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The Development of Old Age and Related Issues

April 18, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Development of Old Age and Related Issues
Filed under: General 

In traditional Chinese and other Asian cultures the aged were highly respected and cared for. The Igabo tribesmen of Eastern Nigeria value dependency in their aged and involve them in care of children and the administration of tribal affairs (Shelton, A. in Kalish R. Uni Michigan 1969).

In Eskimo culture the grandmother was pushed out into the ice-flow to die as soon as she became useless.

Western societies today usually resemble to some degree the Eskimo culture, only the “ice-flows” have names such a “Sunset Vista” and the like. Younger generations no longer assign status to the aged and their abandonment is always in danger of becoming the social norm.

There has been a tendency to remove the aged from their homes and put them  in custodial care. To some degree the government provides domiciliary care services to prevent or delay this, but the motivation probably has more to do with expense than humanity.

In Canada and some parts of the USA old people are being utilised as foster-grandparents in child care agencies.

SOME BASIC DEFINITIONS

What is Aging?

Aging: Aging is a natural phenomenon that refers to changes occurring throughout the life span and result in differences in structure and function between the youthful and elder generation.

Gerontology: Gerontology is the study of aging and includes science, psychology and sociology.

Geriatrics: A relatively new field of medicine specialising in the health problems of advanced age.

Social aging: Refers to the social habits and roles of individuals with respect to their culture and society. As social aging increases individual usually experience a decrease in meaningful social interactions.

Biological aging: Refers to the physical changes in the body systems during the later decades of life. It may begin long before the individual  reaches chronological age 65.

Cognitive aging: Refers to decreasing ability to assimilate new information and learn new behaviours and skills.

GENERAL PROBLEMS OF AGING

Eric Erikson (Youth and the life cycle. Children. 7:43-49 Mch/April 1960) developed an “ages and stages” theory of human development that involved 8 stages after birth each of which involved a basic dichotomy representing best case and worst case outcomes. Below are the dichotomies and their developmental relevance:

Prenatal stage – conception to birth.

  1. Infancy. Birth to 2 years – basic trust vs. basic distrust. Hope.
  2. Early childhood, 3 to 4 years – autonomy vs. self doubt/shame. Will.
  3. Play age, 5 to 8 years – initiative vs. guilt. Purpose.
  4. School age, 9to 12 – industry vs. inferiority. Competence.
  5. Adolescence, 13 to 19 – identity vs. identity confusion. Fidelity.
  6. Young adulthood – intimacy vs. isolation. Love.
  7. Adulthood, generativity vs. self absorption. Care.
  8. Mature age- Ego Integrity vs. Despair. Wisdom.

This stage of older adulthood, i.e. stage 8, begins about the time of retirement and continues throughout one’s life. Achieving ego integrity  is a sign of maturity while failing to reach this stage is an indication of poor development in prior stages through the life course.

Ego integrity: This means coming to accept one’s whole life and reflecting on it in a positive manner. According to Erikson, achieving integrity means fully accepting one’ self and coming to terms with death. Accepting responsibility for one’s life and being able to review the past with satisfaction is essential. The inability to do this leads to despair and the individual will begin to fear death. If a favourable balance is achieved during this stage, then wisdom is developed.

Psychological and personality aspects:

Aging has psychological implications. Next to dying our recognition that we are aging may be one of the most profound shocks we ever receive. Once we pass the invisible line of 65 our years are bench marked for the remainder of the game of life. We are no longer “mature age” we are instead classified as “old”, or “senior citizens”. How we cope with the changes we face and stresses of altered status depends on our basic personality. Here are 3 basic personality types that have been identified. It may be a oversimplification but it makes the point about personality effectively:

a. The autonomous – people who seem to have the resources for self-renewal. They may be dedicated to a goal or idea and committed to continuing productivity. This appears to protect them somewhat even against physiological aging.

b.The adjusted – people who are rigid and lacking in adaptability but are supported by their power, prestige or well structured routine. But if their situation changes drastically they become psychiatric casualties.

c.The anomic. These are people who do not have clear inner values or a protective life vision. Such people have been described as prematurely resigned and they may deteriorate rapidly.

Summary of stresses of old age.

a. Retirement and reduced income. Most people rely on work for self worth, identity and social interaction. Forced retirement can be demoralising.

b. Fear of invalidism and death. The increased probability of falling prey to illness from which there is no recovery is a continual source of anxiety. When one has a heart attack or stroke the stress becomes much worse.

Some persons face death with equanimity, often psychologically supported by a religion or philosophy. Others may welcome death as an end to suffering or insoluble problems and with little concern for life or human existence. Still others face impending death with suffering of great stress against which they have no ego defenses.

c. Isolation and loneliness. Older people face inevitable loss of loved ones, friends and contemporaries. The loss of a spouse whom one has depended on for companionship and moral support is particularly distressing. Children grow up, marry and become preoccupied or move away. Failing memory, visual and aural impairment may all work to make social interaction difficult. And if this then leads to a souring of outlook and rigidity of attitude then social interaction becomes further lessened and the individual may not even utilise the avenues for social activity that are still available.

d. Reduction in sexual function and physical attractiveness. Kinsey et al, in their Sexual behaviour in the human male, (Phil., Saunders, 1948) found that there is a gradual decrease in sexual activity with advancing age and that reasonably gratifying patterns of sexual activity can continue into extreme old age. The aging person also has to adapt to loss of sexual attractiveness in a society which puts extreme emphasis on sexual attractiveness. The adjustment in self image and self concept that are required can be very hard to make.

e. Forces tending to self devaluation. Often the experience of the older generation has little perceived relevance to the problems of the young and the older person becomes deprived of participation in decision making both in occupational and family settings. Many parents are seen as unwanted burdens and their children may secretly wish they would die so they can be free of the burden and experience some financial relief or benefit. Senior citizens may be pushed into the role of being an old person with all this implies in terms of self devaluation.

4 Major Categories of Problems or Needs:

Health.

Housing.

Income maintenance.

Interpersonal relations.

BIOLOGICAL CHANGES

Physiological Changes: Catabolism (the breakdown of protoplasm) overtakes anabolism (the build-up of protoplasm). All body systems are affected and repair systems become slowed. The aging process occurs at different rates in different individuals.

Physical appearance and other changes:

Loss of subcutaneous fat and less elastic skin gives rise to wrinkled appearance, sagging and loss of smoothness of body contours. Joints stiffen and become painful and range of joint movement becomes restricted, general mobility lessened.

Respiratory changes:

Increase of fibrous tissue in chest walls and lungs leads restricts respiratory movement and less oxygen is consumed. Older people more likelyto have lower respiratory infections whereas young people have upper respiratory infections.

Nutritive changes:

Tooth decay and loss of teeth can detract from ease and enjoyment in eating. Atrophy of the taste buds means food is inclined to be tasteless and this should be taken into account by carers. Digestive changes occur from lack of exercise (stimulating intestines) and decrease in digestive juice production. Constipation and indigestion are likely to follow as a result. Financial problems can lead to the elderly eating an excess of cheap carbohydrates rather than the more expensive protein and vegetable foods and this exacerbates the problem, leading to reduced vitamin intake and such problems as anemia and increased susceptibility to infection.

Adaptation to stress:

All of us face stress at all ages. Adaptation to stress requires the consumption of energy. The 3 main phases of stress are:

1. Initial alarm reaction. 2. Resistance. 3. Exhaustion

and if stress continues tissue damage or aging occurs. Older persons have had a lifetime of dealing with stresses. Energy reserves are depleted and the older person succumbs to stress earlier than the younger person. Stress is cumulative over a lifetime. Research results, including experiments with animals suggests that each stress leaves us more vulnerable to the next and that although we might think we’ve “bounced back” 100% in fact each stress leaves it scar. Further, stress is psycho-biological meaning the kind of stress is irrelevant. A physical stress may leave one more vulnerable to psychological stress and vice versa. Rest does not completely restore one after a stressor. Care workers need to be mindful of this and cognizant of the kinds of things that can produce stress for aged persons.

COGNITIVE CHANGE Habitual Behaviour:

Sigmund Freud noted that after the age of 50, treatment of neuroses via psychoanalysis was difficult because the opinions and reactions of older people were relatively fixed and hard to shift.

Over-learned behaviour: This is behaviour that has been learned so well and repeated so often that it has become automatic, like for example typing or running down stairs. Over-learned behaviour is hard to change. If one has lived a long time one is likely to have fixed opinions and ritualised behaviour patterns or habits.

Compulsive behaviour: Habits and attitudes that have been learned in the course of finding ways to overcome frustration and difficulty are very hard to break. Tension reducing habits such as nail biting, incessant humming, smoking or drinking alcohol are especially hard to change at any age and particularly hard for persons who have been practising them over a life time.

The psychology of over-learned and compulsive behaviours has severe implications for older persons who find they have to live in what for them is a new and alien environment with new rules and power relations.

Information acquisition:

Older people have a continual background of neural noise making it more difficult for them to sort out and interpret complex sensory input. In talking to an older person one should turn off the TV, eliminate as many noises and distractions as possible, talk slowly and relate to one message or idea at a time.

Memories from the distant past are stronger than more recent memories. New memories are the first to fade and last to return.

Time patterns also can get mixed – old and new may get mixed.

Intelligence.

Intelligence reaches a peak and can stay high with little deterioration if there is no neurological damage. People who have unusually high intelligence to begin with seem to suffer the least decline. Education and stimulation also seem to play a role in maintaining intelligence.

Intellectual impairment. Two diseases of old age causing cognitive decline are Alzheimer’s syndrome and Pick’s syndrome. In Pick’s syndrome there is inability to concentrate and learn and also affective responses are impaired.

Degenerative Diseases: Slow progressive physical degeneration of cells in the nervous system. Genetics appear to be an important factor. Usually start after age 40 (but can occur as early as 20s).

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE Degeneration of all areas of cortex but particularly frontal and temporal lobes. The affected cells actually die. Early symptoms resemble neurotic disorders: Anxiety, depression, restlessness sleep difficulties.

Progressive deterioration of all intellectual faculties (memory deficiency being the most well known and obvious). Total mass of the brain decreases, ventricles become larger. No established treatment.

PICK’S DISEASE Rare degenerative disease. Similar to Alzheimer’s in terms of onset, symptomatology and possible genetic aetiology. However it affects circumscribed areas of the brain, particularly the frontal areas which leads to a loss of normal affect.

PARKINSON’S DISEASE Neuropathology: Loss of neurons in the basal ganglia.

Symptoms: Movement abnormalities: rhythmical alternating tremor of extremities, eyelids and tongue along with rigidity of the muscles and slowness of movement (akinesia).

It was once thought that Parkinson’s disease was not associated with intellectual deterioration, but it is now known that there is an association between global intellectual impairment and Parkinson’s where it occurs late in life.

The cells lost in Parkinson’s are associated with the neuro-chemical Dopamine and the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s are associated the dopamine deficiency. Treatment involves administration of dopamine precursor L-dopa which can alleviate symptoms including intellectual impairment. Research suggests it may possibly bring to the fore emotional effects in patients who have had psychiatric illness at some prior stage in their lives.

AFFECTIVE DOMAIN In old age our self concept gets its final revision. We make a final assessment of the value of our lives and our balance of success and failures.

How well a person adapts to old age may be predicated by how well the person adapted to earlier significant changes. If the person suffered an emotional crisis each time a significant change was needed then adaptation to the exigencies of old age may also be difficult. Factors such as economic security, geographic location and physical health are important to the adaptive process.

Need Fulfilment: For all of us, according to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs theory, we are not free to pursue the higher needs of self actualisation unless the basic needs are secured. When one considers that many, perhaps most, old people are living in poverty and continually concerned with basic survival needs, they are not likely to be happily satisfying needs related to prestige, achievement and beauty.

Maslow’s Hierarchy

Physiological

Safety

Belonging, love, identification

Esteem: Achievement, prestige, success, self respect

Self actualisation: Expressing one’s interests and talents to the full.

Note: Old people who have secured their basic needs may be motivated to work on tasks of the highest levels in the hierarchy – activities concerned with aesthetics, creativity and altruistic matters, as compensation for loss of sexual attractiveness and athleticism. Aged care workers fixated on getting old people to focus on social activities may only succeed in frustrating and irritating them if their basic survival concerns are not secured to their satisfaction.

DISENGAGEMENT

Social aging according to Cumming, E. and Henry, W. (Growing old: the aging process of disengagement, NY, Basic 1961) follows a well defined pattern:

  1. Change in role. Change in occupation and productivity. Possibly change in attitude to work.
  2. Loss of role, e.g. retirement or death of a husband.
  3. Reduced social interaction. With loss of role social interactions are diminished, eccentric adjustment can further reduce social interaction, damage to self concept, depression.
  4. Awareness of scarcity of remaining time. This produces further curtailment of activity in interest of saving time.

Havighurst, R. et al (in B. Neugarten (ed.) Middle age and aging, U. of Chicago, 1968) and others have suggested that disengagement is not an inevitable process. They believe the needs of the old are essentially the same as in middle age and the activities of middle age should be extended as long as possible. Havighurst points out the decrease in social interaction of the aged is often largely the result of society withdrawing from the individual as much as the reverse. To combat this he believes the individual must vigorously resist the limitations of his social world.

DEATH The fear of the dead amongst tribal societies is well established. Persons who had ministered to the dead were taboo and required observe various rituals including seclusion for varying periods of time. In some societies from South America to Australia it is taboo for certain persons to utter the name of the dead. Widows and widowers are expected to observe rituals in respect for the dead.

Widows in the Highlands of New Guinea around Goroka chop of one of their own fingers. The dead continue their existence as spirits and upsetting them can bring dire consequences.

Wahl, C in “The fear of death”, 1959 noted that the fear of death occurs as early as the 3rd year of life. When a child loses a pet or grandparent fears reside in the unspoken questions: Did I cause it? Will happen to you (parent) soon? Will this happen to me? The child in such situations needs to re-assure that the departure is not a censure, and that the parent is not likely to depart soon. Love, grief, guilt, anger are a mix of conflicting emotions that are experienced.

CONTEMPORARY ATTITUDES TO DEATH

Our culture places high value on youth, beauty, high status occupations, social class and anticipated future activities and achievement. Aging and dying are denied and avoided in this system. The death of each person reminds us of our own mortality.

The death of the elderly is less disturbing to members of Western society because the aged are not especially valued. Surveys have established that nurses for example attach more importance to saving a young life than an old life. In Western society there is a pattern of avoiding dealing with the aged and dying aged patient.

Stages of dying. Elisabeth Kubler Ross has specialised in working with dying patients and in her “On death and dying”, NY, Macmillan, 1969, summarised 5 stages in dying.

  1. Denial and isolation. “No, not me”.
  2. Anger. “I’ve lived a good life so why me?”
  3. Bargaining. Secret deals are struck with God. “If I can live until…I promise to…”
  4. Depression. (In general the greatest psychological problem of the aged is depression). Depression results from real and threatened loss.
  5. Acceptance of the inevitable.

Kubler Ross’s typology as set out above should, I believe be taken with a grain of salt and not slavishly accepted. Celebrated US Journalist David Rieff who was in June ’08 a guest of the Sydney writer’s festival in relation to his book, “Swimming in a sea of death: a son’s memoir” (Melbourne University Press) expressly denied the validity of the Kubler Ross typology in his Late Night Live interview (Australian ABC radio) with Philip Adams June 9th ’08. He said something to the effect that his mother had regarded her impending death as murder. My own experience with dying persons suggests that the human ego is extraordinarily resilient. I recall visiting a dying colleague in hospital just days before his death. He said, “I’m dying, I don’t like it but there’s nothing I can do about it”, and then went on to chortle about how senior academics at an Adelaide university had told him they were submitting his name for a the Order of Australia (the new “Knighthood” replacement in Australia). Falling in and out of lucid thought with an oxygen tube in his nostrils he was nevertheless still highly interested in the “vain glories of the world”. This observation to me seemed consistent with Rieff’s negative assessment of Kubler Ross’s theories.

THE AGED IN RELATION TO YOUNGER PEOPLE

The aged share with the young the same needs: However, the aged often have fewer or weaker resources to meet those needs. Their need for social interaction may be ignored by family and care workers.

Family should make time to visit their aged members and invite them to their homes. The aged like to visit children and relate to them through games and stories.

Meaningful relationships can be developed via foster-grandparent programs. Some aged are not aware of their income and health entitlements. Family and friends should take the time to explain these. Some aged are too proud to access their entitlements and this problem should be addressed in a kindly way where it occurs.

It is best that the aged be allowed as much choice as possible in matters related to living arrangements, social life and lifestyle.

Communities serving the aged need to provide for the aged via such things as lower curbing, and ramps.

Carers need to examine their own attitude to aging and dying. Denial in the carer is detected by the aged person and it can inhibit the aged person from expressing negative feelings – fear, anger. If the person can express these feelings to someone then that person is less likely to die with a sense of isolation and bitterness.

A METAPHYSICAL PERSPECTIVE

The following notes are my interpretation of a Dr. Depak Chopra lecture entitled, “The New Physics of Healing” which he presented to the 13th Scientific Conference of the American Holistic Medical Association. Dr. Depak Chopra is an endocrinologist and a former Chief of Staff of New England Hospital, Massachusetts. I am deliberately omitting the detail of his explanations of the more abstract, ephemeral and controversial ideas.

Original material from 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

In the lecture Dr. Chopra presents a model of the universe and of all organisms as structures of interacting centres of electromagnetic energy linked to each other in such a way that anything affecting one part of a system or structure has ramifications throughout the entire structure. This model becomes an analogue not only for what happens within the structure or organism itself, but between the organism and both its physical and social environments. In other words there is a correlation between psychological conditions, health and the aging process. Dr. Chopra in his lecture reconciles ancient Vedic (Hindu) philosophy with modern psychology and quantum physics.

Premature Precognitive Commitment: Dr. Chopra invokes experiments that have shown that flies kept for a long time in a jar do not quickly leave the jar when the top is taken off. Instead they accept the jar as the limit of their universe. He also points out that in India baby elephants are often kept tethered to a small twig or sapling. In adulthood when the elephant is capable of pulling over a medium sized tree it can still be successfully tethered to a twig! As another example he points to experiments in which fish are bred on

2 sides of a fish tank containing a divider between the 2 sides. When the divider is removed the fish are slow to learn that they can now swim throughout the whole tank but rather stay in the section that they accept as their universe. Other experiments have demonstrated that kittens brought up in an environment of vertical stripes and structures, when released in adulthood keep bumping into anything aligned horizontally as if they were unable to see anything that is horizontal. Conversely kittens brought up in an environment of horizontal stripes when released bump into vertical structures, apparently unable to see them.

The whole point of the above experiments is that they demonstrate Premature Precognitive Commitment. The lesson to be learned is that our sensory apparatus develops as a result of initial experience and how we’ve been taught to interpret it.

What is the real look of the world? It doesn’t exist. The way the world looks to us is determined by the sensory receptors we have and our interpretation of that look is determined by our premature precognitive commitments. Dr Chopra makes the point that less than a billionth of the available stimuli make it into our nervous systems. Most of it is screened, and what gets through to us is whatever we are expecting to find on the basis of our precognitive commitments.

Dr. Chopra also discusses the diseases that are actually caused by mainstream medical interventions, but this material gets too far away from my central intention. Dr. Chopra discusses in lay terms the physics of matter, energy and time by way of establishing the wider context of our existence. He makes the point that our bodies including the bodies of plants are mirrors of cosmic rhythms and exhibit changes correlating even with the tides.

Dr. Chopra cites the experiments of Dr. Herbert Spencer of the US National Institute of Health. He injected mice with Poly-IC, an immuno-stimulant while making the mice repeatedly smell camphor. After the effect of the Poly-IC had worn off he again exposed the mice to the camphor smell. The smell of camphor had the effect of causing the mice’s immune system to automatically strengthen as if they had been injected with the stimulant. He then took another batch of mice and injected them with cyclophosphamide which tends to destroy the immune system while exposing them to the smell of camphor. Later after being returned to normal just the smell of camphor was enough to cause destruction of their immune system. Dr. Chopra points out that whether or not camphor enhanced or destroyed the mice’s immune system was entirely determined by an interpretation of the meaning of the smell of camphor. The interpretation is not just in the brain but in each cell of the organism. We are bound to our imagination and our early experiences.

Chopra cites a study by the Massachusetts Dept of Health Education and Welfare into risk factors for heart disease – family history, cholesterol etc. The 2 most important risk factors were found to be psychological measures – Self  Happiness Rating and Job Satisfaction. They found most people died of heart disease on a Monday!

Chopra says that for every feeling there is a molecule. If you are experiencing tranquillity your body will be producing natural valium. Chemical changes in the brain are reflected by changes in other cells including blood cells. The brain produces neuropeptides and brain structures are chemically tuned to these neuropeptide receptors. Neuropeptides (neurotransmitters) are the chemical concommitants of thought. Chopra points out the white blood cells (a part of the immune system) have neuropeptide receptors and are “eavesdropping” on our thinking. Conversely the immune system produces its own neuropeptides which can influence the nervous system. He goes on to say that cells in all parts of the body including heart and kidneys for example also produce neuropeptides and neuropeptide sensitivity. Chopra assures us that most neurologists would agree that the nervous system and the immune system are parallel systems.

Other studies in physiology: The blood interlukin-2 levels of medical students decreased as exam time neared and their interlukin receptor capacities also lowered. Chopra says if we are having fun to the point of exhilaration our natural interlukin-2 levels become higher. Interlukin-2 is a powerful and very expensive anti-cancer drug. The body is a printout of consciousness. If we could change the way we look at our bodies at a genuine, profound level then our bodies would actually change.

On the subject of “time” Chopra cites Sir Thomas Gall and Steven Hawkins, stating that our description of the universe as having a past, present, and future are constructed entirely out of our interpretation of change. But in reality linear time doesn’t exist.

Chopra explains the work of Alexander Leaf a former Harvard Professor of Preventative Medicine who toured the world investigating societies where people  lived beyond 100 years (these included parts of Afghanistan, Soviet Georgia, Southern Andes). He looked at possible factors including climate, genetics, and diet. Leaf concluded the most important factor was the collective perception of aging in these societies.

Amongst the Tama Humara of the Southern Andes there was a collective belief that the older you got the more physically able you got. They had a tradition of running and the older one became then generally the better at running one got. The best runner was aged 60. Lung capacity and other measures actually improved with age. People were healthy until well into their 100s and died in their sleep. Chopra remarks that things have changed since the introduction of Budweiser (beer) and TV.

[DISCUSSION: How might TV be a factor in changing the former ideal state of things?]

Chopra refers to Dr. Ellen Langor a former Harvard Psychology professor’s work. Langor advertised for 100 volunteers aged over 70 years. She took them to a Monastery outside Boston to play “Let’s Pretend”. They were divided into 2 groups each of which resided in a different part of the building. One group, the control group spent several days talking about the 1950s. The other group, the experimental group had to live as if in the year 1959 and talk about it in the present tense. What appeared on their TV screens were the old newscasts and movies. They read old newspapers and magazines of the period. After 3 days everyone was photographed and the photographs judged by independent judges who knew nothing of the nature of the experiment. The experimental group seemed to have gotten younger in appearance. Langor then arranged for them to be tested for 100 physiological parameters of aging which included of course blood pressure, near point vision and DHEA levels. After 10 days of living as if in 1959 all parameters had reversed by the equivalent of at least 20 years.

Chopra concludes from Langor’s experiment: “We are the metabolic end product of our sensory experiences. How we interpret them depends on the collective mindset which influences individual biological entropy and aging.”

Can one escape the current collective mindset and reap the benefits in longevity and health? Langor says, society won’t let you escape. There are too many reminders of how most people think linear time is and how it expresses itself in entropy and aging – men are naughty at 40 and on social welfare at 55, women reach menopause at 40 etc. We get to see so many other people aging and dying that it sets the pattern that we follow.

Chopra concludes we are the metabolic product of our sensory experience and our interpretation gets structured in our biology itself. Real change comes from change in the collective consciousness – otherwise it cannot occur within the individual.

Readings

Chopra, D. The New Physics of Healing. 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

Coleman, J. C. Abnormal psychology and modern life. Scott Foresman & Co.

Lugo, J. and Hershey, L. Human development a multidisciplinary approach to the psychology of individual growth, NY, Macmillan.

Dennis. Psychology of human behaviour for nurses. Lond. W. B.Saunders.

[http://www.psychologynatural.com/DepressionBroch.html]

Dr. Victor Barnes is an Adelaide psychologist and hypnotherapist. He has also had three decades of experience in adult education including serving as Dean of a Sri Lankan college (ICBT) teaching several Australian degrees. His overseas experience includes studies and consulting experience in USA, PNG, Poland and Sri Lanka.

Red Cross Blood Products Prolong Life of Two-Year-Old Las Vegan

December 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Two-year-old Sawyer Balonek of Las Vegas has been diagnosed with Bruton Agammaglobulinemia, an inherited immunodeficiency disease.  He has to have an infusion of immunoglobulin every four weeks from plasma extracted from blood given by volunteer donors.

 

The blood products needed by Sawyer are provided by the American Red Cross.  The Red Cross is the predominant blood supplier in Las Vegas and has held several blood drives in Sawyer’s honor to help make sure he gets the blood products he needs.  Sawyer’s parents agree that Sawyer is alive today because of the excellent medical care he has received and the blood products provided by the Red Cross.

 

In 2010 a group of local hospitals invited the Red Cross to bid for the contract to supply blood in southern Nevada.  The Red Cross won the contract, supplanting United Blood Services (UBS) as the provider of blood products for nine of the 14 hospitals in Las Vegas.  In order to meet the demand, the Red Cross strives to collect almost 900 units per week.

 

According to Julia Wulf, chief executive  officer of the American Red Cross Blood Service Region, “It is very challenging for us to collect enough blood in Las Vegas to meet the needs of the southern Nevada hospitals we serve.  We need more donors and we need businesses, churches and other organizations to sponsor blood drives here.”

 

To make an appointment to donate blood, call 1-800-RED CROSS or visit redcrossblood.org.

 

For more information about scheduling a blood drive call (702) 522-3998.

 

#   #   #

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

How to Talk to Aging Parents About Senior Housing

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

One in three adults ages 65 and older will fall each year. Use this podcast to learn how to talk to aging parents about senior living before an accident occurs.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in three adults ages 65 and older fall each year. Of these falls, 20–30 percent result in debilitating injuries limiting seniors’ ability to live on their own. It is more important than ever for seniors and their adult children to plan for senior living accommodations—before an accident occurs.

Of course, the conversation about senior living can be emotional and taxing for aging parents. Seniors may view the change as a loss of independence, and it can be difficult to think about leaving their home and existing lifestyle to join a new community.

In a recent podcast from MySilverAge.com, Lisa Holland—regional director of quality improvement at be.group, a nonprofit provider of California senior living communities—offers expert tips to ease these challenges and strategies to help start the conversation. Holland explains how to approach the subject respectfully and sensitively, and how to offer the right support for each parent’s unique needs.

To hear all of Holland’s tips on talking to aging parents about senior living, including whom to include in the discussion and ways to prepare for potential responses, visit: www.mysilverage.com/thetalk.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

U.S. Veterans Honored by Encore.org’s 2013 Purpose Prize

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Seven Awards for People Over Age 60 Solving the World’s Toughest Social Problems

The Purpose Prize has become a “MacArthur genius award for people who develop a second career as social service entrepreneurs.” – The New York Times.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy organizes a network of volunteers across the country to teach disabled veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan how to combat stress — through fly-fishing.

A public relations executive helps wounded warriors find and renovate foreclosed homes – and transforms lives and neighborhoods in the process.

These are two of the seven winners of the 2013 Purpose Prize, awarded by Encore.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who translate decades of skill and experience into “second acts” that contribute to society’s greater good.

Now in its eighth year, The Purpose Prize is the nation’s only large-scale investment in people over 60 who are combining their passion and experience for the social good. Created in 2005 by Encore.org, the prize is aimed at those with the passion to make change and the wisdom to know how to do it, showcasing the value of experience and disproving the notion that innovation is solely the province of the young.

Two winners will receive $100,000 each and five winners will receive $25,000 each.

This year’s winners:

* Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. ($100,000 winner of The Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra)

* Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron taps into her own experience as a cancer survivor to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. ($100,000)

* Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing emotional wounds through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. ($25,000)

* Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
Fennelly runs a unique summer camp behind bars that is transforming federal prisoners into involved parents. ($25,000)

* Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
Huttinger’s project is on a path to eradicate human schistosomiasis, a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. ($25,000)

* Reverend Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. ($25,000)

* Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
Young’s rise from immigrant nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. ($25,000)

The Purpose Prize winners will be honored on December 5, 2013, at an awards ceremony in Sausalito, Ca. NBC’s Jane Pauley will emcee the event for hundreds of Encore leaders and the Purpose Prize winners.

Twenty-one judges – leaders in business, politics, journalism and the nonprofit sector – chose the seven winners from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees. Judges include Sherry Lansing, former CEO of Paramount; David Bornstein, author and New York Times columnist; Eric Liu, writer and founder of CitizenUniversity; and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, The Purpose Prize is a program of Encore.org, which aims to engage millions of boomers in encore careers combining personal meaning, continued income and social impact in the second half of life.

This year, Symetra is sponsoring the $100,000 Purpose Prize for Future Promise, which recognizes an individual whose approach for helping society has the potential to grow steadily over the next five years. The company plans to sponsor another Purpose Prize for Future Promise in 2014.

“While Purpose Prize winners are helping to solve a wide range of pressing social problems, they have one thing in common,” said Marc Freedman, CEO and founder of Encore.org and author of The Big Shift (PublicAffairs Books). “They – and millions of others in encore careers – are turning personal passions and decades of experience into invaluable contributions across sectors, continents and generations, often through entrepreneurship.”

Short summaries for all winners follow. Photos are attached. Longer bios and higher resolution photos are available.

Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas, winner of this year’s Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra, rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. Following a 35-year-career as a fundraising and marketing dynamo, she became the director of communications at Purple Heart Homes in 2008 in an effort to provide greater services for veterans who have service-connected disabilities. In just three years, Thomas helped take the fledgling nonprofit to new heights. She has raised millions for Purple Heart Homes in financial contributions and material donations. Revenue shot up 600% in her first year with the startup. She’s developed an innovative program that matches veterans with foreclosed homes donated by banks, then raises the funds to renovate a home for the individual veteran’s needs. It’s a win-win for all generations—and communities too. It helps veterans to grow assets, towns to recoup lost taxes and neighborhoods that have struggled with foreclosures to stabilize.

Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron is an award-winning journalist with more than 42 years in television broadcasting. She tapped into her own experience as a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. To focus on the plight of low-income Latinos fighting the disease, Duron founded Latinas Contra Cancer (Latinas Against Cancer), an organization committed to educating, supporting and providing essential services to low-income Spanish speakers often overlooked by the health care system. Latinas Contra Cancer has offered a range of programs that have taught more than 3,000 men, women and teens about the disease, resulting in more than 300 preventative cancer screenings. The group has provided psychological and social support to over 100 patients per year. However, the call to action Duron answered has had an impact far beyond the Bay Area. Her passionate commitment is helping Latino communities across the U.S. gain access to cancer support, information and treatment. Her great empathy for cancer patients has made her utterly clear on her bigger purpose in the second stage of life.

Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing the emotional wounds of battle through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. A cancer survivor and war veteran himself, Nicholson was impressed by the fortitude of disabled veterans at the Walter Reed military hospital, where he was treated for prostate cancer in 2005. It spurred him to found Project Healing Waters, a program dedicated to helping disabled soldiers and veterans recover from the trying aftermath of war through the sport of fly-fishing. One-on-one connections have been key to Project Healing Waters’ approach since the beginning. Nicholson knew there were fly-fishing groups and facilities all over the country. His innovation was to convince them to start, manage and lead fly-fishing instruction and outings with veterans through military and Veterans Administration facilities. The quiet bonds forged over fishing lines began to transform lives. Again and again Nicholson heard from family members who said their loved ones had returned from war withdrawn, angry, and difficult to be around. But after fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters, they’ve become happier, more open and engaged. Project Healing Waters works closely with VA Recreational and Occupational therapies to identify those who would most benefit from the program. Many are in wheelchairs or using prosthetics. A few are blind. Participants reflect of full spectrum of disabled veterans and include all ages, genders, ethnicities and disabilities. Nicholson says the impact “goes well beyond the mechanics of fly-fishing.”

Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
A lifelong social activist who ran homeless shelters in the District of Columbia for 17 years, Carol Fennelly abandoned her plans to retire in 1998 when she learned that D.C. inmates had been transferred to Youngstown, OH. One woman made 10-hour round-trip drives twice a week to visit her son. Moved to answer a social need, Fennelly thought about opening a hospitality house in Youngstown for family members visiting inmates. She soon learned that while 93% of the federal inmate population is male, in sheer numbers there are more programs for mothers in prison than there are for fathers. She decided she had what it took to change things. “I had spent years organizing, dealing with government, making change happen, and that emboldened me to think I could go into prisons and start all these radical programs,” Fennelly says. So she launched an encore career with Hope House, an innovative organization that helps prison inmates stay in regular contact with their children. In the past 14 years, Hope House has hosted 200 video teleconferences, 18,000 personalized book readings by fathers and 31 week-long summer camps, which allow kids to spend time with their fathers free of the usual restrictions that come with visitor hours and family chaperones. California recently decided to implement the Hope House model in its 33 state prisons. Prisons in Texas, Idaho and New Hampshire may follow. In 2013 Fennelly was honored at the White House as a Champion of Change.

Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
International public health expert Elizabeth Huttinger spotted a big idea in shrimp, and launched an encore career that could eradicate a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. Huttinger’s project – founded in 2006 – is targeting human schistosomiasis, an infectious parasite carried by river snails. Understanding that the population of prawns that eat those snails had precipitously declined, Huttinger, 63, has devoted her encore career to restoring the prawn population in the SenegalRiver Basin. Projet Crevette’s mission is multifaceted: the restoration of the prawn population diminishes the spread of schisto, provides new economic opportunities to afflicted communities and heals families infected by the disease. Today, Projet Crevette is a prawn-farming microenterprise, operated by locals at public watering holes. It has brought social innovation, new microbusinesses, environmental restoration and improved health to communities. Huttinger is confident Projet Crevette will meet its bold goal to fully restore the indigenous prawn population—and improve countless lives in the process.

Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Reverend Violet Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. After 14 years as parish pastor trained in psychotherapy, Little left behind her traditional congregation to create a religious refuge for the homeless on the streets of the city, which became the “WelcomeChurch.” The church relies mostly on word of mouth, and services can pop up in a city park or on a sidewalk. No questions are asked, and everyone is welcome. The WelcomeChurch coordinates medical services through local universities, helps people get into rehab or jobs, and offers educational services to the public on the causes of homelessness. Little estimates 40 percent of her congregants have moved off the streets into permanent housing and the WelcomeChurch celebrates each and every one of them, many of whom stay connected with Little through their transition. Little’s congregation has grown to include hundreds of homeless as well as non-homeless volunteers in the EvangelicalLutheranChurch in America.

Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
An immigrant from the West Indies who built a meaningful life on meager income, Young’s gritty rise from nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. She’s encouraged thousands to stand up for their right to earn a living wage, and counsels and trains others to become leaders themselves. In 2004, Young began building a movement to legislate a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in New YorkState, which would make overtime, paid time off and rest days mandatory. In 2009, when she heard then Governor David Patterson say on the radio that he’d sign the bill if it made it to his desk, she put on a full court press, becoming the engine behind passage of the law in 2010. The law is the first of its kind in the country, but Young is committed to making sure it isn’t the last. She’s now a key player in the NDWA’s expansion from 11 to 44 affiliated organizations with 15,000 members, up from 5,000 in 2007. Young’s passion for serving her community has only just begun.

Read More About Encore’s Purpose Prize at www.encore.org/prize.

About Encore.org

Encore.org is a national nonprofit that promotes the idea that people in their second acts have the talent and experience to solve some of society’s greatest problems.

About The Atlantic Philanthropies

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. In keeping with the Giving While Living philosophy of founder Charles “Chuck” Feeney, The Atlantic Philanthropies believes in making large investments to capitalize on significant opportunities to solve urgent problems now, so they are less likely to become larger, more entrenched and more expensive challenges later. The Atlantic Philanthropies also seeks to encourage others of significant wealth to engage in major philanthropic pursuits in their lifetime.

About The John Templeton Foundation

The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, supporting research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.

About Symetra

Symetra Financial Corporation (NYSE: SYA) is a diversified financial services company based in Bellevue, Wash. In business since 1957, Symetra provides employee benefits, annuities and life insurance through a national network of benefit consultants, financial institutions, and independent agents and advisors.

 

CONTACT: Sara Ying Rounsaville, srounsaville@encore.org, 415-952-5121, or Russ Mitchell, rmitchell@encore.org, 510-969-0801

Study Shows that People Who Undergo Cataract Surgery to Correct Visual Impairment Live Longer

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Australian researchers find a 40 percent lower mortality risk among patients who had their vision corrected through the procedure  

SAN FRANCISCO – Sept. 4, 2013 – People with cataract-related vision loss who have had cataract surgery to improve their sight are living longer than those with visual impairment who chose not to have the procedure, according to an Australian cohort study published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. After comparing the two groups, the researchers found a 40 percent lower long-term mortality risk in those who had the surgery.

The research is drawn from data gathered in the Blue Mountains Eye Study, a population-based cohort study of vision and common eye diseases in an older Australian population. A total of 354 persons aged 49 years and older and diagnosed with cataract-related vision impairment –  some of whom had undergone surgery and others who had not – were assessed between 1992 and 2007. Adjustments were made for age and gender as well as a number of mortality risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, smoking, cardiovascular disease, body mass index and measures of frailty and comorbid disease. Follow-up visits took place after five and ten years since the baseline exam.

Previous research had indicated that older persons with visual impairment were likely to have greater mortality risk than their age peers with normal vision, and that cataract surgery might reduce this risk. These studies – unlike the Blue Mountains Eye Study – compared people who had undergone cataract surgery with those in the general population or with those who had not had cataract surgery, and did not link vision status to the surgical status.

“Our finding complements the previously documented associations between visual impairment and increased mortality among older persons,” said Jie Jin Wang, Ph.D., of the Westmead Millennium Institute and one of lead researchers of the study. “It suggests to ophthalmologists that correcting cataract patients’ visual impairment in their daily practice results in improved outcomes beyond that of the eye and vision, and has important impacts on general health.”

The association between correction of cataract-related visual impairment and reduced mortality risk is not clearly understood, but plausible factors may include improvements in physical and emotional well-being, optimism, greater confidence associated with independent living after vision improvement, as well as greater ability to comply with prescription medications.

Dr. Wang noted one limitation of the study is that participants with cataract-related visual impairment who did not have cataract surgery could have had other health problems that prevented them from undergoing surgery, and that these other health problems could partly explain the poorer survival among non-surgical participants. This issue is addressed by the researchers in a subsequent study.

Caused by the clouding of the lens, cataract is a leading cause of treatable visual impairment that will affect more than half of all Americans by the time they are 80 years old.[1]  Surgical removal of the opaque lens with an artificial lens implanted is a successful procedure of cataract treatment. If completing everyday tasks is difficult, cataract surgery should be discussed with an ophthalmologist − a medical doctor specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

Seniors who are seeking eye care but are concerned about cost may qualify for EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, which offers eye exams and care at no out-of-pocket cost to qualifying seniors age 65 and older. Learn more at www.eyecareamerica.org. For more information on cataracts and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology 
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons — Eye M.D.s — with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who has the education and training to treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trusted and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

About Ophthalmology
Ophthalmology, the official journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, publishes original, peer-reviewed, clinically applicable research. Topics include the results of clinical trials, new diagnostic and surgical techniques, treatment methods technology assessments, translational science reviews and editorials.

Fullfilling Your Dreams, As a Senior Citizen by Eva Fry

August 12, 2013 by · Comments Off on Fullfilling Your Dreams, As a Senior Citizen by Eva Fry
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Today there are 30 million seniors. In 2030 there will be 70 million. The senior years can be an opportunity to fulfill dreams. Think of how happy those 70 million seniors will be if they believe they still have time to live their dreams. Think of how much happier and better our world will be when it is filled with people who are productive, doing good and living fulfilled lives, in their latter-years.

When we were young, we each had dreams of what we wanted to do with our life. Unfortunately many of us have never realized those dreams.

Why? We may have had parents who didn’t provide the opportunities we needed, when we were young. We may have married young, had children and the responsibilities of life took over. Before we knew, it we were seniors and believed we were too old to live our dreams.

I’m happy to report I am not one of those who live with regret or wish they had done more with their lives. Today, I am 67 years old and I am living my dreams.

I had three dreams when I was a young girl. My first, to be married, have children, and be a good mother with a happy family. My second, to be an entertainer and my third dream was to be a missionary.

Thankfully I have accomplished all three of my dreams and I’m starting on new ones.

My husband and I have been married for 48 years. We have three wonderful grown children and nine grandchildren. Why was this dream so important to me? My father was alcoholic and my mother emotionally ill. My childhood was sad and troubled. I desperately wanted a happy family like some of my friends. I was blessed to have that dream come true because I worked hard to make it come true.

Through the years, I never forgot my dreams to become an entertainer and a missionary. I just put them on hold. These dreams took a long time coming, but today my dreams have come true.

How have I accomplished my long-awaited dreams, in my senior years?

Change is the answer! Life doesn’t always stay the same. One door to our life may close but a new door always opens and we must be ready for it. When my children grew up and started their own lives, it left me in an empty nest. I was smart enough to use it as a launching pad to direct me toward my life-long dreams. I now had time to pursue them.

It began with me going back to college and taking a speech class. I took it to overcome my shyness and to learn to be more outgoing to I would have a chance at being an entertainer. You must know that I had no musical training and could not play an instrument so I had big dreams.

The class was a big step toward my dreams. I discovered I was a pretty good speaker and was asked to be on the college speech team. I traveled all over the USA competing with my speeches with intelligent teenagers. It was so much fun and I won a national speaking award. I joined Toastmasters and became president of my club. I took a stand-up comedy class. For many years I spoke for Mother’s Against Drunk Driving, because I had been a victim of a drunk driver when I was a teenager. These all helped me gain confidence in myself and encouraged me to see what I could do as an entertainer.

I began to learn words to old songs and entered a talent contest for the city of San Diego and won another award. For several years now, I have been the master of ceremonies for the same talent show and for their variety show at the San Diego Fair.

At the age of 60 I began entertaining at senior residences and to learn to play the piano and guitar. I began to write my own music. I have produced 60 songs and had my music played on 150 radio stations. For several years now I have entertained with my own show using my own music at many functions.

I feel I have actually accomplished my second dream to become an entertainer. I wrote a book to encourage others to do the same called “You Must Have a Dream.”

Accomplishing my third dream, to become a missionary, has been a wonderful blessing to me. Because I spoke for MADD, I was asked to speak at Juvenile Hall in San Diego. Because of my involvement with incarcerated kids, I began my own program called “Be a Winner in Life.’ which I presented for ten years to over 10,000 young people. From this I wrote two books to help the kids “Be a Winner in Life” and “Letters From Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids.”
This work has helped me be a missionary to these children teaching them true values and principals of life. My books help me share the message of The Gospel of Jesus Christ and the joy that it brings.

I am a senior citizen now and very thankful to God that I was able to fulfill the dreams of my heart.

We can all live to be 100 years old. How will your life turn out? I hope that when your life is over you will have no regrets and you will never have to say “I wish”, “if only”, but rather you will say, ” I fully lived my life and I have no regrets. I loved my life because I lived my dreams! This is how I feel about my life. I am so thankful. The Lord has truly blessed me. I pray He will bless you too.

My books can be purchased at http://www.evafry.com . I hope they will encourage you to live your dreams.

Eva Fry’s mission is to help others become better and happier. She is an inspirational author, singer/songwriter/ motivational speaker and seminar leader. Eva has published three books – “YOU MUST HAVE A DREAM” -for seniors, “BE A WINNER IN LIFE”-for good kids, troubled kids and their parents. “LETTERS FROM JUVENILE HALL, KIDS HELPING KIDS” (Actual letters from kids at Juvenile Hall, intended to save other kids from destroying their lives) She invites you to use the FREE ARTICLES she has written for: at- risk kids Also FREE ARTICLES of inspiration to help meet life’s challenges. http://www.evafry.com She has produced 7 Music CD’s

“Remember” (new music for seniors), “Oh What Joy Christmas” “The Little Things” (inspirational country), “I Love Living The Teachings of The Lord” (Gospel/Christian) “Savior of Mine” – (Christian) “God Gave You Intelligence” (for children)

“Classical Style” (instrumental)

Her music and books can be purchased at http://www.evafry.com Her books can also be ordered at any bookstore. Her articles have been published, all over the world.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eva_Fry

A Senior Citizen In Juvenile Hall by Eva Fry

August 9, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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It was my first time speaking at Juvenile Hall, I was terrified! I had seen enough movies to know I didn’t want to be there. As I hurried through the metal detectors, and pushed through the big metal doors, my heart was pounding and I was filled with fear. I wondered if I would get out of this place alive.

I passed the holding tanks, rooms with big windows containing kids who had just been arrested. In there were kids pacing, fighting addictions, fearfully waiting to be assigned to a unit. Some kids were right at home. They knew this place! They had been there before.

When I stepped into the inner sanctum I heard sounds that confirmed my fears. Angry kids were screaming, using profane language. I heard loud pounding on the doors, which dotted the narrow hallways. Juvenile inmates were communicating through the thick cement walls. As I scurried along, I saw empty eyes piercing out at me through the small, eye level windows of their rooms. I passed through more metal doors and hallways, until I came to the unit I was to speak in. Inside sat fifty young men, of all nationalities. I knew from their varying hair color. Their backs were toward me. They were juveniles from the age of 15 to 17.

As I slowly walked to the front of the room, I made sure there was a guard on either side, in case one of them grabbed me. I took a deep breath and turned toward them. My heart stopped! I was shocked! They were just kids! I expected them to look like criminals, but they looked like they could be one of my nine grandkids.

Although some did appear tough, and others rough, there was something about them that touched me. At that moment, my life changed! A still small voice inside me said, “you must try to help them!”

Thus began my continuing, nine-year mission, to help kids who are in trouble with the law. These are my kids. “The Forgotten Kid.” The children we think we can lock up, throw away the key, and forget. The ones who learned most of the bad things they have done, from us, the older generation. They are kids, paying the price for the sins of society. Our scapegoats

There are up to 600 kids locked up, in this facility, at any time. The Hall houses kids from the age of 10 to 18, although I saw a nine-year and ten-year-old carrying blankets and pillows. Were they going camping?
No! They were headed to their rooms, to be locked up, for armed robbery.

BE A WINNER IN LIFE IS MY PROGRAM. I help the kids believe they can still be WINNERS. I teach them they have potential to do amazing things with their life. In fact, I believe God sent them to this earth to do good with their lives. I tell them each one is a genius, in their own way, and can do something better than anyone else can do. They must find their genius. They must go to school, obey the law, obey their parents, be honest and work hard. My goal is to share with them the same truths I taught my kids: the basic truths of right and wrong.

I hope to support the parents who are good parents, but their kids got on the wrong track. I try to teach the ones with bad parents, or no parents, values they were never taught: basic principals of good and bad.

How did I start speaking at Juvenile Hall? It began a long time ago, when I was a little girl, the daughter of an alcoholic father who emotionally damaged my mother and us kids. I grew up in circumstances similar to some of these young wards.

I speak to them because I would have loved to have had someone, who cared, talk to me when I was young.

Some of these kids, like me, are the off spring of parents who didn’t care how their actions affected their kids. We were from homes full of contention caused by parents with addictions. Sick parents who were unable to control their own lives, let alone parent a child. So-called parents, who lived in their own hell and created havoc in the lives of their children. Parents who abandoned their kids.

When I talk to the kids, I relate to the ones who hope to fix their parents, and those who must care for their siblings. I relate because I remember pouring my Dad’s alcohol down the drain, thinking it would fix our problems but instead, I got myself into lots of trouble. I remember taking money from my Dad’s pocket, after he passed out, to give to my Mom. Money for food.

I remember the day I realized that whatever I did at home would change nothing. I would never have the loving family I longed for. Like many of these kids, I turned to friends for the family I needed. Like them, they were usually the wrong kids of friends, peers who were doing bad things. I remember drinking alcohol, even though I hated it, so I could fit in.

I hear my same story, over and over again, at Juvenile Hall.

To help them I share a profound truth, which I discovered in my young life. “Bad things happen for a reason!”

My bad thing: after a wasted life, at the age of 57, my Dad died an alcoholic. His drink of choice was 100% over proof rum. The good thing: My Dad’s death led to me realize I didn’t want to end up like him, or give my kids the life he gave me. I eventually made a commitment to stop drinking and change my life. Thankfully I was young and not an alcoholic, like my Father and Grandfather.

My commitment worked! I share with them how wonderfully my life has turned out, because of one small choice. I used my Dad’s mistakes to choose a better life for myself. I now have the life I dreamed about. My husband and I have been happily married for 45 years and with our children and grandchildren, are a close knit, happy, non-drinking family.

I tell them, “you can turn the bad things which have happened in your life into motivation for a better life too.” I help them believe they still have time to change.

Another reason I speak at Juvenile Hall is because I was a victim of a drunk driver. At the age of 17, the car I was riding in was hit head-on by a drunk driver. My head went through the windshield. My nose and part of my ear was torn off. Thankfully doctors put me back together, but I came to realize the terrible carnage alcohol could cause. I’ve had a mission all my life to teach the evils of alcohol use. I was a speaker for Mother’s Against Drunk Driving for several years. In fact, they were the ones who first sent me to speak at Juvenile Hall.

I teach the kids to abstain from alcohol and drugs. I have commitment cards, which I encourage them to sign and honor. I know if I can help them make a commitment not to drink alcohol, or use drugs; they will have a better chance at changing their lives and reaching their potential. They don’t need alcohol or drugs in their life. Most of the kids are locked up because of their first drink of alcohol, which lead to drug use and criminal behavior.

One of the questions people always ask me is “what is it like to talk to young criminals? Do they listen to you?”

My answer is, “at first it took a little time to know what to say and how to say it, so they would accept me. It took me time to overcome my fear of knowing how to communicate with them and have them accept me.”

One night, one of them asked, “why do you come to Juvenile Hall?” I answered, “why do you think?” His response, “for the money!” I replied, “no one pays me, in fact the first time I spoke, someone stole the hub caps from my car.” His mouth fell open and then he really listened to my program.

I’m happy to say I do very well with them! The kids are very attentive. They know I care. I don’t judge them. In most cases, I don’t know what their crime is. I don’t want to know. I tell them that what they have done is wrong and they must pay the price. On the other hand, I hope to stop them from getting deeper into crime. If I can stop them from hurting someone in the future, I feel my time is worthwhile.

I know I won’t get through to all of them, but I hope to plant seeds, which may take root someday when they have choices to make. My dream is to save as many as I can.

It is very gratifying when I feel I have gotten through to them and when they thank me. One boy said. “You told me bad things happen for a reason. Your right!” I never would have gotten an education if I hadn’t come to Juvenile Hall. I just got my GED. I applied to a college and was accepted. I will be going to school to be come an engineer when I get out.”

I am happy when I feel I have helped them look at life in a more positive way.

I try to help them turn their mistakes and bad experiences into something good. My greatest success is that I encourage the kids at Juvenile Hall to write letters to save other kids from the consequences they are experiencing. They have written incredible letters. Their letters have great impact on other kids because they come from their peers. My latest book “Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids contain the letters.

Here are inserts from some of the letters:

Addiction controlled my life. Don’t let it control you! I wish for all you guys to be safe, and I pray for you kids that don’t know what life is really about, because after that second when you make the bad decision, it goes down hill from there. Only you can change your future. I hope you all understand that there’s a number in prison with your name on it, if you don’t change. Now’s the time to change. Not later. Not when you get out, but now! If you don’t change now you never will.

Gang banging was my worst thing I ever gotten into. If I could take it back, I would. I repeated my Dad’s cycle.

Now I sit here in a one-room cell, facing 25 years to life. I want you to look around and see what kind of situation you’re in. Open you eyes and your minds and soak as much education as you can. I’m 17 years old in a couple of weeks. I will be graduating from high school (in Juvenile Hall). Education is the key to life.

I’m in the Hall, Unit 800. Why? Because I committed a sin while I was on drugs. At the age of 13, I started using drugs because my best friend was asking me to try some. At the age of 16, my charges are DUI, evading a peace officer, driving at an unsafe speed with no license, a firearm in the car and 187 murder.

All the violence that is going on in our community is not solving nothing. The only thing it’s doing is killing us off, one by one. Before you know it the human race will be extinct. Because we are the last of the dying breed. I’m only telling you this so you guys can make the right decision. Your homies probably say they are down for you, but they be faking, and that’s real. The only people that’s going to stick by you is your mama and your family. I seen too much in my life young homies and it’s not what you are thinking. I lost my little homie and that really hit me. All that was on my mind was retaliation but when I thought about it, I knew it wouldn’t bring him back so I thought of another game plan. I prayed!

Eva, I want to thank you for all the help that you have given me. All the little words you’ve spoken in your groups have helped me so much along the way. I have changed in ways that people wouldn’t believe. I have done a whole 360. Without the help of you, I see the change being 100% more difficult. I wish my family was around to see my new life.

As you can see, my experience with my kids, at Juvenile Hall, has been emotionally rewarding and very satisfying to me. These kids give my life meaning. I feel I am making a difference.

I continue to try to help kids. I have written a book called “BE A WINNER IN LIFE”, which I hope to get into the hands of every child in Juvenile Hall’s, all over the country. Also, I want to get it into the hands of parents. I hope to get to kids before they are locked up.

Yes I’m a grateful to be a senior citizen at Juvenile Hall! I’m grateful my senior years have value and that I am doing something with my time, which is worthwhile.

I now know that every senior citizen can use the wisdom they have gained throughout their life to make a difference. We can all do something. I encourage you to find a way to help a child. Our kids need you!

Eva Fry is an author, singer/songwriter and motivational speaker. She had a ten year volunteer program at Juvenile Hall called “Be a Winner in Life” She has three books “You Must Have a Dream” for seniors, “Be a Winner in Life” for kids, troubled kids and their parents, and Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids” – for all kinds, especially those who are locked up and to help kids from being locked up. She started writing and songwriting at the age of 60. Her goal is to encourage seniors to reach their potential and help kids do the same. She has many free articles on her web site to help young and old. She has six CD’s which are spiritually based and inspire young and old. She is avilable as a speaker or performer. Her work is available on her web site Eva Fry – eva@evafry.com http://www.evafry.com ( She has many free articles on her web site)

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eva_Fry

Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads

June 5, 2013 by · Comments Off on Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads
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Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads

BOSTON, May 2, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Mother’s and Father’s Day celebrations are approaching, yet millions of adult children care for parents year round while on the brink of burnout.  Catapulted into the accidental caregiver role without warning, stressed-out kids are doing their best to hold life together when everything seems to be falling apart.

Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom issues a timely warning. “You must seek support as a caregiver.  The life you save may be your own.”

Bloom offers practical coping strategies to help family caregivers recharge their energy and avoid burnout during a free monthly Caregiving Power Hour.  During these tele-sessions, caregivers get tactical solutions to get through the week ahead.  Bloom wants to inspire and train caregivers to provide quality support for their loved ones while fully living their own lives.

“It’s coaching, community, and caring in the gift of an hour of sacred time that can really make a difference,” Bloom says.

Bloom knows the stressful caregiving journey well.  He served as the primary, live-in caregiver for his parents during their final years.  His father passed away in 2009 and, after a courageous battle with cancer, Bloom’s mother passed away in his loving arms on Mother’s Day 2012.

“Caregivers put the well-being of loved ones first which can mean putting their own needs and plans on the back burner.  The regret for career or life enhancing opportunities not taken can be a bitter pill to swallow,” Bloom says.

He honors the legacy of his parents by sharing key steps along the roadmap to caregiving without regret.

  1. Release Crisis Mode. Stop being a victim to circumstances so you feel stronger and become laser-focused to meet your family’s needs.  Supporting loved ones through medical challenges is overwhelming and scary.  When you become aware that feeling like a victim or in a state of crisis is a mindset, you can successfully shift back into taking control and positive action.
  2. Overcome Conflict.  Communicate and cope with calm and clarity. Otherwise, you will crash while riding the emotional roller coaster associated with disability or disease. Mastering your own trigger points for anger and frustration will lead you to deal effectively with the most challenging people and circumstances in your life.
  3. Achieve Buy-In. Motivate others to contribute based upon their individual abilities, preferences, and talents so your loved one receives the most satisfying support possible.  Giving others choices for how they can serve will foster their desire to gladly help on a regular basis.
  4. Deliver Greatness and Compassion in Equal Doses.  Become the inspiring caregiver that people cheer for and gladly support in meaningful ways.  Let your compassion shine through in all actions as you support your loved one.  Devote equal time for self-care so you have the energy to let your best shine through even during tough times.
  5. Magnetize and Motivate Talent. Create an atmosphere that attracts and retains the best people to join your loved one’s care team and experience brilliant performance.  Stay positive and open to the opinions of others so you can facilitate options for the best care and support.
  6. Access Intuition.  Trust your instincts and let your care and dedication guide your decisions.  Share any concerns and questions with key support professionals.  It is better to explore a concern that proves to be okay rather than ignore something that could be life threatening.
  7. Put Chocolate in Your Pill Box.  Find ways to fuel your soul so you can thrive during the caregiver journey and develop the passion and purpose for your life beyond caregiving.  Dose yourself regularly to avoid burnout while creating enduring satisfaction and success.

About Certified Professional Coach and Energy Leadership™ Master Practitioner A. Michael Bloom

Since 2011, A. Michael Bloom has revitalized the careers of hundreds of family and professional caregivers with practical, tactical soul-saving coping strategies that support them in saving lives – including their own.  An in-demand New England speaker, workshop leader, and coach, Bloom has influenced hundreds of caregivers to follow a roadmap to avoid burnout and recharge their caregiving energy.  The author of the forthcoming book, The Accidental Caregivers Survival Guide: Your Roadmap to Caregiving Without Regret, Bloom welcomes media interviews, speaking engagements, and the opportunity to inspire caregivers around the world via his monthly Caregiving Power Hours.  Learn more at http://www.bloomforcoach.com/powerhour/.

Respecting The Rights Of Senior Citizens – 4 Factors To Pick The Right Care Facility For The Elderly by Abhishek Agarwal

June 4, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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There is no formal ‘Senior Citizens Bill of Rights’, but as individuals, senior citizens are entitled to their rights. However, the senior citizens have little energy left in them in their old age to fight for their rights and therefore, it is the duty of the children to see that their elderly parents are getting what they are rightfully entitled to.

Every right must be claimed to be deemed as a right. There are laws in existence for the running of nursing homes for the elderly and retirement communities. Even if your elderly mom or dad is in an assisted care facility, there are certain laws that are fundamental and expected to be followed by these care facilities too. It is your duty as a caregiver to see that they are following the laws and living up to the expectations.

There are some factors that you must verify before selecting a facility for your elderly parents:

– Ensure that the facility will provide the basic cleanliness and safety. Check out the evacuation plans in place, in case of an emergency situation. Verify whether the evacuation plan is a workable one, considering the fact that the facility may be full of elderly and invalids who may be slow in moving out of the building in case of a fire. Find out if there is emergency power available to operate the automatic doors and elevators so that everyone can get out safely.

– If food is provided by the facility, ensure that meals will be provided three times a day. The meals should be healthy and the food should be delivered to the room if your parent is disabled or injured. There should be some variety in the diet and since there is a separate charge for the food, it is not wrong to expect some quality and variety in the food.

– If your parent has moved to an assisted care facility, they have every right to live as they wish in that apartment, since they have paid for it. However, they have to observe certain restrictions because they are living in a community setting. They should be able to live without any interference from the staff of the facility and have the freedom to select the décor of the apartment or have family and friends to visit.

– Another fundamental right of a senior citizen is to be treated with compassion, respect and dignity. Although this is not a tangible right, how the staff at the facility treats the elderly is an important aspect in the selection of a facility for your parents. The staff of the facility must be respectful and pleasant in their dealings with your parents. If your parent complains of any emotional or verbal abuse, you must investigate and hold the facility accountable for it.

As a primary caregiver, responsible for the well being of your elderly parents, you have the right to remind the assisted care facility of their responsibilities. Ensure that your parents are getting the service and care that they paid for and that they are comfortable in their living quarters and enjoying their stay there.

Abhishek successfully runs an Old Age Home and he has got some great Eldercare Secrets up his sleeves! Download his FREE 80 Page Ebook, “How To Take Great Care Of Elders” from his website http://www.Senior-Guides.com/560/index.htm. Only limited Free Copies available.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Abhishek_Agarwal

Planning Fun Activities for Senior Citizens by Matthew G Young

May 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Many senior citizens do not want to or cannot leave the house. There are many reasons for this, some are physically impaired and have trouble getting around, and others simply don’t leave because they believe that they have nothing to do. Either way, getting out of the house is important sometimes, if only for the sake of the joys that social gatherings bring. Maintaining existing friendships and creating new ones can mean a lot to elderly folks, especially if they have not left the house for a while.

There are many senior citizen friendly activities out there, the trick is to match an activity with an interest that they hold, and therefore will be more accepting of going out of the comfort zone that is their home. Many people enjoy playing cards or board games. This is a much better solution than something like going to a movie will create; when playing games, it is hard not to be social. Movies are not the best choice because, although fun, there is little opportunity for social exchange. Games foster relationships, especially games like canasta or trivial pursuit where you can play on teams.

Another great activity for senior citizens is craft making. A group of people being instructed in how to put together a scrap book or design simple jewelry for the first time promises to be very fruitful. Not only will they learn a fun new skill, but they will inevitably interact with others at nearby at their table.

Going to a zoo or to a museum is another great choice. If there are any disabilities or hindrances to mobility, this can be a frustrating thing, but most public gatherings and places now allow people to rent wheelchairs. This will make getting around a much easier task, even if the people you are with have difficulty walking. Electric wheelchairs are perhaps the best choice since these require minimal effort in using.

Finally, you can always just go to a coffee shop. Social gatherings don’t need to be big group affair; sometimes people feel more comfortable in an intimate setting. Taking a friend out for coffee is a great way to interact on a one on one basis. It’s hard not to have a good time when you are with a close friend or relative. Coffee shops are great public places to go to with a couple friends because of this.

The most important thing about choosing an activity is to make sure that the person you are with has fun. If the senior citizen you are caring for does not have fun, they will not be likely to give social outings a second chance. As a caretaker, it’s your job to care for them physically as well as emotionally. Making activities fun isn’t hard, but you do need to choose the right activity that will match their desires and wishes.

Matthew G. Young is a freelance writer who specializes in financial, sports, and health-related topics. To learn more about in home health care visit Paradise In Home Care

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Matthew_G_Young

Senior Citizens – Victims No More by Chris Bruno

May 28, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Violent crime against senior citizens used to be unthinkable. It was rare that a street thug would target an elderly person; however criminals of today have a totally different mindset. They prey upon those they perceive to be weak and an easy target and who will offer the least resistance. In the mind of a street thug, seniors fit this category. This alone is why you need to become informed, and do whatever you can to keep yourself from becoming a victim.

Oftentimes senior citizens are led to believe that they have somehow lost the ability to defend themselves against criminals and crime in general. This belief is totally false and in fact there are many quick and easy things seniors can do to defend themselves.

The first thing you should do is find a senior self defense class in your area. Many organizations provide these free of charge. Check with your local police department, YMCA or seniors club in your area. Many community organizations offer these classes free of charge.

Many seniors are opposed to carrying weapons of any kind. This is a thought process that needs to change. Pepper spray or a stun gun are ideal choices and offer a level of protection that will not only boost your confidence but actually allow you to survive an assault by temporarily incapacitating your attacker. Each of these weapons are extremely easy to operate and take just a few minutes to learn.

Because many seniors are so opposed to carrying something such as pepper spray, if you do use it, the attacker will be caught off guard and the element of surprise will buy you the critical time you need to get to a safe location and notify the police. The effects of either weapon are temporary and will not cause permanent injury.

If you are not willing to carry a traditional weapon consider using a cane if you have one. Swing the cane in an “X” pattern, targeting the knees, elbows and other bony parts of the attackers’ body. These strikes will be effective but in very temporary way. They will probably only distract an attacker, so a secondary plan is definitely needed. I would suggest a Personal Alarm. They are a very small discreet device that you can carry in a pocket, purse or on your belt that when activated sound a very loud ear piercing noise which causes your attacker to flee and forget about attacking you. Many alarms are equipped with flashing strobe lights and a few even contain hidden pepper spray giving you the best of both worlds.

Of course, the best way to defend yourself is to not allow yourself to become a victim in the first place. I know this may sound like an obvious statement but simply by adhering to a few easy to follow best practices you can greatly lower your chances of becoming a victim. When you are going out, try and keep jewelry hidden or simply wear it discreetly. Do not carry large amounts of cash. Remain aware of what is going on around you. If you see or even sense something bad, adjust your actions accordingly. Changing the direction you are walking is far easier than recovering from injuries you sustain in an attack.

Senior safety at home is a whole different ballgame but equally as important. Do not keep large sums of money at home. Consider using a debit card and having any monthly payments due you directly deposited into a bank account.

Do not divulge any personal information over the phone or in person. DO NOT withdraw any money from a bank account unless you are absolutely sure you know who you are giving it to. There are a huge number of scams out there and many target seniors. In fact many seniors are scammed out of their life savings simply because they felt sorry for someone or had their emotions preyed upon. If something seems too good to be true, it most definitely is.

When it comes to defending yourself, anyone can improve their abilities. All it takes is the desire to take a stand, educate yourself, and practice some of the techniques mentioned here. With your new found confidence and some practice you will already have done a great deal to lessen your chances of becoming a victim.

Chris Bruno is a retired police officer and contributing author to Safety Products Depot. His certification as a Pepper Spray [http://www.safetyproductsdepot.com/pepper-spray.html] Instructor gives him unique insight into the effectiveness of this defensive weapon. Chris is offering you a 10% discount off any purchase at [http://www.safetyproductsdepot.com] Visit the site now to claim your discount coupon.

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Death is Not My Next Goal – More Advice For Senior Citizens by Jerry Elrod

May 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Aging is a phenomenon which introduces all kinds of subjects and issues we  would rather leave alone. Many senior citizens (and others) are timid and  reluctant to broach the subject of death, being ready for it, making necessary  practical plans and decisions and even admitting to its very likelihood.

Death, however, will happen to each of us, whether we admit, like it, deal  with it or not. Thus, the question, why the hesitance? Discussing death does not  speed its coming, nor prevent its happening.

Recent studies have shown that in the United States male longevity for a 70  year old male today will likely extend to 83.2 years. A female, aged 70, will  likely live to 85.8. These statistics come from the Center for Disease Control  and Prevention.

Depending on where you are on that scale, the news may be either good or not  so good. There is a story making the rounds of a person who said, “I wouldn’t  want to live to be 90,” to which his listening friend allowed: “You must not be  89.”

Dear Seniors, do not make Death your next goal, but remember, Denial is not a  river in Egypt. There is room for some in-between choices here, in-between  denial and talking openly and comfortably about death. If you don’t talk about  it, or if you try to ignore its reality, you just create more problems. You make  it something like the huge elephant in the room. Something unknown that is to be  feared. It’s not an elephant… it’s just death, something that will happen to  each of us. And talking about it doesn’t make it happen sooner. Most of us  simply are not in control of when or how we die.

In order for Death to be removed from your list of life goals, it is not  necessary to pretend it isn’t going to happen to you.

In addition to the practical issues of seeing a doctor and participating in  appropriate care disciplines, there are other dynamics surrounding the “D” issue  that need our attention.

  1. Spend time with your significant other and/or family looking at the issues  surrounding death and how they will be managed as necessity and wise assessment  of conditions indicate.
  2. Lay it all out. Do not skirt issues. Be courageous in opening those matters  about which some will find discomfort and even embarrassment. Dealing with it  now is better than delaying. Delay will create considerably more discomfort and  likely more disagreement within the family.
  3. Go so far as to talk about what a memorial or funeral service would look  like. Put it down in a record. Date it. Change it if necessary.
  4. Open up issues like traditional burial or cremation and scattering of ashes.  Deal with economic issues.
  5. If more comfortable, invite a professional, a pastor or other who would not  impose judgment, but allow for wide ranging issues to be exposed and  addressed.
  6. Maybe, make a group list of the issues that really would be helpful to  discuss. Have Kleenex handy for those who will, naturally, have some emotional  moments.
  7. If/when some anecdotal stories are told, have someone write them down for  recall when the time comes for a celebration of life.
  8. While death is not our next goal, this exercise will begin to put it in its  place.

 

Remember the maximum life expectancy in Sweden in the 1860’s was 101. It is  now 108. And, by the way, 70% of the increase is attributed to death rates above  70. Given optimal genes and good medical care, no one, so far, has lived beyond  123. The good news is you and I have about a 1 in 2 billion chance to live to  120.

Death is not a goal, There is an old song which Virginia slaves used to sing  at funerals: “Come down, death, right easy.” For let that be our song, senior  citizens and all.

Article provided by Dr. Jerry D. Elrod. Dr Elrod, and his wife, Dr Sharon  Shaw Elrod, manage Senior Citizen Journal online. For information on retirement,  Baby Boomers and everything related to Seniors, please visit my blog at http://www.seniorcitizenjournal.com/. Links to  other Senior Citizen Journal pages can be found on the blog.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jerry_Elrod

 

Tips for Staying Safe As a Senior Citizen by Mark Mahaffey

April 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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When it comes to staying safe, senior citizens have special  concerns.

Although research has shown that the risk of being a victim of a physical  assault crime decreases as you age, the risk of other kinds of crime continues  and even intensifies.

Senior citizens are just as likely as the rest of the population to have  their homes broken into, but they are at higher risk for financial crimes. To  criminals, they appear more vulnerable and defenseless. And since the elderly  are often well-off financially, they are a target for crimes involving money  scams.

Further, the elderly grew up during decades when it was proper to be polite  and trusting. This makes them less likely to be rude during a phone conversation  or face-to-face meeting with a con artist. The con artist will keep pushing, and  the elderly victim may just ‘give in.’

Financial crimes are devastating for anyone, but especially so for senior  citizens. They not only feel afraid, but may begin to question their own ability  to handle their own affairs. For an aging person already trying to hold on to  independence as long as possible, this can be emotionally terrifying.

If you are a senior citizen, or have a loved one who is elderly, there are  some steps you can take to keep yourself or your loved one protected. You don’t  have to wait for crime to happen to you: be proactive and make sure you stay  safe.

Secure your home.

A home alarm system is a great deterrent to would-be burglars. Motion  detectors, automatic lights, and a security system with 24-hour monitoring will  significantly decrease the likelihood of a home invasion.

For even more peace of mind, your monitoring service can respond to medical  emergencies as well. And you may even qualify for a senior citizen discount.

Here is a check list of home safety tips for senior citizens:

• Check the locks on all doors and windows to make sure they are secure.

• Trim tall bushes that are up close to the house to eliminate hiding  places.

• Be sure your house number is painted brightly so emergency help can find  you quickly, should you need them.

• Don’t hide keys under mats or pots. Instead, ask a trusted neighbor to keep  your extra key.

• Don’t keep extra cash in your house. It is better to keep it in the bank or  in a safe deposit box.

• Post security signs around your house to let the burglars know you are  protected.

Be smart about financial scams

Senior citizens are susceptible to con artists at the door or over the phone.  These con artists know that the elderly are interested in products promising  anti-cancer benefits or improved memory. Older adults are also less likely to  report fraud, because they don’t know who to call to report.

Here are some tips to stay safe:

• Never allow any unexpected visitor into your home.

• Install peepholes in your doors.

• Do not give out identifying information over the phone such as social  security numbers and account numbers.

• Do not do business with door-to-door salespeople of any kind.

• Know who your neighbors are and try to join a neighborhood watch for added  security.

• Never click on a link to a financial institution in an email. Instead,  manually type the URL into the address bar.

Stay safe away from home

To reduce the risk of being robbed while away from home, follow these safety  precautions:

• Never carry more cash than you need.

• Don’t carry all your credit cards with you.

• Keep your bag close to your body.

• Avoid walking in deserted or dark areas.

• Lock your car doors while traveling in areas where you will be stopping  frequently.

• Also lock your car doors while you are away from your car.

• Consider installing an alarm system in your car. This may qualify you for a  discount on your auto insurance.

You don’t have to wait for crime to come to you. By being pro-active and  educating yourself, you can outsmart the criminals and keep yourself and those  you love safe.

http://www.bestsecurityproducts.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mark_Mahaffey

 

Realizing You Have Become A Senior Citizen by Irene Mori

April 27, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Someday you may come to the realization that you have become a senior  citizen. When we are young, we think old age is so far off that we never worry  about reaching it. We generally feel good physically and cannot imagine a life  which includes aches and pains on a daily basis. Life is enjoyable, and movement  is easy.

Of course, there are exceptions to every rule. Some young people have to  endure health struggles or are prone to emotional instability. They may have  trials and problems of great magnitude. Everyone wants to be healthy and able to  enjoy life, but it does not always work out that way. Yet the majority of young  people are able to at least cope with the experiences and hardships which come  as a part of daily living.

As the baby boomers enter the realms of senior citizens, they have brought a  new enlightenment to the older generation. They have been a segment of society  which has created trends and moved markets. Now that they are getting older, it  does not mean that they are any less interested in good health and wellness.  They are a generation which has brought new meaning to the concept of being a  senior citizen. They want to stay young and vibrant. Many baby boomers have seen  great success in their lives, and they are used to having a good life. They will  make sure that their quality of life continues.

Realizing that you are a senior citizen is not a bad thing. It does not have  to be a signal of being old. There are many senior citizens who continue to work  and contribute meaningfully to society. There are others who have retired but  who engage in service related activities. There are those who make the most of  life and live it to its fullest by traveling or having new adventures.

Nutritional supplements are plentiful on grocery and drug store shelves.  Several network marketing (MLM or multi-level marketing) companies which sell  these products are catering to senior citizens. The huge market of liquid  nutritional supplements is targeting customers among the older generation. These  companies also provide ways for seniors to earn income if they are interested in  buying and promoting products. They offer a home based business opportunity  which can be done at any age.

Although realizing you have become a senior citizen is a reality of being in  your twilight years, it does not mean that life has to suddenly change  drastically. There may be opportunities for more enjoyment with family and  grandparenting. Many of the same or new activities can have new meaning, and  life can be good.

Discover an affordable and easy program for saving and earning money by  visiting: http://www.moremlmsuccess.com.

Learn about emergency preparedness and food storage or starting a home based  business in this area, by checking out: http://www.preparedforlife.net.

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Senior Citizens – Burdened With Grief and Anger by Jessie Penn

April 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Grief and anger often becomes a heavy burden for people as they age. Throughout life, people experience grief over many things. They grieve if there home burns down, lose a job or a pet. However, an area of loss that is not usually considered with grief is the physical decline during the aging process.

Grief can be detected, in seniors, by the comments they make about losing their youth. Many times, they speak with remorse at lost youth, decreased functionality, and body strength. When a senior citizen notices they are losing muscle strength, or begin experiencing arthritis, stiffness, and joint pain, it’s not unusual to notice anger. They become upset and wish to escape the betrayals of their bodies, and become very angry in the process.

No one asks to get old or feeble. Most likely, if we had a choice, most of us would vote to discontinue and ban getting old. A person might grieve when they are bestowed the title of “Senior Citizen.” At first, a senior citizen, might not notice the changes that are taking place in the physical aspects of the body or the mind. And, perhaps, as much as they hate the thought of getting old, family members also grieve about losing the ‘young’ mom or dad they once knew.

Unfortunately, getting angry about growing old has no escape; there’s no one to blame it on. So, sometimes the result is that seniors lash out at the ones closest to them. Anger and frustration with the aging body can cause tempers to rage or flare up unexpectedly. Many times, a senior lashes out at a loved one or caregiver because they are nearby and easily accessible. The aging person knows it isn’t fair, but may have a hard time explaining their actions.

Learning how to cope with anger about aging is necessary so you don’t hurt the innocent ones around you. But, it is also unhealthy to keep your grief bottled up inside you. If seniors are not allowed to vent and get rid of their anger, the body can decline at a faster rate.

It’s been suggested that people become angry because they feel a false sense of entitlement. This crops up when expectations do not line up with reality. A feeling of undo entitlement happens when we believe we do not deserve to get old.

There is just one way to confront getting older, and that is to recognize that we are not alone, everyone will get old, and we are not entitled to be exempt from the aging process. Recognizing this fact can help to eliminate anger from the arena as we cope with the affects of aging.

Attempting to deny the advance of life’s end, is probably the sole cause of midlife crisis’s. Trying to behave as if they are not getting older and hiding emotional responses to aging can cause devastating results. Avoiding the feelings about aging has caused many to act irresponsibility or make bad decisions.

By recognizing the problems that naturally happen through aging, some of the anger can be avoided. Instead of dwelling on declining abilities, senior citizens can minimize the impacts by living with a healthier attitude toward aging.

Focusing on your diet, exercise, keeping busy, and doing everything you can to stay rested and emotionally sound. Thinking about or getting involved with other people can help to create a healthier attitude toward aging and minimize its effects.

Try to keep your spirits up, be happy through achievements and seemingly small enjoyments. Keep a young at heart attitude and get in touch with the child inside you. You’ve come too far, traveled many winding paths, and you deserve to feel content and happy. Emotions about how you feel about yourself can play a major role in the person you choose to be as a senior citizen.

Get free information to protect your loved ones when a medical emergency or security treat happens. Go to http://personalsecuritydevices.walkinsarewelcome.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jessie_Penn

How Much Have You Changed? A Dilemma For Senior Citizens by Jerry Elrod

April 19, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Now that you are 50 or 60 or 70 or so, how much have you changed? As a senior  citizen in retirement, do you still see yourself as you were 10 or more years  ago? What experiences, dramatic or subtle, have changed the mold you always saw  yourself fitting?

Here is an illustration giving proof that some people really don’t change  their patterns. A man in his early 70s is still acting out and living as if it  were 50 or more years ago. No change, no recognition of the need for it. Old  prejudices, bitter cynicism are the hallmarks of his life. Just as his outward  expressions reveal his inward retardation, he is being eaten alive by a terminal  illness. Is there anyway to get through to people who don’t even understand  themselves? How can exercise compassion and care and thoughtfulness for others,  if they don’t even see the need for those emotions within themselves?

This is an alert. It is time for aging senior citizens who have decided to  live in the boxed-in, never gonna change kind of existence, to either decide to  isolate themselves completely or change. Isolation is not desirable, at whatever  age. Punishing others by absenting yourself from the world going on around you  is only a punishment to yourself. It isn’t the rest of the world that has a  problem. It is you!

Resisting change is no indication of brilliance. It is instead, a sign of  insecurity, inability to cope, unwillingness to evolve. Do you really want to be  the way you have always been? Sounds comfortable, but at last it is an indicator  of disconnect. There are a lot of memories and joys from your past to which you  may cling. But, finally, one must admit they can’t remain forever a part of your  life and being. Right now, resolve to begin working hard on eliminating some of  the “things” which still hold you. There is a time for letting go.

It may be relatively easy, and certainly inevitable, to have to let go of  those “things.” It is more of a struggle to deal with the chains, as in Dickens’  Marley, which enslave us. Aging senior citizens may find a good read this Christmas in  “A Christmas Carol.” As you read it, reflect on how much like Marley or Ebenezer  you have become.

Article provided by Dr. Jerry D. Elrod. Dr Elrod, and his wife, Dr Sharon  Shaw Elrod, manage Senior Citizen Journal online. For information on retirement,  Baby Boomers and everything related to Seniors, please visit my blog at http://www.seniorcitizenjournal.com/. Links to  other Senior Citizen Journal pages can be found on the blog.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jerry_Elrod

 

Activities For Senior Citizens – How Hobbies and the Mind Body Connection Work By Diane Carbo

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Hobbies have a mind body connection, they are important activities for  senior citizens and are an important part of healthy aging. Active seniors  are proof that you can enjoy better health and have fun doing it.

Research studies have shown that leisure time and physical activity promote a  healthier lifestyle. Our bodies are meant to be active and move. Many, as they  age, tend to become increasingly inactive, preferring to watch TV to help pass  the time away. Finding fun activities for senior citizens can change that.

Some good activities for senior citizens

Active seniors are involved and participate in what life has to offer.  Hobbies give an individual a reason to get out and share with others. Whether it  is painting, building model airplanes or playing cards the benefits of a hobby  can be an increase your chances for improved physical, social and emotional well  being.

It is important to have regular leisure time physical activity. Anything that  promotes moving and being active will benefit you as you age. The health  benefits of staying active are a delay or prevention of a chronic disease such  as: heart disease, diabetes, some cancers and arthritis. Physical activity also  promotes brain fitness. This can help delay or prevent dementia or  Alzheimer’s.

Participating in a variety of hobbies helps many cope with the stressors of  life. How you react and respond to different situations in life affects your  health. Stress and anxiety can lead to poor health. Active seniors are involved  and lead a more balanced life.

Hobbies allow active seniors to socialize, find companionship and  camaraderie. Making connections with others that have the same interests can  often open an individual to new found friendships.

Many individuals that participate in similar hobbies find themselves with  other individuals that have similar situations and experiences in life. As we  age, we experience losses that affect our emotional health. Active seniors that  are involved in hobbies have a pool of other individuals that they can draw  emotional support and comfort. There are times when they can also learn from  shared experiences. Sharing our feelings with others is a way to connect with  others as well as relieve the stress and anxiety we may be feeling.

More Hobbies and the Mind Body Connection: How Active Seniors are Having  Fun and Enjoying Better  Health …

Hobbies as activities for senior citizens are a way to calm their  minds and relax. It is a way to belong, have something to look forward to  doing.

For many, their hobbies are a tool that releases stress and helps bring their  emotions back into balance again. It is a time when we get an attitude  adjustment and feel right with the world again.

Leisure time physical activity is important to healthy aging. Moving our  bodies and using our minds affect how we age. The mind body connection benefits  of participating in hobbies are improved mental clarity, enhanced immune system,  improved self esteem and self confidence.

Hobbies are a way to have fun, enjoy and stay regularly involved in leisure  time physical activity. Consistency and regular involvement is the key to  maintaining healthy aging.

Having a variety of hobbies during the week can keep an individual busy,  interested and involved. Participating in a hobby with a group can be  motivating. Knowing that the expectations of others are anticipating your  participation in the day’s activity may give one the boost to go when they feel  down. Even to know that you have others that depend on you to be there, may give  you an extra boost to participate when you don’t feel like it. Feeling a sense  of commitment to others, a sense of belonging is important to healthy aging.

Hobbies give many a sense of connection to others, when there are no other  connections in an individual’s life. Connections to others, a sense of  belonging, a sense of community gives many active seniors the reason to  participate in life to their fullest ability.

Hobbies are a way for many to stay physically and mentally stimulated. Trying  new things, meeting new people and sharing your knowledge, experience and  sometimes your creative side with others can keep an active senior challenged  mentally, as well as, physically.

Hobbies are a safe way to get out and meet people with like minded interests.  It is a great ice breaker to meeting new people and a way to stay active, no  matter how old you get to be.

Any activity that gets an aging senior moving and involved with others is a  step towards healthy aging. It is important to get busy and stay active. Take up  dancing, gardening; join a walking club or travel.

Hobbies have a mind body connection. Active seniors are having fun and  enjoying better health as they regularly participate in things they enjoy. It is  never too late to start enjoying yourself now. Take time to find your own  activities for senior citizens to help your loved ones and  yourselves.

Diane Carbo Registered Nurse has more than thirty five years in the nursing  field. Her experience as a geriatric care manager, makes her uniquely qualified  to help those who want to live out their lives in their own homes. Diane has  developed a web site to make people aware of issues and options. You will find a  mountain of helpful information that will be continually updated. Please visit:  http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com/activities-for-senior-citizens.html for more information on hobbies and senior activities Sign up for The Caring  Advocate Ezine her free newlsetter and receive a complimentary copy of  the Home Health Care Planning Guide.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2183928

Nevada Ballet Theatre Presents Romeo & Juliet for an unforgettable season finale

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Las Vegas, Press-Media Releases 

SHAKESPEARE’S PLAY AND PROKOFIEV’S ENDURING SCORE BRINGS THE ‘MONTAGUES’ AND ‘CAPULETS’ TO LIFE IN THIS RIVETING BALLET CHOREOGRAPHED BY JAMES CANFIELD 

 “For never was a story of more woe, than this of Juliet and her Romeo.”- William Shakespeare

 

Romeo & Juliet is Co-Sponsored by: Madeleine & Don Andress and Wendy & Richard Plaster

 

LAS VEGAS, NV (Wednesday, April 10, 2013) – Nevada Ballet Theatre (NBT) concludes its inaugural season at The Smith Center for the Performing Arts with the beloved Shakespearean tragedy, Romeo & Juliet. The classic tale of ill-fated love will be presented on Mother’s Day weekend: Saturday, May 11 at 7:30 pm and Sunday, May 12 at 1 pm in Reynolds Hall at The Smith Center for the Performing Arts, 361 Symphony Park Avenue. Ticket prices range from $35-$128 (plus fees) and can be ordered by calling The Smith Center Box Office at (702) 749-2000 or by visiting www.nevadaballet.org.

Based on the play by William Shakespeare, NBT will transport audiences to 15th Century Verona through Sergei Prokofiev’s well-loved score, Romeo & Juliet, Op. 64. Minimalist – yet lush – sets and costumes, reminiscent of the time period, will complement the inventive choreography of Artistic Director James Canfield. Through comedy and tragedy, movement and miming, feuding families tell the tale of innocent love through street fighting, swordmanship and traditional court dancing in this two-act full-length ballet.

One of Shakespeare’s most performed and notable plays, Romeo & Juliet has successfully been adapted for various performance mediums over the centuries, including stage, opera and film. A challenging ballet for any professional dancer, it requires unique preparation in that performers must master a historically stylized look as well as a deep exploration into the art of acting. With an emotionally charged storyline, a concentration on character development is essential, so that the growth and change in each character is evident to audiences.

Romeo & Juliet is a significant ballet because it serves as a unique educational tool; in addition to the historical importance of William Shakespeare’s play, Romeo & Juliet explores cultural, familial and societal issues that are applicable to young people in our society today,” said Artistic Director James Canfield.  “Clark County students who attend our school matinee on Friday, May 10 at The Smith Center for the Performing Arts will gain a unique understanding into the growth and maturation of a character, similar to how we as human beings develop and change throughout our lives.”

As a benefit for Romeo & Juliet ticket holders, NBT will present Insights, a pre-performance perspective designed to engage, enlighten and entertain audiences in preparation for the performance they are about to see. Led by NBT’s Director of Education & Outreach, Terané Comito, Insights will be presented inside The Smith Center’s Troesh Studio Theater and will take place 45 minutes prior to curtain (Saturday, May 11 at 6:45 pm and Sunday, May 12 at 12:15 pm).

MOTHER’S DAY TEA with

Join us for the Mother’s Day Tea and a “Mommy and Me” Fashion Presentation featuring the designs of Paul Smith in The Smith Center Courtyard (adjacent to the box office). Guests will enjoy tea sandwiches, petit fours and specialty tea selections. Add to the beauty of the ballet experience by attending this special event prior to the matinee on Sunday, May 12 from 11 am – 1 pm. Tickets can be purchased for an additional $75 by calling 702-243-2623 ext. 222 or via email at specialevents@nevadaballet.org.

 

JEWELRY BOX” OPPORTUNITY with

Exclusively for Romeo & Juliet, purchase a “Jewelry Box” of 4, 6 or 8 seats. Purchase includes access to the Founders Room, concierge service as well as a $100 gift card for each guest to The Jewelers of Las Vegas. Call 702-243-2623 ext. 224 to make a reservation.

 

ABOUT NEVADA BALLET THEATRE

Under the artistic direction of James Canfield, Nevada Ballet Theatre is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization based in Las Vegas and the largest professional ballet company and dance Academy in the state. Committed to the highest artistic standards, this classically-based company is at home in an eclectic repertory, moving easily from the classics to the high-energy contemporary ballets. The mission of Nevada Ballet Theatre is to educate and inspire statewide, regional and national audiences and vitally impact community life through professional company productions, dance training and education and outreach. Nevada Ballet Theatre is the resident ballet company of The Smith Center for the Performing Arts.

NEVADA BALLET THEATRE SEASON 42:   

 

October 2013

A CHOREOGRAPHERS’ SHOWCASE

Nevada Ballet Theatre and Cirque du Soleil

Sunday, October 6 at 1 pm & Sunday, October 13 at 1 pm  

Mystère Theatre – Treasure Island

This October, we bring back A Choreographers’ Showcase, the collaboration by Cirque du Soleil® and Nevada Ballet Theatre presented at Treasure Island’s Mystère Theatre. This critically acclaimed partnership features new works created and performed by artists from both organizations.

 

November 2013

SWAN LAKE Act II and SLEEPING BEAUTY Act III (Aurora’s Wedding) A Tribute to TchaikovskyFriday, November 1 at 7:30 pm & Saturday, November 2 at 7:30 pm The Smith Center – Reynolds Hall

In November, ballet’s greatest love stories take the stage with Swan Lake Act II and the enchanting Act III of Sleeping Beauty (Aurora’s Wedding). These immortalized characters come alive on stage set to the timeless scores of ballet’s legendary composer Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky.

Swan Lake Act II tells the classic tale of Odette – a beautiful maiden transformed into a swan by an evil sorcerer – and the prince who swears his enduring love for her. Sleeping Beauty Act III celebrates Aurora’s royal wedding with a cast of fanciful characters and luxurious scenery and costumes by Peter Cazalet.

 

December 2013

THE NUTCRACKER The Magic Continues December 14 – 22, 2013 (10 performances) The Smith Center – Reynolds Hall

 

The magic continues this December with The Nutcracker. From the moment the curtain rises, find out just how thrilling a tradition can be as you are transported to a world of magic and wonder. The first production of its kind built for the Reynolds Hall stage features grand sets, costumes and the choreography of Artistic Director James Canfield. This larger than life production returns this winter in its second year with added elements. This is the centerpiece of the holiday season and as a subscriber, you will be first in line for tickets.

March 2014 (FOR SUBSCRIBERS ONLY)

THE STUDIO SERIES: OUTSIDE IN  A Spotlight on Dance in its Purest Form March 27 – 30, 2014 (6 performances) The Smith Center – Troesh Studio Theater

 

March brings The Studio Series, reserved exclusively for subscribers and gives audiences a rare glimpse into the essence of dance, as our dancers perform commissioned works and original pieces within the intimate setting of the Troesh Studio Theater. With production elements at a minimum, you will experience true emotion and enthusiasm.

 

May 2014

SPRING FINALE  A Performance Not To Be Missed Friday, May 9 at 7:30 pm & Saturday, May 10 at 7:30 pm The Smith Center – Reynolds Hall

Don’t miss this emotionally charged program as NBT crescendos to a grand finale including James Canfield’s own tango inspired Cyclical Night and the return of acclaimed choreographer Matthew Neenan’s bold work, At the border, with live musical accompaniment.

2013-2014 SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION  

Subscriptions will be available to the general public in early May. They can be ordered online at: www.nevadaballet.org  or by calling The Smith Center Box Office at 702-749-2847. Subscribers receive many benefits over single ticket purchasers including priority seating, free ticket exchanges, personalized service, invitations to special events and first opportunity to purchase additional Nutcracker tickets. Group Sales also available.

The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor by Nina Kramer

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Las Vegas, Press-Media Releases 

The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor by Nina Kramer

“‘You have cancer’ are three of the scariest words you will ever hear,”
says Nina Kramer, author of the new book, The Harrowing Medical Journey of
a Cancer Survivor. “But how you react after hearing those words can mean
the difference between thriving and deteriorating.”

Kramer’s journey through the world of cancer treatment began in 2000 when
she was diagnosed with bladder cancer. Every year over 73,000 people are
diagnosed with the disease in the United States. Men are three times more
likely than women to develop it and about 5% will die from the disease, but
the death rate has been declining over the past twenty years.

Like many, Kramer’s journey began with a routine physical. What followed was
anything but routine.  Her first detour began with a trusted doctor. She liked him and
followed his instructions faithfully but, as she was to learn, he was not giving her the best and most advanced treatments. The number one rule when facing an illness as serious as cancer, she quickly discovered, is to do your research and seek out the best doctors and institutions that treat your disease.

The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor is Kramer’s courageous
story as she copes with a severe illness that lasted more than a decade. It began with a diagnosis of low-grade bladder cancer, continued with the removal and/or reconstruction of vital organs, and ended with dialysis and a kidney transplant. Although the story is specific to bladder cancer and its aftermath, it covers aspects inherent in any serious,
and sometimes life-threatening, illness.

With candor, honesty and life-affirming messages, The Harrowing Medical
Journey of a Cancer Survivor shares:

* The impact of emotions on surviving a serious illness – fear, denial, anger, anxiety and depression can have devastating results
* The search for experts – the single most important thing you can do when
battling a severe illness is to find the best hospitals and doctors specializing in your disease
* The focus on other passions – engrossing yourself in activities other than the illness to relieve your mind from the constant anxiety of worrying about it
* The importance of cancer support groups and psychotherapy – talking to other people can help you explore your feelings so they don’t interfere with or hamper your recovery
* Spending time on what you love – do everything you can to fight your illness, but spend time doing the things that bring you pleasure and satisfaction
* Having sex – the human contact and intimacy, as well as the erotic pleasure, can be a wonderful antidote to pain and misery

“I wanted to share my story with other cancer victims,” adds Kramer. “As I travelled this frightening medical journey, I learned a lot about how to survive and even thrive under sometimes terrifying circumstances. I wanted to share this experience in the hope that it would help others undergoing frightening medical journeys.

Nina Kramer, is a published novelist and author of the new nonfiction ebook,
The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor. She has held various
positions from journals manager to assistant vice president with medical,
scientific and technical publishers while pursuing her craft as a writer.
While undergoing cancer treatment, she made an arduous trip through some
remote locations in China—described in her Medical Journey book—as
research for her next novel set in the Middle Kingdom, Phoenix Rising; Tigers Flying. She divides her time between New York City and Stockbridge, MA.

Blog: http://ninaikramer.wordpress.com/cancer

The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor is available in ebook format
through www.authorhouse.com. www.amazon.com, www.barnesandnoble.com,
and all online booksellers.

Review Copies Available Upon Request

Sometimes Little Things Can Be Huge!

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

By Thair Phillips, President, RetireSafe

A small and relatively new product is making life easier for older Americans. It’s a simple thing, but unit dose laundry detergent packs (or pods) are helping seniors perform necessary laundry chores that they might not otherwise be able to do without help. The laundry packs’ small size and pre-measured, consistent content is perfect for aging hands and eyes. With ten thousand of our fellow Americans reaching the age of 65 each day, it’s a really big deal!

While younger Americans can choose from many options, the pods are a huge help to the frail and the disabled.  Consider those who suffer from arthritis, for example. According to 2007-2009 data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), an estimated 50 million adults have self-reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis. That number is expected to grow to 67 million by the year 2030, per NHIS data. Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States, negatively impacting function and mobility for millions of senior citizens. The laundry pods meet the need created by those who can no longer heft a jug of detergent and pour it into a measuring cup. The small (but not too small to handle) size detergent pod fits the bill for aging-in-place seniors who wish to remain self-reliant.

And then there are those who must struggle each and every day with impaired vision.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), individuals over the age of 65 accounts for roughly 30 percent of the U.S. population considered to be visually impaired. Dimming eyesight can reduce physical, functional, emotional, and social well-being.  Doing the laundry can be a chore for all of us, but trying to measure the exact amount of liquid or powder for the person who is vision impaired can be a laundry room disaster resulting in ruined clothes and dangerous messes. For age-in-place seniors with cataracts, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and/or diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes that causes visual impairment, anything that can help simplify the laundry measuring process is truly a godsend.

Keep in mind that many older Americans in single family homes and apartments may well have to take their laundry and laundry supplies to a communal laundry room or a Laundromat.  Having the convenience of smaller, self-contained detergent pods to carry instead jugs of liquids and large boxes of powder is a big advantage for the elderly.  This is especially true for those navigating with canes or walkers, or those needing to keep one hand free for stability.

In short, pre-measured laundry detergent packs or pods are critical innovations for seniors. This is one small-sized product with a huge functional impact for seniors. In an aging America, we need every one of these impactful products, and many, many more.

RetireSafe is a nationwide organization of 4000,000 supporters that advocates on behalf of seniors on issues regarding Social Security, Medicare, health and financial well-being.

Contact Thair Phillips, (202) 628-5095

No more “empty nest”: middle-aged adults face family pressure on both sides

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

The “empty nest” of past generations, in which the kids are grown up and middle-aged adults have more time to themselves, has been replaced in the United States by a nest that’s full – kids who can’t leave, can’t find a job and aging parents who need more help than ever before.

According to a new study by researchers at Oregon State University, what was once a life stage of new freedoms, options and opportunities has largely disappeared.

An economic recession and tough job market has made it hard on young adults to start their careers and families. At the same time, many older people are living longer, which adds new and unanticipated needs that their children often must step up to assist with.
The end result, researchers suggest, are “empty nest” plans that often have to be put on hold, and a mixed bag of emotions, ranging from joy and “happy-to-help” to uncertainty, frustration and exhaustion.

“We mostly found very positive feelings about adults helping their children in the emerging adulthood stage of life, from around ages 18 to 30,” said Karen Hooker, director of the OSU Center for Healthy Aging Research.

“Feelings about helping parents weren’t so much negative as just filled with more angst and uncertainty,” Hooker said. “As a society we still don’t socialize people to expect to be taking on a parent-caring role, even though most of us will at some point in our lives. The average middle-aged couple has more parents than children.”

The findings of this research were just published in the Journal of Aging Studies, and were based on data from six focus groups during 2009-10. It was one of the first studies of its type to look at how middle-aged adults actually feel about these changing trends.
Various social, economic, and cultural forces have combined to radically challenge the traditional concept of an empty nest, the scientists said. The recession that began in 2008 yielded record unemployment, substantial stock market losses, lower home values and increased demand for higher levels of education.

Around the same time, advances in health care and life expectancy have made it possible for many adults to live far longer than they used to – although not always in good health, and often needing extensive care or assistance.

This study concluded that most middle-aged parents with young adult children are fairly happy to help them out, and they understand that getting started in life is simply more difficult now. Some research has suggested that age 25 is the new 22; that substantially more parents now don’t even expect their kids to be financially independent in their early 20s, and don’t mind helping them through some difficult times.

But the response to helping adult parents who, at the same time, need increasing amounts of assistance is not as uniformly positive, the study found – it can be seen as both a joy and a burden, and in any case was not something most middle-aged adults anticipated.

“With the kids, it’s easy,” is a general purpose reaction. With aging parents, it isn’t.

“My grandparents died younger, so my parents didn’t cope with another generation,” one study participant said.

Many middle-aged people said it was difficult to make any plans, due to disruptions and uncertainty about a parent’s health at any point in time. And most said they we’re willing to help their aging parents, but a sense of being time-starved was a frequent theme.
“It brings my heart joy to be able to provide for my mom this way,” one study participant said. “There are times when it’s a burden and I feel resentful.”

The dual demands of children still transitioning to independence, and aging parents who need increasing amounts of care is causing many of the study participants to re-evaluate their own lives. Some say they want to make better plans for their future so they don’t pose such a burden to their children, and begin researching long-term care insurance. Soul-searching is apparent.

“I don’t care if I get old,” a participant said. “I just don’t want to become debilitated. So I would rather have a shorter life and a healthy life than a long life like my mom, where she doesn’t have a life. She doesn’t have memories. Our memories are what make us who we are.”

An increasing awareness of the challenges produced by these new life stages may cause more individuals to anticipate their own needs, make more concrete plans for the future, reduce ambivalent approaches and have more conversations with families about their own late-life care, the researchers said in their study.
About the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences: The College creates connections in teaching, research and community outreach while advancing knowledge, policies and practices that improve population health in communities across Oregon and beyond.

Research Suggests Massage Therapy Is Effective For Health Conditions In People Of All Ages

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Massage Therapy Shown to be Beneficial for Enhancing Immune Function in Preterm Infants, Decreasing Blood Pressure and Improving Stability in Older Persons and Reducing Stress in Cancer Patients.

People of all ages are beginning to understand the many benefits of massage therapy, including the role it can play in overall health and well-being. Recent research compiled by the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) suggests that massage can enhance the immune function in preterm infants, decrease blood pressure and improve stability in older persons, as well as reduce stress and anxiety in cancer patients.
Massage Therapy for Improved Immune Function and Weight Gain in Preterm Infants
Research[1] published in Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), showed that for stable, preterm infants, daily massage therapy is positively associated with higher natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity and weight gain. American Massage Therapy Association President, Cynthia Ribeiro, says of the study, “This research demonstrates that massage therapy can benefit preterm infants by enhancing immunity and stimulating growth. Parents of preterm infants are encouraged to speak with a certified massage therapist to learn more about certain techniques designed to aid in their child’s development.”
Massage Therapy for Improvements in Balance, Neurological, and Cardiovascular Measures in Older Adults
Research[2]published in the International Journal of Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (IJTMB ) found that older adults who receive massage therapy for up to six weeks could benefit from decreased blood pressure and improved stability. “This study suggests that regular massage therapy can produce several advantages for the older generation, including a relaxation affect for the entire body, lowering blood pressure, decreasing stress and improving balance, amongst other things,” says American Massage Therapy Association President, Cynthia Ribeiro.
Massage Therapy for Decreasing Stress in Cancer Patients
Research[3] published in BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care indicates that massage therapy can have a positive influence on the quality of life of people suffering serious illnesses such as brain cancer. The American Massage Therapy Association acknowledges these study results, which suggest that massage therapy can improve physical as well as emotional well-being in patients with late stage disease and when used in combination with standard care, massage can help reduce stress, anxiety, pain and fatigue.
View AMTA’s Research Roundup Volume 2 online
Visit AMTA’s Find a Massage Therapist® to find a qualified massage therapist in your area.
Research Roundup, Volume 1
AMTA issued its first research roundup in 2012 which also highlighted the growing body of evidence showing that massage therapy can be effective for a variety of health conditions, including:
• Osteoarthritis of the knee
• Inflammation after exercise
• Chronic low-back pain
• Fibromyalgia
View this research in further detail.
Massage Therapy Facts
• Between July 2010 and July 2011 roughly 38 million adult Americans (18 percent) had a massage at least once
• 75 percent of American’s surveyed claim that their primary reason for receiving a massage was medical (43 percent) and stress (32 percent) related
• 89 percent of individuals believe that massage can be effective in reducing pain; with 29 percent of respondents admitting they have used massage therapy for pain relief
• 50 percent of people claim their doctor has either strongly recommended or encouraged them to get a massage
Visit AMTA’s research section for more information from our consumer and industry fact sheets.
About AMTA
The American Massage Therapy Association® (AMTA®) is a professional association of more than 56,000 members. AMTA professional members have demonstrated a level of skill and knowledge through education and/or testing and must meet continuing education requirements to retain membership. AMTA provides information about massage therapy to the public and works to improve the professional climate for massage therapists. The association also helps consumers and healthcare professionals locate qualified massage therapists nationwide, through AMTA’s Find a Massage Therapist® free national locator service available at www.findamassagetherapist.org.
[1] Ang J, Lua J, Mathur A, et al. A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial of Massage Therapy on the Immune System of Preterm Infants. Pediatrics. 2012; 130(6):e1549-58.
[2] Sefton JM , Yarar C, Berry JW, et al. Six weeks of massage therapy produces changes in balance, neurological and cardiovascular measures in older persons. International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork.2012; 5(3):28-40.
[3] Keir SM and Saling JR. Pilot study of the impact of massage therapy on sources and levels of distress in brain tumour patients. BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. 2012; 2:363-36.
For more information, contact:
Bob Szafranski
Edelman, 312.240.2687
Bob.Szafranski@edelman.com
or
Caroline Dowdy
Edelman, 312.240.2801
Caroline.Dowdy@edelman.com

The Dr. Miriam & Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus Presents a Free Parenting Workshop from World-Renown Psychologist

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

The Dr. Miriam & Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus Presents a Free Parenting Workshop from World-Renown Psychologist New York Times Best Selling Author Michael G. Thompson, Ph.D. Provides a Practical Guide to Raising Healthy, Secure Children

Las Vegas – Jan. 8, 2012 –The Dr. Miriam & Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus is offering a free Parenting Workshop hosted by world-renowned psychologist specializing in children and families, Michael G. Thompson, Ph.D. On Sunday, Jan. 13 from1 – 3 p.m., 400 parents will have the opportunity to hear from this best selling author and sought after speaker who has appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show, The Today Show, CBS 60 Minutes, ABC 20/20, Good Morning America, and The Early Show. Thompson’s workshop is titled Pressured Children, Worried Parents: A Conversation about Parenting in 2013: managing you and your child’s expectations and emotions with regards to adolescence, friendship development, popularity and social cruelty.

“This is Michael Thompson’s fourth visit to our school and he is back by popular demand,” said Paul Schiffman, head of school of Adelson Educational Campus. “As a celebrated psychologist, he provides parents with wisdom, guidance and humor through all the tough decisions they make. We look forward to hearing his insight on Jan. 13.”

Michael Thompson, Ph.D. is a consultant, author and psychologist specializing in children and families. He is the supervising psychologist for the Belmont Hill School and has worked in more than five hundred schools across the United States, as well as in international schools in Central America, Europe, Africa and Asia.

He and his co-author, Dan Kindlon, wrote the New York Times best-selling book, Raising Cain: Protecting the Emotional Life of Boys (Ballantine Books, 1999). He is the author of Homesick and Happy: How Time Away from Parents Can Help a Child Grow, Speaking of Boys: Answers to the Most-Asked Questions about Raising Sons Ballantine, 2000), and co-author (with Catherine O’Neill Grace and Larry Cohen, Ph.D.) of Best Friends/Worst Enemies: Understanding the Social Worlds of Children (Ballantine, 2001) and Mom, They’re Teasing Me: Helping Your Child Solve Social Problems (Ballantine, 2002.) About Best Friends, Worst Enemies the Publishers Weekly review declared, “Not since Dr. Spock and Penelope Leach has there been such a sensitive and practical guide to raising healthy children.” The Pressured Child: Helping Your Child Achieve Success in School and in Life (with Teresa Barker, Ballantine, 2004) was written to help parents understand the complex journey of children through school, from Kindergarten through senior year. His third book on the psychology of boys, entitled, It’s a Boy!: Understanding Your Son’s Development from Birth to Eighteen, was published in 2008. It focuses on the importance of undirected, free play in the lives of boys. He is presently writing a new book about summer camps and schools trips entitled, Homesick and Happy: How Children Change and Grow When They Are Away from Their Parents.

A dedicated speaker and traveler, Michael Thompson has appeared on The Today Show, The Oprah Winfrey Show, ABC 20/20, CBS 60 Minutes, The Early Show and Good Morning America. He has been quoted in the New York Times, The Washington Post, Newsweek, Time and U.S. News and World Report and has been a guest on NPR’s “Morning Edition” with Susan Stamberg, “Talk of the Nation” with Ray Suarez and the Diane Rhem Show. He wrote, narrated and hosted a two-hour PBS documentary entitled “Raising Cain” that was broadcast nationally in 2006.

Dr. Thompson serves on the board of the American Camping Association and is on the Advisory Board of Parent Magazine. Dr. Thompson lives in Arlington, Massachusetts. He is married to Dr. Theresa McNally, a psychotherapist, and is the father of Joanna, 26, and Will, 20.

About The Dr. Miriam & Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus
The mission of The Dr. Miriam and Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus is to instruct and inspire new generations of students who will draw strength from a rich Jewish heritage, use their knowledge, values and vision to fulfill their own potential, and build a better world. Adelson Educational Campus was originally founded in 1980 and now educates children from 18 months through 12th grade. Adelson Educational Campus accepts students of all faiths and affiliations and offers a drug-free commitment to its students and faculty. Adelson Educational Campus is located at 9700 West Hillpointe Road in Summerlin. For more information please call (702) 255-4500 or visit www.adelsoncampus.org or Facebook/Adelson Campus

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts – February 2013 Calendar Of Events

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
Centers will be closed Feb. 18 for holiday observance.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $5 dollars per person per week at door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $4 dollars per person per week at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of international fun learning Armenian, Bulgarian, Israeli, Arabic, Macedonian, Russian, Greek, Turkish, Chinese, Serbian folk dances, and more. No need to bring a partner. Cosponsored by the Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing Club of Las Vegas, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 562-9889 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Spring Class Registration Opens Feb. 2 (all ages)
Registration for the six-week spring 2013 classes Feb. 20-March 30 is open Feb. 2-16.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Cultural arts classes include African Drum; African Dance for Children and African Dance for Teens/Adults; Keep it Moving…Ballet & Tap; Ballet–Beginner/Intermediate; Modern Dance; Hip Hop, Yoga–Health & Wellness; Tae Kwon Do; Video & Documentary Creation; Music Production; and Private Piano/Voice lessons. The West Las Vegas Arts Center also will offer two new exciting classes exploring the creativity and sheer fun of arts and crafts. They are: Kids Create and Craft It Up. To register, or for more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-4800.
Sweethearts Square Dance (ages 8+)
Saturday, Feb. 2; introductory lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7:30 to 10 p.m.
Admission: $12 per person at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Enjoy square dancing to callers such as Andy Finch, Joe Valvo, Vern Vernazarro and Ron Sowash of Las Vegas and with guest cuer Ron Hartzell. No need to bring a partner. Class-level dances, Plus and Round dances will be included, as well as a chance to win door prizes. Refreshments will be available. Cosponsored by the Stardusters, Las Vegas Square & Round Dance Club, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 348-4906 or (702) 229-6383, or visit www.lasvegassquarenrounddancers.org

Valentine Dance with Boyd Coulter & the Good Times Band
Saturday, Feb. 9, at 7 p.m.
Tickets: $10 advance purchase; $15 per person at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance the evening away with Big Band music. Step back to a sweeter time when Big Band swing was the thing and romance was the theme. Enjoy an evening of dancing to great tunes made famous by the bands of Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey and Benny Goodman; romantic standards from the ‘50s and ‘60s; cha-chas, tangos, and more. For more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call 229-6383.

Downtown Cultural Series – Emanuel Schmidt Quartet “The Music of Miles” (all ages)
Friday, Feb. 15, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
An excellent and experienced musician, Emanuel Schmidt has performed at schools, clubs, cafés and festivals – for intimate crowds as well as for thousands – in Australia, Switzerland and in the U.S.A. According to Schmidt’s peers and educators, he is “an outstanding and versatile guitarist of exceptional ability, and an extraordinarily thoughtful and hardworking musician.” Described by The Australian Music Centre’s Ian Shanahan as an “accomplished and imaginative composer,” Schmidt has written for a full orchestra and performs reflective, emotive and adventurous original compositions with his groups. This group will perform selections from albums such as “Kind Of Blue,” “My Funny Valentine,” “ESP,” and more. Call (702) 229-3515 for more details.

The Poets’ Corner
Hosted by Keith Brantley
Friday, Feb. 15, 7 p.m.
Admission is free.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
A monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants, featuring the best local poetry talent.

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Presents “Across The Truckee” (all ages)
Friday-Sunday, Feb. 15-17; 2 p.m. shows Saturday and Sunday; 7 p.m. shows Friday and Saturday.
Tickets: $7 for adults, $5 for teens/seniors/military; and $3 for children under age 12.
Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St., (702) 229-3515.
Who knew Nevada’s history could be so rich in entertainment? Don’t miss the chance to see the main stage version of “Across The Truckee,” the newly created and lively production about Nevada history, before it goes on tour. Meet colorful characters galore and tap your toes to music that sets you to humming—whatever your age! For tickets and information, call (702) 229-6383 or 229-6553, or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.
Guy Davis in Concert
Saturday, Feb. 16, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $10 advance purchase; $15 per person at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, Jeanne Roberts Theatre, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Guy Davis is a musician, composer, actor, director, and writer. But most importantly, Guy Davis is a bluesman. The blues permeates every corner of Davis’ creativity. Throughout his career, he has dedicated himself to reviving the traditions of acoustic blues and bringing them to as many ears as possible through the material of the great blues masters, along with African-American stories and his own original songs, stories and performance pieces. For more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call 229-6383.

An Evening with Peter Yarrow (all ages)
Friday, Feb. 22, 8 p.m.
Tickets: $10 in advance/$15 event day
Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St., (702) 229-3515.
Share an intimate evening with legendary singer/songwriter and activist Peter Yarrow (Peter, Paul & Mary, Puff the Magic Dragon, Operation Respect). Inspirational as well as humorous, Peter will look back over the career of Peter, Paul & Mary, telling stories and singing some of the many hits that won them acclaim worldwide. Call 229-3515 for more information.

The Jester Hairston Music Association, Inc. Presents “Why Do We Sing – The Evolution of African-American Music” (all ages)
Cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District.
Saturday, Feb. 23, 3 p.m.
Admission is free, but tickets are required and may be picked up in advance at the West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd.
West Las Vegas Library Theatre, 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 507-3989.
The Jester Hairston Music Association (JHMA) chorus, along with youth from the community, share reasons and circumstances of why we sing. The historical music genres of jazz, spirituals, and gospel will be explored and performed in this festive occasion. Please call (702) 229-4800 for more information.

USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, Feb. 23, 7 to 11 p.m.; dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Cost: $10 per person at the door; $5 for USA Dance members, military, and students ages 13-25.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Cosponsored by the USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national organization USA Dance. USA Dance Las Vegas is a volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. Call (702) 813-6694 or (702) 229-6383 for more information, or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org.
Exhibitions
“Second Wind” Exhibition
Artist Robin Stark
Nov. 26, 2012-Feb. 14, 2013; Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Grand Gallery, 495 S. Main St., First floor, (702) 229-1012.
Inspiration for this work was influenced by the work of American sculptor David Smith. The artist’s ceramic sculptural forms have a reference to the traditional ceramic vessel, yet deviate from functionality and focus on expressive formal elements (surface shapes defined by sharp edges and bold color) to suggest visual movement and momentum. The pieces treat the surface as a two-dimensional format to imply motion already established in the three-dimensional form through repetition and layering of various shapes and colors. The purity and intensity of the hues generate an emotional quality, which is critical to the overall nature of the pieces.

“Narratives of Progress” Exhibit
Artist Armin Mühsam
Jan. 18-March 16, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Snake Exhibit
Jan. 31-Feb. 23, by appointment only. Artists’ reception Jan. 31, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
Chinese Year of the Snake begins Feb. 10. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

African-American Heritage Exhibit
2013 Featured Artist: Lolita Develay
Feb. 7-April 18, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Nevada Watercolor Society’s 2013 Signature Members’ Exhibit
Feb. 28-March 23, during the reception and by appointment.
Artists’ reception Feb. 28, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

# # #
High-resolution photos are available for download at ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/Feb_2013_Events/ and ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/Exhibitions/.
No password is required.
Media Contact:
Margaret Kurtz
Public Information Officer
City of Las Vegas
495 S. Main St., 7th Floor
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702) 229-6993
Cell (702) 249-1828
E-mail: mkurtz@lasvegasnevada.gov

Valentine Feature: 3 Surefire Tips to Keep the Sizzle in Your Relationship

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Falling in love is magical, but staying in love can feel like the impossible dream!

This Valentine’s Day rekindle the fire in your romance with three easy tips offered by Deanna Brann, PhD, Huffington Post Wedding blogger and author of Reluctantly Related: Secrets To Getting Along With Your Mother-in-Law or Daughter-in-Law:

1. Schedule at least two date nights a month. Once a week would be better, but start with two times a month and work your way up to once a week. Insist on two important ground rules for date night: No smartphones or tablets and no conversations about kids or work (unless work is part of your goal setting, which we’ll get to in a moment). Find other things to talk about—get to know each other all over again. Neither of you are exactly the same person the other first fell in love with. You’ve both grown and matured. So allow your partner to be part of your personal evolution and allow yourself to be part of his.

2. Discuss your deepest desires by establishing short-term and long-range goals as individuals, as a couple, and as a family. Once a year, take some time away from all your other responsibilities so you and your spouse can talk about these different goals, the steps you’ll need to take to make them happen, and how you can help each other achieve them. Afterall, it’s easier to reach your goals if you support each other—and if you make sure you’re not unwittingly working against each other, as well. But more importantly, opening up to one another about what you most want in life can be a very emotionally intimate experience. So go for it! Don’t hold back.

3. Establish a monthly desire debriefing. Sit down together (maybe over a nice dinner out) and talk about the headway you’re making toward achieving all these goals. Is there something your spouse could help you with that would make reaching your goals easier? Is there something you could help him with? Do you need to re-evaluate your goals? What are each of you feeling good about in this process? Checking in once a month increases the likelihood that you’ll reach your goals, and it ensures you’ll be regularly connecting at a deep and meaningful level. It certainly trumps talking about your toddler’s penchant for putting peas up his nose. Trust me on this.

For more tips on improving your relationship with your partner, or your in-laws, I would be happy to send you a review copy of Reluctantly Related. Dr. Brann is available for interviews and expert commentary, and would be happy to write a guest article. Additional information about Dr. Brann is posted below for your convenience.

Sincerely,
Lynn

Contact: Lynn Coppotelli
856-489-8654 x 312
Lynn@SmithPublicity.com
…………………………………………
Deanna Brann, Ph.D., is a leading expert in the field of mother-in-law/daughter-in-law relationships. She has over 25 years experience as a clinical psychotherapist and ran her own private practice for more than 18 years. Based in Knoxville, TN, Dr. Brann is a sought after speaker, author and seminar leader. She is also the author of Mothers-in-Law and Daughters-in-Law Say the Darndest Things.
Website: www.drdeannabrann.com
Reluctantly Related is available on Net Galley, www.amazon.com and through www.drdeannabrann.com
Review Copies Available Upon Request

Helping Hands Surgical Care Selects Eight Uninsured Nevadans to Receive no-cost surgeries on Second Annual Charity Surgery Day

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Helping Hands Surgical Care Selects Eight Uninsured Nevadans to Receive no-cost surgeries on Second Annual Charity Surgery Day

WHAT: Eight uninsured Nevadans suffering from a variety of conditions will receive surgeries at no cost from Helping Hands Surgical Care (HHSC), a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization founded by Dr. Kevin Petersen and his wife, Kelly Petersen, who also serves as HHSC’s unpaid executive director. The surgeries will be performed by Dr. Petersen and other Las Vegas surgeons, with the assistance from the medical staff at Valley View Surgery Center – all of whom are volunteering their services for the day. A medical advisory board screened the applications to select patients to receive no cost surgeries. HHSC’s mission is to fund and facilitate surgeries for uninsured and underinsured Nevadans without the means to pay for medically necessary surgeries.

WHEN: CHARITY SURGERY DAY – HELPING HANDS SURGICAL CARE
November 13, 2012
Surgeries scheduled on the hour from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (First arrivals starting at 8 a.m.)
Patients and doctors are available to media prior to or on surgery day.

WHERE: Valley View Surgery Center
1330 S. Valley View Blvd.
Las Vegas, NV 89102
PATIENTS:
Jeffery Silverman, 52, Hernia repair, mesh removal
Silverman had an initial hernia repair in 2009 and has been in constant pain ever since. With very little money left in the bank and no insurance, he is embarrassed to ask for help, but grateful Dr. Petersen is willing to remove the mesh that was used in his initial surgery and repair it again without mesh. He has formed a large support group on Facebook comprised of people around the country suffering from the same condition, and he is grateful to be chosen for free surgery. He can’t wait to reclaim his life.

Donald Sykes, 51, Umbilical hernia repair
Sykes is minister of Pentecostal Temple Church of God in Christ, married with four children and eight grandchildren. He had insurance at one point but lost it due to his inability to keep up with the payments. Sykes has suffered from his hernia condition for nine years and is in considerable pain. He is grateful that the pain will be gone soon, that his life will be extended and the hernia will no longer be visible through his clothing.

Mariana Flores, 26, Umbilical hernia repair
Flores is married with two sons, ages 2 and 7. She is excited she will be able to help her sons and be active again. She feels she has not been a good mother since her mobility has been so limited by excessive pain. In fact, she has not been able to clean her home. She is so grateful she was chosen to receive charity surgery so she can become a better mother and wife and not dependent on others.

Mark Babcock, 54, Umbilical and Right inguinal hernia
Babcock, who is single with three children, is unable to work because of his medical condition. He currently lives with a friend free of charge. He has been to the emergency room twice and was turned away both times because the surgery to cure his condition is considered elective. He is looking forward to regaining the confidence he has lost over the last seven years as he has struggled with debilitating pain. He is extremely thankful to finally receive the help he needs to get back his life.

Mario Zaccone, 49, Right inguinal hernia
Zaccone has suffered from his hernia for five years and is unemployed because of his inability to work due to pain. Previously, he worked in the food industry where he was required to lift, which is impossible for him now given his current condition. He is single with four children and lives with his mother because of his inability to provide for his children and care for himself. He is extremely grateful for HHSC and looks forward to beginning his life again.

Paul Labarre, 42, Umbilical hernia repair
Labarre is a veteran construction worker who with specific skills in flooring and laying carpet. He is unable to work due to his hernia and has lost his home and insurance. He currently lives with his parents and is looking forward to being healthy again and passing a physical so he can go back to work and provide for his family.

Michael Haws, 53, Left inguinal hernia repair
Haws has worked for years in the construction and oil industries. He has not been able to lift due to his hernia condition. Unable to provide for himself, he has been forced to move in with his brother. His current situation has had a major effect on his self-esteem, and he feels drained both physically and emotionally. He is thrilled to be chosen and looks forward to a bright future.

Linda Willis, 59, Trigger finger
Willis has been without medical insurance since she lost her job several years ago. Right-handed, she has not been able to do anything with her right hand for a long time. This includes preparing food, writing and simple daily tasks. Willis has been forced to move in with her daughter for both financial support and assistance with her daily care. She is excited about the future and the possibility of regaining some independence. She particularly looks forward to resuming things she enjoys, including sewing and refinishing furniture.

PARTICIPATING DOCTORS:

Dr. Kevin C. Petersen, General Surgeon
Dr. Bishr Hijazi, Hand Surgeon
Dr. Jon Darwin Halling, Anesthesiologist
Dr. Hosny Habashy, Anesthesiologist

COMMUNITY SUPPORT:
The Las Vegas community is coming together to support the efforts of HHSC.
• Valley View Surgery Center is donating the use of the one operating room for an entire day.
• The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf is providing coffee and breakfast for the physicians and medical staff (up to 35 people) on surgery day.

About Helping Hands Surgical Care
Helping Hands Surgical Care is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization whose mission is to fund and facilitate surgeries for uninsured and underinsured individuals without the means to pay for medically necessary, quality of life surgeries. Founded by Dr. Kevin Petersen of Las Vegas, Nevada based No Insurance Surgery, Helping Hands Surgical Care values the health and well-being of each individual regardless of their ability to pay. The organization is guided by its focus on the physician-patient relationship and its dedication to transforming and improving the lives of those it serves. For more information, visit www.HelpingHandsSurgicalCare.com or call 702-242-5393.

Caring for Problem Skin

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Caring for Problem Skin

(Family Features) According to the National Institutes of Health, skin is the largest organ of your body. Skin can be a very delicate thing, and as the outermost layer, it needs to be cared for in order to look and feel its best. Unfortunately, for those who suffer from highly prevalent skin conditions, such as eczema, caring for and maintaining skin can be a daily challenge.

What is eczema?
Eczema is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition characterized by dry, itchy skin and visible skin rash. Over 35 million Americans, both children and adults, suffer from eczema. The prevalence of eczema has increased nearly 400 percent over the past 30 years and is projected to continue to increase due to environmental and other factors such as stress, according to the National Eczema Association.

In a healthy state, the external layer of your skin acts as a protective barrier. For eczema sufferers, the skin has a deficiency in the external layer that allows the moisture to escape and causes chronic dryness. When skin is dry and unprotected, irritants can reach the sensitive layers below and cause uncomfortable itch flare-ups.

Common triggers
There are a number of things that can trigger an eczema flare-up:
• Irritants such as synthetic fibers, detergents, perfumes, rough or poor fitting clothing, dust or sand.
• Environmental factors such as hot or cold temperatures, humidity, or dry air.
• Emotional factors such as anxiety or stress.

Tips for managing eczema
The National Eczema Association says that daily skin care is essential to help manage eczema.
• When bathing, wash in warm water for 5 to 10 minutes.
• Use a non-irritating and fragrance-free wash. Do not scrub skin harshly.
• Moisturize within 3 minutes after every shower. It helps lock in your skin’s natural moisture to help prevent eczema-related dryness.
• In addition to your daily skincare routine, try applying a cold compress to soothe your skin.

When choosing skincare products, look for gentle, fragrance-free washes and moisturizers, such as Neosporin Essentials products, a line of skincare products which includes a daily body wash, daily moisturizing cream and anti-itch cream specifically designed for people with eczema. Each product has a unique Relipid formula, which contains a lipid, humectant, emollient and botanical blend to help retain the moisture essential for healthy-looking skin. Plus, the daily moisturizing cream contains colloidal oatmeal and was clinically shown to restore visibly healthier skin in three days. Use all products as directed.

Eczema can be stressful and make daily living challenging and uncomfortable. With diligent skin care and good habits, you can help maintain healthy skin and effectively manage symptoms when they do flare up.

To get more information on living with eczema, daily management tips and money-saving coupons, go to www.neosporinessentials.com.
Photo courtesy of Getty Images

How to Care for an Elderly Person or Senior

October 11, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

How to Care for an Elderly Person or Senior
by: Starlet Nicole

It is not always easy caring for an elderly person. Their physical condition, health issues and their emotional state can present challenges for you, the caregiver. There are no doubts that caring for an elderly person is admirable, but it certainly comes with stress and at times can be overwhelming.

Far too many people feel guilty that they can not care for an elderly person on their own. Life presents far too many challenges and more often than not raising a family, paying into a mortgage and keeping food on the table can be challenging enough let alone adding to this caring for an elderly loved one. Although this can be challenging – it is not impossible. Preparing yourself and your family members for the transition is essential in order to make this work well.

Physical Considerations

Get informed about the physical needs of your loved one. Talk to the doctor and to anyone else who may have the wisdom and knowledge to help you care for the elderly member of your family. Know what to expect, what medications are required. Using services provided by a certified in-home caregiver from a professional agency can assist you in times that you need that extra help.

Keeping all important information in one file is important and this includes all medical information including test results, names and phone numbers of doctors, appointment dates, hospital cards, and insurance information. If your loved one is taking a lot of medications, make a chart to help keep track of what medication is to be taken and when.

Always be sure the home is safe. If your loved one uses a walker be sure throw rugs are secure, and there are no obstacles for them to trip over. Install safety railings should this help. If your loved one can get confused at times, it’s also a good safety precaution to have a baby gate positioned high enough in the door frame at staircases so that they can not fall down.

Emotional Considerations

Spending time caring for the elderly does not have to be all about taking care of their personal needs. Spend time asking them about their life. Everyone has stories to share about their life and some seniors have great experiences to share.

Teach an elderly person about the Internet. Many elderly people are nervous about computers and teaching them about all the amazing benefits of the Internet can spark new life in the person you are caring for.

The brain likes to stay active and no better way to do this than to play word games, crossword puzzles or even some board games such as Scrabble.

Always remember to be understanding because as we get older we tend to be very set in our ways and this means being stubborn at times. If the person you are caring for is being very stubborn and it is not a big issue, let it go. If the stubbornness is over something that is not negotiable it’s much easier to handle and you’ll have much less stress when you know to expect it.

When you have all the tools you need, it will make caring for the elderly much easier.

About The Author

Starlet is professional author for GC Nexus Group, Elderly Caregivers Agency help in finding professional caregivers throughout Montreal and Toronto in Canada. GC Nexus offers Live in Caregivers Canada, senior caregiver and elderly home care services for your parents and spouses by professionals.

http://www.gcnexus.com/elderly-care/
The author invites you to visit:
http://www.gcnexus.com

Fall Prevention Week!

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Fall Prevention Week Is Rapidly Approaching! “Don’t Fall Down! Fall Prevention 101 for Older Adults” Now Available as E-Book

The third week in September has been nationally recognized as “Fall Prevention Week” and we need your help to increase awareness of the growing public health concern of falls among our aging population!

Falls are the leading cause of accidental death and non-fatal injury for people over the age of 65. The greying of America is causing major concern among government agencies due to the financial and emotional costs to individuals, their families and society. In 2000, the average cost of a fall was over $28,000 (CDC, 2006). The good news is that up to 50% of falls can be prevented through increased awareness and behavior change.

“Don’t Fall Down! Fall Prevention 101 for Older Adults” explains situations that increase the risk of a fall and how a person can reduce that risk. Some factors can be changed and others must be accepted. The first step a person can do to prevent falls is become aware of things that contribute to instability and then make the necessary change when possible.

Balance is a complicated messenger system and this 70-page book offers scientifically-researched concepts in an easy to understand manner. The reader will gain a better understanding of what may be causing loss of balance, how to reduce the risk of a fall and where to go for help.

The index includes a “Help, I’ve Fallen and I CAN Get Up” demonstration, Fall Risk Medications List, Home Safety Checklist and a Senior Resource Directory.
Written in large print, this is a must read for older adults, loved ones, family members, caregivers, staff members, program planners, activity directors, nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, and doctors.

Knowledge is empowering. This easy to read book encourages a person to take responsibility his/her well-being in order to remain independent.

To request a review copy of this e-book, or to arrange an interview with the author, please contact:

Name: Kelly Ward, aka, “The Fall Prevention Lady”
E-mail: wardkelly@mac.com
Website: http://www.thefallpreventionlady.com
Tel: 916-821-5715

Nevada-Senior-Guide Health Care Partners Medical Group

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Las Vegas 

facebook.com/healthcarepartnersnevada

About Us

HealthCare Partners Nevada is a network of more than 200 primary care physicians and more than 1,300 specialists. With medical clinics and specialty care affiliates throughout Las Vegas, North Las Vegas, Henderson, Boulder City and Pahrump, HealthCare Partners Nevada (HCPNV) is committed to delivering the highest quality of care to all our patients.
Through our total care model, HealthCare Partners provides patient centered comprehensive primary care, specialty, and urgent care services. Founded in 1996, HealthCare Partners Nevada is an affiliate of HealthCare Partners LLC with offices in California, Florida and Nevada.

For Patients

At HealthCare Partners we approach your health with Total Care. Our mission is to deliver the highest quality care to all our patients. We do this by offering you complete access to our services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We also accommodate same-day appointments.
Our health care providers are ready and able to offer expert care when you need it most. While our mission is to deliver the best possible care for our patients, our promise is to provide the personal attention you deserve. It is our pleasure to ensure your individual healthcare needs are met.

Specialty Services

When you choose HealthCare Partners, you are choosing to manage your health through what we call our Total Care Model.  Total care means that you are actively involved with a team of healthcare professionals lead by your primary care physician who is responsible for coordinating your care and ensuring the best outcome possible for your medical needs.
HealthCare Partners is continually adding medical specialties to our team of healthcare professionals, including cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, internal medicine, pediatrics, and podiatry.

Cardiology

Cardiologists are doctors with special training and skill in finding, treating and preventing diseases of the heart and blood vessels.
Click here to find a HealthCare Partners Medical Group cardiologists.

  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Repair
  • Angioplasty
  • Atrial Fibrillation Management
  • Cardiac Catheterization /Angiography
  • Cardiovascular Disease Management
  • Carotid Ultrasonography
  • Catheter Ablation (CA)
  • Cholesterol Management And Testing
  • Coagulation Monitoring
  • Coronary Angioplasty/Stenting
  • Doppler Ultrasound
  • Echocardiography (Echo)
  • Electrophysiological Studies (EPS)
  • Gated Blood Pooling Imaging
  • Heart Rhythm Management
  • Holter/Event Monitoring
  • Implantable Cardioverter /Defribrillator (ICD)
  • Laser Lead Extractions
  • Nuclear Cardiac Imaging
  • Patent Foramen Ovale Repair (PFO)
  • Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Rotational Atherectomy (PCTRA)
  • Peripheral Vascular Disease Management And Testing
  • Peripheral Vascular Interventions
  • Permanent Pacemaker Implantation
  • Stress Testing
  • Structural Heart Disease
  • T-Wave Alternans
  • Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)
  • Transesophageal Echocardiography
  • Ventricular Septal Defect Repair (VSD)
  • Women And Heart Disease
Endocrinology

Endocrinologists are doctors that focus on the medical aspects of hormones and their associated diseases and conditions.  Endocrine disorders may include: cholesterol disorders, coronary artery disease, diabetes, hormone replacement therapy, hypertension, hypoglycemia, obesity, osteoporosis, reproductive medicine and thyroid disorders.

Dermatology

Dermatologists are doctors that specialize in the diagnosis, treatment and management of disorders of the skin, hair and nails.

Internal Medicine

Internal medicine specialists are doctors that focus on adult medicine and have had special study and training focusing on the prevention and treatment of adult diseases. Internists are sometimes referred to as the “doctor’s doctor”, because they are often called upon to act as consultants to other physicians to help solve puzzling diagnostic problems.

Pediatrics

Pediatricians are doctors that focus on babies, children, adolescents, and young adults from birth to age 21.  Pediatricians manage the physical, mental, and emotional well-being of their patients in every stage of development.

Podiatry

Podiatrists are doctors that diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and related structures of the leg.

Special Considerations And Tips For Senior Citizens Travel

July 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Travel Tips for Senior Citizens

Cellular and extracellular changes of old age cause a change in physical appearance and a decline in function. Measurable changes in shape and body makeup occur.

The body’s ability to maintain homeostasis becomes increasingly diminished with cellular aging, and organ systems cannot function at full efficiency because of cellular and tissue deficits.

The well-being of an aged person depends on physical, mental, social, and environmental factors. A total assessment includes an evaluation of all major body systems, social and mental status, and the ability of the person to function independently despite a chronic illness.

Psychological Aspects of Aging

Successful psychological aging is reflected in the senior citizen’s ability to adapt to physical, social, and emotional losses and to achieve contentment, serenity, and life satisfactions.

Because changes in life patterns are inevitable over a lifetime, the older person needs resiliency and coping skills when confronting stresses and change.

For this reason, experts recommend travels and other recreational activities for the seniors to promote psychological, social, physical, and emotional aspect of the elderly.

Ideally, senior citizens do best in their own, familiar environment. But adjustments to the environment may be required to allow the older adult to travel to places they have not yet enjoyed in their entire life. This is to promote life satisfaction in normal aging.

Hence, it is recommended that senior citizens maintain the active lifestyle by engaging in activities that will help them promote their total well-being, such as senior citizens travel.

However, since seniors travel will mainly compose of older people, it is important for them to know the necessary precautionary measures in order to avoid health risks as well as social dilemma.

To guide the senior citizens on their travel, here is a list of some senior citizens travel tips:

1. Airline travel tips

Most seniors travel by air. Hence, it is important to know the privileges especially designed for senior citizens traveling through airplanes.

Senior citizens should know that before making any reservations, they should try to learn more about the privileges for senior citizens made available by a certain airline company.

Special discounts and privileges are provided by the government and should be imposed by all airline companies. If the seniors knows his right, he will never miss these great opportunities. He will also be able to save more on discounts and freebies.

2. Have a nose for news

Senior citizens who travel a lot should have a nose for news. If they will be traveling, they should stay glued on their televisions, newspapers, and radios for any cancellations on flight schedules.

Seniors might experience difficulty when stranded on an airport just because of delayed or cancelled flight.

Hence, knowing the problem before hand will enable the senior citizens to act appropriately and prepare solutions for the problem.

3. Money matters

When traveling, seniors should remember not to bring too many cash with them. They should only bring the necessary things with them, such as credit cards (this should be limited, at least 1 or 2 cards will do) and important identification cards.

It is best not to bring any unnecessary items such as extra cash, additional credit cards, or any cards that will reveal their Social Security number or any personal information such as address or home telephone number.

Statistical reports show that nearly 40% of identity theft cases and other crimes involve senior citizens. This is because most seniors fall easy prey to unscrupulous people. So to avoid such problems, senior citizens should be more wary on their money matters when traveling.

4. Open communication

To ensure security at all times, communication should always be open between senior citizens and their immediate families. One good way to maintain an open communication is to bring mobile phones on senior citizens travels.

If this is not possible, it is best that the concerned seniors leave the necessary information to their families to ensure immediate contact in case something came up.

There are community support services that are available to help senior citizens outside their home. Hence, it is best to know these things so that they will know what to do whenever they need help while on travel.

Keep in mind that the frail senior citizens can experience multiple problems at any given point in time. Therefore, it is important that they know what to do first when certain problems occur especially during their travel.
Source: Free Articles

About the Author

Lee Dobbins writes for http://seniors.subjectwise.com where you can learn more about areas of concern for senior citizens.

Senior Living Properties – 20 Point Checklist (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

A move to senior living properties, retirement communities or estates is often complicated by perceptions and emotion. Make the decision as rationally and objectively as possible. A mistake will likely result in considerable stress and wasted money.

The questions, and their significance will depend on your personal circumstances and on how the estate is set up. I suggest that you go through each issue with a fine tooth comb.

Questions to be answered by the estate management.

1. With residents are there restrictions with for example: having someone to live with you, visitors, car parking, pets or anything else?

2. Are there any specific medical requirements to qualify to live independently?

3. Is it required to give details of any medical conditions or treatments? If so, who can see them and are they kept confidential?

4. Is there convenient estate or public transport available?

5. If the units are incomplete, can a resident change the design or finishes?

6. Are there any circumstances under which the deed of sale be cancelled?

7. Can a resident move, or be moved, from one type of accommodation to another. If so, how would the decision be made?

8. Are residents actively involved in the running of the village and in setting any fees and changing estate rules?

9. Are any resident rights at risk if the village is sold?

10. What exceptional charges will have to be paid by residents?

11. Are there any limitations when selling units? Could there be a disagreement over the selling price or improvements made?

12. Have all the estate management proven experience in this type of development?

Personal Check List – some points to ask yourself.

13. Does my my family, advisor and friends agree with my decision to move?

14. Am I considering the move because of all the daily hassles of running a home?

15. Have I considered all the information about the estate I have chosen? Has my legal representative explained all the relevant conditions in the deed of sale to me?

16. Do I think that this is the best choice for me? Does the this estate living suit the things that I believe are important? Have I spoken to any residents in the estate?

17. What choice is there if I become too ill to live alone? Will the estate and my unit suit me if I ever need a wheelchair or walking aid?

18. Are there services especially intended for the elderly like nursing care and an emergency call system? Will it meet my current and expected future needs?

19. Have I made a comparison of the facilities and the alternative financial arrangements of other developments?

20. Can I comfortably afford the estate I have chosen and what will it cost me if I decide to leave?

Working through these issues it is very apparent that this is an important choice in anyone’s life. The decision to consider senior living properties is often taken at a time of emotional distress so it is critical that it’s made in as objective and rational way as possible.

Patrick Millerd is a baby boomer “nevertiree” and aspiring digital nomad. He’ll help you discover how retirement planning can put you on the path to a create the retirement lifestyle you desire at www.Successful-Retirement.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Patrick_Millerd

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Finding an Assisted Living Facility Alternative for Your Loved One – Home Care Solutions (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

The following information is available for individuals who are in the process of making a decision about home care or an alternative to assisted living facility living. If your loved one has decided he or she would prefer to remain in the comfort of their own home rather than an elderly living facility, take the time to decide the best in senior care option for your loved one; it’s important to thoroughly research any professional in senior home care provider who will be visiting your home on a regular schedule.

If you’ve decided on home care as an alternative to assisted living facilities, the following information is important to consider before starting your search. First determine which type of services you or your loved one will need. It may be best to consult a physician or hospital discharge planner for assistance in evaluating your loved one’s special needs and care requirements. After acquiring the names of several service providers, take the time to consider their offered services and reputations. Here are a variety of questions to ask senior care providers and other individuals concerning the track record and history of an elderly living facility alternative care provider:

 

  • How long have you been in business as a provider of home care services?
  • How do you select and train your employees?
  • Do you provide nurses and/or therapists who evaluate patient home care needs?
  • Who supervises the provision of care?
  • How do you involve or include the patient and his or her family in care plan development?
  • How do you bill for services?
  • What procedures are in place in case of emergency?
  • How is patient confidentiality handled?
  • Can the home care provider supply a list of references?

 

Before choosing your senior living facility alternative and settling into a home care plan that works for you, remember that a little initial research can go a long way towards making the patient/senior care provider relationship beneficial to all.

An Alternative to Assisted Living Facilities: Assisted Living Care

You want your parent, friend, or loved one to enjoy their freedom and independence for as long as possible, and remain comfortable in their own household. As an alternative to elderly living facilities, home care is becoming a popular choice for seniors, as it enables them to remain in the safety and comfort of their own home, and relieves care giving duties from relatives and family members. Often times, your loved one may need help with activities or tasks that go overlooked-such as opening jars, driving, maintaining a clean household, and bathing. An alternative to assisted living facilities, home care provides support for those in need with personal care and daily activities and can provide part-time, full time, and as-needed support.

However, it’s important to understand that senior living caregivers do not always provide health-related services. Home health providers offer medical care, such as trained nurses or physical therapy services for seniors. Assisted living caregivers assist with non-medical senior care.

As your parents age they may require assistance, but assisted living care enables your parent or loved one to continue living independently for as long as possible.

Consider assisted living care as an alternative to assisted living facilities. Your loved one may only need care for a few hours a day, but their quality of life can improve significantly with in-home assistance. Although this decision may be emotional and challenging, it’s sometimes necessary to keep your loved ones safe, cared for, and comfortable.

Erica Ronchetti is a freelance writer for Visiting Angels, the nation’s leading, network of non-medical, private duty home care agencies providing senior care, elder care, personal care, Home health care, respite care and companion care to help the elderly and adults continue to live in their homes across America. Visit the Visiting Angels website to find out more information on alternatives to assisted living facilities.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=E._Ronchetti

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Senior Living Services: Caring for the Elderly and Easing the Pressure Off the Sandwich Generation (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Today, this rapidly expanding population is probably the largest it has ever been. Traditionally, women are a disproportionately large percentage of the caregivers. According, to “The Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Takes On Alzheimer’s,” women account for 65% of the Alzheimer’s population and up to three-fifths of Alzheimer patient caregivers.

The term “sandwich generation” was coined by Dorothy Miller in 1981 and refers to the group of adults whose dependents include both their own children and their aging parents.

Frequently adults, especially women, are caring for their elderly parents while simultaneously raising tweens and teenagers. Pulled in two opposite directions, it may often seem overwhelming and as though both parents and children are not getting what they need. Thus, many caregivers eventually seek out either a home health aide or senior care facility as their loved ones’ needs become more than they are equipped to handle.

Home health agencies partner an aide with an elderly patient. Home healthcare is ideal for clients who want to keep either themselves or their loved ones at home with family. Depending on a patient’s needs, the aide may be required to work either during the day or night, or live with the client for 5-6 days at a time. These aides may offer both companionship as well as custodial and medical care, helping with personal hygiene, daily medications, meals, etc. In home healthcare is minimally disruptive to a patient’s routine, allowing him or her to remain in an environment in which she is familiar. This service allows the elderly to either maintain their own residences or continue living with their families, which may actually preserve their mental and emotional health. Dementia patients, for example, benefit from a consistent environment as it helps stave off the disease’s progression. Medicare generally only pays for a small portion of home healthcare; the rest of the cost is covered by private insurance and funds.

Senior assisted living facilities allow residents to maintain some independence within a controlled environment. Seniors may bring their own furniture and other mementos from home. Generally these residences consist of little apartments that are outfitted with kitchenettes, an environment that enables residents to host family and friends in a more private setting. Main meals are generally served at set times in a large dining area and more individual care is available to those who need it. Certain senior assisted living facilities are authorized to dispense medication or reminders to take medication.

Assisted living centers also offer outings and other day trips for seniors who are able to participate. Senior assisted living is a compromise between a nursing home, which has more comprehensive medical care, and living completely autonomously. Although assisted living is normally paid from private funds and assets, certain long term insurance policies will cover licensed assisted living facilities. A few states offer Medicaid funds and waivers to help foot the bill. Assisted living is regulated by the state, so policies and practices vary.

Nursing homes offer the most extensive care, providing full custodial and medical care. For the elderly who require consistent, round the clock medical attention, this choice can be a viable option. Nursing homes provide occupational and physical therapy. Some nursing homes also offer physical rehabilitation programs, which are required after a major procedures, such as hip surgery. For sufferers of advanced dementia, nursing homes provide the round-the-clock care and attention they require.

Although nursing homes cost more due to the level of care they provide, they are also more frequently covered by Medicaid and Medicare. Some nursing home facilities have the air of a hospital and are run like one. Others try to be less austere and more homey and offer many of the same amenities as assisted living facilities.

Choosing the right solution to meet the needs of the elderly is a laborious process that requires individual case-by-case assessment. At home care, assisted living centers, and nursing homes all have their strengths and weaknesses. Each serves a dual purpose: to care for an aging population and ease the burden for familial caretakers. These services provide patients and their families with peace of mind.

www.KennethRozenberg.com operates the Centers for Specialty Care Group, a collection of prominent healthcare organizations offering short- and long-term care, as well as home health services. Learn more at www.KennethRozenberg.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mark_Etinger

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Nevada-Senior-Guide Life Care Centers of America – Las Vegas

http://www.lcca.com/

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About Life Care

Your family is special with its deep bonds and unique relationships. Facing a dramatic change – such as moving a loved one into assisted living or a nursing home – is an unsettling prospect for most people. Life Care Centers have helped families for decades to work through the difficult decisions about how best to care for their loved ones. We understand how trying it is to choose nursing home care for your loved one, and how most struggling caretakers feel there is no other choice.

That’s why we’re here.

We want those special members of your family to become equally special members of ours. We want to relieve the anxiety and frustration you may be experiencing by providing a nursing home community of constant support, attention and personalized care. Above all, we want to serve each person entrusted to us with compassion, dignity, purpose and respect.

That’s not just our goal. It’s our privilege.

Services

At Life Care Centers of America, we take elderly care very seriously. That’s why we offer residents a wide range of living arrangements and amenities, services and care. From home assisted living to retirement living to nursing homes – and even campuses that offer all three in a continuum of care – Life Care has the experience, expertise, and dedication to provide a full scope of specialty services.

Whether your needs include Alzheimer’s care, in-home nursing care, rehabilitation or recovery help, or any of a number of other specialty services, Life Care will be there, with all the support, education, and commitment you and your loved one need.

Rehabilitation

Life can deliver some unexpected twists: accidents, sudden illnesses or emergency surgeries can happen when you least expect them. And in the aftermath of such events, your energy is focused primarily on recovery—trying to also find the best available resources for help can be pretty challenging.

At Life Care, we understand the intense desire to recuperate and get back to normal as quickly as possible. But serious illness or trauma can sometimes force you to relearn even basic functions. The struggle to regain those lost capabilities while still recovering is frustrating and often overwhelming.

That’s when our teams of experts can make an overwhelming difference. Our skilled therapy services can hasten your recovery, help return lost skills and bring back strength and mobility. Our caring professionals work tirelessly with our residents not only in physical areas, but also by constantly supporting and encouraging them emotionally.

We believe our residents are the extraordinary people who refuse to allow temporary setbacks or disabilities to affect them permanently. Their determination and effort become invaluable tools in the rehabilitation process.

And it is our greatest privilege to partner with them—or you, or your loved one—during recovery … and become your strongest advocates in the road to reclaiming total wellness.

Life Care Centers of America

The sun setting is no less beautiful that the sun rising.

Imagine living in a beautiful, peaceful environment, surrounded by friends and activities.

Caring for Life…
Since 1970, Life Care Centers of America has been providing unequaled nursing care and assisted living service. Our continuum of care campuses give our residents an individual care plan through various levels of care. But it\’s our commitment to quality and professionalism that makes us second to none.

2325 E. Harmon
Las Vegas, NV 89119
702-798-7990

Nevada-Senior-Guide Atria Seville – Las Vegas

www.atriaseville.com

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Find Exceptional Senior and Assisted Living in Las Vegas, NV, at Atria Seville

At Atria Seville, residents find a welcoming assisted living community nestled in a serene residential neighborhood. Take a relaxing walk in one of two landscaped courtyards or practice computer skills in the on-site business center. Atria Seville offers spectacular views of Nevada’s Spring Mountains and the Las Vegas skyline.

Atria Seville provides a uniquely sophisticated assisted living experience, complete with a variety of senior housing options, extraordinary senior care, delicious restaurant-style dining, and a dedicated 24-hour care staff. With quality service as our number one priority, Atria Seville provides an independent living environment far superior to other retirement living communities in Nevada.

Services

  • A choice of floor plans
  • A full-time events director
  • An emergency call system in every apartment
  • Assistance with activities of daily living
  • Concierge
  • Delicious meals served restaurant-style daily
  • Housekeeping and linen services
  • Medication assistance
  • Retreat/temporary stays
    Atria offers a respite (retreat) program for seniors who need assisted living services on a short-term basis. Atria Retreat permits seniors to test the waters of senior living. By allowing guests to stay for a short time in an Atria community, potential residents can decide if senior living is right for them. The retreat program is also an alternative to high-cost inpatient rehabilitation following an illness or surgery. Should a patient be ready to leave the hospital but not ready to go home, Atria offers the comforts of home and 24-hour assistance until they get back on their feet. All of our Retreat guests enjoy the same great amenities as our full-time residents, including delicious meals served daily, a full calendar of social activities, scheduled transportation service and more.
  • Scheduled local transportation
    Local scheduled transportation is available to residents for medical appointments, shopping, religious services and other desired local destinations.
  • Trained staff available 24 hours a day

Amenities

  • Cafe with complimentary snacks and beverages
  • Computers
    Our community provides computers with Internet access specifically for resident use. Staying in touch with family and friends and staying connected to the world is important to our residents, and we want to make it easy to shop online, research, play games and more.
  • Engage Life programming
    Explore our events programming, tailored to nurture the mind, body and spirit of every resident.
  • Fitness center
    We recognize the importance of your physical and emotional well-being. And we also know that regular exercise is key to good health. That’s why our community offers an in-house fitness center with exercise equipment designed with older people in mind.
  • Pets welcome
    We recognize pets are important members of the family. That’s why our community allows them in residents’ apartments. Moving to a new home doesn’t have to mean leaving your furry friend behind – instead, they can enjoy the benefits of Atria with you.
  • Worship space
     Religious services are offered in our community, and transportation may also be available to residents to any place of worship they choose.


 

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!