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Fight the Flu with Healthy Habits

January 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

11949(Family Features) With cold and flu season upon us, it may be tempting to hibernate until the danger of red, puffy eyes and a stuffy nose disappears. Waiting for a cold or flu to run its course can truly feel like an eternity, especially when the symptoms have you looking as bad as you feel.

 

While there is no guaranteed strategy for avoiding the flu or sniffles, there are steps you can take to safeguard yourself and your family. And if you do fall ill, taking extra care will help ease you through until you’re on the mend.

 

While the Centers for Disease Control recommends the flu shot as the single best preventive measure, you can also help ward off illness with healthy habits like these:

 

  • Keep yourself and your belongings away from others who may be sick to prevent the spread of germs. Don’t share dishes and utensils in the kitchen, and provide sick family members with their own hand towels in the kitchen and bathroom.

 

  • Wash your hands frequently using soap and water or an alcohol-based rub. Avoid unnecessarily touching your eyes, nose and mouth, which are easy portals for germs to enter your body.

 

  • Keep your immune system running strong by eating sensible and nutritious meals, exercising regularly, managing stress in a healthy way and getting plenty of sleep.

 

If your prevention falls short and you find yourself combatting sniffles, take these steps to nudge yourself back to good health:

 

  • Consult with your pharmacist or doctor about which medications may help relieve your symptoms.

 

  • Use a soft facial tissue on your irritated skin. Puffs Plus Lotion is dermatologist-tested to be gentle and helps soothe irritated skin by locking in moisture

 

  • Stay home for at least 24 hours after a fever passes. This will help you catch up on much-needed rest and prevent the chance of passing anything contagious on to your friends and co-workers.

 

  • Calm stuffy sinuses with the steam of a long, hot shower. Take the sinus soothing a step further by using Puffs Plus Lotion with the Scent of Vicks.

 

  • Cover your nose or mouth with a tissue like Puffs when sneezing or coughing to minimize the spread of germs.

 

As your symptoms ease, remember to take it easy and allow your body to fully recover so you don’t suffer a setback that needlessly prolongs your illness.

 

For more tips for warding off discomfort from a cold, flu or allergies, visit www.puffs.com.

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

2 Easy Travel Tips for Long Trips With Elderly Seniors

January 20, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Are you planning on any traveling with your elderly parents this year – for holiday visits with long distance family members or perhaps just to have a fun trip out to see sights and enjoy lovely scenery? My senior mom and I just returned from a 7 hour drive to visit some of her great-grandkids. It was a lovely visit but we did come back with a few tips to share with fellow journey-ers.

I routinely keep 4-5 lap blankets of different weights in my car – for her and for my grandkids. That way, if the car is too cool for anyone, they can balance it out easily with a snuggly warm blanket. Then, if they get too hot, it’s easy to toss it off. And the different weights are especially helpful for my senior mom, as she can go from very cold to very warm much faster than normal. This allows her to easily swap blankets as her body temperature changes without having the heater or the cooler blast her in the face to try to accomplish the same thing.

She has always enjoyed car trips in the past, but the past couple of years they’ve been less pleasant. She has found that sitting too long bothers her back and her arthritis. On the trip out, we stopped every couple of hours to walk around, get a drink, use the restroom, etc. and that worked well. By the time we headed home, she was happy over the visit, exclaiming, “This was SUCH a nice time together,” yet aching more than her normal amount. She took some medicine before we left that helped a bit and also encouraged sleeping on the way. She didn’t feel up to…  (keep reading… http://eldercareabcblog.com/2-easy-travel-tips-for-long-trips-with-elderly-seniors/)

U.S. Veterans Honored by Encore.org’s 2013 Purpose Prize

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Seven Awards for People Over Age 60 Solving the World’s Toughest Social Problems

The Purpose Prize has become a “MacArthur genius award for people who develop a second career as social service entrepreneurs.” – The New York Times.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy organizes a network of volunteers across the country to teach disabled veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan how to combat stress — through fly-fishing.

A public relations executive helps wounded warriors find and renovate foreclosed homes – and transforms lives and neighborhoods in the process.

These are two of the seven winners of the 2013 Purpose Prize, awarded by Encore.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who translate decades of skill and experience into “second acts” that contribute to society’s greater good.

Now in its eighth year, The Purpose Prize is the nation’s only large-scale investment in people over 60 who are combining their passion and experience for the social good. Created in 2005 by Encore.org, the prize is aimed at those with the passion to make change and the wisdom to know how to do it, showcasing the value of experience and disproving the notion that innovation is solely the province of the young.

Two winners will receive $100,000 each and five winners will receive $25,000 each.

This year’s winners:

* Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. ($100,000 winner of The Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra)

* Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron taps into her own experience as a cancer survivor to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. ($100,000)

* Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing emotional wounds through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. ($25,000)

* Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
Fennelly runs a unique summer camp behind bars that is transforming federal prisoners into involved parents. ($25,000)

* Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
Huttinger’s project is on a path to eradicate human schistosomiasis, a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. ($25,000)

* Reverend Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. ($25,000)

* Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
Young’s rise from immigrant nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. ($25,000)

The Purpose Prize winners will be honored on December 5, 2013, at an awards ceremony in Sausalito, Ca. NBC’s Jane Pauley will emcee the event for hundreds of Encore leaders and the Purpose Prize winners.

Twenty-one judges – leaders in business, politics, journalism and the nonprofit sector – chose the seven winners from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees. Judges include Sherry Lansing, former CEO of Paramount; David Bornstein, author and New York Times columnist; Eric Liu, writer and founder of CitizenUniversity; and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, The Purpose Prize is a program of Encore.org, which aims to engage millions of boomers in encore careers combining personal meaning, continued income and social impact in the second half of life.

This year, Symetra is sponsoring the $100,000 Purpose Prize for Future Promise, which recognizes an individual whose approach for helping society has the potential to grow steadily over the next five years. The company plans to sponsor another Purpose Prize for Future Promise in 2014.

“While Purpose Prize winners are helping to solve a wide range of pressing social problems, they have one thing in common,” said Marc Freedman, CEO and founder of Encore.org and author of The Big Shift (PublicAffairs Books). “They – and millions of others in encore careers – are turning personal passions and decades of experience into invaluable contributions across sectors, continents and generations, often through entrepreneurship.”

Short summaries for all winners follow. Photos are attached. Longer bios and higher resolution photos are available.

Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas, winner of this year’s Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra, rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. Following a 35-year-career as a fundraising and marketing dynamo, she became the director of communications at Purple Heart Homes in 2008 in an effort to provide greater services for veterans who have service-connected disabilities. In just three years, Thomas helped take the fledgling nonprofit to new heights. She has raised millions for Purple Heart Homes in financial contributions and material donations. Revenue shot up 600% in her first year with the startup. She’s developed an innovative program that matches veterans with foreclosed homes donated by banks, then raises the funds to renovate a home for the individual veteran’s needs. It’s a win-win for all generations—and communities too. It helps veterans to grow assets, towns to recoup lost taxes and neighborhoods that have struggled with foreclosures to stabilize.

Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron is an award-winning journalist with more than 42 years in television broadcasting. She tapped into her own experience as a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. To focus on the plight of low-income Latinos fighting the disease, Duron founded Latinas Contra Cancer (Latinas Against Cancer), an organization committed to educating, supporting and providing essential services to low-income Spanish speakers often overlooked by the health care system. Latinas Contra Cancer has offered a range of programs that have taught more than 3,000 men, women and teens about the disease, resulting in more than 300 preventative cancer screenings. The group has provided psychological and social support to over 100 patients per year. However, the call to action Duron answered has had an impact far beyond the Bay Area. Her passionate commitment is helping Latino communities across the U.S. gain access to cancer support, information and treatment. Her great empathy for cancer patients has made her utterly clear on her bigger purpose in the second stage of life.

Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing the emotional wounds of battle through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. A cancer survivor and war veteran himself, Nicholson was impressed by the fortitude of disabled veterans at the Walter Reed military hospital, where he was treated for prostate cancer in 2005. It spurred him to found Project Healing Waters, a program dedicated to helping disabled soldiers and veterans recover from the trying aftermath of war through the sport of fly-fishing. One-on-one connections have been key to Project Healing Waters’ approach since the beginning. Nicholson knew there were fly-fishing groups and facilities all over the country. His innovation was to convince them to start, manage and lead fly-fishing instruction and outings with veterans through military and Veterans Administration facilities. The quiet bonds forged over fishing lines began to transform lives. Again and again Nicholson heard from family members who said their loved ones had returned from war withdrawn, angry, and difficult to be around. But after fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters, they’ve become happier, more open and engaged. Project Healing Waters works closely with VA Recreational and Occupational therapies to identify those who would most benefit from the program. Many are in wheelchairs or using prosthetics. A few are blind. Participants reflect of full spectrum of disabled veterans and include all ages, genders, ethnicities and disabilities. Nicholson says the impact “goes well beyond the mechanics of fly-fishing.”

Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
A lifelong social activist who ran homeless shelters in the District of Columbia for 17 years, Carol Fennelly abandoned her plans to retire in 1998 when she learned that D.C. inmates had been transferred to Youngstown, OH. One woman made 10-hour round-trip drives twice a week to visit her son. Moved to answer a social need, Fennelly thought about opening a hospitality house in Youngstown for family members visiting inmates. She soon learned that while 93% of the federal inmate population is male, in sheer numbers there are more programs for mothers in prison than there are for fathers. She decided she had what it took to change things. “I had spent years organizing, dealing with government, making change happen, and that emboldened me to think I could go into prisons and start all these radical programs,” Fennelly says. So she launched an encore career with Hope House, an innovative organization that helps prison inmates stay in regular contact with their children. In the past 14 years, Hope House has hosted 200 video teleconferences, 18,000 personalized book readings by fathers and 31 week-long summer camps, which allow kids to spend time with their fathers free of the usual restrictions that come with visitor hours and family chaperones. California recently decided to implement the Hope House model in its 33 state prisons. Prisons in Texas, Idaho and New Hampshire may follow. In 2013 Fennelly was honored at the White House as a Champion of Change.

Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
International public health expert Elizabeth Huttinger spotted a big idea in shrimp, and launched an encore career that could eradicate a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. Huttinger’s project – founded in 2006 – is targeting human schistosomiasis, an infectious parasite carried by river snails. Understanding that the population of prawns that eat those snails had precipitously declined, Huttinger, 63, has devoted her encore career to restoring the prawn population in the SenegalRiver Basin. Projet Crevette’s mission is multifaceted: the restoration of the prawn population diminishes the spread of schisto, provides new economic opportunities to afflicted communities and heals families infected by the disease. Today, Projet Crevette is a prawn-farming microenterprise, operated by locals at public watering holes. It has brought social innovation, new microbusinesses, environmental restoration and improved health to communities. Huttinger is confident Projet Crevette will meet its bold goal to fully restore the indigenous prawn population—and improve countless lives in the process.

Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Reverend Violet Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. After 14 years as parish pastor trained in psychotherapy, Little left behind her traditional congregation to create a religious refuge for the homeless on the streets of the city, which became the “WelcomeChurch.” The church relies mostly on word of mouth, and services can pop up in a city park or on a sidewalk. No questions are asked, and everyone is welcome. The WelcomeChurch coordinates medical services through local universities, helps people get into rehab or jobs, and offers educational services to the public on the causes of homelessness. Little estimates 40 percent of her congregants have moved off the streets into permanent housing and the WelcomeChurch celebrates each and every one of them, many of whom stay connected with Little through their transition. Little’s congregation has grown to include hundreds of homeless as well as non-homeless volunteers in the EvangelicalLutheranChurch in America.

Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
An immigrant from the West Indies who built a meaningful life on meager income, Young’s gritty rise from nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. She’s encouraged thousands to stand up for their right to earn a living wage, and counsels and trains others to become leaders themselves. In 2004, Young began building a movement to legislate a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in New YorkState, which would make overtime, paid time off and rest days mandatory. In 2009, when she heard then Governor David Patterson say on the radio that he’d sign the bill if it made it to his desk, she put on a full court press, becoming the engine behind passage of the law in 2010. The law is the first of its kind in the country, but Young is committed to making sure it isn’t the last. She’s now a key player in the NDWA’s expansion from 11 to 44 affiliated organizations with 15,000 members, up from 5,000 in 2007. Young’s passion for serving her community has only just begun.

Read More About Encore’s Purpose Prize at www.encore.org/prize.

About Encore.org

Encore.org is a national nonprofit that promotes the idea that people in their second acts have the talent and experience to solve some of society’s greatest problems.

About The Atlantic Philanthropies

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. In keeping with the Giving While Living philosophy of founder Charles “Chuck” Feeney, The Atlantic Philanthropies believes in making large investments to capitalize on significant opportunities to solve urgent problems now, so they are less likely to become larger, more entrenched and more expensive challenges later. The Atlantic Philanthropies also seeks to encourage others of significant wealth to engage in major philanthropic pursuits in their lifetime.

About The John Templeton Foundation

The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, supporting research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.

About Symetra

Symetra Financial Corporation (NYSE: SYA) is a diversified financial services company based in Bellevue, Wash. In business since 1957, Symetra provides employee benefits, annuities and life insurance through a national network of benefit consultants, financial institutions, and independent agents and advisors.

 

CONTACT: Sara Ying Rounsaville, srounsaville@encore.org, 415-952-5121, or Russ Mitchell, rmitchell@encore.org, 510-969-0801

Virtual Life After Death: Why Digital Assets Should Be Included in Estate Plan

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

Who would answer your Facebook “friend requests” if you were no longer around?

That depends on whom you determine – or don’t – in your estate plan. October 21 through 27, 2013 is National Estate Planning Awareness Week, and one web service is using the time to bring attention to the preparation digital assets require.

Digital assets include a variety of web and computerized documents and accounts, including social media accounts, photos, videos, websites, blogs and financial accounts.

Currently, only seven states have legal protocol for what happens to these items and accounts if their owner dies without including them in final wishes.

Bill Simpson is the Founder and President of Life Document Storage, an online storage bank for family documents and vital records including estate and digital asset plans. He said many people don’t realize how important it is to include digital assets in their estate plans.

“Digital assets are new to estate planning. Many people die without knowing they should have included these items in their plans. This makes it difficult for family members to access or delete online accounts. Depending on the site, sometimes impossible,” he said.

Life Document Storage allows people to upload important documents such as estate plans, trusts, wills and other documents. Selected relatives are able to view documents, or access them when necessary, such as the death of a relative. The company launched earlier this year.

Simpson said he came up with the idea for a family-centered document storage company from his experience as a funeral director.

“I’ve helped thousands of people make funeral arrangements. And I noticed that many of their families weren’t prepared to handle final wishes and affairs,” he said. He hopes Life Document Storage will prompt family discussions and end of life planning.

Simpson said there are several ways to begin including digital assets into estate plans.

“It’s as simple as creating a list of what online accounts you have and writing down account information. You can take it further by deciding what should happen to those accounts upon your death,” he said.  “But no matter how you store your information, electronically or on paper, make sure your family can find it if something were to happen to you,” Simpson concluded.

For more information on digital asset planning or document storage, visit www.LifeDocumentStorage.com.

Contact:

Bill Simpson – Email – 1-800-377-7341

How to Take Care of a Senior Citizen in the Family – Some Do’s and Don’ts by Ruma Sen

September 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Expert Author Ruma Sen

Although the idea may sound quaint to some, having a senior citizen in your home is something unavoidable. Yes, it is burdensome. Yes, it means having frayed nerves. Yes, it means sacrificing your privacy. Yes, you should not expect any pay-back from your elderly parents…this is their time in the sun.

From the outset,let me explain, that there is no one who will understand the problems faced by the family when an elderly person is a permanent resident, unless he/she too is in a similar position. Elders grow even older, and with increasing age comes unexpected blows, in the form of health issues, visits to doctors, and mounting medical bills. Realize that no one from the extended family or even the closer family members will be there to pitch in. It’s a fact of life….no one wants to INVITE trouble!

Most articles on Senior Citizen care lay stress on the fact that it is an honourable task that you have undertaken, to look after an old person. Few go on to explain what measures you can take to avoid those inevitable moments of depression, craziness, and having the blues, whilst you’re at the job.

Being a seasoned caretaker of a permanent live-in elderly in-law for the past two decades, I can only say this: forget your Ego, forget your cravings for instant happiness and impulsive actions. Look at the long term benefits only. Do you really want to ignore an old person’s problems by staying away and pretending to have fun? In that case, you are only playing with fire. With their lack of presence of mind, the family elder may either leave the house premises, and roam unattended, or leave the gas or geyser on, leading to gravely dangerous situations.

Be kind to the elderly, even though it may raise your hackles at times. Remember, their insensitivity and memory losses are something beyond their understanding or intention. Sometimes, the elderly get violent…handle the situation appropriately. Nowadays there are n number of forums, support groups etc who cater to specific problems involved in caring for the elderly.

Here are some pointers to follow at home, in the event of having an elderly person to take care of.

 

  1. Do keep your house well-ventilated, clean and dust-free.
  2. Try keeping the bathrooms of the elderly clean and DRY, to avoid cases of slipping.
  3. Provide ample reading material and interesting things to do, customized to suit the individual.
  4. Music is a great mood elevator; keep music of their generation easily accessible, with simple to operate music systems.
  5. Constant reminders are needed for the elderly; sometimes they react negatively to such instructions. Be prepared to face bouts of anger.
  6. Keep a doctor’s number, an ambulance number handy.
  7. Inform all the people living around your house about the elderly relative you are looking after. This will help avoid situations in which you will feel flustered.
  8. Keep all medicines out of their reach, and administer medicine in your presence.
  9. Employ a part-time help at home in cases where you feel helpless.
  10. Try to involve them in family outings and fun.
  11. Make them feel respected, loved and wanted. This is an uphill task, as the next generation has no patience to communicate with the elderly.
  12. Keep all the financial support ready. This may be in the form of medical insurance, pensions, savings and other schemes. One never knows when an emergency situation requiring a sudden lumpsum of money may arise.
  13. Make them carry some form of an identity on their person if they happen to be going out for a walk, by themselves.

 

Lastly, do pay attention to their diet.

It finally does not matter whether the senior citizen you are looking after happens to be an in-law or your own parent. In both cases, remember you are dealing with aging problems, and this is not an easy task. It calls for a lot of patience on your part. And when I say Patience, I mean patience! Try not to shout and express your feelings of disgust, anger, and rage: even though these might feelings may be uppermost on your mind.

Balance your own life out by reading, meditation, having friends over, or going out for a break. A strong family bond will ensure that the stressful moments will be counterbalanced with relaxed ones. Lastly, always boost yourself up by reminding yourself that the present situation could have been worse!

This article is an original one. The contents have been garnered from various sources, online, books and real life experiences. In case the reader wishes to add any new dimension to this, I would welcome it.
http://rumasen77.wordpress.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ruma_Sen

Medicare Annual Open Enrollment Changes Are Expected, Allsup Explains

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Medicare Annual Open Enrollment Changes Are Expected, Allsup Explains

New Medicare plan options for 2014 will be available Oct. 15, but Health Insurance Marketplace enrollment could confuse beneficiaries 

There are only a few weeks before the Medicare annual open enrollment period begins Oct. 15. This year’s Medicare season crosses calendars with the rollout of the Health Insurance Marketplace, so it’s important Medicare-eligible beneficiaries understand the differences between the two government programs, according to Allsup, a nationwide provider of Medicare plan selection services.

During the Medicare annual enrollment period, Oct. 15 to Dec. 7, all Medicare beneficiaries have the option to change their Medicare plans for the coming year to better match their needs. This includes anyone using original Medicare, Medicare Advantage or Part D prescription drug plans.

“Because the federal and state-run health insurance exchanges open for business just two weeks prior to Medicare enrollment, some people may be confused,” said Paula Muschler, manager of the Allsup Medicare Advisor®, a Medicare plan selection service offering personalized help that includes customized research and enrollment assistance.

“Medicare beneficiaries may falsely think they need to enroll in an exchange plan to avoid penalties. Or, they may be so flustered that they don’t carefully evaluate their Medicare plan options for 2014, which could be detrimental if their plan or their needs have changed,” Muschler said.

Another potential area of confusion is for those individuals turning 65 during Medicare annual enrollment. “Because some seniors become Medicare eligible during this time period, they need to look at their Medicare selections for coverage that takes them through year-end 2013, as well as coverage that will begin Jan. 1, 2014,” Muschler said. “These first-time enrollees can benefit from the help of a Medicare specialist like Allsup when it comes to navigating their Medicare plan decisions.”

What to Expect: Medicare Coverage 2014

Nearly 50 million people are enrolled in Medicare. Each year, annual open enrollment brings with it changes that can affect their Medicare plan selections.

Following are factors to keep in mind for 2014 coverage:

Medicare is not part of the Health Insurance Marketplace. Anyone with Medicare is considered covered and won’t face penalties for being uninsured under provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Medicare annual open enrollment runs Oct. 15 to Dec. 7. (Note: Health Insurance Marketplace enrollment is from Oct. 1, 2013, through March 31, 2014, according to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS).)

Medicare recipients reaching the drug donut hole will benefit from lower costs. The gap in prescription drug coverage starts when someone reaches the initial coverage limit, estimated at $2,850 in 2014. It ends when they have spent $4,550, when catastrophic coverage begins. (These are reductions of $120 and $200, respectively, from 2013.) During the donut hole, all costs are covered by individuals out of their own pocket. In 2014, those who reach the donut hole can receive a 52.5 percent discount on brand-name drugs and 28 percent discount on generic drugs (an increase from 21 percent in 2013).

Under catastrophic coverage, they are responsible for a co-pay of $2.55 for generic or preferred multisource drugs (down from $2.65 in 2013) with a retail price up to $51 and $6.35 for all other drugs (down from $6.60 in 2013) with a retail price up to $127. For 2014, however, beneficiaries are responsible for a 5 percent cost-sharing fee for drugs over those retail prices.

Medicare Part B premium changes are expected. In each of the past three years, Part B premiums have increased. The 2013 monthly premium for Medicare Part B (medical insurance) was $104.90, an increase from $99.90 in 2012. In addition, because Part B premiums are based on the beneficiary’s income and those income levels are frozen at 2010 levels, more individuals could see their premiums change. Information on the standard Part B premium for 2014 should be available by the time Medicare annual open enrollment begins Oct. 15.

Prescription drug Part D plans will see slight changes in deductible and premiums. The Part D initial deductible decreases by $15 to $310. HHS also recently reported the Part D monthly premiums will remain relatively stable, at $31 for a basic prescription drug plan in 2014. This is close to the reported average premium of $30 for the past three years (2011-13). Part D premiums are subject to the same income-based thresholds as Part B.

Changes anticipated for Medicare Advantage plans. Not all plans change every year, but common changes include costs, such as premiums, deductibles and co-pays, and changes to covered procedures, tests, medical facilities and other provisions. Some plans may be eliminated, which means beneficiaries will need to select a new plan or default to original Medicare Part B. Enrollment in Medicare Advantage plans continues to grow with 14.4 million people enrolled, an increase of more than 1 million from 2012, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Most Medicare participants will receive their Annual Notice of Change (ANOC) and Evidence of Coverage (EO) from their current Medicare Advantage and Part D providers by Sept. 30, according to Muschler. “It’s crucial people review materials as soon as they receive them and asses their current healthcare needs,” she said.

“Healthcare costs are a critical line item in most people’s budget, and especially so for seniors and people with disabilities,” Muschler added. “Believing your current plan will continue to cover your needs in the same way can lead to unexpected and costly surprises.”

Medicare specialists such as Allsup are available to help consumers and their family members review Medicare plans and choices for 2014 coverage, Muschler added.

“For many people, this can be a time-consuming, confusing and complex evaluation process, especially when comparing Part D plans or Medicare Advantage plans,” Muschler said. “Many Medicare beneficiaries are pleased to find out there are Medicare specialists like Allsup who look at the comparative details of the plans, and then provide them the assistance they need to make choices that suit their needs and budget in the coming year.”

The Allsup Medicare Advisor is an affordable, flat-fee based service for Medicare-eligible individuals.

For an evaluation of Medicare options, call an Allsup Medicare Advisor specialist at (866) 521-7655 or visit Medicare.Allsup.com to learn more about the service.

The Allsup Medicare Advisor also has features that help financial advisors guide their clients to the Medicare plans that match their specific lifestyles and healthcare needs. Employers also use Allsup Medicare Advisor for their employees who are retiring and transitioning to Medicare. For more information, go to FinancialAdvisor.Allsup.com, or call (888) 220-9678.
ABOUT ALLSUP

Allsup is a nationwide provider of Social Security disability, veterans disability appeal, Medicare and Medicare Secondary Payer compliance services for individuals, employers and insurance carriers. Allsup professionals deliver specialized services supporting people with disabilities and seniors so they may lead lives that are as financially secure and as healthy as possible. Founded in 1984, the company is based in Belleville, Ill., near St. Louis. For more information, go to http://www.Allsup.com or visit Allsup on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/Allsupinc.

The information provided is not intended as a substitute for legal or other professional services. Legal or other expert assistance should be sought before making any decision that may affect your situation.

# # #

Contact:
Rebecca Ray, (800) 854-1418, ext. 65065, r.ray@allsupinc.com
Mary Jung, (773) 429-0940, mtjung@msn.com

Diversion Safes For Senior Citizens by Carleton Cook

September 3, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Expert Author Carleton Cook

Diversion Safe Helps Senior Citizens Keep Valuables Hidden

Diversion safes are perfect for senior citizens. In case you have never heard of a Diversion Safe, it is a small safe disguised as a can of dog food, or shaving cream, or a cleaning supply product. When thieves break into a home, they are looking for cash or jewelry lying around, plus electronic items, such as, televisions, radios, and other gadgets that have value to them.

When thieves enter a home, they don’t have time to go through things that will slow them down, and they aren’t going to bother with cleaning supplies or dog food, after all, it’s heavy and will weigh them down, as well.

A diversion safe, could be a dog food can on the outside, but on the inside is a secret compartment where you can store cash, jewelry, stock certificates, or whatever else you want to hide. The diversion safe can also be a way to have cash stored in your home that you spouse or visiting family members won’t know about. The point is that your privacy is your privacy and no one has a right to invade your privacy OR rob you of these items.

Perhaps you have a visiting nurse or house cleaner that you don’t want to see your jewelry or cash lying around, so the diversion safe can be great for that reason as well. So, whether you are rich or poor, single or married, living alone or with someone, you can safeguard your valuables with a small, inexpensive, discreet, unnoticed diversion safe, in your home, apartment, or room.

Not only are these perfect for senior citizens, but they are perfect for anyone, and they make a great gift item. When you need or want to give someone a gift, and don’t know what to get, why not a diversion safe, so that they can protect and hide their precious, secret belongings? A person can never be “too careful” these days, and a diversion safe is one step in the right direction.

Carleton Cook is a life long military, police, and private security expert. Carleton Cook & Affiliates has a staff of thirteen employees and three warehouses available to serve you.

[http://www.know-selfdefense.com] IF YOU DON’T NEED US NOW YOU MAY IN THE FUTURE

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Carleton_Cook

A Comprehensive Look At Senior Citizens Travel by Bruce A. Hoover

August 22, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Expert Author Bruce A. Hoover

Travel is becoming popular among many groups of people. Children are traveling more with their parents, teens are traveling more in groups and people who thought they could not afford to travel are traveling more now because of the availability of so many deals! Senior citizens travel too and today, they are traveling more than ever!

In the past, only seniors who had a substantial retirement savings were able to travel. Today, there are so many deals and opportunities for cheap, quality travel that anyone, including seniors on a budget can see the world without going broke!

Some destinations are cheaper than others such as the Caribbean, Mexico and some countries in Europe. Of course, there are many places to see in your own backyard and The United States and Canada are no exception where deals are concerned. Just like there are cheaper destinations, there are also cheaper methods of travel. Cruising is a great way to see many different parts of the world at a low price and all-inclusive Caribbean vacations are great deals as well.

If you are a senior looking for a great travel deal, there are many things you can do to maximize your chances of finding the best deal. First, ask around. You never know what you might find out from friends and family members who have traveled recently. Do a thorough internet search and sign up for travel deal newsletters that allow you to be among the first to find out about deals. Start looking for your trip and book your trip as early as possible in order to get the best savings.

If you put the proper amount of time and effort into your search, you will have no problem the right vacation for you at the right price and next thing you know, you will be on your way to relax and have some fun in a place you have always wanted to see!

Next, now that you understand how you can get inexpensive senior citizens travel will you take advantage of it?

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Bruce_A._Hoover

In an Aging Society – Are Senior Citizens Driving Safely? by Diane Carbo

August 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Remember when you couldn’t wait until you were old enough to drive. Getting a driver’s license gave us an opportunity to experience a new freedom we did not have before. For those of us with two parents working, driving meant taking ourselves and our siblings to after school activities and work. Driving took us to a level of independence that we had not experienced before. In an aging society of drivers, those very same feelings exist in many today. Driving gives us a sense of independence and freedom, the ability to go out and socialize, go to work or to church. Safety issues are a concern as many move into the golden years. The life expectancy of seniors is increasing. There are more active senior citizens out on the road today than ever before. Since we all age differently, many aging adults, can drive into their seventies and eighties. As we age, the risks for having a serious car accident that requires hospitalization rises. Statistics show that fatal car accidents rise after the age of seventy.

If you know an aging adult driver who is experiencing difficulty with driving, it is important to carefully monitor the situation. This article can help you determine whether you should take steps to encourage the senior to stop driving.

An aging society and risk

Some key risk factors that affect our aging society are:

Vision declines affecting depth perception and ability to judge speed of oncoming traffic. Night vision becomes a problem as our eyes loose the ability to process light. By age 60, you need three times the amount of light that you did at age 20 in order to drive safely after nightfall. We also become more sensitive to bright light and glare. Signs and road markings can be difficult to see.

With age, flexibility may decrease as response time increases. A full range of motion is crucial on the road. Turning your head both ways to see oncoming traffic, moving both hands and feet can be difficult for those with chronic conditions such a rheumatoid arthritis, or Parkinson’s disease, heart disease and diabetes.

Older adults in an aging society will often need to begin to take medications. Certain medications, as well as a combination of medications and alcohol, can increase driving risk. Be aware and careful about medication side-effects and interactions between medications. It is important to talk to your pharmacist to be aware of interactions that could affect your driving safely. Some medications cause drowsiness.

Aging affects our quality of sleep, resulting in daytime sleepiness. Falling asleep at the wheel is a major concern for those that dose off during the day.

The beginning of dementia or mental impairment can make driving more dangerous. A decreased mental capacity or decrease tolerance to stressful driving situations such as complex and confusing intersections may cause delayed reactions to sudden or confusing situations on the road. An aging brain and body does not have the same response time as we did when we were younger.

Look for warning signs

There are multiple warning signs that an aging adult is becoming or is an unsafe driver. Some of them are small, but if there are multiple concerns it may be time to talk about your concerns with the aging driver. Warning signs of an unsafe driver include

 

  • Abrupt lane changes, braking, or acceleration.
  • Increase in the dents and scrapes on the car or on fences, mailboxes, garage doors, curbs, etc
  • Trouble reading signs or navigating directions to get somewhere
  • Range-of-motion issues (looking over the shoulder, moving the hands or feet, etc.)
  • Becoming anxious or fearful while driving or feeling exhausted after driving
  • Experiencing more conflict on the road: other drivers honking; frustration or anger at other drivers. Oblivious to the frustration of other drivers towards them
  • Getting lost more often
  • Trouble paying attention to signals, road signs, pavement markings, or pedestrians
  • Slow reaction to changes in the driving environment
  • Increased traffic tickets or “warnings” by traffic or law enforcement officers
  • Forgetting to put on a safety belt

 

If you are concerned about an aging adult driver, closely monitor their driving before deciding whether they need a refresher coarse on their driving skills or approaching them to give up their driver’s license altogether. Ongoing and open communication is important to addressing the issue of driving. Studies conducted by Harvard and MIT show that while most drivers preferred to discuss the issue with their spouse, doctor or adult children (in that order), this is not the case for everyone. The right person may not necessarily be the most forceful or outspoken one, but rather someone whose judgment and empathy are especially trusted by the driver.

Talk with other family members, your doctor, and close friends to determine the best person for “the conversation.” Remember driving signifies independence, freedom and being self sufficient to active senior citizens. Realize you may meet with resistance and the aging driver may become defensive. Emotion may get in the way of a rational conversation. Express your concerns and give specific reasons for those concerns.

The goal is to get the aging driver be part of the decision making process

You may begin by asking your loved one to make some concessions because of your concerns.

 

  • Taking a driver refresher course
  • Not driving at night
  • Suggest they not drive on busy thoroughfares or during rush hour
  • Taking shorter trips
  • Not driving under adverse weather conditions
  • Encourage a visit to their primary care physician or pharmacist to go over medications that may affect driving skills. Your physician may be able to recommend a Driver Rehabilitation Specialist. This individual can assess driving safety by an office exam and driving test and make recommendations regarding special equipment or techniques that can improve the driver’s safety. Consider ways to decrease the need to drive. Check out alternatives to shopping by car, including:

  • Arrange for home deliveries of groceries and other goods, and try to arrange for home visits by clergy, medical and personal care providers, and government service providers.
  • Use financial services that don’t require bank visits, like automatic bill paying, direct deposit, and bank-by-phone or on-line banking services.

Fears of those living in an aging society 

Fear of isolation and decrease in socializing is a real concern for the aging driver. It is important to keep spirits high as the aging driver makes the adjustments to becoming a non driver. Be in tune to their need for fun, volunteering, work and religious activities. Create a transportation plan that can make it easier for the aging driver to give up driving. You can create a list of friends and family that are willing to drive, contact the church and the local Area Agency on Aging in regards to transportation programs in the area.

Some seniors may adjust better if they can keep their own car, but have others drive them. Their own car may feel more comfortable and familiar, and the sense of loss from not driving may be lessened. Remember, baby boomers have grown up walking out the door and being able to go where they want to go. We need to keep the aging adult driver and those on the road with them safe.

Diane Carbo RN- As a geriatric care manager, that has cared for her father and mother in law in their homes, she learned first hand how overwhelming, stressful, and time consuming caring for a loved one can be. Staying in their homes was very important to them. As a result, Diane started http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com to assist others age in familiar surroundings and avoid the emotional and frustrating task of maneuvering the medical delivery system

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

Choosing A Nursing Home For Your Parents

July 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

nursing-home-abuse

CHOOSING A NURSING HOME FOR YOUR PARENT

So many of the most important decisions we make in life are made when we are least prepared to make them.   So it is, when the time comes to choose whether, or which nursing home facility in which to place an aging parent.  It’s estimated that 60% of nursing home admissions are made from a hospital, rather than from a home, or an assisted living facility.  Your loved one may have suffered a broken a hip or a stroke, or may be suffering from dementia.  The time constraints in this type of situation press care givers to make a quick decision regarding care of their love one, without the luxury of investigation and due diligence that such a decision deserves.

We will attempt in this post, to review resources which are available to help you make a decision of this kind, whether the situation is a hurried one or not.  Making such a decision depends, in large measure, on the condition of the parent and what types of care or treatment will be required for their individual circumstances.  It will largely depend on whether they are injured due to a broken hip, or other disabling condition, suffering from Alzheimer’s or other form of dementia, or other conditions.

There is a growing amount of information available online to assist in this process.  At the federal government level, there are many resources to assist.  The website, http://www.eldercare.gov/eldercare.NET/Public/index.aspx is a good place to begin.  You can either search by location or by topic to find resources available in your state or city.  There are a large number of resources listed on this site which address many of the concerns and problems faced by care givers to our aging populations.

Additionally, to assist with evaluating potential nursing homes, a publication called, Your Guide to Choosing a Nursing Home, (http://www.medicare.gov/pubs/pdf/02174.pdf)  presents a fairly complete outline of considerations when attempting to evaluate a place for an aging parent.   Subjects such as “Choosing the Type of Care You Need” to “Steps to Choosing a Nursing Home” are included.  The Nursing Home Checklist (http://www.medicare.gov/nursing/checklist.asp) will also provide many ideas for evaluating and screening potential facilities.

The federal government also funds state level Ombudsmen to assist in these matters.  The National Long-Term Care Ombudsman Resource Center website (http://www.aging.state.nv.us/) will allow you to find these resources in your state.  For Nevada, that contact information can be found here. (http://www.aging.state.nv.us/)  The Las Vegas office of the Ombudsman can be called at (702) 486-3545.  Concerns ranging from finding an appropriate care facility to reporting cases of elder abuse can be directed to the State Ombudsman’s office.

Among non-government agencies, there are many advocacy groups that can also provide assistance.  The Consumer Voice provides a Guide to Choosing a Nursing Home .

http://www.theconsumervoice.org/sites/default/files/advocate/A-Consumer-Guide-To-Choosing-A-Nursing-Home.pdf ) This organization also provides private ombudsman services to families and residents of nursing facilities.  Another privately funded website provides a registry and grading of nursing homes is http://www.memberofthefamily.net/.  This site provides listings of Medicare and Medicaid certified nursing homes and grades various aspects of the operations of the nursing home.

Beyond these and other resources that you may uncover in your search for a nursing home, many of the considerations you may want or need to consider have to do with costs.  Medicare will only pay for medically necessary care in a nursing home.  It will not pay for non-medical everyday assistance with normal living.  If your loved one needs assistance with walking or eating, these things are not covered.  Most nursing home costs are paid out of personal savings, social security benefits, Long Term Care (LTC)  insurance benefits, or Medicaid if the patient qualifies.  Nursing home costs are estimated to average $200 per day for patients, and this doesn’t include cost for treatment needed for additional services, such as dementia care, for example.  Long Term Care insurance must be purchased and in force, prior to your loved one’s need for services.

Once you’ve done the initial research, nothing replaces visiting the facility and seeing for yourself.  Visit often and at various unexpected times, to be sure that the facility is the type of environment you would want your parent or loved one to be exposed to.  Considerations include turnover rate of personnel in the home.  Does the home offer “consistent assignment” which means do nurses and aids treat the same patients on most of their shifts.  Consistency and familiarity are important considerations for your loved one.  Relationships built between patient and nursing home staff can provide a measure of security for your loved one.  If a home employs a high number of temporary workers, or turnover is high, that consistency can be lost.

Four items to think about in any nursing home placement include, how convenient is the home to all family members, quality of care for chronic conditions including dementia and/or physical disability, supportive environment for the potential resident, and do costs fall within an affordable range.  And once this decision is made and your parent or grandparent is now in such a facility, keeping an eye open for negligence or even abuse is important.  Unfortunately, this is a growing problem as our population ages and requires higher levels of care.  So if such a thing should happen to your loved one, the services of a trusted attorney may be required.  Our firm does provide such services, and more information can be found here.  (http://www.richardharrislaw.com/personal-injury/nevada-nursing-home-abuse-lawyer.php)

Additional resources:

http://www.medicare.gov/pubs/pdf/02174.pdf

http://www.medicare.gov/nursing/checklist.asp

http://www.theconsumervoice.org/sites/default/files/advocate/A-Consumer-Guide-To-Choosing-A-Nursing-Home.pdf

http://www.memberofthefamily.net/

http://www.eldercare.gov/Eldercare.NET/Public/Index.aspx

http://www.ltcombudsman.org/

http://health.usnews.com/health-news/best-nursing-homes/articles/2013/02/26/how-to-choose-a-nursing-home

http://guides.wsj.com/health/elder-care/how-to-choose-a-nursing-home/

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/20/health/20patient.html?ref=health&_r=0

http://www.richardharrislaw.com/personal-injury/nevada-nursing-home-abuse-lawyer.php

 

 

World’s Leading Ophthalmologist, Dr. Edward Kondrot, Cycling 335 Miles to Raise Awareness for Macular Degeneration

July 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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World’s Leading Ophthalmologist, Dr. Edward Kondrot, Cycling 335 Miles to Raise Awareness for Macular Degeneration

DADE CITY, FLORIDA – (July 18, 2013) – On July 19, 2013, Dr. Edward Kondrot and his wife, Ly, are beginning a 335-mile bike through the beautiful Great Allegheny Passage. Their journey starts in Pittsburg, PA and ends in Washington, DC, an estimated ten-day ride. The couple are biking to raise awareness about alternative treatments for macular degeneration and asking for sponsors to pledge anything from 10 cents to $10 per mile. All the funds raised will go to Restore Vision Foundation, an Arizona non-profit Corporation.

According to the National Eye Institute, Age-Related Macular Degeneration, or AMD, is a common eye condition, usually occurring in adults 50 years and over. It is the leading cause of vision loss in older adults as the macula is destroyed, creating blurry images. Your risk of developing AMD rises with age, as well as if you are a smoker or if you have family members with macular degeneration.

“I think it’s important to highlight the statistics of AMD due to the sheer number of people that are affected,” affirms Dr. Kondrot, the world’s leading ophthalmologist and founder of Healing the Eye & Wellness Center. “Most people with AMD are recommended to get laser surgery or injections, but alternative treatments are much less invasive and have incredible results.”

“If I’m going to bike 335 miles in my sixties, I think the cause is important,” adds Dr. Kondrot, “I want people to realize that harsh surgeries and medication is not the only way to go to prevent or treat macular degeneration. The goal is to raise awareness about alternative therapies, which can be more effective and less invasive. We hope to raise a lot of money for the Restore Vision Foundation.”

Dr. Kondrot is the author of three best-selling books, including “10 Essentials to Save Your Sight” (Advantage Media Group, July 2012), and president of the Arizona Homeopathic and Integrative Medical Association. He has founded the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center, located just north of Tampa, Fla., which offers alternative and homeopathic routes to vision therapies known as the “Kondrot Program.” The program focuses on such conditions as macular degeneration, glaucoma, dry eye, cataracts, and others. His advanced programs have helped people from around the world restore their vision. The center sits on 50 acres of land and features a 14,000-square-foot state-of-the art complex, an organic ranch, jogging trails, swimming pool, hot tub, and more. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

To pledge, please visit: http://ow.ly/n0FFp

To follow Dr. Kondrot and his wife on their journey, visit: http://ow.ly/mZikP

To learn more about the Restore Vision Foundation: http://www.restorevisionfoundation.org/RVF/Welcome.html

About Health The Eye & Wellness Center

The Healing The Eye & Wellness Center is located 30 miles north of Tampa, in Dade City, FL. Founded by Dr. Edward Kondrot, the Center offers world-class alternative therapies for vision conditions, including color and vision therapy, the treatment of glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration, dry eye, and more. The center also offers a variety of seminars, webinars, and training sessions for others in the medical community. Dr. Kondrot is the world’s only board-certified ophthalmologist and board-certified homeopathic physician. He is also author of three best-selling books in the field. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

# # #

Source:

National Eye Institute. Age-Related Macular Degeneration.http://www.nei.nih.gov/health/maculardegen/armd_facts.asp#1

WestCare Foundation Announces Expanded Veterans Programs

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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WestCare Foundation Announces Expanded Veterans Programs

(Las Vegas) – WestCare, a community-based nonprofit providing responsive human services and behavioral health care programs for four decades, announced today that it has expanded its Veterans’ services.

WestCare, founded in Las Vegas 40 years ago, serves approximately 5,000 veterans throughout the United States annually.  America’s returning warriors often face health challenges including substance abuse and mental health disorders, identified as this generation’s “invisible wounds of war.”   Among them are post traumatic stress, brain injury, sexual trauma, anxiety and depression.  Episodes of homelessness, unemployment, and criminal justice involvement are not uncommon among our Veterans.

“These challenges present opportunities for community organizations, led by specially trained, qualified and informed staff, to assist with issues such as social isolation, domestic violence, reintegration and transition, and other problems a Veteran, as well as Veteran family members, may be experiencing,” said veteran and Director of Veteran Services, Dan Bernal. “WestCare is committed to helping Veterans and military family members live positive, productive and healthy lives.”

WestCare’s expanded programs are aimed at addressing a broad range of issues for Veterans and their families through services that  include: treatment for substance abuse and mental health disorders with gender or youth-specific services as appropriate, HIV/AIDS-specific programs, assistance to homelessness  including transitional shelters and permanent housing projects, family counseling, community reintegration, assistance to those who are justice involved, educational and vocational programs for both youth and adults, and case management.

From the top down, starting with WestCare’s President and Vietnam Veteran, Richard Steinberg, more than 10 percent of WestCare’s leadership and staff are Veterans and members of military families. The organization has a deep understanding of military culture at every level and in every program.  “Serving those who have served” is more than a slogan at WestCare.

Since the organization’s inception, Veterans have been welcomed into WestCare programs.  Today, the expanding reach of Veteran-specific programs is aimed at extending services to the men and women who deserve respect for their service, understanding of where they have been and opportunities for their future.

WestCare

WestCare, whose mission “uplifting of the human spirit,” was founded 40 years ago in Las Vegas.  Since its inception, it has grown to more than 100 locations in 16 U.S. States, the US Virgin Islands and the Pacific Islands headquartered in Guam.  The non-profit organization has a variety of programs available in each of the communities it serves.   For more information on the WestCare Foundation and its mission, visit www.WestCare.com.

Memory Loss in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

June 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many senior citizens experience some form of memory loss. Still, there are differences between mild forgetfulness and more serious memory problems. And, it is important that senior citizens and those involved in their elder care address problems with memory, as it may be a sign of a more serious condition.

Mild Forgetfulness

As we age, we lose some of the sharpness of memory we had when we were younger. We may notice that it takes longer to recall facts or information, learn new things, or find or identify familiar objects. In general, these are all signs of mild forgetfulness rather than a more serious medical problem. If you are becoming worried about your memory, schedule an appointment with your doctor to rule out larger problems. Many activities can sharpen your mind and memory, such as picking up a new hobby, visiting friends, eating well, and exercising.

Some more tips for helping your memory are listed below:

 

  • Learn a new skill.
  • Volunteer in a local school, hospital, place of worship, or somewhere else in your community.
  • Spend a lot of time with loved ones.
  • Make use of memory tools such as large calendars, agendas, and notes to yourself.
  • Make an effort to put your wallet, purse, keys, or glasses in the same place each time you set them down.
  • Get ample rest.
  • Exercise and eat a healthy diet.
  • Avoid drinking a lot of alcohol.
  • Seek help if you feel depressed for an extended period of time (more than two weeks).

 

You can also make use of the following:

 

  • Large calendars
  • Agendas for each day
  • Notes about safety in the home
  • Directions for using common items around the house

Serious Memory Problems 

More serious memory problems disrupt your ability to carry on normal activities like driving, shopping, or handling money. Some signs of a serious memory problem include:

 

  • Repeating the same questions over and over.
  • Getting lost in a usually familiar place.
  • Being unable to follow directions.
  • Experiencing confusion about time, people, or places.
  • Taking poor care of yourself (eating poorly, forgetting to bathe, or engaging in unsafe actions or activities).

Causes of Serious Memory Problems 

Medical conditions. Certain medical conditions can lead to serious memory problems that should disappear after treatment. Some things that can cause memory problems are bad reactions to certain medications, depression, dehydration (insufficient amount of fluids in the body), poor diet (insufficient vitamins and minerals), minor head injuries, and thyroid problems. These are all serious medical conditions that should be handled by a physician.

Emotional problems. When senior citizens have certain emotional problems, serious memory problems may develop. Sadness, loneliness, worrying, or boredom can cause confusion and forgetfulness. An active lifestyle, visiting with loved ones, and learning new skills can be helpful, but it may be necessary to seek the help of a doctor or counselor for treatment. If this is the case, getting proper help should minimize memory problems.

Alzheimer’s disease. This disease also causes problems with memory. It begins slowly, but the symptoms get progressively worse as the brain changes. Although it may appear to be mild memory loss at first, people with Alzheimer’s get to a point at which it’s difficult to think clearly. Everyday activities like shopping, driving, cooking, and carrying on a conversation become complicatedTaking medication during the early or middle stages of Alzheimer’s disease can delay memory loss and can be of great help if you have trouble sleeping or are worried or depressed.

Multi-infarct dementia. This is another disease that causes memory problems, where symptoms often appear abruptly. Memory loss and confusion associated with this disease come about through small strokes or short periods of decreased blood flow to the brain. Preventing additional strokes can maintain or improve memory after a stroke, but having more strokes generally leads to more memory loss. To prevent strokes and multi-infarct dementia, maintaining a healthy blood pressure is key.

Diagnosing Serious Memory Problems

As with all health concerns, if you have cause to worry about your memory, you should see your doctor. Be prepared to have a complete checkup if your doctor thinks it is necessary. This checkup may include tests to check memory, problem solving, counting, and language skills, and your doctor may need to take a CAT scan of your brain. A CAT scan is helpful because it shows normal and problem areas in the brain and can help to identify a problem. When your doctor comes to a conclusion as to what is causing your memory problems and makes a diagnosis, ask which treatment options are best for you.

Support

Friends and family members can provide support to help you cope with memory loss. They can help you exercise, visit friends, and continue daily routines and activities. They can also remind you of the time, your location, and what is going on around you.

If memory problems progress to the point that you have difficulty taking care of yourself, in home care for senior citizens can be helpful. Home health care aides can assist with personal care, meal preparation, and health management. And they provide services according to your need, from a few hours a week to 24-hours a day.

The Caring Space
http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

 

The Best Gift Ideas for Senior Citizens by Uma Eklund

June 6, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

It happens every year about this time. We start thinking about creative and thoughtful gifts for our older family members and friends and just can’t get any help. Search on Amazon for senior citizen gift ideas and you’ll be overwhelmed by lots of frankly inappropriate selections.

So what is the magic secret to avoiding the same old flowers, scarves and socks? Let’s look at a few options that we have given to our parents and grandparents that have really gone down well.

Thoughtfully practical

As we get older, everyday tasks become harder. You don’t want to see Grandpa taking out the trash on a winter night holding trash in one hand and a flashlight in the other. The thoughtful solution might be a lighted baseball cap with LEDs to light his way, freeing one hand for stability.

Is Mom having trouble reaching the cat dishes because she has trouble bending? What about a reaching device that is not just useful, but will have everyone in the family playing with it.

Anyone in the family having bathroom issues? A $2,000+ Japanese talking robotic toilet would be great, but did you know that there are several low-cost options for retrofitting automatic toilet seats to your bathroom?

Thoughtfully beautiful

Practical is great, but there are times that a simply beautiful gift is more appropriate. Even here, though, it pays to be sensitive to the challenges of aging.

My Mom has been suffering from arthritis recently, and her ability to fasten buttons and clasps has diminished significantly. So my last gift to her was a set of 30 inch gold and silver chains that she could slip over her head without doing the clasp. We also swapped a few of her pendants from her older chains so that she could wear her favorite pieces all over again.

Thoughtfully personalized

No, we don’t mean a cup with “World’s greatest Dad” on it. We’ve had great success with thoughtfully personalizing gifts, particularly using today’s technology.

Do you know anything that gets older members of the family to reminisce more than music from their “golden age”? One of our favorite recommendations for anyone looking for the perfect senior gift is an MP3 player.

Yes, we know that your parents and grandparents can barely get to grips with the TV remote (ours, too). That’s where the personalization comes in. You add the music beforehand and keep adding to their collection over time. We bought Dad 3 CDs of 50s classics and loaded them on the MP3 player so all he has to do is press play and stop (and on his player that’s the same button).

So this year stay away from the same old tired gifts and get something for your favorite senior citizen that is thoughtfully practical, beautiful or personalized.

Uma Eklund is dedicated to providing products and gifts that allow seniors to enjoy life to the full. Uma researches and selects products to recommend based on her own experience with finding and buying the best gifts for senior citizens.  If you would like more gift ideas for senior citizens please visit our website at http://www.thoughtfulseniorgifts.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Uma_Eklund

 

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

At a time when thousands of Baby Boomers are reaching the age of 65 every day, the issues of senior rights, elder laws, and anti-ageism have never been more important, more volatile, or more questioned. After all, this is the generation that was ready to take down the establishment fifty years ago, and they haven’t lost any of their desire to change the world for the better. And, they have the numbers to do it. Here are our 100 top blogs for seniors dealing with senior rights, law & policy, and anti-ageism.

Boomers Against The Law

  1. Elder Law Plus: lawyer Evan H. Farr blogs about topics concerning elder law, including probate strategies and parental care.
  2. Michigan Elder Law Blog: the attorneys at Barsch & Joswick provide seniors and their loved ones with sage advice on a variety of Elder law issues.
  3. Everything Elder Law: Evan Farr is back at it again, this time focusing on Elder Law news, concepts, and innovations from around the country.
  4. Massachusetts Estate and Elder Law Blog: lawyer and blogger Stephanie Konarski gives tips on estate planning and other elder law topics.
  5. New York Elder Law Attorney Blog: your source for elder law news and comment in New York, this blog analyzes nursing home legislation and elder care costs.
  6. Elder Law Prof. Blog: Elder Law professor Kim Dayton authors a really nice blog that covers a wide range of Elder law issues, from Supreme Court cases to seminars.
  7. The Pop Tort: can a consumer advocates blog dealing with civil justice be cute? This blog proves it can, complete with an adorable “Pop Tort” logo, even while exploring such issues as Medicare and Medicaid lawsuits, nursing home scams, and medical malpractice against the elderly, among other legal issues.
  8. Supportive Senior Solutions: this blog from a geriatric care management practice in New York covers issues related to geriatric care, caregiving, and healthcare laws for the elderly and infirm.
  9. Aging Beats the Alternative: elder care specialist Lorie Ebers uses her blog to talk about overcoming the challenges of aging, caring for aging parents, and the less talked about side of elder law: Boomer divorce.
  10. Elder Law Blog: lawyer Ronald C. Morton’s elder law blog is full of sage advice for seniors looking how to tap into Veteran’s benefits, how to plan for their golden years, and more.
  11. The Best Elder Law Blog: published by the attorneys at Lamson & Cutner, this blog discusses elder law cases, the Affordable Care Act, and same-sex marriage.
  12. Elder Law Tips and News: the lawyers at Cooper, Adel & Associates bring you posts on living trusts, aging issues, and general estate planning.
  13. The Connecticut Elder Law Blog: lawyer Michael Keenan provides his readers with estate planning tips, elder fraud, and Medicare rules.
  14. The Teddy Bear Lawyers: attorney Rick Law gives readers a great resource for Elder Law in the Chicagoland area. Find articles on protecting vulnerable seniors and financial planning.
  15. Oregon Elder Law: attorney Orrin Onken blogs on elder law, estate planning, and probate proceedings in plain, easy to understand language.
  16. Florida Elder Law and Estate Blog: this informative blog includes great articles on VA benefits, estate planning, and trusts.
  17. Golden Law Center: written by attorney Sasha Golden, the Golden Law Center blog discusses elder law, special needs planning, guardianship, wills and trusts, and estate administration.
  18. Kraft Elder Law: attorney Robert Kraft blogs about Medicaid, Medicare, wills, trusts, probate, veterans benefits, and other elder law topics.
  19. Pennsylvania Law Blog: this elder law blog by the attorneys at the law offices of Shober & Rock discusses Medicaid, taxes, Veterans, banks, and annuities.
  20. Long Beach Elder Law Blog: this blog focuses on elder abuse, estate protection, the Cal MediConnect program, and reform of health law.
  21. Houston Elder Law Blog: the folks at Wright Abshire Attorneys blog about care planning, estate planning, Medicaid Planning, Probate & Estate Administration, and and Veteran’s Benefits.
  22. Hauptman Law Blog: readers of this blog can learn more about elder, estate, and special needs law. Includes articles on the Medicare Settlement and VA Aid.
  23. Fulkerson Elder Law Blog: the function of this elder law blog is for the firm to respond to common questions clients have about elder law and review developments in the law impacting elder law and estate planning.
  24. CMLP Estate Planning and Elder Law Blog: readers can look forward to reviewing articles on simplifying their estate plan and elder law news items of note.
  25. Massachusetts Estate Planning and Probate Blog: attorney Matthew Karr keeps readers up to date on estate planning and probate news and information.
  26. Marshall Elder and Estate Planning Blog: the author of this elder law blog has over 30 years experience in estate planning, special needs planning, and estates.
  27. Hartford, CT Elder Law Blog: the attorney’s at Ruggiero Ziogas & Allaire discuss estate planning, care planning, Medicaid, Veteran’s Benefits, and Probate.
  28. El Paso Elder Law Blog: the law firm of Stephanie Townsend Allala and Associates blogs on estate planning, guardianships, Medicaid Planning, Nursing Home Abuse, and Trust & Probate.
  29. Miami Probate Law Blog: the folks at the Byrant law firm keep readers up-to-date on estate administration, probate court, estate litigation, and the nuisances of will and trust disputes.
  30. Elder Law News: attorney Brian A. Raphan is based in New York City and specializes in Wills, Estates, Trusts, and Elder Care issues. His blog is full of great resources.
  31. Aging & Law in West Virginia: this blog contains news in law and aging in West Virginia, written by the West Virginia Senior Legal Aid organization.
  32. Florida Elder Law and Estate Planning: this Florida Certified Elder Law attorney provides in depth insights and news to help Floridians protect themselves and preserve their assets.
  33. Family Law Blog Maryland: while this blog looks at all matters pertaining to Family Law, elder law sneaks in as a prevalent theme in many of the cases discussed. They look at legal matters like when divorce and retirement coincide, or when grandparents wish to take custody of their grandchildren.
  34. Phoenix AZ Family Law Blog: looking at issues older couples face in Arizona, this family law blog explores the specific challenges elders face in divorces and custody battles, complete with the latest policy changes and laws.
  35. Otherspoon: hospice volunteer and blogger Ann Neumann talks about care-giving and the realities, politics, and senior rights involved in death and dying.

Seniors Talk Policy And Politics

  1. Aging in Place: this blog is concerned with seniors who are dealing with shrinking benefits and increasing costs—seniors find answers on how to protect themselves.
  2. Estate in Denial: providing news, analysis, and commentary on abusive practices occurring in probate courts. Features original perspective and direct communication.
  3. Florida Estate Planning Lawyer Blog: this blog covers estate planning legal issues, cases of interest, and news with a focus on Florida elder law.
  4. McGuire Woods: the people at McGuire Woods author this great blog on long term care legal issues, including timely news, articles, and white papers.
  5. Illinois Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: published by the law office of Wilson & Wilson, this blog covers asset protection, banking, estate planning, and trusts.
  6. Illinois Nursing Home Abuse Blog: covers Illinois nursing home law, including Supreme Court cases and other information relating to residents and family members.
  7. Law Office of Donald D. Vanarelli Blog: provides readers in New Jersey with information on elder law, estate and special needs planning, and mediation services.
  8. Maryland Nursing Home Lawyer Blog: this blog offers insight on nursing home abuse reports, legislation, and legal opinions of elder law in Maryland.
  9. Massachusetts Estate Planning, Probate & Elder Law: elder law attorney Brian Barreira writes on legal issues involving death, taxes, special needs, and long-term elder care.
  10. New Jersey Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: blog posts explore life and death in New Jersey from a perspective of estate planning, elder law, taxation, probate, and estate administration.
  11. Medina Law Group: postings provide readers with advice on estate planning and management, estate taxes, elder law, and VA benefits.
  12. North Carolina Wills and Trusts: this blog provides readers with estate planning and elder law news with a North Carolina focus.
  13. California Nursing Home Abuse Law Blog: covers nursing home abuse, elder law abuse, and features many quality articles relating to California elder law.
  14. Nursing Home Law Blog: this well written blog discusses elder issues, legislation, legal news, protections of elder rights, and helpful health tips.
  15. PA Elder Estate and Fiduciary Law Blog: focuses on elder law, long-term care, end-of-life and health care surrogate decision-making, and estate planning.
  16. Patti’s Blog: find information about this lawyer’s practice, which concentrates on advocacy for seniors. She shares personal interests and her passions.
  17. Pennsylvania Nursing Home Abuse Lawyer Blog: this blog discusses nursing home abuse laws, cases, and news items from Pennsylvania.
  18. Barbara Cashman Blog: Barbara blogs about elder law and policy issues, and often hosts guest bloggers to share their insights on elder law and news.
  19. NJ Elder Law: lawyer Kenneth Vercammen blogs about topics related to estate planning and elder law. He was once awarded the NJ State Bar Municipal Court Practitioner of the Year.
  20. The Senior Sentinel: a blog compiling news and information for Baby Boomers, the Senior Sentinel concentrates on the intersection of ageism and public policy both nationally and world-wide.
  21. Elder Consult: this geriatric medicine blog not only covers Alzheimers, dementia, financial decision making, and medications, it also discusses related legal issues such as elder financial abuse.
  22. Grey Pride: a UK blog by the Anchor Digital Marketing team is dedicated to keeping older people at the top of the political agenda and petitioning the government to create a Minister for Older People to ensure their needs are met.
  23. Over 65 Blog: project organizers from Harvard, Yale, and The Hastings Center host this blog for “seniors seeking solutions for health care and security, mainly looking at health care system reforms, elder law policies and practices, and how seniors can achieve a stronger role in the future of health care.
  24. Reaping Hope Blog: a blog from an NGO in Nepal promoting dignified aging and elder rights, Reaping Hope explores elder abuse and elder oppression while actively helping elderly people claim their rights and challenge discrimination.

Age Against The Machine: Anti-Ageism

  1. Ageist Beauty: the musings, product reviews, and random thoughts of a woman who is fighting against her age.
  2. Everyday Ageism Project: this blog aims to capture people’s everyday experiences dealing with ageism. The author has discovered that ageism is the most commonly experienced form of prejudice.
  3. The Lonely Gerontologist: professor Kelly Yokum blogs about all things aging—including aging stereotypes and other aging topics that come to mind.
  4. My Elder Advocate: this blog provides comprehensive coverage of ageism, the dangers of nursing homes, elder abuse, and elder care.
  5. The Roaming Boomers: David and Carol are great examples of a couple who doesn’t let age get in the way of living life to the fullest.
  6. The Gypsy Nester: Veronica and David show readers how to rock the empty nest and get the most out of life as you age.
  7. Changing Aging: this multi-blog platform challenges conventional views on aging. The authors believe aging is a strength, rich in developmental potential and growth.
  8. The Elders: founded by Nelson Mandela in 2007, the Elders is a group of seniors committed to addressing global challenges, including child marriage and climate change.
  9. Beauty and Wisdom: the blog of photographer Robbie Kaye, who traveled to salons throughout the US to photograph and interview women in their 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s and discovered that beauty is ageless.
  10. Advanced Style: don’t tell these women they are too old to model hip and alluring fashions. This blog teaches women how to dress to impress and that age is only a number.
  11. RL TV: the only cable network and online destination for folks 50+, features a nice blog that provides tips on elder issues and promotes active living.
  12. The 70-Something Blog: blogger Judy informs readers how to live a full and engaging life as she chronicles her journey of aging.
  13. Retirement is Work: newly retired librarian and blogger resolves to post one good thing about retirement every day for a year, but along the way struggles with senior rights and anti-ageism.
  14. Yo Is This Ageist?: a humorous blog by Ashton Applewhite dedicated to determining whether age-related remarks are offensive, “challenging the stereotypes that segregate us by age.”
  15. This Chair Rocks: a smart and sassy blog by Ashton Applewhite that challenges the ideas of ageism with humor and snark. All stereotypes and insensitive remarks are grounds for brilliant blog posts.
  16. Senior Planet: “aging with attitude” is the tagline of this blog community of older adults using technology to connect with each other and take on the issues of ageism and senior rights.
  17. Changing Aging: a blog founded by Dr. Bill Thomas to promote “a radical reinterpretation of longevity” which focuses on anti-ageism and senior rights, as well as getting the most out of a long life.
  18. Time Goes By: Ronni Bennett takes on aging, ageism and related issues with humor, exploring the truth of “what it’s really like to get old.” She starts by rejecting the “cutesy” terms for old people – they’re called “elders” around here!
  19. The Magic of Middle-Aged Women: author Daniel Even Weiss – a man – blogs on the theme of his latest book, The Magic of Middle-Aged Women, where he challenges the prevailing ageist idea that women don’t get better as they age. They do.
  20. Advanced Style: Ari Seth Cohen, a young-ish photographer, roams the New York City streets photographing stylish and creative elders. Here, art challenges the paradigm that age and beauty can’t co-exist.
  21. The New Old Age: the New York Times blog on aging takes advantage of the newspaper’s top writers to explore the unprecedented intergenerational challenge of the Baby Boomers.
  22. The Little Old Lady Stays Put (or doesn’t): explores the “lives, lifestyles and issues of interesting older people,” touching on the issues surrounding ageism, elder rights, living with dementia, and overcoming the struggles of aging with strength and good humor.
  23. Naked at Our Age: advocate of ageless sexuality, Joan Price, talks about sex and aging, taking on Senior Rights subjects like safer sex for seniors while providing helpful tips.
  24. Aging & Work at Boston College: scholars, academics, and researchers share their findings on ageism in the workplace and the challenges aging workers face in this PhD-heavy blog by The Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College.
  25. Ethnic Elders: this newsy blog by New America Media examines the Senior Rights issues and Elder Law of minority groups such as age discrimination, lawsuits related to Social Security, and elder healthcare reform.
  26. The Everyday Ageism Project: blending blogging and research, this site’s goal is to capture the experience of age discrimination. The forum is full of people sharing their experiences in a supportive environment.
  27. Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens Blog: the Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens sub-blog offers wide ranging posts on issues including senior rights and ageism – with its signature left-wing perspective.
  28. Clinical Geriatrics: created as more of a peer-reviewed clinical journal by the American Geriatrics Society, some of the top scholars in geriatrics converge on this blog to discuss geriatric health and wellness issues, which often cross over into legal and anti-ageism issues.
  29. Age Action Alliance: this organization brings together a network of 300 organizations and individuals committed to helping older people. Its blog is dedicated to improving older people’s lives through advocating against ageism, particularly in Britain.
  30. Manitoba Senior Centres: this Canadian blog covers the rampant ageism in Canada and promotes world elder abuse awareness. It also has a list of resources for older adults.
  31. Fierce with Age: defying ageism goes mainstream at this blog, created by veteran journalist Dr. Carol Orsborn. Having written about the Boomer generation for major newspapers and blogged for the Huffington Post and NPR’s Next Avenue, Orsborn is well equipped to take on the spiritual and policy hurdles of aging.
  32. Live Better Boomer!: a Philadelphia-based blog, by social worker Tiffany Matthews, devoted to helping educate and empower Boomers advocate for their own improved healthcare.
  33. Third Age: billed as “health for Boomers and beyond,” Third Age offers relatively fluffy fare, like “Change your Mood with Color,” to the legal issues surrounding Boomer divorce and care-giving.
  34. The Old Gunhand: one facet of senior citizen rights you don’t see every day is elder gun advocates. This website not only tells you the best types of guns for elderly wielders, it also goes into gun policy and senior self-defense.
  35. Age Discrimination Info: a simple name for a one-stop source of statistics and information on age discrimination, including legislation, cases, news, publications, events and training. The perfect resource for the activist.
  36. Age UK: the largest organization in the United Kingdom for working with and for older people, this website has an entire section dedicated to age discrimination and ageism.
  37. National Youth Rights Association: not just for youngsters, the National Youth Rights Association combats ageism in all its forms. In fact, they probably wouldn’t appreciate being called “youngsters.”
  38. Disability and Representation: a blog by writer, photographer and activist Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg that discusses (and tries to change the discourse about) disability rights and ageism, along with autism.
  39. Over 50: Career coaching and workshops for the over-50 crowd, this blog doesn’t stop at finding a job. This site explores Baby Boomer activism in and out of the workplace.
  40. Activist Post: while this blog deals with many topics requiring advocacy, they often include issues that regard Senior Rights, Elder Law and anti-ageism.
  41. California Booming: an informational blog dedicated to California Baby Boomers, this blog covers everything from sex, to diet, to politics of the Boomer generation, including issues concerning senior rights and ageism in the workplace.

Traveling With Senior Citizens by Karissa Price

May 28, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Traveling with elderly patients can certainly be a challenge, but there are many things that caregivers and family members can do to make it easier, safer, and less stressful. Planning ahead is essential to make sure everything goes smoothly and also to ensure that the traveler gets the most for their money. Last minute bookings are often expensive and should be avoided if possible.

When flying, here are some tips for easier travel:

1. Arrive at the airport with plenty of time to spare; getting through security can take much longer if the airport is busy or the patient moves slowly, and having to rush will only add to the stress
2. If possible, arrange in advance to have a wheelchair available and access to any special services offered to senior citizens
3. Make sure that the traveler has all of their identification, insurance information, itinerary, money, and medications; have copies of any instructions from physicians about medications or medical devices such as a pacemaker
4. Try not to pack too many clothing or other items; comfortable shoes are definitely necessary
5. To make the actual flight more comfortable, take a pillow and reading material or anything else for entertainment on the flight such as crossword puzzles or card games.

A common theme among senior citizen travel is to visit out of town family members, especially children, grandchildren, or even great grandchildren for a special event or just for a vacation. As soon as a wedding, birthday, or graduation announcement arrives, start planning the vacation! In addition to visiting family, there are many vacation destinations that cater to senior citizens. Many cruise lines have special senior citizen cruises, which can be a wonderful social experience for any seniors who want to enjoy the company of others and make new friends on their trip. Many destinations (such as Branson, Missouri, for example) have tons of specialty tours for senior citizens. Caregivers can find an abundance of information online about these tours, and should also check with the Better Business Bureau to make sure they are legitimate companies before paying for anything.

For more information, please visit http://www.trustedhandsnetwork.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Karissa_Price

Internet Safety For Senior Citizens by James Kirkwood

May 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Dishonest individuals scamming senior citizens out of their money appears to  be happening more often than ever before. Seniors are targeted most often by  criminals due to the fact that it can sometimes be easier to gain the trust of a  senior trust and also due to the fact older, retired people are more likely to  have some savings set aside and therefore become a more lucrative target. It can  be helpful to keep some of the following tips in mind to help you or your loved  ones who are older protected against scams and frauds, especially when shopping  or working online.

Todays seniors say that staying in touch with family members and friends  remains the main reason that they use the internet. According to recent research  by the American Association of Retired Persons, seniors are the segment of the  online community that is growing the most quickly. It is estimated that more  than 27.5 million senior citizens are using the internet today. These numbers  have risen significantly from about 10 years ago, when it was estimated that  just over 10 million seniors were online. Increasingly, these seniors are  putting their computers to use doing online shopping and banking, and people 55  and older are becoming quite a popular target for internet marketers.  Unfortunately, some of those marketers are actually criminals who are using the  internet to take money from unsuspecting victims. Because of the fact that the  internet is relatively new, these scams continue to grow and develop.

While almost all age groups have their own distinct vulnerabilities and risks  when making online transactions, seniors unfortunately seem to be at the  greatest risks for internet phishing scams. Many scam artists are tailoring  complex schemes specifically targeted to exploit internet users who are older.  Many of the online scams will target seniors with nearly unbelievable deals on  low-cost insurance and discount prescriptions. Scams will also often target  older internet users with documents that seem genuine such as phony ‘bank  notices’ and ‘final warnings’.

Just like in the ‘real world’, you should take care when revealing your date  of birth, social security number or credit card information over the internet.  Search for web addresses on one of the major search engines instead of clicking  links that you receive in e-mails. Then, use that address to contact the company  and inquire about the message you received. Once you have verified that you are  on a legitimate website, you can save that address in your broswer as a  ‘favorite’. You will then be able to return there again safely in the  future.

Senior  home safety begins with making yourself aware of today’s numerous scams. If  you would like to read more articles on how to keep senior citizens safe, please come and visit our  website.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=James_Kirkwood

Senior Citizen Assisted Living Facilities by David Crumrine

May 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Assisted living is an alternative living arrangement for senior citizens requiring moderate elder care, including help with activities like eating, getting dressed, bathing, and using the bathroom as opposed to the more intensive care provided in nursing homes. This type of care serves as an intermediate between in home care for the elderly and the elder care provided by a nursing home. Facilities for this type of living may be in connection with retirement communities, nursing homes, home health care agencies, or complexes for senior citizens, or they may be separate facilities. This type of elder care is known by many names, such as residential care, board and care, congregate care, and personal care.

Assisted Living Facilities

When looking for an assisted living facility, you can usually expect to have your own room or apartment, provided meals, a staff of caregivers for support, and some or all of the following services:

  • housekeeping and laundry
  • security
  • recreational activities and exercise
  • transportation
  • guidance and monitoring of health care
  • reminders about or help taking medication
  • support with dressing, bathing, and eating

Choosing the Right Assisted Living Community

 

With these ideas in mind, it is important to choose the right facility for you. Each facility may have different ideologies of caring for the elderly, so not every facility may be a match for the kind of care and services you are looking for. When searching for elder care in an assisted living facility, there are a number of ways to determine whether a certain place will provide you with the comfort, security, and level of care you need:

  • Think about your future needs and determine whether the facility can provide the right kind of care for those needs.
  • Figure out whether the facility is near family, friends, and shopping centers or other businesses you’d like to walk to.
  • Are there admission and retention policies that do not allow people with severe cognitive impairments or physical disabilities to live there?
  • Is there a written statement of the philosophy of elder care of the facility, and do you agree with it?
  • Make more than one trip to each facility you are considering, sometimes unannounced.
  • Try to make some of those trips during mealtimes to check out the quality of food and service to the residents.
  • Take note of interactions between residents and those providing the elder care.
  • Ask whether each facility offers social, recreational, and spiritual activities based on your interests.
  • Talk to residents.
  • Find out what kind of training caregivers receive and how often they are trained.
  • Review state licensing reports.

Researching Assisted Living Centers

 

If you have concerns after performing some of the preceding suggestions-or if you would simply like to be thorough in your search-you may also wish to consider the following:

  • Call your state’s long-term care ombudsman as well as the local Better Business Bureau to ask about recently issued complaints against the facilities you are considering.
  • If a facility is connected to a nursing home or home health care agency, you may want to find out more its counterpart. You can find information about nursing homes on the Medicare website (www.medicare.gov/nhcompare/home.asp).

Assisted Living Financial Considerations for Seniors

 

Another aspect of assisted living facilities to consider is cost. Assisted living is generally less expensive than nursing home care, but more expensive the in home care for the elderly. The usual range is anywhere from $10,000 per year to over $50,000 per year, so it is important to know what you can afford and how much each facility costs. Another thing to know is that there may be fees not included in the basic rate. It will be helpful to figure out how much extra you will have to pay to live in a certain home.

Insurance may help cover some of these costs, but usually charges are covered primarily by the senior citizens who decide to live in these residences or family members responsible for their elder care. Some facilities also offer financial assistance programs, which you may want to inquire about.

Medicare does not cover the costs of these residences or the elder care provided there. Medicaid-the joint federal and state program that helps senior citizens and people with disabilities pay for health care when they are unable to afford it-may cover the service component of assisted living in certain states.

It is important to consider the different options in elder care. If cost is a concern, it may be helpful to consider in home care for senior citizens. This type of elder care may provide sufficient care for your needs in the comfort of your own home. If the degree of elder care provided by in home care or an assisted living facility does not meet your needs, consider a nursing home.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

Senior Citizen Insurance by Jerry Fatjo

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Senior citizen insurance is used by people who are 65 years old or above. The  reason why this is a separate category of insurance is because senior citizens  tend to have more health related troubles, compared to younger people.

Therefore it is important for a senior citizen to find the right type of  insurance. They need to find insurance that is both affordable and offers good  coverage for their specific needs. Seniors do need insurance for the simple  reason that Medicare only provides partial coverage. The thing to do here is to  find out exactly what medicare covers and then have secondary insurance to cover  other expenses.

An example would be, Medicare part A will cover some of their inpatient care,  nursing home care and some health care. Medicare part B covers some types of  their outpatient hospital care, medical equipment and occupational therapy.

However, medicare of any type will usually not cover annual physicals. In  order to get this the patient may have to get the senior health insurance. This  is why it is important to check with your broker and see what exactly is covered  by medicare before getting insurance.

With the use of the internet it is easy nowadays to find an insurance company  that gives affordable rates. Although before getting your senior citizen  insurance coverage, it is always better to talk to an agent before signing  anything. Senior citizens can also qualify for some life insurance plans. There  is a common misconception that seniors do not have anybody directly dependent on  them, therefore they do not need life insurance policies.

This is simply not true in all cases and should be discussed with your  insurance agent or broker. The idea behind life insurance is to give financial  protection for family members. This way they are not left to pay for the funeral  and any unsettled debt that is left behind.

When it comes to the unfortunate situation, such as a loved one’s demise, you  will want to be sure everything or everyone is taken care of. This is especially  true if the person leaves behind a spouse and, or children. The surviving wife  or husband will have many expenses such as rent and health insurance. In this  case a life insurance policy will be of great help for the surviving family  member or members to take care of the daily, weekly, or even monthly living  expenses.

For more information on insurance for seniors check out  [http://www.senior-citizen-insurance-online.com/]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jerry_Fatjo

 

Senior Citizens – Burdened With Grief and Anger by Jessie Penn

April 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Grief and anger often becomes a heavy burden for people as they age. Throughout life, people experience grief over many things. They grieve if there home burns down, lose a job or a pet. However, an area of loss that is not usually considered with grief is the physical decline during the aging process.

Grief can be detected, in seniors, by the comments they make about losing their youth. Many times, they speak with remorse at lost youth, decreased functionality, and body strength. When a senior citizen notices they are losing muscle strength, or begin experiencing arthritis, stiffness, and joint pain, it’s not unusual to notice anger. They become upset and wish to escape the betrayals of their bodies, and become very angry in the process.

No one asks to get old or feeble. Most likely, if we had a choice, most of us would vote to discontinue and ban getting old. A person might grieve when they are bestowed the title of “Senior Citizen.” At first, a senior citizen, might not notice the changes that are taking place in the physical aspects of the body or the mind. And, perhaps, as much as they hate the thought of getting old, family members also grieve about losing the ‘young’ mom or dad they once knew.

Unfortunately, getting angry about growing old has no escape; there’s no one to blame it on. So, sometimes the result is that seniors lash out at the ones closest to them. Anger and frustration with the aging body can cause tempers to rage or flare up unexpectedly. Many times, a senior lashes out at a loved one or caregiver because they are nearby and easily accessible. The aging person knows it isn’t fair, but may have a hard time explaining their actions.

Learning how to cope with anger about aging is necessary so you don’t hurt the innocent ones around you. But, it is also unhealthy to keep your grief bottled up inside you. If seniors are not allowed to vent and get rid of their anger, the body can decline at a faster rate.

It’s been suggested that people become angry because they feel a false sense of entitlement. This crops up when expectations do not line up with reality. A feeling of undo entitlement happens when we believe we do not deserve to get old.

There is just one way to confront getting older, and that is to recognize that we are not alone, everyone will get old, and we are not entitled to be exempt from the aging process. Recognizing this fact can help to eliminate anger from the arena as we cope with the affects of aging.

Attempting to deny the advance of life’s end, is probably the sole cause of midlife crisis’s. Trying to behave as if they are not getting older and hiding emotional responses to aging can cause devastating results. Avoiding the feelings about aging has caused many to act irresponsibility or make bad decisions.

By recognizing the problems that naturally happen through aging, some of the anger can be avoided. Instead of dwelling on declining abilities, senior citizens can minimize the impacts by living with a healthier attitude toward aging.

Focusing on your diet, exercise, keeping busy, and doing everything you can to stay rested and emotionally sound. Thinking about or getting involved with other people can help to create a healthier attitude toward aging and minimize its effects.

Try to keep your spirits up, be happy through achievements and seemingly small enjoyments. Keep a young at heart attitude and get in touch with the child inside you. You’ve come too far, traveled many winding paths, and you deserve to feel content and happy. Emotions about how you feel about yourself can play a major role in the person you choose to be as a senior citizen.

Get free information to protect your loved ones when a medical emergency or security treat happens. Go to http://personalsecuritydevices.walkinsarewelcome.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jessie_Penn

Taking Care of a Senior Citizen in Your Own Family by Richard Fowler

April 19, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

You may want to take care of a member of your family who is already a senior  citizen. Your desire is sincere and is definitely there and you truly want to be  of help, but you should be aware of a lot of things before you actually do so.  It is not an easy thing to do, for one thing. There are plenty of challenges  involved in taking care of a senior citizen, and that’s even if you take into  consideration the fact that you are going to do it for a member of your own  family.

It is important that you know right away of the challenges that you are  likely to face early on, so that you can decide if you really want to do it. The  difficulty of dealing with elderly family members is a good place to start. You  would have to be prepared to deal with them, with their behavior and the  tantrums that they are likely to have once you do assume the task of taking care  of them. And of course there are the health issues that are quite serious when  you talking about senior citizens. The costs of their medication and different  health issues are something that you really need to consider seriously.

Above all that however, is the fact that you want to do it because you  genuinely care for them. The love that you have for your senior family members  goes beyond any of the things that you need to deal with or worry about. It all  becomes easy and even fun to do and you are not really going to worry about all  the stuff that is connected with taking care of your senior family member.  However, even if you have all the right intentions, you still need some tips and  the right information about how you could do things the right way.

Here then are some tips for you to follow if you are going to take care of a  citizen at home:

  • Make sure that the bathrooms in your home, especially those that are  frequently used by the elderly, are always clean and kept as dry as you can so  that they would not slip and fall. There have been too many cases of senior  citizens slipping and falling in bathrooms and you definitely don’t want that to  happen to your loved ones.
  • Needless to say, the home where you and your senior citizen family members  are staying should be as clean as possible. You need to make sure that your  home; specifically its interiors and the rooms where the elderly are staying are  free from dust and have very good ventilation.
  • Senior citizens need to be reminded of different things on a constant basis.  It can be about anything, the medication that they need to take or the time that  they need to take their nap. The important thing is that you remain patient even  though they may display some irritability and some anger at times. Just maintain  your patience and understanding at all times.

If you or someone you love suffers from a handicap or disability due to an  accident, disease, or illness and find it difficult to get around and function  in the current home environment, then you have come to the right place. We offer  chair lifts new jersey that are commercially available or just make whatever you may need from  scratch.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Richard_Fowler

 

Depression in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Depression is a medical condition that is characterized by feeling down,  depressed, or hopeless; low self-esteem; and loss of interest in things one used  to enjoy. Senior citizens are prone to life-altering changes that can lead one  to feel depressed. Dealing with the trials life throws at us such as, loss,  change, loneliness, or a chronic medical condition can be quite overwhelming.  Still, depression is not a “normal” part of aging. Like heart disease or  diabetes, depression is a medical condition and it can be treated with  medication and therapy. Treatment is effective at alleviating symptoms within a  few weeks in at least 80 percent of people.

It is important that senior citizens and those providing their elder care  understand the symptoms of depression. If you think you or someone you know may  be suffering from depression, identify your symptoms by using the checklist  provided below. Then, if necessary, seek assistance. For senior citizens, the  most frequently used resource is a family doctor. Bringing a trusted friend or  relative may help ease any anxiety when going to an appointment. Understand that  your doctor may suggest a checkup and begin treatment or refer you to a mental  health specialist.

Before you say, “I’m okay”….

Do you feel:

  • Anxious or “empty”
  • Guilty or useless
  • Agitated or irritable
  • Less interested in things you used to enjoy
  • Like no one loves you
  • Life is not worth living

Or if you are:

  • A change in sleeping habits
  • A change in eating habits
  • Persistent headaches, stomach aches, or pain

Remember that these  may be real symptoms of a real medical condition that can be effectively  treated. Talk to your doctor today. Though many senior citizens suffer from  depression, feeling depressed is not a normal part of aging.

 

Health and Wellness tips

There are many measures senior citizens can take to help relieve the symptoms  of depression. Those involved in the elder care of senior citizens experiencing  depression should encourage the senior to follow these tips and improve their  wellbeing.

Check your medications. Senior citizens often take many  medications. Some medications, including those for sleep, blood pressure, and  nervousness, may affect mood. Talk with your doctor about each of the  medications you are taking. Be sure to include all over-the-counter medicines,  vitamins, and herbal supplements to minimize the chances of having side  effects.

Limit alcohol consumption. Alcohol use can bring about  depression. And, when alcohol and drugs are combined, interactions that lead to  depression can occur.

Stay connected. Sometimes, senior citizens find it more difficult  to get out and stay connected with others. Still, talking with friends and  family members, getting a pet, or even finding a new interest or hobby can help  one through this tough time.  Get involved in activities you take pleasure  in, such as reading a good book, going to a ballgame or a taking a class in a  subject that interests to you.

Be active. Physical activity can improve physical and mental  wellbeing. Though some senior citizens believe they cannot exercise, there are  activities like walking, gardening, or working out (even if one is in a  wheelchair) that can be helpful. Make a goal of 30 minutes of activity 5 days a  week. If you have not taken part in physical activity in a while, be sure to  check with your doctor and get his OK before you begin.

Eat healthy and drink plenty of fluids. Choose healthy snacks  like fruits, vegetables, yogurt, or nuts to increase your nutrition and energy.  Also, try to eat well-balanced meals.  Some senior citizens suffer from  loss of appetite and weight loss; if you have experienced either of these,  consult your doctor.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects  caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for  families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking  employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3021412

Make Your Home Safer for Senior Citizens by Richard Fowler

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

You want to make your home as safe as possible for everyone who lives in it  and for those who visit you from time to time. It is just a general thing; you  just want it to be safe for everyone who happens to go to your home – for  whatever reason. But when you think about the kind of safety that is needed for  senior citizens, then you definitely want your home to have that as well. It is  not just for the homes that have family members who are already senior citizens,  but also for those that do not.

The safety of senior citizens is always a very important concern. With their  frailty, they really need to be looked after. They tend to stay in the homes or  places where they have lived for so long, and the air of familiarity is probably  the biggest reason for that. It also happens to be filled with so many memories  that can only make the home even more special and the seniors would definitely  become even more attached to it. So you would definitely to make sure that your  own home is quite safe, even if a senior citizen happens to be living with you  or not.

Here are a few things that could be done to your home in order to make it  safer and friendlier for senior citizens:

  • It is always good to start to plan even when it is as simply as you can, and  in this case do this by fixing some of the simple things within the home. The  safety of the senior citizens are you primary concern, so you need to make doors  easier to open, and also place handrails within the bathroom in order to make it  easier for them to move around and maneuver while in it.
  • Aside from the obviously simple things that need to be fixed within the  home, there are also the more complicated ones that could be done. An example of  that would be the installation of ramps as a means of making access inside the  home easier. This one has to be done properly and in accordance with existing  standards so that it could really help in making things easier for the seniors,  especially as far as access to the home is concerned.
  • It would also be best to have a plan about how the various things that the  senior member of the family needs are arranged. Ample storage would be nice, and  then everything else inside the home should be arranged in such a way that it  would hinder freedom and ease of movement indoors. This can be achieved only  through proper planning.
  • Whenever you find that things are getting a little too difficult for you  then you can always seek help in improving your home or any home safe for senior  citizens. And you must remember that you are not only doing it for senior  members of the family, but for every other senior citizen that might visit that  particular home and eventually benefit from the changes that were made which  actually favors them.

If you or someone you love suffers from a handicap or disability due to an  accident, disease, or illness and find it difficult to get around and function  in the current home environment, then you have come to the right place. We offer  chair lifts New Jersey that are commercially available or just make whatever you may need from  scratch.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Richard_Fowler

 

How Senior Citizens Can Be Better Prepared for the Upcoming Cold Season by Richard Fowler

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, General 

Senior citizens are more physically vulnerable than the rest of us. During  times of extreme weather, it is even more true. With the increasing occurrence  of more extreme cases of weather, the vulnerability of senior citizens – be it  to extreme cold, heat, strong winds, floods, etc. – is also increased several  times over.

With the upcoming cold season, senior citizens are sure to be vulnerable to  the weather once more. Those of us who have family members and friends who are  already senior citizens should do what we can to make sure that we help them  become more comfortable. Do the little things that can make their homes and  living areas warmer and full of all the comfort that they require.

Another important thing that we can do is to make them feel that they are  secure and cared for. The attention and the time that we can give them is  already enough to let them have a better feeling, and that would help them cope  with the situation that they are in. Although of course, there are a lot  practical things that need to be done in order to ensure their safety and  preparedness for the coming winter.

To be clearer about how senior citizens can become better prepared for the  upcoming cold season, here are a few specific things to remember:

  • Adequate heating should be provided for the homes of senior citizens. And  aside from actually being provided with ample heat, they should also be given  proper assurance that the heater in their place is actually running. Not only  that but the furnaces, air filters, and the insulation in the homes should also  be checked. This is ideally done before the onset of the cold. Some care and  caution should be exercised in the use of wood stoves and fireplaces.
  • Seniors should be provided with as much essential supplies as possible.  Those who are helping out senior citizens with their preparations should  prioritize food that can be stored for a long time. This becomes especially  important when getting out for food supplies becomes difficult, or even  impossible. Emergency and medical supplies also become absolute necessities  during these times, as well as alternative sources of energy.
  • Since senior citizens love to keep contact with their families and loved  ones all the time, then you could just imagine how they would like it to  continue during the winter season. In fact, it can be expected that they would  love to hear from them more. And what those people should do is to actually  comply and make contact and communicate with their family members who are  already senior citizens much more often. It gives them assurance and also cheers  them up during the bleak season.
  • Senior citizens find that it is more difficult for them to move around  during the cold season. Be it walking or driving in their cars, and that is why  their relatives and friends who are able should help them travel around,  especially if it cannot be avoided at all.

If you or someone you love suffers from a handicap or disability due to an  accident, disease, or illness and looking for the reliable and affordable chair lifts new jersey,  visit us today!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Richard_Fowler

Social Services and Education Programs

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

March calendar of social services and education programs for individuals, caregivers, and family members impacted by the diseases we treat.  All of these programs are open to the community and are offered free of charge.

 

Lending Library (4th Floor)

Featuring hundreds of books, videos and brochures for patients, families and the community-at-large.  Open to the public Monday – Thursday, 10 am – 2 pm.  Receive a free tote bag when you check out a book.

 

Healthy Living: Up2Me

New 6 week session begins Mar 29, 12:30 pm – 3:00 pm

Join us for this proven six-week program designed to help caregivers and individuals with chronic diseases set goals and develop skills for success.  Free and open to the public, advance registration is required.  Contact Susan, 483-6055, solorzs@ccf.org.

 

Lunch & Learn

 

Wednesdays, 12 noon – 1 pm

888 W. Bonneville Avenue, Las Vegas

Bring your lunch, drink & dessert are provided; open to the public.

 

Mar 6: Brain Stimulation to Improve Movement, Brach Poston, PhD, Project Scientist, Cleveland Clinic

 

Gain an understanding of non-invasive brain stimulation techniques shown to improve the motor skills of individuals with Parkinson’s Disease as well as in older adults.  Learn about current Cleveland Clinic projects using these techniques along with their future therapeutic potential.

 

Mar 13: In Case of Emergency, Rodney Anderson, MHA, Department Supervisor, Cleveland Clinic

 

Learn tips and strategies to prepare for emergency situations and to keep you and your loved ones safe.

 

Mar 20: Healthy Meal Ideas, Master Chef Gustav Mauler, Spiedini

 

Answer the age-old question, “what’s for dinner” with quick, simple, and nutritious meal ideas.  Recipes and samples will be provided.

 

Mar 27: Interior Design – Supporting Daily Activities, Attila Lawrence, Professor, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

 

Discover inspiring ideas for the design of interior spaces to improve the quality of independent living for individuals and caregivers.

 

Cleveland Museum of Art Series

 

Dynamic conversations about art through videoconferencing.

 

All art education programs are held at the LouRuvoCenter for Brain Health Library, 888 W. Bonneville Avenue, Las Vegas; open to the public.

 

America’s Story through Art: America Emerging; 1700s

Mar 5, 11:00 am – 12:00 noon

America Emerging is a discussion of the 1700s.  This program includes the developing American identity, folk art, the influence of the Age of Reason, the effect of the mercantilist economy, and underlying causes of the Revolution.

 

America’s Story through Art: America Expanding; 1801 – 1861

Mar 19, 11:00 am – 12:00 noon

Art in the first half of the 19th century was a reflection of American values, identity, and political culture.  America Expanding explores frontier life, the results and impact of westward expansion, landscape painting, Jacksonian democracy, and genre art.

 

Contact Susan Solorzano, 483-6055 or solorzs@ccf.org for additional information.

 

Support Groups

 

MEMORY LOSS SUPPORT GROUP

Wednesdays, 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Meetings are held weekly for adult members who provide care for loved ones with memory loss.  Contact Donna, 483-6035, municd@ccf.org.

 

PARKINSON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP

Mar 12, 12:00 noon – 1:00 pm

(Held the 2nd Tuesday of every month)

 

Separate groups for early stage individuals and adult family members.

 

Contact Jennifer, 483-6036, gayanj@ccf.org.

 

HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP

Mar 26, 12:00 noon – 1:00 pm

(Held the 4th Tuesday of every month)

 

Separate groups for gene-positive individuals (asymptomatic and early stage) and adult family members.

 

Contact Jenna, 483-6054, cliffoj@ccf.org.

 

 

 

 

 

Social Services

LouRuvoCenter for Brain Health

Cleveland Clinic |  888 W Bonneville Ave  |  Las Vegas, NV89106

Desk: (702) 331-7042  |  Fax: (702) 260-9797 |  E-mail: louruvosocialserv@ccf.org

Connect:  www.keepmemoryalive.org

Healthy Aging: Up2Me

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Healthy Aging: Up2Me – January 18, 12:30 – 3:00 PM
Join us for this proven six week program helping caregivers and individuals with chronic diseases set goals and develop skills for success. Free and open to the public, advance registration required. Contact Susan, 483-6023, hirschs2@ccf.org

Lunch & Learn
Wednesdays, 12 noon – 1 pm
888 W. Bonneville Avenue, Las Vegas
Bring your lunch, drink & dessert provided; open to the public

Jan 9: Yoga for Everyone!
Marilyn Kovach and Sandy Rickards
Yoga can exercise our body, mind and spirit. Learn simple techniques that can be used to promote increased flexibility and provide a break from everyday stresses.

Jan 16: Understanding Complementary Therapies
Lisa Browder, RA, ICA, CR, Complementary Therapies Manager, Nathan Adelson Hospice
Increase your understanding of techniques that can be used to promote health and wellbeing.

Jan 23: Getting Your Legal and Financial Ducks in a Row
Kim Boyer, Certified Elder Law Attorney
This presentation will provide an overview of common legal documents such as durable power of attorney, wills and trusts as well as benefits programs to help cover the cost of care.

Jan 30: Super Aging – The Science Behind Successful Brains
Sarah Banks, PhD, Neuropsychologist, Cleveland Clinic
Most people experience some cognitive decline with age, it’s normal. But others show no real decline: What makes these superagers different?

Cleveland Museum of Art Series
Dynamic conversations about art through videoconferencing
All art education programs are held at the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health Library, 888 W. Bonneville Avenue and open to the public.

L’Art de L’Afrique
January 15, 11:00 – 12:00 Noon
Explore the rich history and traditional arts of former French colonies including Mali, The Democratic Republic of Congo and The Cote d’Ivoire. Styles, materials, techniques and functions of art works will be discussed.

Contact Susan Hirsch, 483-6023 or hirschs2@ccf.org for additional information.
Support Groups
MEMORY LOSS SUPPORT GROUP
Wednesdays, 1 pm-2:30 pm
Meetings are held weekly for adult members who provide care for loved ones with memory loss.
Contact: Donna Munic-Miller 483-6035, municd@ccf.org
PARKINSON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP: January 8, 12 noon -1 pm
(Held the 2nd Tuesday of every month)
Separate groups for early stage individuals and adult family members.
Contact: Jennifer 483-6036, gayanj@ccf.org

HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP: January 22, 12 noon -1 pm
(Held the 4th Tuesday of every month)
Separate groups for gene positive individuals (asymptomatic and early stage) and adult family members.
Contact: Jenna 483-6054, clifforj@ccf.org

WestStar CU Converts Smiles to Cash for Opportunity Village

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Las Vegas, Nev. – On Friday, Jan. 4 at 4 p.m., WestStar Credit Union will be making a $16,000 donation to Opportunity Village as the culmination of their 2012 charity campaign: A Mile of Smiles. In August 2012, WestStar Credit Union set out on a mission to collect a mile’s worth of smiles with the intention of donating $1 for every smile collected to Opportunity Village. The Nevada-based credit union launched the Mile of Smiles campaign to remind Nevadans that a simple smile can make a difference; that a smile is contagious and has the ability to make someone’s day brighter. They have met their goal and this sentiment now equates to a $16,000 donation from WestStar Credit Union, on the behalf of the smiling participants, to Opportunity Village, Las Vegas’ Favorite Charity.

Over the past several months, WestStar sent teams of volunteer employees out to different local venues including Fremont Street, UNLV campus, local malls, Las Vegas Wranglers hockey games, The Great Santa Run and even the Magical Forest at Opportunity Village to capture pictures of people’s smiles. Their efforts, partnered with the local Las Vegans who uploaded their own smile pictures to the gallery at www.amileofsmiles.org <http://www.amileofsmiles.org> , will conclude in one giant donation to Opportunity Village.

The donation presentation will be at the Magical Forest located at 6300 W. Oakey Blvd. Las Vegas, NV 89146, this Friday, January 4 at 4 p.m. WestStar’s CEO, Rick Schmidt, Vice President of Business Development, Mona Joseph, and Marketing Manager, Kelly Cook will be presenting the donation to Dawn Newburg, Resource Development Director for Opportunity Village.

Membership in WestStar Credit Union is open to anyone employed in the Gaming Industry of Nevada and many other employer groups, including employees and members of AAA Nevada and members of the Friends of Nevada Wilderness conservation group. Family members and those living in the same household of anyone who is eligible are also eligible. A full list of eligible employer groups can be found on their website, www.weststar.org/eligibility <http://www.weststar.org/eligibility> .
ABOUT OPPORTUNITY VILLAGE
MISSION
Opportunity Village is a not-for-profit organization that serves people within our community with significant intellectual disabilities, to improve their lives and the lives of their families.

Opportunity Village was founded in 1954 by seven families who were determined to give their disabled children the best lives possible. 58 years later, Opportunity Village is one of the most recognized and respected Community Rehabilitation Programs in the United States.

Nevada’s largest employer of people with disabilities, Opportunity Village serves nearly 2000 individuals annually, providing vocational training, employment, habilitation and social recreation programs and services that make their lives more productive and interesting.

Opportunity Village citizens – individuals who were previously considered unemployable – work at Opportunity Village’s Employment Resource Centers and in jobs throughout the community, collectively earning wages amounting to more than $7.6 million in 2012. They are hard-working and diligent, proudly paying taxes and happily leading more fulfilling lives.

Primarily a self-funded organization, Opportunity Village generates the majority of its operational funding through its employment contracts and fundraising efforts such as the Magical Forest and Great Santa Run, saving Nevada taxpayers $33.7 million annually.

Las Vegas Residents Invited To Celebrations, Luncheons & Activities At City Centers

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City Of Las Vegas February Senior Special Events
Las Vegas Residents Invited To Celebrations, Luncheons & Activities At City Centers

The city of Las Vegas active adult and senior centers offer exercise, fitness, craft, arts, dance, music and computer classes; cards; games; discussion and social groups; luncheons; sports; and special events Monday through Friday to residents age 50 and better. Many of these activities contribute to wellness and a healthy lifestyle. A listing of classes and activities is published in the Beyond the Neon Leisure Guide, available in the centers and online at www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. All activities are subject to change. Most activities require $2 annual membership to city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all senior and active adult centers. Centers will be closed Feb. 18 for holiday observance.

Grief and Loss Support Group (ages 50+)
Second and fourth Tuesday each month, 9 to 10 a.m. Advance registration is not required.
Free with a current annual $2 senior membership.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Dealing with the loss of a loved one, including our four-legged family members, is difficult to handle alone. Join this group of people that understand and can relate to you. Call 229-1702 for more information.
Scrapbooking and Card Making (ages 50+)
Third Wednesday of each month, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Free with a current annual $2 senior membership.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Bring a project you’re currently working on and share/receive crafting ideas. Call 229-1702 for more information.
AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Mondays and Thursdays, Feb. 4-April 11. Call for an appointment beginning Jan. 7.
Free with appointment only.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Income restrictions apply. Call 229-1702 for information and appointments.

Chinese New Year Brunch (ages 50+)
Thursday, Feb. 7, 10 a.m. Registration open Jan. 2-Feb. 1. Advance registration required.
Cost: $3.
East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.
Celebrate the Year of the Snake at our Chinese New Year brunch. Call 229-1515 for information and registration.
Midday Inspirational Showcase and Luncheon (all ages)
Tuesday, Feb. 12, 11 a.m. RSVP by Feb. 5 for luncheon.
Showcase is free; $7 for luncheon.
West Las Vegas Library Theatre, 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 507-3989.
The annual showcase features singers, dancers and a special guest speaker, immediately followed by a soul food lunch. Call the Doolittle Senior Center at (702) 229-6125 for information and reservation.

Casanova’s Sweet Cuisine Luncheon (ages 50+)
Thursday, Feb. 14, 11:30 a.m.
Cost: $5.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Celebrate Valentine’s day with friends, a fabulous luncheon and a deliciously decadent dessert! Must have a current city of Las Vegas Senior Programs membership to register.

Valentine’s Day Social (ages 50+)
Thursday, Feb. 14, 1 p.m.
Cost: $1.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Dress in red and pink to enjoy this Valentine’s Day social. Make your reservation by Feb. 11.

Carnival Day Luncheon (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Feb. 20, 11:30 a.m. Advance registration open Jan. 2-Feb. 15.
Cost: $5.
East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.
What’s more fun than a carnival? Try your skill at carnival games and enjoy traditional carnival treats! Advance registration required. Call 229-1515 for registration and information.
AARP Safe Driving Course (ages 50+)
Thursday, Feb. 21, 11 a.m. Advance registration required.
Cost: $12 for AARP member; $14 for non-member.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.
You will receive a certificate after completing this four-hour safety course. Bring lunch or snack and drinks.

Free Senior Center Art Show
Tuesday, Feb. 26, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Many of the center’s art courses produce fabulous pieces of art. Enjoy this display by senior art students! If you are student in a class at the Las Vegas Senior Center and wish to display your work, please contact Henry for information.

Caring for Your Fruit Trees Free Workshop (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Feb. 26, 1:30 p.m. Advance registration required by Jan. 22.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.
Join the Master Gardner for a lecture on how to take care of your fruit trees. Don’t forget to bring your questions!

# # #
Media Contact:
Margaret Kurtz
Public Information Officer
City of Las Vegas
495 S. Main St., 7th Floor
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702) 229-6993
Cell (702) 249-1828
E-mail: mkurtz@lasvegasnevada.gov

Improving Senior Life With Medical Alert For Seniors

November 26, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Improving Senior Life With Medical Alert For Seniors
by: Lance Mcisaac

Senior Citizens are in a time of their lives when they should be able to enjoy the freedom to live independently and go places when they desire. Unfortunately, sometimes their freedom is restricted by health concerns caused by their aging bodies. Medical Alert for Seniors can provide them with a sense of security, enabling them to enjoy the freedom they want and deserve. Seniors can come and go as they desire knowing that they have an alert button they can press at any time should they require assistance. This medical alarm system can provide loved ones with peace of mind as well. They can be assured that medical help is only a push of a button away.

With medical alert for seniors, senior citizens can live independently. They have the comfort of knowing that help is available any time day or night should they need it, while they have the freedom to continue to live in their own homes and follow their own routines without feeling like burdens on family members. Should they experience a fall or other medical emergency, all they have to do is press their medical panic button and help is available.

Nowadays, people move around frequently with careers, often leaving elderly parents in distant states. This can frequently be a source of concern for loving children. Being so far away often causes worry for family members who can’t visit frequently or be available in case of an emergency. When their parents or other senior family members have a medical alarm system, relatives can feel secure that they will receive the immediate medical help they might need. This can bring great peace of mind to family members living long distances from their aging relatives.

If you are a senior living alone or the relative of an independent senior, medical alert for Seniors may provide the assurance you need to avoid worrying. Knowing an alert button is always on hand will allow you to continue the independent lifestyle without worry. Seniors love the freedom it allows and their relatives enjoy the peace of mind it provides.

About The Author

Lance Mcisaac is the author of this article on Medical Alert Systems.

Find more information about Medical Alert Pendant here.
The author invites you to visit:
http://www.medicalguardian.com

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!