelson, AAA director of traffic safety advocacy and research in Washington, D.C., says it’s important to understand what health factors can compromise safe driving. If senior drivers have ongoing limitations that could put them or their passengers at risk, they may want to reconsider their capacity to continue driving.

Older drivers should evaluate how the following factors affect their driving ability:

  • Vision. How well a driver can see accounts for about 90 percent of his or her ability to drive safely. Weak visual aptitude can be measured by an inability to read signs, street markings, or to see other cars and pedestrians in low-light conditions.
  • Mobility. Loss of strength, coordination and flexibility can make it challenging to control a vehicle. Mobility difficulties may also be signaled by pain and discomfort performing daily activities as well as arthritis in the neck and shoulders.
  • Behavior. Trouble remembering familiar routes, anxiety or confusion while driving, or problems distinguishing the gas from the brake pedal are causes for immediate concern.

For a complete list of driving safety tips, including information on driver improvement courses, new driving technologies and alternate modes of transportation, download the driving guide for seniors.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

Downsizing? 4 Easy Ways to Get Rid of Unwanted Stuff

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

Use these methods from MySilverAge.com to declutter and pare down before moving into a new home.

Members of the National Association of Senior Move Managers recently reported that 98 percent of their senior clients downsized before relocating.

Downsizing before a move can be both liberating and overwhelming. But for seniors who have acquired many possessions over the years, it can be an especially daunting task. Seniors planning a move into smaller living spaces should begin the downsizing process about 90 days before moving, says Greg Gunderson, owner and president of Gentle Transitions, a senior relocation services company located in Manhattan Beach, Calif.

“The most time-consuming part is the decision-making process,” Gunderson says. But even after deciding what stays and what goes, Gunderson says one question remains:  “What’s the best way to get rid of the items I don’t want?” From donating a book collection to selling a grand piano, here are four ways to give possessions a new home.

  1. Hold an estate sale. Partner with an estate sales group that can facilitate the auction or sale of belongings at the home.
  2. Contact an auction house. Consider letting an auction house take over the sale of high-end valuables such as antique furniture, artwork or collectibles.
  3. Donate to a charity. Thinking about passing some possessions to those in need? Call the charity (for example Salvation Army, Goodwill) in advance to give them a list of the items that will be donated.
  4. Hire a paper-shredding service. Because financial, bank and private documents can contain confidential information, Gunderson says it’s important to practice caution when removing them from the home.

Downsizing can be an essential part of seniors’ transition to a new home. Another important step is finding the best housing solution to meet current and future needs. A free guide from MySilverAge.com addresses common questions about senior living and offers helpful resources to ease the transition. Find out:

  • When is the right time to move?
  • What are the available housing options?
  • Are there services to help with the moving process?

Download the full guide for all of these answers and additional senior living tips: http://www.mysilverage.com/seniorhousingguide.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

Checklist Helps Seniors Through Medicare Open Enrollment

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Older adults can follow a few simple tips to avoid uncovered expenses in the upcoming year.

With Medicare open enrollment beginning Oct. 15, now is the time to start preparing for future health care needs.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130710/CG45364LOGO-b)

Frank Nelson, program manager at the Central Coast Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program, regularly educates Medicare beneficiaries about the importance of open enrollment. He urges seniors to use this period to reevaluate their Medicare Part D coverage and make the most of their policies.

In an interview with MySilverAge.com, Nelson said many beneficiaries feel overwhelmed or have questions about their plans: “It can be a complicated maze. There are a lot of ways you can get tangled up in the nuances.” To avoid the headaches that often come with health insurance, Nelson advises seniors to:

  • Check changes to Medicare Part D. Part D plans should be specific to an individual’s medication needs. Seniors will need to make sure their prescriptions are still covered each year during open enrollment.
  • Request local pharmacy pricing. Open enrollment is a good time to check pricing of prescriptions, as each pharmacy can differ.
  • Purchase a supplemental policy. Older adults might consider Medigap to cover health care costs that aren’t already covered by Medicare.

The steps outlined in this checklist help readers successfully navigate the complexities of Medicare open enrollment and stay on top of their health care plans. Read the full checklist here: http://www.mysilverage.com/medicarechecklist.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

AARP Report Highlights Need for Innovative Long-Term Care for the Aging Baby Boomer Population; Japan’s Technological Secrets May Hold the Answers

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

A newly published AARP report illustrates a profound demographic shift that will have consequences for decades to come, particularly in the senior living and long-term care industry. Baby boomers are entering their retirement years, while the ratio of potential family caregivers to those who require long-term services and support is beginning to drop. Fewer available caregivers will mean the senior living industry must rapidly adapt to a surging market. The AARP’s full report is available here: http://bit.ly/156phYi

Family caregiving is a low-cost but often burdensome approach to elder care. Becoming a primary caregiver often involves leaving behind a career, among other sacrifices. Plus, these well-intentioned caregivers may not have the expertise necessary to provide the level of care needed by an aged parent. Adults in these roles often feel enormous pressure and stress, sometimes even resentment. At any rate, the nation’s changing demographics will make today’s family caregiving situation far different in the near future.

Between 1990 and 2010, there were about 7 potential caregivers for every one person aged 80-plus. That ratio is at the start of a freefall that will force society to change the way it cares for its elderly members. By 2030, the ratio of caregivers to elderly will be 4 to 1. All remaining baby boomers will have reached their years of highest risk (80+) by 2050, when the caregiver ratio will have plummeted still further to 3 to 1.

Kevin Williams, president of SeniorMarketing.com, suggests innovative thinking will be required to bridge this care gap: “Naturally, with fewer family caregivers available, the responsibility will largely shift to senior living communities, care agencies and already overextended government programs. But it will take more than simply building more communities or training more staff—assuming an adequate number of candidates are even available. Technological innovation may be the silver bullet to raise the standard of living for aging boomers, improve efficiency, and reduce costs.”

The nation of Japan, which has the greatest life expectancy and one of the oldest average populations in the world, has recently experienced a demographic transition of its own. Recently, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare put out a call for 2 million new professional caregivers, but only received 1.3 million eligible candidates. With low birth rates being the norm, that shortfall will only increase. A tech-savvy society to begin with, the Japanese have embraced robotics and automation as a solution to the elder care issue. Motorized, assistive devices can help older individuals perform tasks themselves, while automated pill dispensers can prevent dangerous medication mistakes. A recent blog post on The Economist explained Japan’s inventive approach to the elder care dilemma: http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2013/05/automation-elderly

Williams concluded: “This demographic shift is a great challenge but also a great opportunity. Forward-thinking, entrepreneurs will be leading the way in this new environment. Technology to assist with daily tasks, provide medical care, monitor, and connect seniors to loved ones is advancing at a faster pace every year. It’s not unreasonable to predict that the future will witness even better care for our future seniors.”

About SeniorMarketing.com

Baltimore-based SeniorMarketing.com was created with twin goals in mind. First, the company helps connect caregivers and seniors with local, affordable care options. Second, the company increases income for senior living communities and health care agencies.

Contact:

Kevin M. Williams, President
SeniorMarketing.com
5024 Campbell Blvd., Suite D-3
Baltimore, MD 21236
Phone: 1-888-523-3311

Thoughtful Gift Ideas for Senior Citizens by Natalie Aranda

May 31, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Kids are easily pleased by almost any gifts as the whole world is new to them. Senior citizens may have experienced and owned everything they wanted in their life. That’s what makes a challenge when it comes to choose gifts for your grandmothers or grandfathers.

No matter what time of year it is, personalized yet unique gifts will sure impress them if you listen to they say and look at what they do. Far too often people tend to buy senior citizens items that they’d never want. Consequently, you should first make a list of what type of hobbies they like. Do they enjoy golfing or spending time playing games with their friends? If this is the case, you could purchase a unique game for their Christmas gift. Researching vintage entertainment or new board games on EBay would be a different approach. This way you could give them something one of a kind. Christmas gift ideas may be tricky to come up with, but they should also incorporate how much you are thinking about them. Since you do want them to enjoy what you purchase, you could get them a gift certificate to a spa or a day at a romantic inn. These gifts are wonderful and inspiring items, regardless of what holiday it is. Chances are they will thank you for months, because the majority of gift givers do not think so deeply.

If you are having trouble coming up with birthday gift ideas, you should always remember to avoid joke presents! When we all get older, we cringe at the thought of age being mentioned. Although some senior citizens embrace who they are, some people would rather not make a big deal of their age. Therefore, you should avoid the birthday gift ideas that involve age jokes. You never know when you are going to offend someone. After all, the last thing you want to do is remind them of their life insurance settlements or the life settlement issues they may have to worry about.

If you are trying to find a better birthday idea, you should explore the idea of scrapbooks. By creating a book filled with photos, memories, and comments, it will bring your grandparents to tears. They embrace nostalgia and would love to have a keepsake that they can look through for years. As a result, these special birthday gift ideas are an extraordinary way to say you love them and are happy to be part of their lives.

Senior citizens may seem like they are impossible to buy for, but all they want are unique gifts like everyone else. No matter whom you are buying presents for, the gift ideas need to be out of the ordinary. Discouraged and don’t have a lot of money to spend? Even by taking time to create a memory book or photo album, it would bring a smile to their face. From birthday gift ideas to Christmas gift ideas, anything is possible as long as you put your heart into it. If you are looking for a quick fix and a simple present to buy, sadly you will be like everyone else.

Natalie Aranda writes on home and family [http://www.moonsome.net/Family-1/]. If you are having trouble coming up with birthday gift ideas, you should always remember to avoid joke presents! When we all get older, we cringe at the thought of age being mentioned. Although some senior citizens embrace who they are, some people would rather not make a big deal of their age. Therefore, you should avoid the birthday gift ideas that involve age jokes. You never know when you are going to offend someone. After all, the last thing you want to do is remind them of their life insurance settlements or the life settlement issues they may have to worry about.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Natalie_Aranda

Nevada-Senior-Guide Lakeview-Terrace-Boulder-City

www.lvterrace.com

Welcome to Lakeview Terrace of Boulder City Assisted Living Community

Boulder City Assisted Living

Lakeview Terrace of Boulder city is a close, intimate assisted living community, located in a small, friendly historic town outside of Las Vegas.  We enjoy the natural beauty of Lake Mead, the grandeur of the mountains, and the views of the big horn sheep in our front yard.  The glitz and glamour of Las Vegas is only minutes away!

Whether you are a Boomer seeking the best for your parent, a senior interested in securing your own future care, or someone who values the companionship and wisdom of elders—you have started in the right place. Our mission guides us in creating a senior services environment where elders direct their lives. We support each individual’s choices and desires to be healthy, embrace life-long learning, and experience elderhood to its fullest.

At Lakeview Terrace, we believe in the power of the team, families, and elders working together to create a real sense of community. We invite you to visit Lakeview Terrace of Boulder City to experience the joy and security we can help provide.

Boulder City, NV Senior Care Options

Lakeview Terrace of Boulder City provides a full range of exceptional senior living options. Our  community offers all of the comforts of home with the added benefit of a  team of experienced, caring professionals dedicated to providing you or  your loved one with quality service.

Senior Care Boulder City Services & Amenities

Welcome  to your new home at Lakeview Terrace of Boulder City in Boulder City, NV. As soon as you step  foot into our beautiful senior living community, you’ll  feel right at home.

Lakeview Terrace of Boulder City offers the finest senior living in Boulder City, including daily  activities, organized outings, nutritional meals, a variety of exercise  programs and much more. Our programs are individually designed for each  senior living option. Whether you are seeking specialized memory care, or a more independent or residential care style of living, we’d love to welcome you or your loved  one home at Lakeview Terrace of Boulder City.

 

 

 

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!