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Life Extension: The Modern Anti-Aging Movement – Are We Standing at the Threshold of Immortality?

July 17, 2016 by · Comments Off on Life Extension: The Modern Anti-Aging Movement – Are We Standing at the Threshold of Immortality?
Filed under: General 

Why is skincare the focus of longevity research? I guess a cell is a cell, and if you can crack the code for one human cell, it is only a matter of time to solving the puzzle with different types of cell – and skin is without doubt the most visible cells each of us have. And it’s our faces in particular we often judge ourselves and others by, and we are in turn quickly scrutinized, and often opinions reached in a fraction of a second. Our faces often show the most visible signs of aging, and for many in modern society age is by nature “bad” and young or looking young is the ideal. That is why billions and billions of dollars each year are poured by consumers into all sorts of treatments to minimize wrinkles, to push back the effects of gravity, and to turn back the hands of time. And with that much money to be spent by consumers, there are many manufacturers eager to find the next step in arresting Father Time – and at least detaining him until the next stagecoach arrives, where hopefully he can be encouraged to move on before too much damage can be done.

The Entire Issue Explained – In A Pair of Shoelaces

Some time ago a friend gave me a simple analogy that puts this entire issue in perspective. The science may not win a Nobel Prize, but it gave me the necessary ah-ha moment.

The double helix of the DNA strand – our most basic foundation for life – is held together at each end by things that act in the same way as the hard plastic bits on the end of shoelaces do – preventing the DNA from unraveling, and the individual chromosomes scattering across the floor like dropping a string of pearls down a marble staircase. These things are called telomeres.

Somewhere programmed into these tiny telomeres is the entire basis to how long the DNA stays intact – and by inference these are the keys to the length of life of the organism. Somewhere written into the telomere is a great musical score but like all musical scores it has a double bar somewhere to signify the end; but is it to be a minuet or a Wagnerian epic? But sure enough, when the time comes, and the telomeres blow the full time whistle, the DNA strand will unravel and die – and the circle of life begins again. Telomeres govern how often our skin cells are replaced; why a puppy and a child born on the same date may age exactly the same chronologically, but the puppy has become a geriatric before the child reaches puberty.

Telomeres, my friend explained, occasionally go on the fritz (that must have a very specific scientific meaning). One of the ways this occurs is they may forget their programming to release and unravel, and they just hang on, allowing the cells thus affected to multiply again and again without dying. In fact, when this occurs often they become very difficult to kill and to all intents and purposes once the telomeres act in this way, the cell – and those it propagates – are effectively immortal.

This condition has a name which we all know. Cancer.

But, what if we were able in some way to persuade the telomeres within a cancer to behave normally – would that not be the “magic bullet” cure for cancer? And the other side to that equation – if the telomeres in healthy cells could be persuaded to act as they do in a cancer – then is this the recipe for a healthy cell that does not die? Does the cure for cancer and immortality hang on just this one thread?

Whatever your views may be, the reality is that some of the world’s finest research scientists are working on that exact question and some would say it is only a matter of a decade or two before this is neither conjecture nor science fiction, but a reality to face up to. The changes that would take place in society even if life expectancy were to take a leap forward by say 10 or 20 years are enormous, but we should all be thinking that this is a distinct possibility.

From the dab of lanoline a generation ago to what I know hold in my hand as an anti aging skincare treatment is more than just a revolution – and I have no doubt in a few years I will be saying this cream will not just slow the aging process and reduce the visible signs of aging, making your face appear younger – but it will actually be younger.

But before that, let’s look back at how this whole engagement with life extension and anti-aging started. Mankind has always striven for longevity and mused about immortality – but the past 50 years has seen some dramatic steps in reality toward this goal.

Genesis

The thought of extending life has been on the mind of mankind for millennia. References to the search for ways to prolong life can be found as far back as the Epic of Gilgamesh.

Gilgamesh was reputedly the fifth king of the kingdom of Uruk, the modern-day Iraq, around 2500 BC. According to the Sumerian list of kings, he reigned for 126 years. The Torah or Old Testament records Methuselah as living over 900 years, with life spans measured in centuries apparently commonplace before the time of Noah.

Throughout the development of scientific thought from the Reformation onwards, scholars have applied themselves to solving this riddle and these endeavors continue today at the very leading edge of scientific progress.

Unraveling Secrets

As the secrets of our existence are unraveled in ever more minute detail, we are beginning to understand what it is that makes us grow from tiny babies into adults. We now know, for example, that cell functions slow down as the body ages and that production of certain substances required by the body to regenerate decrease or cease completely.

Skin, for instance, needs two substances to retain strength and firmness.
The production of these substances namely collagen (strength, tightness) and elastin (flexibility) decreases with age. The decreases in production together with other factors that include the threat of free radicals make the skin age and become wrinkly. Free radicals are essentially incomplete oxygen molecules causing destructive chain reactions within cells.

The same kind of thing happens in every cell, every tissue and organ around the human body. For example, people develop frown lines, crow’s feet and wrinkles. Nutrients are no longer absorbed easily and vital cell functions, hormones and other substances are produced at decreased rates resulting in the body aging.

A Brief History of the Life Extension Movement

Science has been looking for ways to slow down this process for centuries. The forming of life extension movements, however, did not really begin until around 1970.

➢ In this year, Denham Harman, the originator of the so-called ‘free radical theory of aging’, decided that an organization dedicated to the research and information sharing between scientists working in biogerontology (the field of science concerned with the biological aspects involved in the aging process) was needed. As a result, the American Aging Association was formed.

➢ In 1976, two futurists, Philip Gordon and Joel Kurtzman wrote a book on the research into extending the human lifespan. This popular volume was titled ‘No More Dying. The Conquest Of Aging And The Extension Of Human Life’.

➢ Kurtzman was then invited to speak at Florida’s House Select Committee (HSC) of Aging, which was chaired by Claude Pepper, an American politician and spokesman for the elderly. The aim of this talk was to discuss the impact on Social Security by life extension.

➢ In 1980, Saul Kent, a prominent activist in the field of life extension, published the book ‘The Life Extension Revolution’ and founded the nutraceutical (from ‘nutrition’ and ‘pharmaceutical’, in other words, a nutrition supplement) firm known as ‘The Life Extension Foundation’.

This foundation is a non-profit making organization promoting dietary supplements and publishing the periodical ‘Life Extension Magazine’. Kent was later involved in work relating to cryogenics. He was jailed in the course of this work over a dispute at one point, although charges were dropped at a later stage.

➢ In 1982, American health writer and life extension advocate Sandy Shaw and her co-writer, Durk Pearson, popularized the term ‘life extension’ even further with the bestseller ‘Life Extension: A Practical Scientific Approach’.

➢ Roy Walford, a gerontologist and life-extensionist, published ‘Maximum Lifespan’, another popular book on the subject. He and Richard Weindruch, his student, followed this up in 1988 with their summary on the research they had conducted into the ability to prolong the life of rodents through calorie restriction. The title of this book is ‘The Retardation of Aging and Disease by Dietary Restriction’.

Although this ability to extend life with calorie restriction had been known since the 1930’s, when gerontologist, biochemist and nutritionist Clive McCay did some research into the subject, it was the work of Walford and Weinbruch that gave solid scientific grounding to the McCay’s findings.

Walford’s scientific work was driven by a personal interest in life extension. He practiced calorie restriction as part of his own life and eventually died at the age of 80. The cause of his death was amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a progressive motor neuron disease.

➢ A4M, the ‘American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine’ was founded in 1992 to create a medical specialty for anti aging that was distinctly separate from geriatrics. This allowed scientists and physicians interested in this particular field of science to hold conferences and discuss the latest developments.

➢ The sci.life-extension, a Usenet group, was created by California-born author, philosopher and translator Brian M. Delaney. This represented an important development within the movement of life extension. It made it possible, for example, for the CR (Calorie Restriction) Society to be created.

➢ A more recent development is the proposal of Dr A. de Grey, a biogerontologist at Cambridge University. This proposal suggested that damage to cells, macromolecules, organs and tissues can be repaired with the help of advanced biotechnology. This is evident in hair restoration products, for instance.

More than Books

Although it would appear that most of the work revolving around life extension has been done solely by writing books or founding societies or organizations of some kind or another, the reality is that these books were written in response to or based on very specific, detailed scientific research that have yielded positive results.

They are no longer the works of hopeful minds, but the works of dedicated scientists who have spent their lives working on discovering facts about aging and trying to find ways to slow down, or even reverse the process.

Many breakthroughs have been made, and in many ways, we are already able to extend lives to a certain extent. The average lifespan of a human being is already far greater than it used to be as a result of medical, pharmaceutical and nutritional advances brought about by research and development.

The work continues, and scientists around the world are continually conducting research, comparing results, discussing options and making advances on our behalf.

Driving Forces behind the Development of the Life Extension Movement

What factors are driving this movement into ever greater efforts to find solutions to the extension of Life? The answer to this question actually includes a whole range of factors.

Expectations Have Risen

As the ‘baby boomer’ generation (born between 1946-1964) enters retirement age, expectations of this group are dramatically different from those of the preceding generations. They have greater expectations and desires to enjoy their life as pensioners to the fullest and for as long as is possible. This expectation covers not only length of life, but quality of life as well and this is not a passive request but an active and strident demand in many cases.

Pharmacology

Progress in pharmacology has led to a wide selection of drugs that allow people to live longer and fuller lives being developed over the last two decades or so. The work is still very much in progress and many more drugs are being developed daily.

One of the classic examples of a drug raising the quality of life for older individuals are erectile dysfunction treatments – notably Viagra, Cialis and Levitra. These drugs have dramatically reduced the number of fatalities or serious injury resulting from elderly men rolling out of bed, as well as a number of more qualitative benefits.

Advances in Genetics

Some of the latest scientific research and subsequent advances made in biotechnology and genetics are providing some hope that it may be possible to hold back some of the fundamental causes of aging.

As we outlined previously, chromosomes containing DNA strings are essentially capped with a binding substance known as telomeres. In effect, the telomeres are consumed during cell division and over time, they become shorter and shorter.

This was first observed by a scientist called Leonard Hayflick, and the process of limited cell division was subsequently named the Hayflick Limit. Advocates of life extension work on the thought that lengthening the telomeres through drugs or gene therapy may ultimately extend the Hayflick Limit and thereby fool the cells, and as such the body, into ‘thinking’ it is younger than it actually is.

Developments in Precision Manufacture

Advances made in the fields of nanotechnology, miniaturization, computer chips and robotics also provide hope for potentially life extending solutions.

In the 1970’s, a popular TV series starred Lee Majors as the ‘Six Million Dollar Man’? Science fiction then. Today, it is science fact. Millions of people now walk through life with artificial ankle, knee and hip joints and healthy feet. A generation ago, mass production of this kind of technology was a distant dream.

The same applies to many individuals with artificial limbs. Artificial legs used to be crude wooden contraptions that were just able to keep a person balanced. Today’s artificial limbs are almost fully functional.

The Blessings of Medical Progress

Who would have thought even 50 years ago that it would become possible to bypass a coronary artery, or even replace a heart completely? Yet there are hundreds of thousands, if not millions of individuals enjoying their lives after having this kind of surgery – few of whom would be alive just half a century ago.

Millions of people no longer have to wear glasses, because of the availability of laser surgery. This, too, was science fiction just a few years ago. Today, it is advertised next to shampoo in magazines and on TV.

In other words, science is moving rapidly towards not only extending life, but making the quality of these extra years better as well.

Is it Science, Science Fiction or Lunacy?

What should the average person believe? This question is almost as difficult to answer as finding solutions to extended life. Even among scientists, opinions are divided. Some do believe that extending the quality of life is as possible as extending life in general.

Others brush off the thought as un-scientific nonsense. This is often simply based on the fear of anything ‘new’ disturbing the status quo of established limits. Fortunately, real scientists do keep on looking, because if every single scientist had decided that some of the advancements already in medical, pharmaceutical and technological fields could not be possible, we would all still be dying at 30.

So where does that leave us?

There is no doubt what-so-ever that there are many charlatans out there trying to make a quick buck out of people’s desire to retain their youth. Even today, many products being sold in their millions are essentially non-effective – often given fantastic names and have the most bewildering ingredients to make them look scientific to consumers and justify their cost.

But the facts are while many advancements are being made and research points to the possibility of eventually finding the key to maintaining youth for longer, the scientific community is still warning the public that many of the products being sold today are unreliable to say the least.

➢ Although food supplements may assist in keeping a body healthier – something that can often be achieved by simply adopting a healthier life style and diet – there is as yet no categorical and undeniable proof that they slow down aging as such.

➢ The same goes for many hormone treatments. Although they may have a short term effect of some kind, it is not yet scientifically proven that they will actually work in the long run. The fear that it may not work is based on the fact that taking hormones, a good example is the hormonal acne treatment, will ultimately actually slow down the body’s own production of these hormones.

In addition, many treatments may have potential (and yet unknown) side effects in the long run that could be harmful to the user’s health. This includes the fears that such hormone treatments could increase the risk of cancer, diabetes and other major illnesses.

➢ Other ideas, like the calorie restriction method, are working for rodents. In fact, studies conducted with rats on 30 to 50 per cent restricted diets have shown to almost double the life span of rats.

Similar studies conducted on primates have also shown tendency to extend life to a certain extent and prevent a list of age related illnesses. There are as yet no studies on humans, although some are actually living on calorie restricted diets. Whether this will prolong their lives, however, is a question of having to wait and see.

The theory is that by reducing calorie intake, the metabolism of the body is slowed down, thereby slowing the aging process as well. Nutritionists say there is a certain amount of calories a body of a certain size and weight needs to have to maintain health. Reducing this amount by up to 50 per cent is hardly a good idea in the long term.

Time will tell, as they say, but how will anyone be able to tell the difference? If a person lives to the age of 80, is this because they are on this diet or would they have lived to this age anyway?

Where Will This Lead?

Many believe there is realistic hope and expectation of making significant strides in the area of longevity within the next two decades. This group typically believes the answer will ultimately lie within genetics and biotechnology. It is too early to make definite predictions, but the research so far shows promise and, as mentioned earlier, some of the results of this research are already being used in certain treatments to improve patients’ lives.

At present, overall aging is difficult to slow down, to say the least. Some products indicate they will assist in maintaining overall health/longevity, but the area we are seeing the first commercial products being developed is in the area of skin care and given the size of this market, it is likely that this will continue to be the weather-vane of longevity treatments.

Science or Snake Oil?

It will be difficult to tell these two apart for many years. Charlatans are likely to about, because it is difficult to disprove many theories easily. Equally difficult will be positive proof from those with an ethical perspective on the trail of a real breakthrough, as products based on valid research and using technology or ingredients that will actually have an effect rarely promise overnight results. This is something that anyone looking to find improved youthful looks, etc, will have to bear in mind. None of these products can perform miracles. Even the best of them will take time and regular use in order to achieve the desired effect.

The bottom line is that where we stand now, we can be sure there are some things which are ineffective or even harmful; there are some that show some promise and there are some that are starting to cross the line of being able to demonstrate results – albeit modestly at this point.

In the meantime, it is wise to research products very carefully and to refuse to be baffled by weird and wonderful sounding ingredients or fantastic sounding promises of instant youth. Regeneration will take time – let’s face it, it has taken a lifetime to get to this point, turning back the clock can never be possible over night.

Skin Care and the Life Extension Movement

One may well ask just what all this, and in particular the life extension movement as such, could possibly have to do with skin care, health and beauty products. The fact is, much of the research into life extension is resulting in new approaches to skin care as a kind of by-product.

A greater understanding of how genetics and cellular processes affect the aging and condition of skin allows these research and development teams to investigate different compounds, their compatibility with human cells and genetic make up.

Many compounds found in nature are not just compatible to human skin but in fact the skin cells actually have natural receptors for these compounds. Because life extension research has discovered these receptors, skin care developers can now use this knowledge and create the formulae for their products to provide maximum effect.

Another skin care ‘by-product’ of life extension research is the use of nanotechnology. The use of nanotechnology, or, to be more precise, nanoparticles, has had a huge impact on the way nutrients and other components of skin care products are being delivered to the skin cells. In some ways, nanotechnology has already revolutionized skin care. It is now possible to use active ingredients previously difficult to effectively deliver to the skin, as well as making old, proven ingredients even more effective. Some ingredients used in cosmetics for hundreds, if not thousands of years by certain cultures can now be even more effectively used to improve skin condition and maintain a healthy, youthful look.

Even the moisturizing effect of skin care products can be improved with nantechnology. For this effect, so-called nanosomes are used. Nanosomes are small, pocket-like particles that melt or disintegrate on skin contact. By doing this, the moisturising effect is accelerated, assisting the skin faster and more efficiently.

Nanotechnology plays a key part not only in slowing the aging of skin, but is believed to actively assist in repairing and healing skin cells and tissue.

Another breakthrough in life extension research that is beginning to make itself felt in skin care products is the research into stem cells. Stem cells are elements of all life, plant, animal and human. Stem cells have two properties other cells do not have. These properties are the ability to develop into any kind of cell type and the ability to divide almost indefinitely. The use of plant stem cell extracts in skin care is likely to become one of the next ‘big things’ in the industry. And prepare for the debate when human stem cells are proposed as part of an anti-aging skincare regime, as will inevitably occur!

One thing we can be certain of, is that science will continue to search for answers to the question of life extension, and business will drive the commercialization of discoveries. But whether these lead us to a utopian future or potentially a minefield of strife as we debate who will use and who will benefit from these new godlike powers. In the meantime, at a practical level in the skincare, health and beauty industry we remain hopeful and expectant we will see the emergence of products that not only promise results, but produce them.

David Christensen is a veteran of Asia Pacific business, currently residing in Bangkok, Thailand and heading up the business he was a co-founder of, Royal Siam Natural Health & Beauty – who can be located at [http://www.royalsiam.asia], and the information supporting site at [http://www.royalsiam.info]. Royal Siam was established after careful planning in early 2011, spending 2011 concentrating on building the necessary business infrastructure and concentrating on the domestic Thai market. Early in 2012 Royal Siam launched its international website and online store, and in April 2012 publicly declared the ambition to be among the world’s top 20 premium health and beauty brands by the year 2020. Royal Siam is a unique business, operating in the premium skincare, anti aging, and related fields. At its core, one mission is to commercialize and bring to a global market the immense wealth of knowledge about the healing and beneficial properties of Thai and South East Asian plants – a knowledge base carefully built up over the last thousand years. At the same time, the mission is to bring to market the very latest in scientific advances in the area of anti aging… resulting in the unique position of having a Thai heritage and offering the best of nature, tradition, and science.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/David_D_Christensen/1317312

The Facts When Should One Begin an Anti Aging Routine To Keep Good Looking In Your Older Age

July 4, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Facts When Should One Begin an Anti Aging Routine To Keep Good Looking In Your Older Age
Filed under: General 

The beginning stages of aging are very important because prevention is really a much better method for coping with aging skin than treating the skin when the signs of aging have already appeared. The fact is that, all of us are without exception are subject to aging. And skin at different stages of aging need different attention that providing age-specific anti-aging care. However, most people have the wrong impression that we should deal with our skin about anti aging when we reaches older! The question now is when shall we begin our routine to counteract the earliest stages of aging skin? The answer is as earlier as in your mid 20s!

Aging begin as soon as adulthood is reached. Physically, early (20 to 39 years old) and middle adulthood (40 to 59 years old) are marked by slow, gradual declines in body functioning, which accelerate as late adulthood (60 and above of age) is reached. The mass of muscle will continue to boost through till mid 20s, thereafter gradually decreasing. Each stage experiences its own specific type of breakdown of protein and collagen and other building blocks that keep your skin looking youthful and glowing.

During the early adulthood, the production of collagen start slowing down and the regeneration of new cells diminishes slightly. Inside your skin along with other parts of your bodies, cells are constantly dying and rejuvenating and the new cells are pristine and strong and it shows on your faces. This process is part of youth and aging, once you reach mid 20s, the process of generation slows down. This is hardly noticeable on the outside of the skin but this is when aging actually begin to happen.

In the middle adulthood, aging starts happening under your skin from the ages of 40. But it can be started as earlier as from 35 depends on how you taking care of your skin, practices healthy diet and lifestyle. During this stage, you will begin to show fine lines around your eyes and outside the mouth area. The color of the skin becomes more pale or dull and loses its youthful glow. Then you begin to lose collagen and amino acids which natural bonding substance in your body that keep your skin plump and puffy. This is the stage where wrinkles start to take underlying on your face.

As in the late adulthood, the human growth hormone is depleted and aging starts to speed up. If you have not used repairing products like anti aging serum, then all of the damaging activities occurring beneath your skin continues but they will accelerate and the consequences will probably be a lot worse than one who used good skin care products, implemented healthy diet and lifestyle routine. Without the aid of good anti aging wrinkle products that help to prevent, restore, protect and rejuvenate, your wrinkles will go deeper and age spots will show up. The building blocks beneath your skin have broken down so you start experience an intense loss of plumpness and resilience.

Therefore, in early stage of adulthood especially you reach mid 20s, a good skin care product series, avoid too much sun light exposure, keep your body hydrated plus eat antioxidants rich foods would definitely make you look much younger and glow in your older age. The start of uses a good anti aging serum that with ingredients such as antioxidants, Alpha Hydroxy Acids (AHAs) and retinols in addition to your moisturizer cream is highly recommended when reaches your middle adulthood to keep your skin restore and rejuvenate. When come to late adulthood, series of high quality anti aging products that include serum, face cream and eye cream is surely as much needed at this time. But it never too late to improve the look of your skin no matter what age you in!

Keng Chan is an anti aging practitioner with more than 10 years of experiences. Frequently research of information, finding interesting tips and solutions for anti aging which helped him look more than 10 years younger than his age! He surprised all of the new friends he met!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7113303

How Old Are You Really? Biological Age

May 29, 2016 by · Comments Off on How Old Are You Really? Biological Age
Filed under: General 

People have always been interested in being “forever young” and today’s society is no different. We want to resist the ageing process.

The speed at which we are ageing can be measured – its called biological age, or how old your body really is.

The area of study which is now called longevity, and was once called anti aging, is hugely popular in the states.

It’s something I’m very interested in, and see it as a big part of the future for myself and my clients.

Your chronological age is how old you actually are.

Biological age is the age of your body at the cellular level.

Today we will look into how you can establish, what your biological age is and how you can improve it.

There are a few longevity factors in the list which surprised me!

(Deep question alert!)

What is the purpose of life? I don’t mean any deep seated stuff, like procreation.

I just mean, what is most people’s AIM in life. What do they want to get out of their time on earth?

Firstly and most importantly, people want to be happy. Easier said than done.

Happiness is a state of mind. It’s a feeling.

Ask someone with a big goal (like building a successful business or losing more than three stone).

“What will reaching your goal do for you?”

Often they will say something like “When I get there I will feel happy”, or “satisfied with myself”, or they say “I will feel proud”.

“I will have more energy”.

“I won’t be afraid of trying new clothes on or going out with friends”.

“I don’t want to feel like a slave to food”

“I don’t want to be scared to look in the mirror or get on the scales”.

Life is all about feelings.

People spend their entire lives in search of feelings! (mostly happiness, contentment, satisfaction and love)

How people actually reach this state of “happiness” is different for us all.

Most people I know AIM for a decent job (or business) with decent money.

All with the ultimate goal of having a good retirement.

I hear people say “When I finish work, I’m going to do this or I’m going to… (insert goal)”.

The point here being, if being happy and having a nice retirement is people’s main goal in life, then keeping your body fit and healthy surely must be part of your plan.

I know of a very wealthy man who got cancer and passed away just before his retirement, I’m sure that was not part of the master plan, he had built his business up so he could sell it and have a nice retirement (as most business people do).

He didn’t make it and didn’t get to “cash out”.

Many people don’t make it to retirement because their “plan” is messed up from the start.

Without sounding depressing we only get one shot remember.

This is NOT a rehearsal.

A lot of people get to retirement age and their body is wrecked!

This stops them from being able to enjoy their time off as much. Living life with lots of restrictions. “I can’t go there because of the steep hill”, or “I can’t do that because of my back or my knees”.

After working hard for 40-50 years – to give yourself a good pension and retirement, this is the last thing that anyone wants.

Peoples bodies are like cars.

On one hand you have new cars with high mileage that are not well serviced.

On the other hand you have old cars with low mileage that have been well looked after.

I want YOU to be like a well looked after old car, with low mileage when you get to your retirement.

I know some people, that slog away and get to the age of 40, and feel and look like they’re 50 or 60!

I also know many people who hit retirement age and feel like a 40 year old, and can keep on working and exercising for another 20 years!

This is all dependent on how we live our lives, obviously there are things such as injuries, diseases and other bad things which can impact our lives negatively through no fault of our own but on the whole we are in control of our own health.

What affects our longevity?

Scientists agree that these factors all affect your longevity in some way, big or small. (this is not a definitive list)

Muscle size and strength
Level of education
How pro active you are with going to see the doctor if needed
The amount of friends you can rely on, and love in your life
Your diet
Blood pressure
Your upper body strength
If you enjoy your work or not
Weather you smoke/drink alcohol or not, and the amount
If you exercise or not

Most of us shorten our lives and ultimately kill ourselves, through our bad habits and lifestyle choices, whatever they may be.

As you would of guessed, it is possible to slow down the onset of ageing and even reverse it to some extent.

I must say, that there is nothing wrong with ageing, it is inevitable. It is something we should be proud of, a chance to show our wisdom to the younger generation.

This article is just to show you how you can SLOW the ageing process with ease and actually enjoy it.

The Ageing Process

As we get older our bodies start to slow down and stop being able to function as well, sadly there is no getting away from this.

BUT through healthy living and making the right choices day in day out we can delay our body slowing down by years!

Just think how much more you will be able to enjoy your retirement if you feel like a 40 year old? and can spend it with the people you love.

Compare this to how much you will enjoy it if you can barely walk up a flight of stairs without having tired legs and being short of breath.

Your chronological age doesn’t have to be the same, or worse, than your physiological age.

How to slow the effects of ageing

The list above obviously helps you but here are a few more ideas for you to beat the clock.

When some people think anti aging, I’m sure some of you may think of things like anti wrinkle creams and lotions, hair dying products, botox and maybe even plastic surgery.

That does kind of sum up some of the western world that these are the steps that the majority of people (plastic surgery being an extreme example) will take to make them look younger, rather than eating healthily and exercising.

Aging leads to loss of muscle mass, loss of mental function, low mobility and a lack of energy, and as you know the cosmetic type anti aging steps I mentioned won’t help any of these.

Top tips to delay ageing naturally:

Enjoy the Outdoors – Don’t spend all of your time cooped up indoors behind the computer or watching TV. There are plenty of things to do and see outside, especially on a nice day I can’t think of anything better than going for a walk with the family down the park or beach. Sunlight also is a natural source of Vitamin D.

Yoga & Meditation – I would say that this is one of the most important strategies in staying young. I started to do this myself and it honestly makes me feel great. Yoga and meditation can help you relax and lower your stress levels (linked with aging) dramatically. It can also help you to see things a lot clearer.

Yoga is also great for your flexibility, the more flexible and supple you are the less chance you have in the future of suffering falls and lack of mobility.

Socialise – Loneliness can be a real killer. Socialise as much as possible with your friends and family. Get out there and do things, go to the cinema, concerts, attend an evening class (the more mentally stimulating the better).

Stay Strong & Active – You have to keep moving or your body will come to a standstill. Taking part in regular exercise is absolutely vital. Regular strength training is extremely important.

Losing muscle mass is something you want to avoid or at least delay for as long as possible so strength training will help this as well as keeping your bones strong, this will lower your chances of osteoporosis.

Nutrition

I believe food is medicine, many of the effects you get from modern day medicine you can get from eating the right foods.

Nutrition influences biochemistry. Biochemistry influences everything at a cellular level.

If you eat well there should be no need for some medications.

If you spend your whole life eating fresh, natural whole foods and stay active then it will also show. You will most likely be lean, mobile, disease free and full of energy, a rarity these days.

You should aim to eat a diet containing lots of quality fats and protein’s (the bodies building materials) which will help you to maintain your muscle stores. Also protein boosts the production of HGH in your body, HGH (Human growth Hormone) is your body’s natural ‘fountain of youth’.

As you age the production of this hormone slows down greatly, regular strength exercise (lifting, pushing and pulling heavy stuff) and quality protein keeps the production of this hormone going!

Eat plenty of antioxidant rich foods – Antioxidants which are found in colourful fruit and vegetables help to reduce the damage caused by free radicals in your system.

Free radicals can speed up the onset of ageing; they are unstable electrons (O1 molecules)which are produced during metabolism. They damage the cell nucleus and the mitochondria.

Free radicals bounce around inside your cells like a pin ball, causing damage every time they hit something. They cause absolute havoc.

Antioxidants provide the free radical with the extra O1 molecule they need to become stable O2 molecules.

Good quality natural foods are the best way to combat these harmful free radicals. Natural organic foods are packed with antioxidants which neutralise the free radicals before they cause too much damage.

Eat Omega 3s – They fight inflammation, improve the appearance of your skin and aid brain function. Three vital things that we need as we age. So make sure you get as many omega 3s into your system as you can, the best source is fresh fish, if not a fish oil supplement will do.

Lower Sugar Intake – Aim to cut out any excess sugar that you eat, excess sugars can modify essential proteins in our body which can lead to wrinkles and energy loss.

Look after your skin through good food and lots of water – Eating foods containing vitamin A (sweet potatoes, broccoli, spinach, asparagus and carrots), Vitamin C (red peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, strawberries, oranges, kiwi and pineapple) and Vitamin E (nuts, seeds and spinach) are a great way of helping your skin look healthy.

Stop smoking and limit alcohol intake – There are few things that age you faster than smoking and drinking alcohol every day so cut out smoking and do as much as you can to drink less.

Lower Stress Levels – This is another big one, I just mentioned that there are few things that age you faster than smoking and alcohol; well I think stress is one of them.

Being constantly stressed will ruin your mood, energy levels, social interaction as well as causing so many health problems.

As I mentioned above, I have found deep breathing techniques, yoga and meditation really important and a great way of combating stress.

Let’s be realistic the big medical and health companies aren’t going to promote anti aging through the things I just said, they are going to promote it through new miracle pills, lotions and creams, there is a lot of money to be made from it so they will keep on doing it.

The people who buy these products don’t have to alter their lifestyle one little bit so it suits them which is why it is so popular.

We ultimately reap our rewards in our retirement, if you have invested some time and effort into your “health & fitness account”, you will reap the rewards.

If you haven’t then you won’t!

You can actually measure your biological age online with a biological age calculator.

If all of the things I have mentioned above didn’t require effort or commitment then everyone would be running around into their 90s and later!!

But unfortunately we don’t, we die much younger than that.

Depending on what stats you use, in 2010, UK men were reported to live on average until about 77 or 78, and women on average live until 82 or 83 years old.

Do it naturally and do it right.

Let me know your thoughts on this topic, comment below, I really want to know what you think.

Thanks for reading, take care,

Richard

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Take a Number: Five Ways to Look at Age

April 24, 2016 by · Comments Off on Take a Number: Five Ways to Look at Age
Filed under: General 

One for the Ages

Satchel Paige was a great baseball pitcher, one of the greatest of all time. He was an African-American and, due to the racial discrimination of the time, most of his outstanding career was not spent in the (white) major leagues. However, after the historic breakthrough by the courageous and talented Jackie Robinson (Mr. Paige’s junior by about 14 years), Satchel Paige pitched in the major leagues for a number of years. In fact, he was still able to get major league batters out at the age of 60! (Mr. Paige’s age at his retirement from baseball is not known for certain because no one, probably including Mr. Paige himself, knew his exact year of birth; some thought he was older than 60). Mr. Paige revealed a mind as sharp as the break on his curve ball when he asked this profound question for the ages:

“How old would you be if you did not know how old you are?”

These writings are dedicated to the memory of Satchel Paige and to all the so-called “over-the-hill” guys and gals in every sport and in every area of life, from Churchill and Reagan in politics to Jessica Tandy in acting and Paul McCartney in fatherhood. They and many like them in the past and present will be joined by many more in the future who are not really “over the hill” because they are too busy taking the hill.

Five Ways to Look at Age

Chronological Age

The most common way to look at age is the Chronological. This is the one that everyone is familiar with. It is simply the time that has passed since your date of birth to today. It is the one that governments and insurance companies require of you and that your Doctor knows, even if your boy friend doesn’t. It is a unidimensional measure because it considers only time. It is uniform because everybody who is 48 years, 6 months, and 3 weeks old is exactly that, chronologically. People who view age only from the chronological perspective are somewhere between dumb and dumber.

True Age

True Age is another and better way to look at your age. True age is basically what a measurement of all the biomarkers of aging would reveal about you. Here’s four points about true age. One, if a well-trained physician did NOT know how old you are but reviewed a print-out of your biomarkers, she or he could accurately estimate your true age. Two, your true age is not uniform but varies by individual: you can be younger or older than your chronological age. Three, true age is multidimensional rather than confined to time. Four, absolutely nothing can be done about chronological age because it is fixed, but a great deal can be done about true age.

Appearance Age

Appearance Age is the age you appear to be to others. It no doubt has some relationship to both chronological age and true age. Yet it is different. This is because it is heavily influenced by a number of factors outside the scope of biomarker measurement, not the least of which is attitude. We all know people that appear to be quite a bit younger or older than their chronological age. But the only scientific way to measure a person’s appearance age would be to have a representative sample of the population observe a person for at least a few minutes. A quick glance is not sufficient because appearance age includes factors such as movement of the body and alertness, not just a frozen face. Then the estimates from all members of the representative sample would be gathered, simple statistical measures applied, and Voila! You have the person’s appearance age. Of course, unless we are part of a study, none of us will ever get this scientific about it. We will just have to rely on random comments from friends, family, and nice or mean strangers to estimate our appearance age; and usually it’s a pretty good estimate.

NEAT Age

A new way to look at age, which occurred to me awhile back, is what I call one’s N.E.A.T. age. This is simply one’s time left on the planet from right Now to the time of death. This age is unknowable by readers or anyone, except those committed to imminent suicide (and these poor folks are no more likely to take the short time remaining to do age calculations than they are to be caught dead reading an article about lively longevity). The best we can do is make a calculated estimate based on what we know about the general population and factor in any pluses or minuses that apply to us individually.

The N in NEAT of course stands for Now since the calculation is from the present, today, right now. E is for Elusive because I believe moments of time are elusive. As we humans try to hold or capture a moment of time it eludes us because the next moment is here, and then the next. Time and life are a flow.

The A in NEAT is for Allotted. Everyone who has ever lived has only so much time to live. Some have short lives, some have long lives, and some have lives neither particularly long nor short. But human life is finite and almost certainly will remain finite into the distant future if not forever. We do not need to take sides in the age-old debate about whether or not our allotted time is predestined by God in order to recognize that the amount is finite.

Of course, T is for Time. Time remaining is what it is all about. As has been oft noted: a millionaire on his death bed would gladly exchange his riches for a little more time, say one more day of healthy living.

So one’s NEAT age is one’s Now Elusive Allotted Time. It is a concept that provides a different perspective on aging and on life. For example, let’s suppose there was a 30-year old person named Terry and a 60-year old person named Sydney living in the same town in 1960. Conventional wisdom and simple arithmetic agree that Sydney was twice as old as Terry at that time. Such wisdom carries the (usually) unstated assumption that Terry is about 30 years further from the grave than Sydney. Statistically, this is difficult to argue with. But statistics are oft off for an individual and sometimes by a wide margin.

Let’s suppose that Terry had a lifetime of very bad health habits and, never having had the opportunity to read my writings, continued the very bad habits. Poor Terry expired a little shy of 40. (The same fate could have befallen Terry due to a dreaded disease or tragic accident.) Sydney, on the other hand, decided at some point to lead a health-conscious life. Sydney made good choices and stuck with them. Sydney enjoyed basically good health beyond age 100 before passing on. When Sydney was 60 and Terry was 30, Sydney had a NEAT age of 40+ and Terry had a NEAT age just under 10. So way back in 1960, who was younger: the one with less than a decade of life left, or the one with more than four decades of vibrant life left? One of the neat things about the NEAT age is that the bigger this age number the better.

Ideal Age

The fifth and final way that we will look at age is one’s Ideal Age. Your ideal age is your age of choice, your preferred age. The concept of ideal age brings us back to Satchel Paige’s question:

How old would you be if you did not know how old you are?

In a sense, perhaps most of us do NOT know how old we are anyhow. Sure we know our chronological age, and some of us have a rough gauge of our appearance age. But few of us know our true age, and none of us knows our NEAT age. So it should not be so difficult to put chronological age aside for a few moments and answer Mr. Paige’s question.

Before leaping to an answer like 21, keep in my mind that successful living usually involves a combination of physical vigor, mental acuity, and wisdom. Personally, my ideal age is 37; thus even at my next birthday I will still be one year younger than all the women over 40.

What about you? What’s your number? What’s your ideal age? The way my anti-aging program works for you is that after reflection you establish your ideal age. Then we work with all the tools and techniques of the program to bring your true age into ever closer alignment with your ideal age. There is a balance to be struck. A 90-year old reader shooting for an ideal age of 19 is setting up way too much of a challenge and thus is setting up for failure. A 50-year old reader settling for an ideal age of 45 is not challenging herself or himself enough.

Take a number.

Satchel Paige was the impetus for me to write the close to this article:

When it comes to matters of age,

It is best to take a page out of Paige,

And move forward with grace,

Paying no mind to this myth of the human race.

Gary Patrick is a certified anti-aging professional (Giovane Medical Services). He is also an author, hypnotist, personal trainer, and speaker. Free stuff is available for a limited time at his web site: [http://rapidresults.biz]

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The Development of Old Age and Related Issues

April 18, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Development of Old Age and Related Issues
Filed under: General 

In traditional Chinese and other Asian cultures the aged were highly respected and cared for. The Igabo tribesmen of Eastern Nigeria value dependency in their aged and involve them in care of children and the administration of tribal affairs (Shelton, A. in Kalish R. Uni Michigan 1969).

In Eskimo culture the grandmother was pushed out into the ice-flow to die as soon as she became useless.

Western societies today usually resemble to some degree the Eskimo culture, only the “ice-flows” have names such a “Sunset Vista” and the like. Younger generations no longer assign status to the aged and their abandonment is always in danger of becoming the social norm.

There has been a tendency to remove the aged from their homes and put them  in custodial care. To some degree the government provides domiciliary care services to prevent or delay this, but the motivation probably has more to do with expense than humanity.

In Canada and some parts of the USA old people are being utilised as foster-grandparents in child care agencies.

SOME BASIC DEFINITIONS

What is Aging?

Aging: Aging is a natural phenomenon that refers to changes occurring throughout the life span and result in differences in structure and function between the youthful and elder generation.

Gerontology: Gerontology is the study of aging and includes science, psychology and sociology.

Geriatrics: A relatively new field of medicine specialising in the health problems of advanced age.

Social aging: Refers to the social habits and roles of individuals with respect to their culture and society. As social aging increases individual usually experience a decrease in meaningful social interactions.

Biological aging: Refers to the physical changes in the body systems during the later decades of life. It may begin long before the individual  reaches chronological age 65.

Cognitive aging: Refers to decreasing ability to assimilate new information and learn new behaviours and skills.

GENERAL PROBLEMS OF AGING

Eric Erikson (Youth and the life cycle. Children. 7:43-49 Mch/April 1960) developed an “ages and stages” theory of human development that involved 8 stages after birth each of which involved a basic dichotomy representing best case and worst case outcomes. Below are the dichotomies and their developmental relevance:

Prenatal stage – conception to birth.

  1. Infancy. Birth to 2 years – basic trust vs. basic distrust. Hope.
  2. Early childhood, 3 to 4 years – autonomy vs. self doubt/shame. Will.
  3. Play age, 5 to 8 years – initiative vs. guilt. Purpose.
  4. School age, 9to 12 – industry vs. inferiority. Competence.
  5. Adolescence, 13 to 19 – identity vs. identity confusion. Fidelity.
  6. Young adulthood – intimacy vs. isolation. Love.
  7. Adulthood, generativity vs. self absorption. Care.
  8. Mature age- Ego Integrity vs. Despair. Wisdom.

This stage of older adulthood, i.e. stage 8, begins about the time of retirement and continues throughout one’s life. Achieving ego integrity  is a sign of maturity while failing to reach this stage is an indication of poor development in prior stages through the life course.

Ego integrity: This means coming to accept one’s whole life and reflecting on it in a positive manner. According to Erikson, achieving integrity means fully accepting one’ self and coming to terms with death. Accepting responsibility for one’s life and being able to review the past with satisfaction is essential. The inability to do this leads to despair and the individual will begin to fear death. If a favourable balance is achieved during this stage, then wisdom is developed.

Psychological and personality aspects:

Aging has psychological implications. Next to dying our recognition that we are aging may be one of the most profound shocks we ever receive. Once we pass the invisible line of 65 our years are bench marked for the remainder of the game of life. We are no longer “mature age” we are instead classified as “old”, or “senior citizens”. How we cope with the changes we face and stresses of altered status depends on our basic personality. Here are 3 basic personality types that have been identified. It may be a oversimplification but it makes the point about personality effectively:

a. The autonomous – people who seem to have the resources for self-renewal. They may be dedicated to a goal or idea and committed to continuing productivity. This appears to protect them somewhat even against physiological aging.

b.The adjusted – people who are rigid and lacking in adaptability but are supported by their power, prestige or well structured routine. But if their situation changes drastically they become psychiatric casualties.

c.The anomic. These are people who do not have clear inner values or a protective life vision. Such people have been described as prematurely resigned and they may deteriorate rapidly.

Summary of stresses of old age.

a. Retirement and reduced income. Most people rely on work for self worth, identity and social interaction. Forced retirement can be demoralising.

b. Fear of invalidism and death. The increased probability of falling prey to illness from which there is no recovery is a continual source of anxiety. When one has a heart attack or stroke the stress becomes much worse.

Some persons face death with equanimity, often psychologically supported by a religion or philosophy. Others may welcome death as an end to suffering or insoluble problems and with little concern for life or human existence. Still others face impending death with suffering of great stress against which they have no ego defenses.

c. Isolation and loneliness. Older people face inevitable loss of loved ones, friends and contemporaries. The loss of a spouse whom one has depended on for companionship and moral support is particularly distressing. Children grow up, marry and become preoccupied or move away. Failing memory, visual and aural impairment may all work to make social interaction difficult. And if this then leads to a souring of outlook and rigidity of attitude then social interaction becomes further lessened and the individual may not even utilise the avenues for social activity that are still available.

d. Reduction in sexual function and physical attractiveness. Kinsey et al, in their Sexual behaviour in the human male, (Phil., Saunders, 1948) found that there is a gradual decrease in sexual activity with advancing age and that reasonably gratifying patterns of sexual activity can continue into extreme old age. The aging person also has to adapt to loss of sexual attractiveness in a society which puts extreme emphasis on sexual attractiveness. The adjustment in self image and self concept that are required can be very hard to make.

e. Forces tending to self devaluation. Often the experience of the older generation has little perceived relevance to the problems of the young and the older person becomes deprived of participation in decision making both in occupational and family settings. Many parents are seen as unwanted burdens and their children may secretly wish they would die so they can be free of the burden and experience some financial relief or benefit. Senior citizens may be pushed into the role of being an old person with all this implies in terms of self devaluation.

4 Major Categories of Problems or Needs:

Health.

Housing.

Income maintenance.

Interpersonal relations.

BIOLOGICAL CHANGES

Physiological Changes: Catabolism (the breakdown of protoplasm) overtakes anabolism (the build-up of protoplasm). All body systems are affected and repair systems become slowed. The aging process occurs at different rates in different individuals.

Physical appearance and other changes:

Loss of subcutaneous fat and less elastic skin gives rise to wrinkled appearance, sagging and loss of smoothness of body contours. Joints stiffen and become painful and range of joint movement becomes restricted, general mobility lessened.

Respiratory changes:

Increase of fibrous tissue in chest walls and lungs leads restricts respiratory movement and less oxygen is consumed. Older people more likelyto have lower respiratory infections whereas young people have upper respiratory infections.

Nutritive changes:

Tooth decay and loss of teeth can detract from ease and enjoyment in eating. Atrophy of the taste buds means food is inclined to be tasteless and this should be taken into account by carers. Digestive changes occur from lack of exercise (stimulating intestines) and decrease in digestive juice production. Constipation and indigestion are likely to follow as a result. Financial problems can lead to the elderly eating an excess of cheap carbohydrates rather than the more expensive protein and vegetable foods and this exacerbates the problem, leading to reduced vitamin intake and such problems as anemia and increased susceptibility to infection.

Adaptation to stress:

All of us face stress at all ages. Adaptation to stress requires the consumption of energy. The 3 main phases of stress are:

1. Initial alarm reaction. 2. Resistance. 3. Exhaustion

and if stress continues tissue damage or aging occurs. Older persons have had a lifetime of dealing with stresses. Energy reserves are depleted and the older person succumbs to stress earlier than the younger person. Stress is cumulative over a lifetime. Research results, including experiments with animals suggests that each stress leaves us more vulnerable to the next and that although we might think we’ve “bounced back” 100% in fact each stress leaves it scar. Further, stress is psycho-biological meaning the kind of stress is irrelevant. A physical stress may leave one more vulnerable to psychological stress and vice versa. Rest does not completely restore one after a stressor. Care workers need to be mindful of this and cognizant of the kinds of things that can produce stress for aged persons.

COGNITIVE CHANGE Habitual Behaviour:

Sigmund Freud noted that after the age of 50, treatment of neuroses via psychoanalysis was difficult because the opinions and reactions of older people were relatively fixed and hard to shift.

Over-learned behaviour: This is behaviour that has been learned so well and repeated so often that it has become automatic, like for example typing or running down stairs. Over-learned behaviour is hard to change. If one has lived a long time one is likely to have fixed opinions and ritualised behaviour patterns or habits.

Compulsive behaviour: Habits and attitudes that have been learned in the course of finding ways to overcome frustration and difficulty are very hard to break. Tension reducing habits such as nail biting, incessant humming, smoking or drinking alcohol are especially hard to change at any age and particularly hard for persons who have been practising them over a life time.

The psychology of over-learned and compulsive behaviours has severe implications for older persons who find they have to live in what for them is a new and alien environment with new rules and power relations.

Information acquisition:

Older people have a continual background of neural noise making it more difficult for them to sort out and interpret complex sensory input. In talking to an older person one should turn off the TV, eliminate as many noises and distractions as possible, talk slowly and relate to one message or idea at a time.

Memories from the distant past are stronger than more recent memories. New memories are the first to fade and last to return.

Time patterns also can get mixed – old and new may get mixed.

Intelligence.

Intelligence reaches a peak and can stay high with little deterioration if there is no neurological damage. People who have unusually high intelligence to begin with seem to suffer the least decline. Education and stimulation also seem to play a role in maintaining intelligence.

Intellectual impairment. Two diseases of old age causing cognitive decline are Alzheimer’s syndrome and Pick’s syndrome. In Pick’s syndrome there is inability to concentrate and learn and also affective responses are impaired.

Degenerative Diseases: Slow progressive physical degeneration of cells in the nervous system. Genetics appear to be an important factor. Usually start after age 40 (but can occur as early as 20s).

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE Degeneration of all areas of cortex but particularly frontal and temporal lobes. The affected cells actually die. Early symptoms resemble neurotic disorders: Anxiety, depression, restlessness sleep difficulties.

Progressive deterioration of all intellectual faculties (memory deficiency being the most well known and obvious). Total mass of the brain decreases, ventricles become larger. No established treatment.

PICK’S DISEASE Rare degenerative disease. Similar to Alzheimer’s in terms of onset, symptomatology and possible genetic aetiology. However it affects circumscribed areas of the brain, particularly the frontal areas which leads to a loss of normal affect.

PARKINSON’S DISEASE Neuropathology: Loss of neurons in the basal ganglia.

Symptoms: Movement abnormalities: rhythmical alternating tremor of extremities, eyelids and tongue along with rigidity of the muscles and slowness of movement (akinesia).

It was once thought that Parkinson’s disease was not associated with intellectual deterioration, but it is now known that there is an association between global intellectual impairment and Parkinson’s where it occurs late in life.

The cells lost in Parkinson’s are associated with the neuro-chemical Dopamine and the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s are associated the dopamine deficiency. Treatment involves administration of dopamine precursor L-dopa which can alleviate symptoms including intellectual impairment. Research suggests it may possibly bring to the fore emotional effects in patients who have had psychiatric illness at some prior stage in their lives.

AFFECTIVE DOMAIN In old age our self concept gets its final revision. We make a final assessment of the value of our lives and our balance of success and failures.

How well a person adapts to old age may be predicated by how well the person adapted to earlier significant changes. If the person suffered an emotional crisis each time a significant change was needed then adaptation to the exigencies of old age may also be difficult. Factors such as economic security, geographic location and physical health are important to the adaptive process.

Need Fulfilment: For all of us, according to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs theory, we are not free to pursue the higher needs of self actualisation unless the basic needs are secured. When one considers that many, perhaps most, old people are living in poverty and continually concerned with basic survival needs, they are not likely to be happily satisfying needs related to prestige, achievement and beauty.

Maslow’s Hierarchy

Physiological

Safety

Belonging, love, identification

Esteem: Achievement, prestige, success, self respect

Self actualisation: Expressing one’s interests and talents to the full.

Note: Old people who have secured their basic needs may be motivated to work on tasks of the highest levels in the hierarchy – activities concerned with aesthetics, creativity and altruistic matters, as compensation for loss of sexual attractiveness and athleticism. Aged care workers fixated on getting old people to focus on social activities may only succeed in frustrating and irritating them if their basic survival concerns are not secured to their satisfaction.

DISENGAGEMENT

Social aging according to Cumming, E. and Henry, W. (Growing old: the aging process of disengagement, NY, Basic 1961) follows a well defined pattern:

  1. Change in role. Change in occupation and productivity. Possibly change in attitude to work.
  2. Loss of role, e.g. retirement or death of a husband.
  3. Reduced social interaction. With loss of role social interactions are diminished, eccentric adjustment can further reduce social interaction, damage to self concept, depression.
  4. Awareness of scarcity of remaining time. This produces further curtailment of activity in interest of saving time.

Havighurst, R. et al (in B. Neugarten (ed.) Middle age and aging, U. of Chicago, 1968) and others have suggested that disengagement is not an inevitable process. They believe the needs of the old are essentially the same as in middle age and the activities of middle age should be extended as long as possible. Havighurst points out the decrease in social interaction of the aged is often largely the result of society withdrawing from the individual as much as the reverse. To combat this he believes the individual must vigorously resist the limitations of his social world.

DEATH The fear of the dead amongst tribal societies is well established. Persons who had ministered to the dead were taboo and required observe various rituals including seclusion for varying periods of time. In some societies from South America to Australia it is taboo for certain persons to utter the name of the dead. Widows and widowers are expected to observe rituals in respect for the dead.

Widows in the Highlands of New Guinea around Goroka chop of one of their own fingers. The dead continue their existence as spirits and upsetting them can bring dire consequences.

Wahl, C in “The fear of death”, 1959 noted that the fear of death occurs as early as the 3rd year of life. When a child loses a pet or grandparent fears reside in the unspoken questions: Did I cause it? Will happen to you (parent) soon? Will this happen to me? The child in such situations needs to re-assure that the departure is not a censure, and that the parent is not likely to depart soon. Love, grief, guilt, anger are a mix of conflicting emotions that are experienced.

CONTEMPORARY ATTITUDES TO DEATH

Our culture places high value on youth, beauty, high status occupations, social class and anticipated future activities and achievement. Aging and dying are denied and avoided in this system. The death of each person reminds us of our own mortality.

The death of the elderly is less disturbing to members of Western society because the aged are not especially valued. Surveys have established that nurses for example attach more importance to saving a young life than an old life. In Western society there is a pattern of avoiding dealing with the aged and dying aged patient.

Stages of dying. Elisabeth Kubler Ross has specialised in working with dying patients and in her “On death and dying”, NY, Macmillan, 1969, summarised 5 stages in dying.

  1. Denial and isolation. “No, not me”.
  2. Anger. “I’ve lived a good life so why me?”
  3. Bargaining. Secret deals are struck with God. “If I can live until…I promise to…”
  4. Depression. (In general the greatest psychological problem of the aged is depression). Depression results from real and threatened loss.
  5. Acceptance of the inevitable.

Kubler Ross’s typology as set out above should, I believe be taken with a grain of salt and not slavishly accepted. Celebrated US Journalist David Rieff who was in June ’08 a guest of the Sydney writer’s festival in relation to his book, “Swimming in a sea of death: a son’s memoir” (Melbourne University Press) expressly denied the validity of the Kubler Ross typology in his Late Night Live interview (Australian ABC radio) with Philip Adams June 9th ’08. He said something to the effect that his mother had regarded her impending death as murder. My own experience with dying persons suggests that the human ego is extraordinarily resilient. I recall visiting a dying colleague in hospital just days before his death. He said, “I’m dying, I don’t like it but there’s nothing I can do about it”, and then went on to chortle about how senior academics at an Adelaide university had told him they were submitting his name for a the Order of Australia (the new “Knighthood” replacement in Australia). Falling in and out of lucid thought with an oxygen tube in his nostrils he was nevertheless still highly interested in the “vain glories of the world”. This observation to me seemed consistent with Rieff’s negative assessment of Kubler Ross’s theories.

THE AGED IN RELATION TO YOUNGER PEOPLE

The aged share with the young the same needs: However, the aged often have fewer or weaker resources to meet those needs. Their need for social interaction may be ignored by family and care workers.

Family should make time to visit their aged members and invite them to their homes. The aged like to visit children and relate to them through games and stories.

Meaningful relationships can be developed via foster-grandparent programs. Some aged are not aware of their income and health entitlements. Family and friends should take the time to explain these. Some aged are too proud to access their entitlements and this problem should be addressed in a kindly way where it occurs.

It is best that the aged be allowed as much choice as possible in matters related to living arrangements, social life and lifestyle.

Communities serving the aged need to provide for the aged via such things as lower curbing, and ramps.

Carers need to examine their own attitude to aging and dying. Denial in the carer is detected by the aged person and it can inhibit the aged person from expressing negative feelings – fear, anger. If the person can express these feelings to someone then that person is less likely to die with a sense of isolation and bitterness.

A METAPHYSICAL PERSPECTIVE

The following notes are my interpretation of a Dr. Depak Chopra lecture entitled, “The New Physics of Healing” which he presented to the 13th Scientific Conference of the American Holistic Medical Association. Dr. Depak Chopra is an endocrinologist and a former Chief of Staff of New England Hospital, Massachusetts. I am deliberately omitting the detail of his explanations of the more abstract, ephemeral and controversial ideas.

Original material from 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

In the lecture Dr. Chopra presents a model of the universe and of all organisms as structures of interacting centres of electromagnetic energy linked to each other in such a way that anything affecting one part of a system or structure has ramifications throughout the entire structure. This model becomes an analogue not only for what happens within the structure or organism itself, but between the organism and both its physical and social environments. In other words there is a correlation between psychological conditions, health and the aging process. Dr. Chopra in his lecture reconciles ancient Vedic (Hindu) philosophy with modern psychology and quantum physics.

Premature Precognitive Commitment: Dr. Chopra invokes experiments that have shown that flies kept for a long time in a jar do not quickly leave the jar when the top is taken off. Instead they accept the jar as the limit of their universe. He also points out that in India baby elephants are often kept tethered to a small twig or sapling. In adulthood when the elephant is capable of pulling over a medium sized tree it can still be successfully tethered to a twig! As another example he points to experiments in which fish are bred on

2 sides of a fish tank containing a divider between the 2 sides. When the divider is removed the fish are slow to learn that they can now swim throughout the whole tank but rather stay in the section that they accept as their universe. Other experiments have demonstrated that kittens brought up in an environment of vertical stripes and structures, when released in adulthood keep bumping into anything aligned horizontally as if they were unable to see anything that is horizontal. Conversely kittens brought up in an environment of horizontal stripes when released bump into vertical structures, apparently unable to see them.

The whole point of the above experiments is that they demonstrate Premature Precognitive Commitment. The lesson to be learned is that our sensory apparatus develops as a result of initial experience and how we’ve been taught to interpret it.

What is the real look of the world? It doesn’t exist. The way the world looks to us is determined by the sensory receptors we have and our interpretation of that look is determined by our premature precognitive commitments. Dr Chopra makes the point that less than a billionth of the available stimuli make it into our nervous systems. Most of it is screened, and what gets through to us is whatever we are expecting to find on the basis of our precognitive commitments.

Dr. Chopra also discusses the diseases that are actually caused by mainstream medical interventions, but this material gets too far away from my central intention. Dr. Chopra discusses in lay terms the physics of matter, energy and time by way of establishing the wider context of our existence. He makes the point that our bodies including the bodies of plants are mirrors of cosmic rhythms and exhibit changes correlating even with the tides.

Dr. Chopra cites the experiments of Dr. Herbert Spencer of the US National Institute of Health. He injected mice with Poly-IC, an immuno-stimulant while making the mice repeatedly smell camphor. After the effect of the Poly-IC had worn off he again exposed the mice to the camphor smell. The smell of camphor had the effect of causing the mice’s immune system to automatically strengthen as if they had been injected with the stimulant. He then took another batch of mice and injected them with cyclophosphamide which tends to destroy the immune system while exposing them to the smell of camphor. Later after being returned to normal just the smell of camphor was enough to cause destruction of their immune system. Dr. Chopra points out that whether or not camphor enhanced or destroyed the mice’s immune system was entirely determined by an interpretation of the meaning of the smell of camphor. The interpretation is not just in the brain but in each cell of the organism. We are bound to our imagination and our early experiences.

Chopra cites a study by the Massachusetts Dept of Health Education and Welfare into risk factors for heart disease – family history, cholesterol etc. The 2 most important risk factors were found to be psychological measures – Self  Happiness Rating and Job Satisfaction. They found most people died of heart disease on a Monday!

Chopra says that for every feeling there is a molecule. If you are experiencing tranquillity your body will be producing natural valium. Chemical changes in the brain are reflected by changes in other cells including blood cells. The brain produces neuropeptides and brain structures are chemically tuned to these neuropeptide receptors. Neuropeptides (neurotransmitters) are the chemical concommitants of thought. Chopra points out the white blood cells (a part of the immune system) have neuropeptide receptors and are “eavesdropping” on our thinking. Conversely the immune system produces its own neuropeptides which can influence the nervous system. He goes on to say that cells in all parts of the body including heart and kidneys for example also produce neuropeptides and neuropeptide sensitivity. Chopra assures us that most neurologists would agree that the nervous system and the immune system are parallel systems.

Other studies in physiology: The blood interlukin-2 levels of medical students decreased as exam time neared and their interlukin receptor capacities also lowered. Chopra says if we are having fun to the point of exhilaration our natural interlukin-2 levels become higher. Interlukin-2 is a powerful and very expensive anti-cancer drug. The body is a printout of consciousness. If we could change the way we look at our bodies at a genuine, profound level then our bodies would actually change.

On the subject of “time” Chopra cites Sir Thomas Gall and Steven Hawkins, stating that our description of the universe as having a past, present, and future are constructed entirely out of our interpretation of change. But in reality linear time doesn’t exist.

Chopra explains the work of Alexander Leaf a former Harvard Professor of Preventative Medicine who toured the world investigating societies where people  lived beyond 100 years (these included parts of Afghanistan, Soviet Georgia, Southern Andes). He looked at possible factors including climate, genetics, and diet. Leaf concluded the most important factor was the collective perception of aging in these societies.

Amongst the Tama Humara of the Southern Andes there was a collective belief that the older you got the more physically able you got. They had a tradition of running and the older one became then generally the better at running one got. The best runner was aged 60. Lung capacity and other measures actually improved with age. People were healthy until well into their 100s and died in their sleep. Chopra remarks that things have changed since the introduction of Budweiser (beer) and TV.

[DISCUSSION: How might TV be a factor in changing the former ideal state of things?]

Chopra refers to Dr. Ellen Langor a former Harvard Psychology professor’s work. Langor advertised for 100 volunteers aged over 70 years. She took them to a Monastery outside Boston to play “Let’s Pretend”. They were divided into 2 groups each of which resided in a different part of the building. One group, the control group spent several days talking about the 1950s. The other group, the experimental group had to live as if in the year 1959 and talk about it in the present tense. What appeared on their TV screens were the old newscasts and movies. They read old newspapers and magazines of the period. After 3 days everyone was photographed and the photographs judged by independent judges who knew nothing of the nature of the experiment. The experimental group seemed to have gotten younger in appearance. Langor then arranged for them to be tested for 100 physiological parameters of aging which included of course blood pressure, near point vision and DHEA levels. After 10 days of living as if in 1959 all parameters had reversed by the equivalent of at least 20 years.

Chopra concludes from Langor’s experiment: “We are the metabolic end product of our sensory experiences. How we interpret them depends on the collective mindset which influences individual biological entropy and aging.”

Can one escape the current collective mindset and reap the benefits in longevity and health? Langor says, society won’t let you escape. There are too many reminders of how most people think linear time is and how it expresses itself in entropy and aging – men are naughty at 40 and on social welfare at 55, women reach menopause at 40 etc. We get to see so many other people aging and dying that it sets the pattern that we follow.

Chopra concludes we are the metabolic product of our sensory experience and our interpretation gets structured in our biology itself. Real change comes from change in the collective consciousness – otherwise it cannot occur within the individual.

Readings

Chopra, D. The New Physics of Healing. 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

Coleman, J. C. Abnormal psychology and modern life. Scott Foresman & Co.

Lugo, J. and Hershey, L. Human development a multidisciplinary approach to the psychology of individual growth, NY, Macmillan.

Dennis. Psychology of human behaviour for nurses. Lond. W. B.Saunders.

[http://www.psychologynatural.com/DepressionBroch.html]

Dr. Victor Barnes is an Adelaide psychologist and hypnotherapist. He has also had three decades of experience in adult education including serving as Dean of a Sri Lankan college (ICBT) teaching several Australian degrees. His overseas experience includes studies and consulting experience in USA, PNG, Poland and Sri Lanka.

ALZHEIMER’S SET TO MOVE FROM THE MOST DAUNTING GLOBAL HEALTH CRISIS TO THE 21ST CENTURY’S FISCAL NIGHTMARE

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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ALZHEIMER’S SET TO MOVE FROM THE MOST DAUNTING GLOBAL HEALTH CRISIS TO THE 21ST CENTURY’S FISCAL NIGHTMARE

OECD and the Global Coalition on Aging Convene at Harris Manchester College, Oxford University to Shape New Approaches for Solutions

Oxford, UK (26 June 2013) – The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Harris Manchester College, Oxford University and Global Coalition on Aging (GCOA) concluded on Friday 21 June, an “Expert Consultation on Unlocking Global Collaboration to Accelerate Innovation for Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia.”  Aimed at providing input to the OECD action agenda for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, the Consultation brought together the highest level of global experts across health, economics, public policy, business, biotechnology and beyond.

Its timing is aligned with UK Prime Minister David Cameron’s recent recognition that dementia is fast becoming the biggest pressure on care systems around the world.  “That’s why we’re using our G8 to bring together health ministers, clinical researchers and healthcare companies,” he said.  “If the brightest minds are working together on this then we’ve got a greater chance of improving treatments and finding scientific breakthroughs.  I’ve said before that we need an all-out fight-back against dementia that cuts across society. Now we need to cut across borders and spearhead an international approach that could really make a difference.”

The objectives of the Consultation included:

  • Providing a space for country experts, policy makers, and scientific, medical and academic experts to share views on the main scientific, technological and policy challenges Alzheimer’s and dementia raise in the context of creating a pathway for aging populations to be sources of economic growth in the 21st century; and
  • Creating an opportunity for multidisciplinary exchange on a collective action plan that maps the way forward.

“The impact of Alzheimer’s and dementia on individuals, families, health systems and national economies as populations age will become truly crippling, and no one nation or research organization can solve this global epidemic alone.” said Michael Hodin, Executive Director of GCOA.  “It requires global understanding, sharing and collaboration, and this Consultation was a critical step in our ongoing fight against Alzheimer’s – a fight we must win if we are truly to unlock our aging populations as new sources of economic growth.”

Alzheimer’s afflicts one in eight over 65 and one-half of all those over 85, and the economic, social and personal costs will only increase with age-related demographic change.  In 2010, the global cost of Alzheimer’s and dementias equalled 1 percent of global gross domestic product (GDP), or $604 billion.  The prevalence and cost, combined with the stigma, which prevents recognition of symptoms and subsequent treatments, signal an urgent call to action.

“Traditional strategies around healthcare services and investments in research are not enough to address the growing worldwide onslaught of Alzheimer’s and dementias,” said Marc Wortmann, Executive Director of Alzheimer’s Disease International.

“The global scale of the pending healthcare-economic crisis mandates a bold forward looking action plan to harmonize a multi-nation attack on the problem,” noted  Zaven Khachaturian, recognized at the meeting as the ‘Chief Architect’ of Alzheimer & Brain Aging research in the United States, now the President of the Campaign to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease by 2020. He indicated the urgent need for a “multinational strategic goal for reducing the prevalence of Alzheimer’s and other chronic brain disorders by 50 percent within a decade” – thus urging the OECD to “identify the framework conditions to accelerate multi-national collaborative R & D.”

George Vradenburg, Chairman of USAgainstAlzheimer’s and convener of the Global CEO Initiative on Alzheimer’s, called for new attention, resources, commitment and collaboration to defeat Alzheimer’s disease. In his keynote speech, coined “The Oxford Accord,” he called for G8 leadership equivalent to the G8 Summit that created the HIV/AIDS Global Fund.

Consultation experts presented their views for proactive public policy and an OECD role in supporting actions to : promote broad-based partnerships; identify incentives, frameworks and infrastructures for enhanced international data sharing; leverage big data as strategies to advance our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease, improve care, promote global exchange of good practice and move toward cure and even prevention.

The Consultation was borne out of the September 2012 OECD workshop, “Anticipating the Special Needs of the 21st Century Silver Economy: From Smart Technologies to Services Innovation,” co-hosted by the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, OECD and Waseda University, with the support of the Japanese government.  The workshop concluded that innovation was needed to meet the challenges and opportunities of global demographic change and mitigate the health, social and economic impacts of aging.

The Consultation was held on 20-21 June, 2013 at The Harris Manchester College (HMC), Oxford University in collaboration with the OECD.

For more information see OECD’s website: oe.cd/innovating-against-alzheimers.

ABOUT THE GLOBAL COALITION ON AGING

The Global Coalition on Aging (GCOA) aims to reshape how global leaders approach and prepare for the 21st century’s profound shift in population aging. GCOA uniquely brings together global corporations across industry sectors with common strategic interests in aging populations, a comprehensive and systemic understanding of aging, and an optimistic view of its impact. Through research, public policy analysis, advocacy and communication, GCOA is advancing innovative solutions and working to ensure global aging is a path for fiscally sustainable economic growth, social value creation and wealth enhancement. For more information, visitwww.globalcoalitiononaging.com.

Senior Citizen Medical Alert Systems and Fall Detectors by Angelo Losavio

July 1, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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If you are looking for a medical alert system to protect an elderly loved one, be sure to do your homework.  There are a lot of companies out there that offer personal emergency response systems with a number of features and benefits that are very useful and others with serious limitations.  For example medical alert phones may be a practical solution for your elderly loved one if they are comfortable with the technology and you believe that they are not in a great risk of falling in becoming incapacitated. A medical alert phone is more or less a wireless phone that you can program with an auto dial feature.  It allows the user to carry the telephone around and be able to present auto dial button and be connected with friends, relatives or emergency response professionals but it does require them to be able to access the telephone, operate the telephone and communicate with the person that they’re calling.

The trouble with these medical alert phones is that in the event of a sudden illness, fainting or slip and fall the elderly user may not be able to find, use or even remember that they have the phone.  On the plus side, these systems are cheaper than medical monitoring systems as there is no monthly monitoring service to pay for.  By getting your senior citizen a reliable mobile phone and preprogramming personal contact numbers into autodial you pretty much accomplish the same effect. We’re not knocking these phones we just want to point out that while they give the user access to a telephone service remotely the system is only as strong as its weakest link.

When an elderly person falls chances are they are going to be disoriented.  If they are too confused to find and operate a remote medical alert phones they will not be able to use this system to summon help.

A more practical solution is a medical alert system that can be activated using a pushbutton that is worn around the neck as a pendant or on the wrist like a watch. These medical alarm systems will allow your parent to maintain an independent lifestyle because you’ll have the peace of mind of knowing that they can get help simply by pushing a button.

A typical medical alert system has a transmitter which is worn by the user and receiver located somewhere in the house.  The range on these devices generally will cover the interior of an average home but they will not provide any protection once you go outside their radio range. Some systems will alert the monitoring station when the signal is lost in the call will be placed to the home to determine if everything is all right.

The basic system operates under the scenario that the elderly person falls and is unable to get up to reach a phone to call for help. By pushing the panic button on the pendant or wristwatch transmitter a coal box is activated in the house which connects the caller to the monitoring station. The monitoring agent speaks with the user to determine how to best help remedy the situation. If the user is coherent and able to give instructions to the monitoring station those instructions will typically be followed. If the caller can’t be reached or understood, the monitoring station will then follow a predetermined emergency call protocol which may include calling 911 responders, relatives, friends and next-door neighbors.

The worst-case scenario is that an elderly person falls and becomes unconscious, or they suffer a stroke. In this state they are unable to push a panic button. That’s where an auto fall detector can be the difference between life and death.  A senior monitoring system with a fall-alert feature should, in theory, create an alarm at the monitoring station which will prompt an operator to contact the user to see if everything is all right.

Other more elaborate monitoring systems can actually provide richer detail and true fault detection. Sometimes when people fall they don’t fold face down and make a loud thump on the ground.  Sometimes they simply slumped down slowly to the floor or chair.  Most fall detection systems are only activated if the device is violently jarred. A more subtle and advanced system will be able to detect the positioning and inactivity as well as changes in body functions to alert the monitoring station.

These more advanced monitoring systems that are able to monitor heart rate, skin temperature and mobility are slightly more expensive but offer much more protection. The downside is that the device that monitors bodily functions must be worn around the chest and some users may find this too invasive.

There are no simple solutions to providing total safety to a senior citizen living at home.  All medical monitoring and emergency response systems for aging people have their pluses and minuses.  A system that may be right for your grandmother may not work for your grandfather. It’s important that you study the features and benefits of all the top brands to decide which features you can live with and which ones are not worth paying for.

If you’ve had personal experience with a monitoring service that you’d like to recommend or suggest that we take a critical look at please get in touch by leaving a comment below.

Lifestation – Senior Monitoring Service

myHalo – Medical Monitoring – True Fall Detection and Medical Monitor

VRI Medical Alert Systems

Freedom Alert – Medical Alert Phone

Wellcore Personal Emergency Response

Philips Lifeline with AutoAlert

Brickhouse Alert Fall Detection Device

Response Link Medical Alert

Life Guardian Medical Alarm System

Connect America Medical Alert

Find support and discover how you can give your elderly loved one the care they deserve – without burning out or going broke – by visiting ElderKind.com. This site will help make caring for that special senior citizen less stressful. Get fast, free and easy access to elder care resources at ElderKind.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Angelo_Losavio

 

A Guide to Medications For Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

June 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Although modern medicines have many benefits for senior citizens in treatment of age-related disease, caution needs to be taken when using a combination of medicines. Medicine or “drugs” can refer to any substance you get with a prescription, any oral or topical substance used for pain relief, and dietary supplements. Any substance that has the potential to interact with other substances in the body can be considered in this category. To prevent mixing medicinal substances together that could be harmful, always let your doctor know what medications you take in addition to those prescribed. Senior citizens should keep a list of medications and doses that they take and bring it to every doctor’s appointment.

It is very important to practice safe habits with medication as many drugs can be lethal is taken in the wrong way. Senior citizens should use the following tips to ensure safe use of medication. Companions or caregivers should use these tips to help facilitate and encourage proper medication use.

Tips for when you are Prescribed Medications

When a doctor prescribes a new medication for specified symptoms, remember the following tips for how to proceed afterward:

 

  • Tell your doctor about all other medications you currently take,
  • Remind primary care physicians about allergies that you have or side effects that you experience from other types of medications.
  • Be sure that you understand exactly how all of your medications work and how to properly take them.

 

Here are some helpful questions to get this information:

 

  • What is the name of the medication?
  • Why am I taking it?
  • How many times a day should I take it?
  • Should I take this medication before, during, or after meals?
  • What does “as needed” mean?
  • When should I stop taking the medication?
  • If I forget to take the medication, what should I do?
  • What side effects can I expect?

 

You can also ask your pharmacist these questions and others to get more information about your medication. By having all of your medications filled at the same pharmacy, the pharmacy may be able to predict harmful interactions if all of your medications are kept on file. When getting a prescription filled at the pharmacy, keep these tips in mind:

 

  • Be sure that you can read and understand all directions and writing materials that accompany prescribed medication.
  • Check that you can open the container the medicine is in.
  • Let your pharmacist know if you have difficulty swallowing pills, so that you can get a liquid variety if available – Do not crush or chew medication meant to be swallowed.
  • Ask about the best way to store the medication.
  • Be sure that the label of the medication indicates that it is the correct medication you were prescribed and displays your name.

Tips for Taking Medications 

After filling a prescription for a medication that you received from your doctor, you should be sure that you follow directions for taking that medication. Here are some tips for safely taking a combination of medications:

 

  • Have a list of medications; include the doctor who prescribed it, the name of the medication, the reason you take it, and the directions for use.
  • Read and save all written information that comes with prescribed medication
  • Take your medication exactly in the way that it is meant to be taken.
  • Let your doctor know immediately if you experience any unexpected side effects from the medication.
  • Use charts, calendars, or weekly pillboxes to help you remember which medications to take on a daily basis.
  • Make sure companions or caregivers know when and how you are supposed to take your medication so that they can remind you.
  • Do not skip medication – if you have trouble affording medication, research programs that can aid in funding for needed medications. Medicare, a government program for senior citizens, may be a good place to start.
  • Avoid mixing alcohol and medication – alcohol can cause medications to not work correctly.
  • Take medication until it is finished or your doctor instructs you to stop.
  • Do not take medication prescribed to others.
  • Do not take medication in the dark to avoid making a mistake.
  • Check expiration dates on your pill bottles in case a medication should be replaced.
  • Do not leave your medication in the open where children or pets could get to them.

 

The Caring Space
http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space
We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

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Starting a Home Based Business – A Consideration For Senior Citizen Retirees by Jed Tooke

June 21, 2013 by · Comments Off on Starting a Home Based Business – A Consideration For Senior Citizen Retirees by Jed Tooke
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Who needs to consider starting a home based business? The answer is YOU and the overwhelming majority of people, due to the Recession. However, in particular and one of the most vulnerable to the affects of the Recession are senior citizen retirees.

Many individuals from age 55 and above who are retired and receiving Social Security or a company pension may have to come out of retirement and find a job. Retired senior citizens face a huge challenge when competing for jobs against those who are younger. Retirees do not want to cut back their lifestyle at this stage of the game.

Recently, a study done by Charles Schwab & Co. estimates that a large number of senior citizen retirees in the United States are considering returning to the workforce on at least a part-time basis.

What Can Senior Citizens do about it?

Since older job seekers, especially those who have been out of the workforce in the recent past will have a difficult time competing. The best option is to start a home business on the Internet.

They need to prepare themselves with the necessary information and skills needed to accept the challenge of starting a business on the Internet. If some retirees already have the needed technical skills and resources they are good to go.

For those who do not, I encourage you to first purchase a state-of-the-art computer and learn basic computer and Internet skills. That can be done by way of the thousands of free online tutorials. You will most likely need a mentor, friend or some other person to guide you from beginning to end. Do not let the idea of training and learning something new cause you to give up. Also, neither age nor gender is a factor in this industry; it is open to everyone.

In addition to those resources, you will need be self-disciplined and self-motivated to get started with building a home business and ultimately become financially secure. If doing it on a part-time basis is sufficient to supplement your income, all well and good. However, you should know that there is no limit on the amount of income you can generate, either part-time or full-time.

Also, for those who think you can simply join a home business opportunity, promote it for a couple of weeks and expect to get rich, is not reality. Dismiss that idea and do it the right way. If you join a legitimate home business opportunity, you will be on the road to starting a home based business and ultimately, financial freedom.

Learn the real truth about starting a home based business [http://homebasedbusinessteam.com/03/starting-a-home-based-business-4/] working with a team. Discover how working with a team in building a business for you that yields residual income which means independence and financial freedom.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jed_Tooke

Memory Loss in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

June 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Many senior citizens experience some form of memory loss. Still, there are differences between mild forgetfulness and more serious memory problems. And, it is important that senior citizens and those involved in their elder care address problems with memory, as it may be a sign of a more serious condition.

Mild Forgetfulness

As we age, we lose some of the sharpness of memory we had when we were younger. We may notice that it takes longer to recall facts or information, learn new things, or find or identify familiar objects. In general, these are all signs of mild forgetfulness rather than a more serious medical problem. If you are becoming worried about your memory, schedule an appointment with your doctor to rule out larger problems. Many activities can sharpen your mind and memory, such as picking up a new hobby, visiting friends, eating well, and exercising.

Some more tips for helping your memory are listed below:

 

  • Learn a new skill.
  • Volunteer in a local school, hospital, place of worship, or somewhere else in your community.
  • Spend a lot of time with loved ones.
  • Make use of memory tools such as large calendars, agendas, and notes to yourself.
  • Make an effort to put your wallet, purse, keys, or glasses in the same place each time you set them down.
  • Get ample rest.
  • Exercise and eat a healthy diet.
  • Avoid drinking a lot of alcohol.
  • Seek help if you feel depressed for an extended period of time (more than two weeks).

 

You can also make use of the following:

 

  • Large calendars
  • Agendas for each day
  • Notes about safety in the home
  • Directions for using common items around the house

Serious Memory Problems 

More serious memory problems disrupt your ability to carry on normal activities like driving, shopping, or handling money. Some signs of a serious memory problem include:

 

  • Repeating the same questions over and over.
  • Getting lost in a usually familiar place.
  • Being unable to follow directions.
  • Experiencing confusion about time, people, or places.
  • Taking poor care of yourself (eating poorly, forgetting to bathe, or engaging in unsafe actions or activities).

Causes of Serious Memory Problems 

Medical conditions. Certain medical conditions can lead to serious memory problems that should disappear after treatment. Some things that can cause memory problems are bad reactions to certain medications, depression, dehydration (insufficient amount of fluids in the body), poor diet (insufficient vitamins and minerals), minor head injuries, and thyroid problems. These are all serious medical conditions that should be handled by a physician.

Emotional problems. When senior citizens have certain emotional problems, serious memory problems may develop. Sadness, loneliness, worrying, or boredom can cause confusion and forgetfulness. An active lifestyle, visiting with loved ones, and learning new skills can be helpful, but it may be necessary to seek the help of a doctor or counselor for treatment. If this is the case, getting proper help should minimize memory problems.

Alzheimer’s disease. This disease also causes problems with memory. It begins slowly, but the symptoms get progressively worse as the brain changes. Although it may appear to be mild memory loss at first, people with Alzheimer’s get to a point at which it’s difficult to think clearly. Everyday activities like shopping, driving, cooking, and carrying on a conversation become complicatedTaking medication during the early or middle stages of Alzheimer’s disease can delay memory loss and can be of great help if you have trouble sleeping or are worried or depressed.

Multi-infarct dementia. This is another disease that causes memory problems, where symptoms often appear abruptly. Memory loss and confusion associated with this disease come about through small strokes or short periods of decreased blood flow to the brain. Preventing additional strokes can maintain or improve memory after a stroke, but having more strokes generally leads to more memory loss. To prevent strokes and multi-infarct dementia, maintaining a healthy blood pressure is key.

Diagnosing Serious Memory Problems

As with all health concerns, if you have cause to worry about your memory, you should see your doctor. Be prepared to have a complete checkup if your doctor thinks it is necessary. This checkup may include tests to check memory, problem solving, counting, and language skills, and your doctor may need to take a CAT scan of your brain. A CAT scan is helpful because it shows normal and problem areas in the brain and can help to identify a problem. When your doctor comes to a conclusion as to what is causing your memory problems and makes a diagnosis, ask which treatment options are best for you.

Support

Friends and family members can provide support to help you cope with memory loss. They can help you exercise, visit friends, and continue daily routines and activities. They can also remind you of the time, your location, and what is going on around you.

If memory problems progress to the point that you have difficulty taking care of yourself, in home care for senior citizens can be helpful. Home health care aides can assist with personal care, meal preparation, and health management. And they provide services according to your need, from a few hours a week to 24-hours a day.

The Caring Space
http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

 

Memory Techniques For Senior Citizens – Secrets to a Lasting Memory! by Carson Hill

June 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The mind is very capable of growing and generating beyond what we give it credit for! Senior citizens can greatly reduce their brains lack of focus by taking time for small brain stimulation sessions each day.

I recommend starting your brain exercise five minutes a day, Monday through Friday and gradually working up to a fifteen minutes a day session. The objective of the brain sessions is to only focus on the minds growth by stretching it beyond it’s normal though capacity.

Brain techniques can consist of anything that stimulates the mind beyond it’s normal thinking capacity. A great place to start is number memorization. The great thing about number memorization techniques is that it is simple and very easy to chart progress. It is also optimal for brain stimulation since numbers are not fairly plain and not distracting. When doing brain stimulation, you do not want to be in the creative, visual mode.

List about three to five numbers on a piece of paper. Now turn the paper over and see if you can remember what numbers you just wrote. Use thicker paper so you can not see the other side. Now add an additional digit until your brain is really having to stretch to remember them all. This is were the benefit results!

Do this for about fifteen minutes a day, five days a week and you will begin to notice additional focus ability and memory strength. These two assets go hand in hand!

You may incorporate other exercises as long as they do not distract you. keep the goal of your exercises mind resistance and not increased intelligence. Work your mind out just like you would a muscle.

Now that you understand the basic principle behind memory technique with an exercise method available, you can start to schedule five minutes of your day aside for this alone. You will be amazed how much this small exercise can help your ability to focus and remember.

If you liked this information you may locate more details at http://www.regrowmybrain.info You can also visit: http://www.squidoo.com/memory-fitness-for-senior-citizens

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Creating a Senior Citizen-Friendly Environment by Warren Comer

June 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Now, more than ever, elderly adults opt to stay in the comforts of their homes instead of living in a nursing facility. That is why an increasing number of home owners are beginning to adjust the environments of their houses in order to make it more senior citizen-friendly. This can be a task that would require a great amount of effort, and just like any endeavor that you’d like to accomplish successfully, it requires a lot of efficient planning.

If you’re a concerned relative who wants only what’s best for your elderly member, there are two general tips that you should remember. (Note that every senior experiences a unique condition from the rest and it would be wrong to generalize their particular needs.):

1) As I have mentioned: plan. Though you’d want to take action as soon as possible in order to shorten your loved one’s discomfort, it will be impractical to simply throw in one idea over another without properly considering the most efficient way of doing them.

Planning includes checking every part of your home and making a list from the simple things that may need adjustments to things that you think you may install to make the house more convenient. Some details that you’d want to consider are the width of your door frames — especially if your senior uses a device such as a wheelchair or a walker, the floor — make sure that the surface is not at all slippery and is clear of clutter, and the availability of space in the house — ensure that there is enough of it to allow the senior to move about without bumping on furniture or appliances.

Finally when you’ve made your list, you can proceed to the organizing part. Evaluate your list and see which items go with each other or in which areas of the house should each adjustment be applied. The evaluation will also allow you to realize if you’ve missed some important issues. For instance, in choosing the best materials or brands to utilize and considering your financial needs, you may realize that you need to determine further which ones are affordable for the time being and if you’re going to need to apply for a loan.

A great plan leads to great implementation. When you’ve finally come up with a well thought out plan, made a list of all the adjustments and materials needed, and specialists you may consult, you can finally proceed to putting this plan into effect. Remember that if you keep the well-being of the elderly in your heart, for the entirety of this project, you’ll be able to successfully pull it through.

In performing these tasks, make sure that every adjustment is favorable to your senior. Allow him/her to tag along if you’re going shopping for recliner chairs or walkers and make them try various models and sizes so they could choose which ones are best for them. It is also important to allow them to familiarize with the adjustments you’ve made so they’d be aware of the changes and quickly adapt to them.

Family First HomeCare is the perfect solution for seniors and others in need in New Jersey who are not ready to leave their home for an institutional setting, but because of illness or chronic conditions need support to remain at home. We improve your life by providing compassionate, one-on-one care in the comfort of your own home. Find out more about senior care services in New Jersey.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Warren_Comer

 

Senior Citizens Vs Crime by Victor C Swindell

June 13, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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What can we say about Senior Citizens?

  • They are Old!
  • They are Slow!
  • They have money!
  • They have nice expensive stuff!
  • They make easy targets to rob and beat up.
  • And almost no one seems to care.

 

Lately, you many have seen various news stories where senior citizens were a target of crime. In one of the latest stories in 2012 a WWII veteran was attacked, beaten, and car-jacked during daylight at a busy Detroit gas station and he had to crawl across a concrete parking lot to get help. If this wasn’t tragic enough there were lots of people who walked and drove pass him during this ordeal. What a shame! If you have seen the TV Show WHAT WOULD YOU DO, you know that we have a society of people who choose not to get involved, or treat a crime in progress like watching a reality television show. Some would say that this is a sign of the modern times, but it has happened before. During the same war in which this soldier fought a government decided to lie, round-up and exterminate some of its citizens, while other citizens turned a blind eye and did nothing. So history would prove that, many citizen chose not to get involved. We all hope that when we are in danger that others would come to assist us. Don’t necessarily count on it. The first line of defense in your life is YOU.

7 Things Senior Citizens Can Do

  1. Have a crime preventions specialist or local police give your residence a home security survey. They can tell you of things you can do to decrease you chances of being targeted.
  1. If you are returning home, look around of suspicious-looking strangers, have your key ready. If someone is home, alert them that you are coming home and to keep watch out for you. Don’t linger at the door. If you see someone near your house, go to your neighbor’s house and pretend to be a visitor, and it would be a good time to call the police.
  1. Establish a light up and lock-up routine to make sure all your doors and windows are locked. Be sure to close your drapes and pull down shades when you are retiring for the night.
  1. Jesus sent his disciples out two-by-two. This is an example you should adopt if possible. Whenever you need to go shopping or on an excursion that take you away from home, try to take a friend or relative with you.
  1. Try to vary your routines, you don’t know who is watching you and trying to figure when you are not going to be home.
  1. When parking, Try to park as close to your destination. Younger people should park a little further out to save spaces for elderly people.
  1. Be mindful of strangers, not all of them are really trying to help you- TRUST YOUR GUT!

 

Victor Swindell is a freelance writer of informational blogs on self defense and security countermeasures. PepperEyes.com is dedicated to providing you with the best and most affordable personal protection products on the market to meet your security needs. We believe that in today’s society being equipped mentally and physically is no longer an option.

visit http://www.peppereyes.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Victor_C_Swindell

 

Mobile Phones For Senior Citizens by Kathie R. Dionisio

June 13, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many of the old people I know are fixed in their ways and they have the idea that they’re not up to using new technology. However, a cell phone in the hands of a senior citizen can be a life-saver. It’s pretty useless having a land line if you’re face down in the back yard after falling down.

They have these little devices that senior citizens can wear around their necks, but all they do is summon emergency services and the monthly cost is way higher than the cost of a cell phone. It’s mostly the older generation that keep their land lines anyway, so if you know a senior citizen that may be at risk, try to persuade them to get a cell phone instead, the cost may even be less.

Most senior citizens won’t want to text their BFFs in the assisted living facility so a simple cell phone will be the answer. Most of us have old cell phones somewhere in the house and giving an old cell phone to an old person is a thoughtful way to recycle them. In some areas there are charities where you can drop off your unwanted phone and they are distributed to older folks who may be in poor health or live alone. It’s even a good way to get rid of the charger too, because many cell phone recycling places don’t want the old cases, car or wall chargers.

If the old person can get into the habit of carrying a cell phone in their pocket all the time then help will always be at hand for them. You may have to sit down and show them how to use it including how to plug it up and recharge it, but if you can impress on them how helpful it will be in case they have a problem, then they might listen. Call every day to make sure they’re carrying it.

Many seniors unfortunately suffer from Alzheimer’s or senile dementia and hundreds of them wander off and get lost every year. If you have an elderly friend or relative, you could add a GPS tracking system to their phone, hopefully they will remember to take the phone with them before they go wandering off.

Even if it saves just a few from getting into serious problems it’s a good idea. Chances are they won’t use it much anyway, so a pay-as-you-go plan that costs only $10 a month may be sufficient to keep them safe and give you peace of mind if you can’t visit as often as you like.

Find out more about mobile recycling and recycle iPhone 4 16GB options.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kathie_R._Dionisio

Tips For Senior Citizens To Live Safer And Longer In Their Own Homes by Jamie McAdams

June 13, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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As people age, they are more prone to injuries occurring in their home. Common injuries that affect senior citizens are falls that occur in the home. In addition, medical emergencies often occur while a person is at home, and can be life threatening especially if immediate medical attention is not taken. Relying on other individuals being around to call for emergency services is a risky proposition, as for example if a fall happens in the shower it may take hours for someone to realize what has happened. Every minute is vital during injuries and medical emergencies.

While falls are a common cause of injury, there are several steps one can take to help prevent falling in the first place. These fall prevention tips include staying fit and active, wearing sensible shoes, removing tripping hazards from the walkways in the home, and ensuring walkways in the home have ample lighting. In addition, ensuring that stairways have hand rails, steps have non-slip treads, toilets are at the appropriate height, and grab bars are in the shower and tub helps to prevent falls.

In addition to the fall prevention tips listed above, it may be important to consider other ways of improving safety at home. To offset the dangers of living or being at home alone as one ages, a home medical alert system could be considered as an important component of living safely and independently at home.

A medical alert system is simply a system that enables a person to push a button, typically waterproof and worn somewhere on the body, which causes the medical alert company to respond typically within 20 seconds. The company is able to provide assistance over the phone, contact friends and relatives, and notify emergency services personnel if required.

Medical alert systems are appropriate for people who live alone, who are 65 years of age or older, have fallen in the past 3 years, who are worried about falling in the shower, and who have any health issues which could potentially require use of an ambulance. A medical alert system can provide peace of mind for seniors and their families, and can help keep seniors living in their own home independently.

Visit [http://www.MedAlertSystems.us] for more information on medical alert systems.

Jamie McAdams has worked in home health care and has worked with senior citizens in-home.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jamie_McAdams

Informative Information for Female Senior Citizens and Purse Snatching by Lawanna Bean

June 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Female Senior Citizens and Purse Snatching

I have read several articles recently about older women having their purses snatched. I am a 70 year old female senior citizen and realize that women who are older are perfect victims for purse snatchers. Mainly, because they are not able to defend themselves as well as a younger, more alert and strong person. Being a female senior citizen, this concerns me personally.

Did you know that statistics are that the majority of purse snatchers are young men under the age of 18? They are quicker, stronger and more alert, so an older woman would be a prime target for them.

By the way, if you try to hold on to your purse or resist in any way, there is always the possibility that you could fall and break a hip. Older people don’t have the balance they once did when they were younger. And for some reason, we tend to fall differently. When we are younger we are able to think quick enough to try and brace our fall. But as we get older, we don’t always think to do that, therefore we are more prone to broken bones.

There are a lot of challenges being a senior citizen. Just to name a few:

 

  • Balance,
  • Difficulty hearing
  • Impaired vision
  • Forgetfulness
  • Our side peripheral vision is not as good as it once was

 

Personally, I have to admit carrying a purse is just one more thing to keep up with when I’m out and about. And now we have to remember to have our cell phones with us at all times as well as our keys and our and purses. It’s just too much! So it’s very important to eliminate as many opportunities of having your purse snatched as possible.

Scenarios for Purse Snatchers:

 

  • It’s not a good idea to go shopping alone. If possible, go with a friend.
  • I know better, but I have been guilty of walking a few feet away from the grocery cart at the grocery store with my purse in it. NOT a good idea. Never leave your purse open or unattended.
  • Waiting for a bus at a bus stop.
  • Areas that are not well lit at night.

 

Common Sense Ideas:

If it’s at all possible, leave your purse at home. Put the credit card and/or checkbook in your pants or jacket pocket. That way, the opportunity is eliminated entirely. For some reason, we tend to think that we have to have all of our credit cards, checkbooks, etc with us at all times.

 

  • A good investment would be a Fanny or Belt Pack. Granted they certainly aren’t very pretty, and you can’t carry very much in them. But they have the advantage of fitting snugly around your waist and are easily accessible when you need them. You can even wear them under your shirt or jacket. They have just enough room for a little cash, a credit card and your driver’s license, all the things that are necessary for a shopping trip.
  • And for goodness sake, don’t be guilty of putting your name or address on your keys. Then you not only have lost your purse, but you have the added worry of knowing the person now knows where you live.
  • One idea that works for me, if I think of it, is to put my purse at the bottom of the grocery cart before I start shopping. That way, someone would have to literally empty my cart to get to my purse.

 

Carry a Purse if You Must

Some of us old timers think a purse is a necessity. So if you really have to take a purse with you only carry whatever is absolutely necessary. Leave all unnecessary valuable items at home.

If you do carry a credit card, it’s a good idea to make a copy of the number and phone number so you can call and report it as lost or stolen.

Ways to Protect Yourself

 

  • For under $10.00, you can have a small container of Pepper Spray or Mace. Pepper spray often has a quick release key chain that allows you to separate your keys from the pepper spray container. It sprays up to 10 feet and will temporarily blind your attacker.
  • There are inexpensive personal alarms that can be put on your key chain. If you are in harm’s way, just a touch of a button will send off a high decibel crisis alarm and send the perpetrator packing!
  • There is an alarm that fits around your wrist and also attaches to your purse. If someone tries to grab your purse, the pull of the purse will set off an alarm immediately. In most cases, the person will drop the purse and run for their life.

 

Remember, when you carry a purse, it’s always in plain sight. That, in itself gives the purse snatcher a golden opportunity to just grab it and run. Always take precautions and protect yourself!

Don’t be a Victim!

Lawanna Bean is passionate about marketing products that will help people stay safe. The products she found are top quality and competitively priced. Most of us can’t afford an expensive home security system, but that’s no reason we can’t be protected. A canister of mace or Pepper Spray costs under $10.00. Personal safety for you and your family should be your No. 1 priority!

Be sure and visit her website, http://www.peppersprayetcstore.com. Get informed and take action today!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lawanna_Bean

 

Medicare and Medicaid For Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

June 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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There are two main programs administered by the government that offer benefits to senior citizens – Medicare and Medicaid.  Medicare is available for all senior citizens age 65 or older.  Those under age 65 with certain disabilities may also be eligible for Medicare.  If you are not a U.S. citizen, you must have entered the U.S. lawfully at least five years prior to receiving Medicare benefits. Medicaid is for people with limited income.

Medicare has two parts. Part A is the hospital insurance and Part B is the medical insurance.

Medicare Part A can pay for home health care if the patient meets certain requirements.  Part A is set up mainly to pay for care in a hospital or skilled nursing facility, or by hospice.  Depending on the amount of Medicare taxes paid by the patient and their spouse over their lifetimes, they may not have to pay a monthly fee for Medicare Part A.  Otherwise, the patient may have to enroll and pay a premium.

Medicare Part B is the medical portion which helps pay for medically-necessary doctors’ services and other patient care.  Part B can also pay for some preventative services (like flu shots) or some services to keep certain illnesses from getting worse.  The standard monthly premium for Medicare Part B was $96.40 in 2008.

You have two main options in how you get your Medicare coverage.  

You can choose traditional Medicare coverage, which is managed by the Federal government.  This plan provides Medicare Part A and Part B coverage.  The recipient can choose to have either Part A or Part B or both.  There is a mandatory deductible, and usually coinsurance charges for each time one gets service. A Medicare supplemental insurance policy known as “Medigap,” can also be purchased. This helps pay for some of the “gaps” such as co-payments, coinsurances, and deductibles.

Medicare Advantage Plans, offered by Medicare-approved private insurance companies (called Part C) is another option.  They generally provide services in addition to Part A and Part B services.  Co-payments, co-insurance, and deductibles are likely to be less, but you pay a monthly premium.

Medicare Part D is available for senior citizens with limited income to help pay for prescription costs.

Medicaid

Medicaid is a health insurance program designed for people with low-income.  It is funded by both the Federal and state government.  Each state administers the program for its residents. Rules for eligibility include the potential recipient’s income and assets.  Each state may have slightly different rules for determining financial need and other eligibility requirements.

If the senior citizen you are caring for has limited income, you should apply to find out if he or she is qualified.  Find a qualified caseworker in your state to help you with the application process.  You may have to pay a co-pay for certain medical services, depending on your state’s policies.

Medicare and Medicaid will pay for most of the medical expenses, including nursing home care, for those who qualify.

The Caring Space
http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space
We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

 

Senior Citizens – If You Cannot Be Your Own Advocate For Your Medications, Get Help! by J Delms

June 7, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Senior citizens purchase 35-40% of all prescribed and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. Seniors between the ages of 65-84 take from 14-to-18 prescriptions annually. Up to 25% of these medications are considered unnecessary or inaccurate.

The Internet offers numerous articles and other information on how senior citizens can protect themselves from over-medication and other unnecessary treatments. Some of these articles are written by physicians who realize that medical drugs are not the answer to all health conditions. Additionally, a recent midwestern newspaper article indicates that less than half of our medical care is supported by adequate scientific evidence. These kind of articles also offer recommendations for protection from the harmful side effects of too much medication.

Recommendations

1. Good insurance pays. Although health insurance is a good thing to have nowadays, do keep in mind that your insurance and drug plans could be prevailed upon for medical business reasons. If you already have medicare and other health insurance, your health condition could inadvertently be targeted for more treatments than really necessary.

2. Common sense. Listen to your best instincts about the treatments you might or might not need. Do not passively accept medication without knowing its exact health goal and purpose first. Ask questions about your prescription and why you need it for your specific condition? Make sure this treatment makes sense to you.

Although senior citizens account for only 13% of the population, they purchase up to 40% of all medications. Therefore, document any side effects from your prescriptions, and report them to your doctor, e.g., headache, cough, drowsiness, dizziness, pain, itching, gas, upset stomach, or constipation. Your doctor can change these medications if they cause you discomfort.

3. Take someone with you to an appointment. Take a friend or family member with you when you see your doctor. This person will add to your advocacy by giving you emotional support, and by helping you thwart questionable prescriptions or treatments. Three heads are better than one. Also, remember that 77% of the seniors between the ages of 65-70 have at least one chronic illness. Thus, you could really need one or two prescriptions of some kind.

Yet, other prescriptions are questionable. For example, if you have a desirable cholesterol level lower than 200-mg/dL, and your doctor prescribes a statin drug to enhance your cholesterol level, you will need to question that recommendation to find out exactly why you need it for your apparent condition. Will it affect your other bodily systems in some way, good or bad? In another reported situation, a study at a northwestern state university found that some doctors were prescribing powerful anti-psychotic drugs to patients for mild depression, anxiety, and insomnia. These drugs are approved only for serious mental and emotional disorders. Otherwise, the effects from these drugs can be harmful.

Still other adverse medical effects can be somewhat innocent. In one case, a senior started taking two common OTC pills daily to help reduce hip pain. However, these pills thinned that person’s blood, which caused his or her small colon fissures to bleed. After the resulting bleeding showed up in the stool, this senior was much relieved to find out it was not caused by cancer.

4. Learn about your medical condition. If you have a computer available, search the Internet for reliable information about your condition, and how to treat it. If not, try a public or medical library to find out as much about it as you can. This kind of knowledge is defensive power in favor of your continued good health.

5. Keep and carry your own set of records. Carry your basic health history and information with you, in writing. List your chronic conditions, medications, allergies, blood type as well as your doctor’s name and phone number. Also keep a copy of these life-saving records in the open at your residence in case of an emergency, or in case you become unconscious and cannot provide this information verbally. Additionally, if possible, add copies of your laboratory test results to these records. Your life could depend on them.

6. Report suspected abuse or fraud. Medicare fraud costs tax payers multiple millions of dollars, and causes health insurance premiums to rise sharply. Study the suspect fraud carefully, and then report it. Such abuse can be reported to a senior-medicare patrol in your area or state if they exist. These offices or patrols are found at the government agencies on aging. For starters, see the links below for prevention and protection.

1. Avoid Medication Problems — http://longevity.about.com/od/optimizemedicalcare/a/medications.htm

2. Report Medicare Fraud — http://www.medicare.gov/fraudabuse/howtoreport.asp

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=J_Delms

 

The Best Gift Ideas for Senior Citizens by Uma Eklund

June 6, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

It happens every year about this time. We start thinking about creative and thoughtful gifts for our older family members and friends and just can’t get any help. Search on Amazon for senior citizen gift ideas and you’ll be overwhelmed by lots of frankly inappropriate selections.

So what is the magic secret to avoiding the same old flowers, scarves and socks? Let’s look at a few options that we have given to our parents and grandparents that have really gone down well.

Thoughtfully practical

As we get older, everyday tasks become harder. You don’t want to see Grandpa taking out the trash on a winter night holding trash in one hand and a flashlight in the other. The thoughtful solution might be a lighted baseball cap with LEDs to light his way, freeing one hand for stability.

Is Mom having trouble reaching the cat dishes because she has trouble bending? What about a reaching device that is not just useful, but will have everyone in the family playing with it.

Anyone in the family having bathroom issues? A $2,000+ Japanese talking robotic toilet would be great, but did you know that there are several low-cost options for retrofitting automatic toilet seats to your bathroom?

Thoughtfully beautiful

Practical is great, but there are times that a simply beautiful gift is more appropriate. Even here, though, it pays to be sensitive to the challenges of aging.

My Mom has been suffering from arthritis recently, and her ability to fasten buttons and clasps has diminished significantly. So my last gift to her was a set of 30 inch gold and silver chains that she could slip over her head without doing the clasp. We also swapped a few of her pendants from her older chains so that she could wear her favorite pieces all over again.

Thoughtfully personalized

No, we don’t mean a cup with “World’s greatest Dad” on it. We’ve had great success with thoughtfully personalizing gifts, particularly using today’s technology.

Do you know anything that gets older members of the family to reminisce more than music from their “golden age”? One of our favorite recommendations for anyone looking for the perfect senior gift is an MP3 player.

Yes, we know that your parents and grandparents can barely get to grips with the TV remote (ours, too). That’s where the personalization comes in. You add the music beforehand and keep adding to their collection over time. We bought Dad 3 CDs of 50s classics and loaded them on the MP3 player so all he has to do is press play and stop (and on his player that’s the same button).

So this year stay away from the same old tired gifts and get something for your favorite senior citizen that is thoughtfully practical, beautiful or personalized.

Uma Eklund is dedicated to providing products and gifts that allow seniors to enjoy life to the full. Uma researches and selects products to recommend based on her own experience with finding and buying the best gifts for senior citizens.  If you would like more gift ideas for senior citizens please visit our website at http://www.thoughtfulseniorgifts.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Uma_Eklund

 

Top 10 steps to prepare for a remodel

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Top 10 steps to prepare for a remodel

NARI offers tips in honor of National Home Improvement Month.

  

Des Plaines, Illinois, May 8, 2013—In honor of National Home Improvement Month this May, the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) advises homeowners of the 10 most important steps to take before the remodeling project starts.

“The planning and researching phases of a project are the most critical steps in the remodeling process,” says NARI National President Art Donnelly, MCR, CKBR, Legacy Builders & Remodelers Corp., based in Mount Sinai, N.Y. “The more knowledgeable and prepared a homeowner is, the more they protect themselves.”

What can a homeowner do to prepare for a remodel? NARI provides a top 10 list of steps homeowners should take before breaking ground on their next remodel.

  1. Research your project. Taking time to research projects on the Internet and NARI.org will provide a good sense of what is involved such as price, scope of work, return on investment and new product/material options. Also, research property values in your neighborhood to make sure your project is in line with other homes in the area.
  2. Plan project around the long-term. How long do you plan to stay in your home? How might your family structure change over time? Life can change quickly—these questions should be answered early on to ensure your project will fit your lifestyle long after it’s complete.
  3. Set your budget. Deciding on a realistic budget and arranging finances to support your project are essential. This number needs to include everything—the project, products, contingencies, etc. Don’t be afraid to share this with your remodeler; professionals are respectful of a client’s budget and will create a plan around it, not over it.
  4. Use advanced search for professionals. The online world makes it easy to gather information about strangers. Ask friends, family and neighbors for referrals and then spend time researching that person online. Professional remodelers take their reputation seriously and hold credentials beyond licensing, such as certifications, memberships in trade associations and additional training. Look for examples of press coverage or involvement in industry presentations or events. Check online reviews and social media to see how they interact with past clients and peers.
  5. Ask the right questions. Time and cost are important, but getting the right information requires the right questions. Ask your professional remodeler about his educational background, training, specialties or past issues with clients. Ask about how the remodeling process will work.
  6. Verify your remodeler. Don’t take their word for it. Check the information given to you such as references, license numbers, insurance information and certifications by calling providers to verify. Request a visit to an active client’s jobsite. Make it known that you are checking on him—a true professional considers that as a positive sign to working with a homeowner.
  7. Review contracts word-by-word. A remodeling contract protects you and your remodeler. Homeowners should review this carefully. Professional remodelers have done this before, and know what should go in a contract. Homeowners are not as familiar with remodeling and should ask about terms if they don’t understand. Pay attention to details about change orders, payment, additional fees, timeline and responsibilities. If it’s not in the contract, it doesn’t exist.  
  8. Keep design in mind. Your design guides the entire project. Think about what you dislike about your current space and the intended use of the new space. Use Websites such as Pinterest.com and Houzz.com to gather design ideas. Make sure you can articulate specifically what you like about that design when talking to your designer. Professionals don’t recreate a photo—they incorporate accessibility, functionality, ease of modification, style and value into your design.
  9. Make your selections. Deciding on products and materials is a larger process than most imagine. With so many options to choose from, product selections are one of the primary reasons for project timelines to get extended. Base decisions on quality, function, price, style and availability. Include selections in the contract to lock down pricing and keep your budget intact.
  10. Create a communication plan. A common downfall in remodeling is lack of communication between homeowners and remodelers. Your remodeler should lay out a communication plan at the beginning of the project. If not, ask them to do so. This plan should clarify roles of everyone involved, communication methods, availability, and frequency of communication that is expected.

As an industry that struggles with a persistent negative perception of remodeling contractors, these tips serve both the industry and consumers in elevating real professionals from the pack.

The first step to hiring a professional is through NARI, whose members are vetted and approved by industry peers to ensure they live up to the professional standards that NARI sets. “NARI members are proud of their affiliation and commitment to professionalism, and it’s a reputation they work hard to protect,” Donnelly says.

Consumers may visit www.NARI.org to find a qualified professional who is a member of NARI or call NARI National at (847) 298-9200 and request a free copy of NARI’s brochure, “How to Select a Remodeling Professional.”

Click here to see an online version of this press release.

EDITOR’S NOTE: NARI can provide hi-res digital photos of award-winning projects to accompany your story. Contact NARI with your photo request at marketing@nari.org or ask for Morgan Zenner at (847) 298-9200.

# # #

About NARI: The National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) is the only trade association dedicated solely to the remodeling industry.  The Association, which represents member companies nationwide—comprised of 63,000 remodeling contractors— is “The Voice of the Remodeling Industry.”™ To learn more about membership, visit www.NARI.org or contact national headquarters, based in Des Plaines, Ill., at (847) 298-9200.

Respecting The Rights Of Senior Citizens – 4 Factors To Pick The Right Care Facility For The Elderly by Abhishek Agarwal

June 4, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

There is no formal ‘Senior Citizens Bill of Rights’, but as individuals, senior citizens are entitled to their rights. However, the senior citizens have little energy left in them in their old age to fight for their rights and therefore, it is the duty of the children to see that their elderly parents are getting what they are rightfully entitled to.

Every right must be claimed to be deemed as a right. There are laws in existence for the running of nursing homes for the elderly and retirement communities. Even if your elderly mom or dad is in an assisted care facility, there are certain laws that are fundamental and expected to be followed by these care facilities too. It is your duty as a caregiver to see that they are following the laws and living up to the expectations.

There are some factors that you must verify before selecting a facility for your elderly parents:

– Ensure that the facility will provide the basic cleanliness and safety. Check out the evacuation plans in place, in case of an emergency situation. Verify whether the evacuation plan is a workable one, considering the fact that the facility may be full of elderly and invalids who may be slow in moving out of the building in case of a fire. Find out if there is emergency power available to operate the automatic doors and elevators so that everyone can get out safely.

– If food is provided by the facility, ensure that meals will be provided three times a day. The meals should be healthy and the food should be delivered to the room if your parent is disabled or injured. There should be some variety in the diet and since there is a separate charge for the food, it is not wrong to expect some quality and variety in the food.

– If your parent has moved to an assisted care facility, they have every right to live as they wish in that apartment, since they have paid for it. However, they have to observe certain restrictions because they are living in a community setting. They should be able to live without any interference from the staff of the facility and have the freedom to select the décor of the apartment or have family and friends to visit.

– Another fundamental right of a senior citizen is to be treated with compassion, respect and dignity. Although this is not a tangible right, how the staff at the facility treats the elderly is an important aspect in the selection of a facility for your parents. The staff of the facility must be respectful and pleasant in their dealings with your parents. If your parent complains of any emotional or verbal abuse, you must investigate and hold the facility accountable for it.

As a primary caregiver, responsible for the well being of your elderly parents, you have the right to remind the assisted care facility of their responsibilities. Ensure that your parents are getting the service and care that they paid for and that they are comfortable in their living quarters and enjoying their stay there.

Abhishek successfully runs an Old Age Home and he has got some great Eldercare Secrets up his sleeves! Download his FREE 80 Page Ebook, “How To Take Great Care Of Elders” from his website http://www.Senior-Guides.com/560/index.htm. Only limited Free Copies available.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Abhishek_Agarwal

Why Are Reverse Mortgages Important to Senior Citizens? by Craig Castle

May 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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In Texas and many other parts of the country, senior citizens are being squeezed. They receive, on average, $965 per month in social security. And, while property taxes vary, a senior in many Texas cities with a home valued at $100,000 will pay more than $200 per month in property taxes alone. Add to that the high cost of necessities like health care, prescription medicine, utilities, and mortgage payments, and the financial picture can be very bleak. It’s no wonder that many seniors face foreclosure or tax liens on their homes.

“Reverse mortgages are important to Texas seniors because they allow them to obtain a loan against the equity in their home—often their single largest asset—without making monthly payments to repay that loan. That means that with a government-insured reverse mortgage, a senior will never lose his or her home to a bank simply because he or she could not make a payment,” said Craig Castle, a San Antonio reverse mortgage specialist for the past four years.

So why don’t more Texas seniors take advantage of this financial product?

Castle says that in his experience, seniors shy away from reverse mortgages for three reasons:
◾1. Fear
◾2. Bad advice
◾3. The availability of other, more well-advertised, loan products

“I have had many clients elect not to complete the reverse mortgage process because of fear,” Castle says. “Usually, the additional cash could have improved their lives significantly.”

Seniors’ fear is not unfounded. They are often the targets of scams and fraud. But, reverse mortgages have one important safe-guard built into them to protect even those who are uncomfortable making financial decisions. In order to obtain a government-insured reverse mortgage, a senior must have counseling by a HUD counselor with the local housing authority or the Consumer Credit Counseling Office. This unbiased person can help the senior determine whether a reverse mortgage makes sense for his or her individual situation.

And, sometimes well-meaning family and friends give bad advice.

“I have had ministers tell clients that they heard that you could lose your home with a reverse mortgage,” Castle said. “It isn’t true, but advice isn’t always based on facts.”

The availability of home equity loans also clouds the picture for many seniors. “Home equity loans can be appropriate for people who have an income, but they often spell disaster for seniors,” Castle said. “I talk to potential clients every week who tell me that they are having problems keeping up with their payments.”

“My experience has been that most home equity clients who are over 65 and have taken the maximum 80% of their home value will eventually lose their house—if they live at least 3-5 years beyond the date of loan origination,” Castle added.

With a reverse mortgage, the homeowner can access from 40-60% of the appraised value of their home, but the loan is not repaid until they die or leave the home permanently. Then the home is sold and the proceeds are used to repay the loan, with any remainder going to the owner’s estate.

To find out more about the benefits and requirements for a reverse mortgage, visit [http://www.SouthTexasReverseMortgage.com] and request the free Federal Trade Commission publication, Facts for Seniors about Reverse Mortgages. Or call Castle at 210-789-3685.

“Misinformation has prevented many seniors from getting a reverse mortgage when it would have provided them with greater financial stability—and peace of mind. That’s why I like to have the family involved and why I often spend several hours at my clients’ home explaining and re-explaining how a reverse mortgage works and how the various pay-out options can make their lives better,” Castle said.

Craig Castle is a Reverse Mortgage Specialist with Financial Freedom in San Antonio and the South Texas area. He holds a BA in Economics from the University of Missouri, is a former Licensed Stock Broker, and has worked with reverse mortgages for the past four years. He is also chairman of the Not Forgotten Coalition, a not-for-profit organization that provides services and advocacy for senior citizens in San Antonio. For more information, visit [http://www.SouthTexasReverseMortgage.com] or phone 210-789-3685.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Craig_Castle

Planning Fun Activities for Senior Citizens by Matthew G Young

May 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many senior citizens do not want to or cannot leave the house. There are many reasons for this, some are physically impaired and have trouble getting around, and others simply don’t leave because they believe that they have nothing to do. Either way, getting out of the house is important sometimes, if only for the sake of the joys that social gatherings bring. Maintaining existing friendships and creating new ones can mean a lot to elderly folks, especially if they have not left the house for a while.

There are many senior citizen friendly activities out there, the trick is to match an activity with an interest that they hold, and therefore will be more accepting of going out of the comfort zone that is their home. Many people enjoy playing cards or board games. This is a much better solution than something like going to a movie will create; when playing games, it is hard not to be social. Movies are not the best choice because, although fun, there is little opportunity for social exchange. Games foster relationships, especially games like canasta or trivial pursuit where you can play on teams.

Another great activity for senior citizens is craft making. A group of people being instructed in how to put together a scrap book or design simple jewelry for the first time promises to be very fruitful. Not only will they learn a fun new skill, but they will inevitably interact with others at nearby at their table.

Going to a zoo or to a museum is another great choice. If there are any disabilities or hindrances to mobility, this can be a frustrating thing, but most public gatherings and places now allow people to rent wheelchairs. This will make getting around a much easier task, even if the people you are with have difficulty walking. Electric wheelchairs are perhaps the best choice since these require minimal effort in using.

Finally, you can always just go to a coffee shop. Social gatherings don’t need to be big group affair; sometimes people feel more comfortable in an intimate setting. Taking a friend out for coffee is a great way to interact on a one on one basis. It’s hard not to have a good time when you are with a close friend or relative. Coffee shops are great public places to go to with a couple friends because of this.

The most important thing about choosing an activity is to make sure that the person you are with has fun. If the senior citizen you are caring for does not have fun, they will not be likely to give social outings a second chance. As a caretaker, it’s your job to care for them physically as well as emotionally. Making activities fun isn’t hard, but you do need to choose the right activity that will match their desires and wishes.

Matthew G. Young is a freelance writer who specializes in financial, sports, and health-related topics. To learn more about in home health care visit Paradise In Home Care

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Matthew_G_Young

Traveling With Senior Citizens by Karissa Price

May 28, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Traveling with elderly patients can certainly be a challenge, but there are many things that caregivers and family members can do to make it easier, safer, and less stressful. Planning ahead is essential to make sure everything goes smoothly and also to ensure that the traveler gets the most for their money. Last minute bookings are often expensive and should be avoided if possible.

When flying, here are some tips for easier travel:

1. Arrive at the airport with plenty of time to spare; getting through security can take much longer if the airport is busy or the patient moves slowly, and having to rush will only add to the stress
2. If possible, arrange in advance to have a wheelchair available and access to any special services offered to senior citizens
3. Make sure that the traveler has all of their identification, insurance information, itinerary, money, and medications; have copies of any instructions from physicians about medications or medical devices such as a pacemaker
4. Try not to pack too many clothing or other items; comfortable shoes are definitely necessary
5. To make the actual flight more comfortable, take a pillow and reading material or anything else for entertainment on the flight such as crossword puzzles or card games.

A common theme among senior citizen travel is to visit out of town family members, especially children, grandchildren, or even great grandchildren for a special event or just for a vacation. As soon as a wedding, birthday, or graduation announcement arrives, start planning the vacation! In addition to visiting family, there are many vacation destinations that cater to senior citizens. Many cruise lines have special senior citizen cruises, which can be a wonderful social experience for any seniors who want to enjoy the company of others and make new friends on their trip. Many destinations (such as Branson, Missouri, for example) have tons of specialty tours for senior citizens. Caregivers can find an abundance of information online about these tours, and should also check with the Better Business Bureau to make sure they are legitimate companies before paying for anything.

For more information, please visit http://www.trustedhandsnetwork.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Karissa_Price

Santa Barbara Palms – Nevada Senior Guide

4880 Santa Barbara St, Las Vegas NV 89121

Santa Barbara Palms apartment homes is a brand new affordable Senior Living community offering 2 bedroom 2 bath options in the southeast area of Las Vegas, NV. Amenities include a huge clubhouse complete with kitchen, fitness center, media room, billiards, craft room, class room, computer and business center, health and wellness room and free WiFi. We also provide gated entry, covered parking, pool & spa, picnic areas with BBQs, elevator access to all floors, alarm systems and so much more!

Office Hours

Mon-Fri 8 am to 5 pmSaturday 10 am to 4 pm

Senior Citizen Abuse by Jessie Penn

May 2, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

News headlines report of senior citizen abuse, most everyday. Long gone are  the values and moralities of our grandparent’s generation. Time was when a  handshake, or your word was all that was necessary to honor commitments. Gone  are the days on an unlocked house, open windows, or sitting out back alone.

The elderly in today’s society can, unfortunately, encounter many traumatic  events for no cause of their own. Predators watch and learn learn an old  person’s schedule, like, when they leave their homes and when they are likely to  return, what times they get up or go to bed, and if they are handicapped or ill  by the comings and goings of a visiting nurse.

Many in the society of today appear to have lost all respect for other  people’s property. It seems these people are without limits, with nothing more  important than self-serving tactics. Who cares if an old person is lonely, in  pain, or needs assistance?

Many times, the media tells us about a kid that brutally beat elderly  parents, grandparents, or elderly strangers. Without any motivation, other than  pursuing what they want, senior citizens can become their prey. And, if they  want something you have in your home, you could be their next victim.

But, not all attackers are strangers, and the elderly person might not be  beaten, robbed, or brutally murdered by the hands of an unknown person.  Sometimes, the attacker is a family member, relative, or friend.

When elderly people are attacked or threatened, how are they to protect  themselves? Many don’t possess the strength or agility to fight back or run.  They can fall down stairs, against door jams, or be trapped in a wheelchair.  Many times they do not understand what or why this is happening to them, because  the person doing them harm is someone they trusted.

Perhaps a friend or relative lives in the senior citizen’s home to provide  assistance and/or companionship. This person might get angry because they don’t  want the responsibility of caring for an older person. Perhaps they feel as if  their freedom has been taken from them. If the elderly person has adequate  finances, the one that is supposed to be looking out for the well-being of the  senior begins to feel that they should be compensated or rewarded  excessively.

An elderly person who refuses to give money or sign over their property,  risks being violently attacked by a family member or friend. It could be an  adult son or daughter, grandson or granddaughter, or a friend. Most elderly  people hesitate to report abuse from a relative or friend. Many are in failing  health, and don’t know who to turn to for help. Or, perhaps, they fear the  attacker will retaliate and things will get much worse, if they report the  abuse.

Aging can be a lonely and painful experience. Some senior citizens were  attacked and left alone to endure the pain and shame. Many could not get to  their phone to call for help. But, if they would have had an emergency alarm,  the help they needed could have been summoned.

A small device, disguised as a pendant or wristwatch can save lives,  literally. There is no need to get to a phone. Help and assistance is no further  away than the end of the finger. As easy as pushing a button on the device calls  an emergency operator, and help can be on the way.

Many times, long-term injuries or death can be the result of not being able  to get the care when it is needed. A personal security device can provide peace  of mind, and is a true friend in need. Senior citizens can live independently  knowing they have the ability to get help whenever they need.

Get free information to protect your loved ones when a medical emergency or  security treat happens. Go to http://personalsecuritydevices.walkinsarewelcome.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jessie_Penn

 

Senior Citizens and Pets by Kay Catlett

April 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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As baby-boomer pet parents reach retirement age it is common to think about  putting aside the dog collars, pet clothing and dog harnesses and retire from  being pet parents. This is especially common as a beloved pet may die. The usual  questions of a grieving pet owner are magnified by older pet owners. The only  real questions with younger owners concerns whether or not they miss the joy of  pet ownership and whether they still possess the desire to take on the  responsibility of another pet. As the pet parent ages, more questions have to be  asked. The age and health of the human along with whether or not the needs of  particular pets can be managed are the most important questions for aging pet  parents.

The primary question concerns whether or not a pet is beneficial for aging  people.

Many seniors crave and miss nurturing. Often, a lifetime of nurturing has  defined a person, first as a parent, friend, spouse or grandparent. With  children and grandchildren growing older, nurturing may no longer required on a  personal basis. Senior citizens may find the circle of friends narrowing as  interests change, people retire and move, and activities lessen. Having a pet to  nurture, and providing that pet with food, comfort, exercise, toys, play and  companionship can fill the void in a changing life.

As the years pass, people may find their lives boring and lonely. Having a  pet cat or dog can fill this void. Taking care of a pet can provide meaning and  provide positive feelings of caring for another being. A pet can provide  structure missed by people following the routine of working outside of the home.  Caring for a pet provides some structure: time to eat, time to play and go  outside, time to be combed, time for naps. At the same time, the pet parent has  a role: to take care of the pet. This sense of responsibility provides structure  as well as a sense of being needed.

Another plus for seniors to have dogs, is for the protection a dog can give.  Seniors are often prey for intruders since the resistance of a senior citizen is  perceived as being lower and often it is known that there are less people living  in the home. However with a dog, the fear of barking or being bitten inhibit the  activities of intruders to that home. Research shows that homes with barking  dogs are violated fewer times than homes without dogs. Dogs provide safety to  seniors.

Another benefit of a senior owning a dog is that it makes them more active.  Owning a dog will compel the senior to live a more active lifestyle then if they  are by themselves. The dog will need to go outside to use the bathroom; feeding  and grooming must take place. These simple activities will give the owner  exercise. Matching the activity needs of the pet to the activity level of the  owner is an important factor to consider in deciding what kind of pet or breed  is best for both the senior and the pet.

Aging pet parents need to think about the future of their pets as time goes  on. A plan for pet care should be arranged so that if a hospitalization is  necessary, or a period of recovery in the home should occur, the needs of the  pets need to be met in those circumstances. Pet care in the home of another,  kennel care or acquiring the assistance of others to provide assistance in the  home are all necessary elements of a pet care plan. Pet parents of every age,  but especially senior citizens need to investigate alternatives in the dire case  of having to give up the pet. This author strongly suggests that “no-kill” pet  shelters need to be listed in the plan in the direst situations.

Overall, a senior owning a pet is an excellent idea. Dogs and cats provide  excellent companions and safety to senior citizens. Studies show that seniors  with pets are happier and live longer then seniors without pets. Preparing the  home properly with crates, dog collars, cat harnesses and pet beds coupled with  preparing plans for all contingencies will make for happy seniors and their  happy pets.

Kay Catlett [http://www.PetCollarStoreAndMore.com]

I believe that as we are humane to our pets, they make us more human. My  online pet store has carefully selected products at competitive prices.

I welcome your input on what products you like and want me to  carry.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kay_Catlett

 

Birthday Party Ideas for Senior Citizens by Criss White

April 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many people believe that once you get to a certain age a birthday becomes  another wrinkle on their forehead, or another grey hair on their head. This just  isn’t the case! There are many senior citizens who look forward to their  birthday almost as much as they did when they were young children. A birthday  becomes a milestone and a triumph when you reach a certain age.

For families that have a senior citizen getting ready to celebrate a birthday  there are many ways that you can make their day just a little more special and  memorable. You don’t have to have an elaborate birthday party, unless that is  what you think they would like, just a meaningful thought that can remind them  of how cherished they are to you.

There are four main factors to have a successful birthday party for any  senior citizen:

Guests

Many senior citizens have lots of friends and family. Consider having a  gathering at your local senior center, where everyone can join in the  celebration. Send out invitations to their closest friends and all their family,  oftentimes they will appreciate just being around the people they care about for  their birthday. For the senior who prefers a relaxed birthday event, you can  have just the immediate family and just a few of their friends to join in for a  more intimate celebration.

Food

Since it is their birthday it is best to have foods that the birthday boy or  girl will appreciate and like. A meal does not have to be elaborate to be a  success. Sandwiches or chicken and potatoes are always great, and be sure that  you don’t forget coffee and cake! Keep in mind the number of guests that are  going to be in attendance if you are planning a meal and ordering a cake,  everyone needs a piece!

Activities

For entertainment at the part you can offer various activities that are  favorites for the birthday senior. Some like to listen to live music and dance,  others enjoy playing cards, and some even like watching old movies. Whatever  hobby the birthday senior enjoys participating in will always be appreciated and  enjoyed.

Decorations

Decorations for senior citizens to not have to be elaborate either. Many will  enjoy simple balloons and streamers. However, if you want to get creative you  can create centerpieces have personalized tablecloths. It might even be a good  idea to create a slideshow or collage of the birthday boy or girl’s life and of  their friends and family wishing them happy birthday! This is an idea that they  can even keep with them long after the party is over.

There is no right or wrong way to celebrate the birthday of a senior. Keep in  mind however, that some activities or locations for a party may not be  appreciated or accessible for older seniors that have trouble moving a lot.

The idea behind a senior birthday party is to celebrate the long life of the  individual, and the respect and admiration others have for them. Despite this  some seniors still want to party like they were kids, so make it fun!

Criss White is a professional article writer and an avid baker. To check out  some holiday  cookies or some birthday cookies, visit My Baby Shower Favors.
Note:  You can reprint this article in your ezine, blog, or website as long as the  credits remain intact and hyperlinks remain active and dofollow. If you want  more articles, visit our site and click on the Contact Us link.

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Where Are Senior Citizens Job Opportunities? by Raymond Angus

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Are There Really Senior Citizens Job Opportunities Out There?

Are you a senior, and have you convinced yourself that there aren’t any more  senior citizens job opportunities lurking in the underbrush these days, let  alone walking down main street U.S.A.? Do you subscribe to the notion that all  senior citizens job opportunities are now being grabbed up by smooth  complexioned youngsters that don’t remember a world with Ted Williams and Frank  Sinatra in it doing their thing?

Wake up! Look around you. Sure the economy is in some pretty sorry straits,  but this kind of down turn has happened numerous times throughout history and  men and women have all survived it. There are real, honest to goodness senior  citizens job opportunities out there right now needing someone with your unique  talents and skills to fill them. You’re right. Maybe you don’t know where the  senior job openings are. But they don’t know where you are either and they’re  sure not going to come knocking on your door while you’re watching TV soap  operas.

You have to stand up straight and tell yourself your new mantra. I am  proactive. Write it on a piece of paper and stick it on your refrigerator with  one of those little magnet gizmos made for such things. Things don’t happen to  you, you’re now going to take charge of your senior citizens job opportunities  search and make things happen. Sit down at your table or desk, grab a tablet of  paper and a pen and make a list of five topics. Understand that first of all  this is your personal work sheet and is not available for public consumption.  It’s not a resume or a pitch for employment. This is your outline for a  proactive battle plan to find the perfect employment for you.

1. What kind of job do you really want. Don’t list employment that you  suspect is available. Write down what you really and truly want to do.

2. List the jobs that you’ve actually held during your life. Did you deliver  newspapers as a kid? Write it down and decipher the skills needed later.

3. List the jobs you actually performed for past employers. If you cleaned  floors, washed windows, ran machinery, waited on customers, kept records; list  them, they are building blocks for your action plan.

4. How did your personal activities at each employer affect the overall  operation of the business?

5. This is a tough one and it will require giving some clarity of thought.  Why did you leave each job? If you were terminated, it would be best to be less  than forthright.

You’re not finished yet. Make a list of your hobbies. Don’t laugh! Think  about it. Do you like bowling or fishing? How about gardening? Can you imagine  the skills you’ve amassed from these endeavors, let alone the factual knowledge  related to them. Are you a guy and do you do some of your automobile work  yourself.

Think about all of this and then contact employers that would find your  skills invaluable. Most important! There are senior citizens job opportunities  all over the landscape. But only go after the ones your actually would enjoy  doing.

Be proactive! After all is said and done, getting a job is in your hands  alone.

Raymond Angus is the best selling author of http://www.TheSeniorsLife.com. He writes about how seniors  find employment in today’s ever changing world. Are you a senior and do you want  tips on how to work and live in this bleak economy? Go to http://www.TheSeniorsLife.com and click on  employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Raymond_Angus

 

Meeting and Socializing Locations For Senior Citizens by Padmanabha Vyasamoorthy

April 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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As a person working for the welfare of senior citizens I am always interested  in meeting several of them in one place. Therefore I used to go to places where  they are normally seen in good numbers. I took the help of a web group called  sss-global and found out places where I can further explore looking for old  people. Here is a gist of my findings. They are given no specific order, because  categorization freezes free thinking!

o Senior Citizen Associations when they conduct regular meetings o Day  Care Centers attached to such SCAs o In the west, McDonald outfits offer  discounts to seniors in the morning hours and for early elderly lunchers:  therefore, McDonald outfits. o Alzheimer’s Day Care Centers o Retirement  Community Activity Rooms o Banks on first few days of the month to collect  pension o Parks in the evenings to while away time o Temples to bribe  Gods and to gossip and perhaps worship too! o Typical clubs and pubs to meet  friends; play cards; relax with a drink o Lectures planned for senior  citizens o Libraries to borrow / return or read books o Hospital out  patient geriatric wards for obvious reasons o Old Age Homes and retirement  facilities (senior homes) o Post Offices to deposit or collect pension or  interest income o On boulevards, parks, gardens, walking or jogging paths –  walkers o Locations where laughter club sessions are held o Near schools  waiting to collect grand children o Any bus or train bogie carrying  travelers on pilgrimage o Railway booking counters meant especially for  senior citizens o Any marriage function – not necessarily reception – is  full of oldies o Any Bhajan sessions, religious discourses

The listing will be useful to product or service providers for this age  group. Banks offering special FD schemes, Health Insurance companies, suppliers  of assistance devices etc to mention a few. If you can extend my listing I shall  be happy. If you reflect deeply upon the question: “What do senior citizens do?”  and try to answer “where” they do it in good numbers, I am getting  you!

Dr P Vyasamoorthy Retired Librarian turned Information Consultant. Specialist  in providing Information to Senior Citizens who are Indians or Indians living  abroad. Moderates a Web group for Senior Citizens in India for the past 8 years.  Web group: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sss-global

He blogs at: http://vyasa-kaaranam-ketkadey.blogspot.com/ The posts in his blog are mostly his own writings dealing with retired peoples’  problems.

He has taken to writing recently for the past six months and writes in  Merinews, cplash, karmayog, Triond and other sites.

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Tips For Senior Citizen Travelers by Gerry Restrivera

April 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Traveling is one thing that even older people can enjoy. Whether you are a  seasoned traveller or someone who is just beginning to enjoy traveling, these  travel advice can help you plan a safe and enjoyable trip. Here are some helpful  tips for senior citizen travelers:

Prepare your documents as early as possible. Passport is the most important  document and you can apply in person, through passport agencies and by mail.  When you receive your passport, be sure to fill in the information page so that  your family and friends can be notified in case of accident or emergency. Most  countries requires visa, so after acquiring a valid passport, you also need a  valid visa. These documents need time for processing and for senior citizen  travelers, it is best to apply 2-3 months before your trip to avoid stress and  rushing that could be bad for you.

Do not bring more than you need. Bring only the things that you need because  it will be so tiring to carry heavy suitcases. Senior citizen travelers, should  not burden themselves with too much luggage.  Wash and wear clothing is a  good idea so that you will not bring too many clothes.  Avoid bringing  valuable things like jewelries and dress simply to avoid being a target of  thieves. Bring only reasonable cash with you. Bring your additional budget in  the form of traveler’s check, credit card and ATM card.

Senior citizen travelers should check their health condition with their  doctor before traveling. Find out if you need immunization before traveling to  protect you from serious diseases abroad. If you are under medications, it is  important to bring enough supply to maintain your health. Bring your medicines  in its original packages or bottles and bring your doctor’s prescription to  avoid narcotics issues in foreign countries or airports. Review your insurance  policy and check if it covers your medical expenses abroad, if not it is best to  buy a policy that covers your travel medical expenses.

Read and get information about the country you want to visit. It is best for  senior citizen travelers to know the current situation of their destination in  terms of security, weather, culture, people, laws and other important things  about your destination.  You can protect your health, security and enjoy  more on your trip if you know more about your destination.

Don’t stress yourself. Senior citizen travelers should not subject themselves  to stressful situations. Even if this is the travel you’ve been waiting all your  life, it is not wise to stress yourself and fill in all your time with a lot of  activities. Take time to relax, you will not enjoy if you are too  tired.

Look for best deals to get the best out of your travel. Traveling could be  really expensive if you do not know where to find the best deals. There are a  lot of perks available especially for senior citizen travelers. Getting  discounts on your accommodation and airfare will give you more opportunity to  enjoy your trip. Find out how to get cheap airfare visit Your World Travel Guide  [http://www.yourworldtravelguide.com/]

To travel on a budget visit Travel Secrets

Gerry Restrivera writes informative articles on various subjects including  Tips for Senior Citizen Travelers. You are allowed to publish this article in  its entirety provided that author’s name, bio and website links must remain  intact and included with every reproduction.

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ConnectMyFolks iPad App Offers New Way For Tech-Resistant Seniors To Connect With Family, Friends

April 22, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events 

ConnectMyFolks iPad App Offers New Way For Tech-Resistant Seniors To Connect With Family, Friends

EUGENE, Ore., April 18, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — A new iPad app that’s free to download and use will keep technologically challenged seniors in safe, simple and easy electronic touch with their friends, children and grandchildren. ConnectMyFolks delivers email, texts, photos and videos instantly to technophobes of all ages, although it’s designed to be used by people 65 and older. It is now available in the App Store.

Email and texting have replaced letter writing and phone calls for most people, and that leaves seniors out of the loop, says ConnectMyFolks co-founder Steve Lee. “If someone’s not able to get email or texts, they can end up isolated from their own family,” Lee says. “These days if you’re not receiving emails or texts, you’re left behind.”

Although the nation’s tech-savvy population is aging and bringing its expertise with it, the 85-year-old and up age category is the fastest growing demographic in the United States . Many of these seniors never acquired tech skills and are often intimidated by computers and smart phones.

ConnectMyFolks is simple and secure. Only people on the senior’s approved list can communicate through the app. That eliminates spam, scammers and other threats. “Whether it’s a nephew who’s always asking for money, or it’s a random phishing attempt, those emails won’t get through,” Lee says.

Housed on the intuitive iPad, ConnectMyFolks is designed for people easily overwhelmed by traditional tech devices. It launches with three big buttons – one for mail, one for pictures and one for videos. Forward, back and home buttons make navigation simple. “You absolutely cannot get lost in this app,” Lee says. “You can’t break it. When it doubt, just ‘go home.'”

A key feature is the simple web-based admin panel, where a designated friend or relative can set up the senior’s approved ConnectMyFolks sender list, select reply options based on the senior’s needs (pre-set replies, typed emails or voice recordings) and make adjustments to font sizes and other interface settings.

The app is expected to be popular in part because families are so geographically scattered. Even grown children who take care of their folks are often helping from afar, according to the US Census Bureau, which reports 7 million to 10 million adults care for their aging parents long distance.

ConnectMyFolks was developed by In the Loop, a Eugene , Oregon , company devoted to the use of technology to solve everyday challenges faced by modern families. Learn more at www.connectmyfolks.com.

NEON LIT PRESENTS NINE READERS APRIL 26

April 22, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Las Vegas 

NEON LIT PRESENTS NINE READERS APRIL 26

 

Fiction and poetry writers from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas’ Creative Writing Masters of Fine Arts program read monthly at the Arts Factory

(April 18, 2013– Las Vegas ) – Neon Lit, a monthly literary event presented by the UNLV MFA and PhD programs, will present student readers Friday, April 26, at Trifecta Gallery in the Arts Factory, 107 E. Charleston Blvd. Doors open at 6 p.m., reading starts at 7 p.m. Prior to the event, enjoy beer and specialty cocktails at Bar + Bistro in the Arts Factory.

This month, we celebrate writers who are finishing their programs at UNLV. Reading this month will be Justin Irizarry, John Douglas, Mark Lennon, Mary Catherine Martin, Andrew Merecicky, Joe Langdon, Mollie Bergeron, Tim Moungey, and Jackson Wills. All will be reading selections from their thesis or dissertation.

Often attracting more than 80 attendees monthly, the downtown literary event has showcased the work of the university’s creative writing students and guest writers since 2009. The readings reflect the diverse student body, and offer the opportunity to hear a variety of fiction and poetry created in Las Vegas . Neon Lit is hosted monthly in one of the most renowned contemporary art galleries in the arts district.

ABOUT NEON LIT:

Supported by the Black Mountain Institute, UNLV and the Arts Factory Las Vegas, Neon Lit is a monthly downtown literary event showcasing the university’s creative writing MFA and PhD students. For more information visit http://neonlit.org/.

Ways Senior Citizens Can Keep Young by Charice Louise

April 19, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

No one wants to grow old before his or her time. There are some things senior  citizens can do that will keep them looking and feeling younger. Consider these  seven ways seniors can stay young.

Geriatric Massage is one of the best things senior citizens can do for  themselves. The massage of the muscles improves blood circulation by moving  blood cells that may have become trapped in the capillaries. The massage  provides relief for stiff and sore muscles resulting in the person feeling  better. As muscles are released, the individual has more freedom of movement  resulting in an improved posture. Many seniors report fewer problems with  insomnia or other sleep problems after a massage.

Senior citizens soon learn that eating healthy is in their best interest. A  healthy diet provides the needed fiber to keep the individual regular and fight  the discomfort of constipation. Eating healthy food provides the body with  antioxidants to fight disease and can prevent health problems. The senior who  selects healthy foods is more likely to maintain a healthy weight, one of the  keys to living a more active life with fewer health problems.

There is a tendency of some seniors to withdraw into their own homes and  avoid socializing with others. However, you need to socialize in order to stay  young. If you have hobbies that you love, now is the best time in life to  partake in them. Make an effort to remain in touch with friends and family. The  banter of conversations with those outside your own home is necessary to keep  your mental functions sharp.

Exercise has many positive benefits for the senior citizen. In addition to  making the person look younger and fit, exercise can improve flexibility and  increase mobility. A workout releases endorphins, chemicals that help to improve  the overall mood. The person who is in shape is less likely to experience falls,  which can lead to broken bones.

Retirement can be a joyous time; however, it is easy to begin to feel that  your existence on earth is no longer making a difference. Seniors that get  involved stay younger by knowing that their presence matters. Many volunteer  organizations need help. Become a grandma or grandpa volunteer at local schools.  Volunteer at a hospital. Use your time to benefit your church, synagogue or  other house of worship.

Use your brain to keep young. Get a library card and read on a regular basis.  Enroll in a community college course to learn something new. Keep your brain  challenged using crosswords, puzzles and games.

Use meditation to reduce stress on a daily basis. Use relaxing exercises such  as tai chi or yoga (often available at your local Y) to reduce your stress  load.

Massage Envy Spa Valencia, CA is Valencia’s most affordable spa. Visit them  online today at http://www.massageenvy.com/clinics/CA/Valencia.aspx, or visit  their blog at http://expertmassagetherapy.com/valencia/.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Charice_Louise

 

Join Senior Citizen Clubs To Save Your Money by James Redder

April 19, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

When it involves your senior single travel requirements joining senior  citizen travel clubs might be a good choice. There are lots of benefits for  joining the senior citizen travel clubs. Once you take the time to look around  for top clubs to suit your requirements you will be glad of your decision.

Of course an obvious advantage to these travel clubs is definitely having a  variety of people to travel with. This can permit you to join the club along  with friends to help you travel and revel in your holiday together.

Senior single travels can take place worldwide today. There are many ways to  make this experience enjoyable and many ways to make it inexpensive. If you’re a  senior single, travel may appear a little bit daunting, particularly if you’re  planning a trip to a foreign destination. Just remember that being single  doesn’t imply that you cannot enjoy exactly what traveling has to give you.

The very first advantage for joining senior citizen travel clubs is that you  could save cash. This happens because if you’re in the club they will offer  group discounts. This will help you to have exactly the same kind of vacation  you may have taken by yourself but for a lot less. If you’re a senior who’s  living on the fixed income but still has the desire to travel a club can  definitely be a good deal for you. Just keep in mind that you may have to spend  monthly fees as a club member. This should be part of your selection criteria  when you choose a club to join.

An excellent benefit that may be had from the good senior citizen travel  clubs is that they’ll help you chalk out the details of your holiday. This could  be a great advantage for individuals who don’t possess time or even the assets  to plan the holiday themselves. Although you’ll have to follow an organization  itinerary there are usually monthly meetings where one can have input on what is  offered in the actual vacation. Lots of seniors appreciate having another person  look after their trip details and gather all of the needed details in one spot.  Usually the club may meet and determine where the following vacation is going to  be and after that decide what ought to be done about the vacation. They’ll also  determine travel lodging, hotel bookings and any attractions that need to be  visited plus any other important things that need to be considered.

Next, now you have a lot more information about senior citizen travel clubs. Will you join one? Find out more  about senior single travel here.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=James_Redder

 

Exercise for Senior Citizens At 50 And Beyond by Renie M Rutten

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Even a small amount of increased physical activity can benefit your  functional health. This means getting in and out of your home to attend church,  going for a walk, and getting your own mail without the assistance of someone  else.

Benefits Of Regular Exercise For Senior Citizens

—–Improved Overall Health

—–Smaller Waistline

—–Lowered Risk of Bone Fracture Including Hips

—–Lower Risk of Lung, Breast and Color Cancers

—–Stabilized Blood Sugar Reducing Type II Diabetes

—–Better Balance and Bone Strength

Levels of Senior Citizen Exercise Workouts

There are three basic levels of activity to discuss when thinking about  exercise for Senior Citizens, the first is sedentary. This is where many  senior citizens fall unfortunately. This means you are getting little or no  regular physical exercise. Sedentary individuals take less the 10,000 steps a  day and their risk of falls, illness and disease are much greater than seniors  in the next group.

The second group of seniors we want to discuss are those who get  moderate physical activity each day. Moderate activity should be the goal  of most seniors to keep them healthy and independent. Brisk walking, dancing,  bicycling, swimming, dance and exercise DVD’s are excellent examples of exercise  that will raise the heart rate, but allow you to breath and talk normally.

The final level of activity for the more active seniors is vigorous  activity. This level means you heart rate has increased to the level that  you are not able to talk and exercise at the same time. Some examples might  include running, tennis, Zumba dance or other high intensity exercise.

Senior Exercise the Answer to Anti Aging

Aging and lack of physical activity are often associated with health issues  like: loss of balance causing falls, forms of arthritis causing stiffness and  pain, breathing problems and sleep apnea, stroke, heart disease and even some  cancers. These conditions are attributed to the limited activity and excess  weight from a decrease in your muscle tone and RMR from not getting enough  movement as we age.

How To Increase Your Physical Activity Level

Increasing your activity especially if you fall into the sedentary level of  seniors may seem like a daunting task. The good news is that is not necessarily  true. Starting an exercise program can be fun and easier to start than you might  think.

The most important issue is to find some activity you enjoy. Remember you  don’t need to spend a fortune on a home gym to reach your peak fitness level.  Some ideas that cost little or nothing are walking, dancing or water aerobics.  Start slowly and increase your time and intensity each week or so. As always  it’s a good idea to visit with your doctor, especially if you have health issues  already.

Incorporate friends and make it fun. You can help others reach their peak  fitness and improve their health as well.

Learn more about exercise for senior citizens and how it can improve your  health and save your life. More fitness information is available on my website  at http://www.yourweightlossanswers.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Renie_M_Rutten

 

Email Marketing For Senior Citizen Centers by Dan Forootan

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Ads in the phone book and Yellow Pages are a better investment than a  newspaper ad, but senior citizen centers need to provide gentle reminders of  their presence to potential patrons, many of whom are living alone and uncertain  about venturing into something new and unknown. How can they encourage newcomers  to come to the center while reminding regular visitors of all the center has to  offer? The answer is email marketing!

A senior citizens’ center email marketing campaign will achieve a pair of  essential objectives for the center by cutting costs and delivering the message  straight to the target audience. The idea that senior citizens would be relying  on email for news would have sounded ludicrous 15 or even 10 years ago. But with  more senior citizens jumping aboard the information superhighway than ever  before, an email marketing plan is the best way to reach seniors!

Email marketing allows these establishments to provide the type of  interactive advertisement newspapers and even television commercials cannot  offer. In addition to listing the essentials such as address, contact  information and operating hours, an email can include a schedule of upcoming  events, photos of people at the center and even videos of some of the fun  activities that take place at the center. What better way is there to convince  people to come to a senior center than by showing them what they are  missing?

Even those senior citizens who do not use email can be reached via email  marketing efforts. Often times, it is the children and/or grandchildren who  investigate senior centers on behalf of their elders. The “next generation” can  sign up to receive emails from a senior citizen center and then let their  parents or grandparents know the types of events that are taking place there,  from lunches and dinners to movies, card game tournaments and performances by  local music or theatre groups.

In addition, senior citizens who use email but who aren’t the ones checking  out senior citizen centers online can still receive these forwarded messages  from their children, grandchildren or friends. The email marketing software  required for these campaigns makes it very easy to forward messages to other  interested people, which can only help generate further business for the  centers. Just as importantly, this software is inexpensive to purchase and easy  to install and manage. There is no need to add staff to implement and/or handle  these email marketing projects. Add it all up and aemail marketing campaign is a  win-win for those who operate the center as well as those who visit  it!

Dan Forootan is the President of EZ Publishing, Inc., the creator of the  StreamSend Email  Marketing service.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Dan_Forootan

 

Benefits Of Joining A Senior Citizens Travel Club by James Redder

April 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Traveling is an interesting way of enjoying and spending time especially for  the senior citizens who are confined to their homes and do not have much of  physical activities. Older members of the family can have a lot of benefits by  taking small and big trips to various places. There are numerous advantages of  senior citizens travel. The best thing to do is to join one of the travel clubs  for seniors in the locality. This will allow you to spend time in useful travel  pursuits.

First, find out about the local clubs in the particular area. Search the  internet or find out from friends and acquaintances about such clubs. Beware of  scams and choose reputable ones. Be very careful and join a senior travel club  that has been there for quite a long time and that has a reputation. The  greatest benefit of joining such travel clubs is discounts on travel. Travel to  various places for a cheaper rate than traveling alone. This is very beneficial  for people who are living on a fixed monthly income and would like to  travel.

Another benefit is that the club can help to plan the trip in a better way.  Many people do not have the time or resources to plan the trip. For such people  this is a very helpful. Most of these clubs have regular meetings for discussing  various things including the travel plans. Be active in the meetings and suggest  various things that are interesting for the group. A good idea can be better  executed when it is shared and planned by a group of people belonging to the  travel club.

Another thing is that many senior citizens are lonely at home. When they  travel with the other members of the club, they can have a wonderful time  socializing with each other and making new friends. They can get rid of their  loneliness and enjoy life in a whole new way. Such clubs also have many  volunteers who take care of the seniors and their needs. So people who are on  their own can be benefited greatly.

Since the senior citizens club volunteers are well-trained, they know about  all the requirements of these people and take them to places that are really  meant for relaxing and enhancing the mood of the seniors. In order to enjoy all  these benefits find the best club from the locality and enroll in it. After  becoming a member it is easy to enjoy the various benefits offered by the senior  citizens travel club.

Next, now you are better informed on Senior Citizens Travel are you ready to get traveling? Read  more information concerning Senior Citizen Travel here.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=James_Redder

 

Depression in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Depression is a medical condition that is characterized by feeling down,  depressed, or hopeless; low self-esteem; and loss of interest in things one used  to enjoy. Senior citizens are prone to life-altering changes that can lead one  to feel depressed. Dealing with the trials life throws at us such as, loss,  change, loneliness, or a chronic medical condition can be quite overwhelming.  Still, depression is not a “normal” part of aging. Like heart disease or  diabetes, depression is a medical condition and it can be treated with  medication and therapy. Treatment is effective at alleviating symptoms within a  few weeks in at least 80 percent of people.

It is important that senior citizens and those providing their elder care  understand the symptoms of depression. If you think you or someone you know may  be suffering from depression, identify your symptoms by using the checklist  provided below. Then, if necessary, seek assistance. For senior citizens, the  most frequently used resource is a family doctor. Bringing a trusted friend or  relative may help ease any anxiety when going to an appointment. Understand that  your doctor may suggest a checkup and begin treatment or refer you to a mental  health specialist.

Before you say, “I’m okay”….

Do you feel:

  • Anxious or “empty”
  • Guilty or useless
  • Agitated or irritable
  • Less interested in things you used to enjoy
  • Like no one loves you
  • Life is not worth living

Or if you are:

  • A change in sleeping habits
  • A change in eating habits
  • Persistent headaches, stomach aches, or pain

Remember that these  may be real symptoms of a real medical condition that can be effectively  treated. Talk to your doctor today. Though many senior citizens suffer from  depression, feeling depressed is not a normal part of aging.

 

Health and Wellness tips

There are many measures senior citizens can take to help relieve the symptoms  of depression. Those involved in the elder care of senior citizens experiencing  depression should encourage the senior to follow these tips and improve their  wellbeing.

Check your medications. Senior citizens often take many  medications. Some medications, including those for sleep, blood pressure, and  nervousness, may affect mood. Talk with your doctor about each of the  medications you are taking. Be sure to include all over-the-counter medicines,  vitamins, and herbal supplements to minimize the chances of having side  effects.

Limit alcohol consumption. Alcohol use can bring about  depression. And, when alcohol and drugs are combined, interactions that lead to  depression can occur.

Stay connected. Sometimes, senior citizens find it more difficult  to get out and stay connected with others. Still, talking with friends and  family members, getting a pet, or even finding a new interest or hobby can help  one through this tough time.  Get involved in activities you take pleasure  in, such as reading a good book, going to a ballgame or a taking a class in a  subject that interests to you.

Be active. Physical activity can improve physical and mental  wellbeing. Though some senior citizens believe they cannot exercise, there are  activities like walking, gardening, or working out (even if one is in a  wheelchair) that can be helpful. Make a goal of 30 minutes of activity 5 days a  week. If you have not taken part in physical activity in a while, be sure to  check with your doctor and get his OK before you begin.

Eat healthy and drink plenty of fluids. Choose healthy snacks  like fruits, vegetables, yogurt, or nuts to increase your nutrition and energy.  Also, try to eat well-balanced meals.  Some senior citizens suffer from  loss of appetite and weight loss; if you have experienced either of these,  consult your doctor.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects  caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for  families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking  employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

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Activities For Senior Citizens – How Hobbies and the Mind Body Connection Work By Diane Carbo

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Hobbies have a mind body connection, they are important activities for  senior citizens and are an important part of healthy aging. Active seniors  are proof that you can enjoy better health and have fun doing it.

Research studies have shown that leisure time and physical activity promote a  healthier lifestyle. Our bodies are meant to be active and move. Many, as they  age, tend to become increasingly inactive, preferring to watch TV to help pass  the time away. Finding fun activities for senior citizens can change that.

Some good activities for senior citizens

Active seniors are involved and participate in what life has to offer.  Hobbies give an individual a reason to get out and share with others. Whether it  is painting, building model airplanes or playing cards the benefits of a hobby  can be an increase your chances for improved physical, social and emotional well  being.

It is important to have regular leisure time physical activity. Anything that  promotes moving and being active will benefit you as you age. The health  benefits of staying active are a delay or prevention of a chronic disease such  as: heart disease, diabetes, some cancers and arthritis. Physical activity also  promotes brain fitness. This can help delay or prevent dementia or  Alzheimer’s.

Participating in a variety of hobbies helps many cope with the stressors of  life. How you react and respond to different situations in life affects your  health. Stress and anxiety can lead to poor health. Active seniors are involved  and lead a more balanced life.

Hobbies allow active seniors to socialize, find companionship and  camaraderie. Making connections with others that have the same interests can  often open an individual to new found friendships.

Many individuals that participate in similar hobbies find themselves with  other individuals that have similar situations and experiences in life. As we  age, we experience losses that affect our emotional health. Active seniors that  are involved in hobbies have a pool of other individuals that they can draw  emotional support and comfort. There are times when they can also learn from  shared experiences. Sharing our feelings with others is a way to connect with  others as well as relieve the stress and anxiety we may be feeling.

More Hobbies and the Mind Body Connection: How Active Seniors are Having  Fun and Enjoying Better  Health …

Hobbies as activities for senior citizens are a way to calm their  minds and relax. It is a way to belong, have something to look forward to  doing.

For many, their hobbies are a tool that releases stress and helps bring their  emotions back into balance again. It is a time when we get an attitude  adjustment and feel right with the world again.

Leisure time physical activity is important to healthy aging. Moving our  bodies and using our minds affect how we age. The mind body connection benefits  of participating in hobbies are improved mental clarity, enhanced immune system,  improved self esteem and self confidence.

Hobbies are a way to have fun, enjoy and stay regularly involved in leisure  time physical activity. Consistency and regular involvement is the key to  maintaining healthy aging.

Having a variety of hobbies during the week can keep an individual busy,  interested and involved. Participating in a hobby with a group can be  motivating. Knowing that the expectations of others are anticipating your  participation in the day’s activity may give one the boost to go when they feel  down. Even to know that you have others that depend on you to be there, may give  you an extra boost to participate when you don’t feel like it. Feeling a sense  of commitment to others, a sense of belonging is important to healthy aging.

Hobbies give many a sense of connection to others, when there are no other  connections in an individual’s life. Connections to others, a sense of  belonging, a sense of community gives many active seniors the reason to  participate in life to their fullest ability.

Hobbies are a way for many to stay physically and mentally stimulated. Trying  new things, meeting new people and sharing your knowledge, experience and  sometimes your creative side with others can keep an active senior challenged  mentally, as well as, physically.

Hobbies are a safe way to get out and meet people with like minded interests.  It is a great ice breaker to meeting new people and a way to stay active, no  matter how old you get to be.

Any activity that gets an aging senior moving and involved with others is a  step towards healthy aging. It is important to get busy and stay active. Take up  dancing, gardening; join a walking club or travel.

Hobbies have a mind body connection. Active seniors are having fun and  enjoying better health as they regularly participate in things they enjoy. It is  never too late to start enjoying yourself now. Take time to find your own  activities for senior citizens to help your loved ones and  yourselves.

Diane Carbo Registered Nurse has more than thirty five years in the nursing  field. Her experience as a geriatric care manager, makes her uniquely qualified  to help those who want to live out their lives in their own homes. Diane has  developed a web site to make people aware of issues and options. You will find a  mountain of helpful information that will be continually updated. Please visit:  http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com/activities-for-senior-citizens.html for more information on hobbies and senior activities Sign up for The Caring  Advocate Ezine her free newlsetter and receive a complimentary copy of  the Home Health Care Planning Guide.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

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Do Senior Citizens Need to Exercise? by Judy Conway

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many people ask the question, “Do senior citizens need to exercise?” One of  the greatest causes of atrophy to the muscles of seniors is insufficient  activity needed to stimulate adequate blood flow to vital organs.

Reasons for an Exercise Program:

Left to the reticence of a senior lifestyle can result in disease, lack of  muscle tone, and promote a depressing, non productive lifestyle. I speak from  experience as I watched my mother refuse to do her required exercises after her  knee replacement surgery. She chose instead to sit in her chair and watch TV the  greater part of the day and evening. Because of her inactivity I watched as she  became a prisoner in her own body. This had a great effect on not only her  physical activity but also her mental condition.

Recommendations:

A sensible, regular exercise program that is planned around a person’s  capacity and needs will help them feel better, live longer and gain  independence.

A senior is not someone who is going to engage in a marathon. In planning a  healthy, stimulating program start by planning a routine that will provide  enough exercise that will generate adequate blood flow to all of the vital  organs. You will want to maintain the hard-earned muscles employing  cardiovascular exercises, weight training and stretching routines. Consider  using resistance bands.

The primary goal is to reach a balance of activity providing just enough  exercise to accomplish the goals of maintaining muscle mass, adequate blood flow  and a feeling of well-being. If the regimen is extremely strenuous it can cause  an adverse effect to the overall condition of a senior. It is imperative that  you check a senior’s physical and verbal response. Pay special close attention  for adverse signs such as excessive sweating, difficulty in breathing,  imbalance, droopy eyelids and evidence of mild to severe pain. It these elements  occur the activity should be stopped immediately.

A senior citizen’s exercise program should be based on their individual  needs. If a group regime is put into action there could be the risk of over  training. In addition it will be easier to follow the progress of a person if  they are following a specific set of exercises that have been developed with  only their needs in mind. One person may be able to do more repetitions and a  more vigorous exercise than another person. For this reason a program that has  been commenced with a senior citizen should be fully documented and a log book  maintained noting the details of every workout.

As a senior develops more strength and flexibility their exercise program can  be changed. The program should be flexible, keeping in mind that the routines  and movements can be increased or decreased on a weekly basis depending on the  physical condition of the person.

Execution Procedures:

If you are a family member, or friend caring for the senior citizen, it is  recommended that you seek the opinion of a professional to help you develop the  exercise plan. They will be able to assist you in selecting a program with the  proper intensity and type of exercises that will be beneficial to the patient.  In addition to an exercise plan, it is also suggested you engage the services of  a dietitians, physical therapist, and a nutritionist. These trained  professionals will be able to monitor whether the program is too strenuous or  acceptable.

When you commence a program it is suggested that you ask a professional to be  present and assist in demonstrating the various moves. An exercise that is  executed improperly can cause severe injury to a patient. To achieve the  required results you want to be certain that exercises are performed properly.  Professionals should also be scheduled to check in various times during the  program to evaluate the senior’s response to the treatment.

Research Recommendations:

It is important for the person who is going to be initiating the exercise  program do their due diligence and research what is available to help them make  the right decisions in achieving the goals for physical help to the senior  citizen. Below are a few suggestions for developing the best program  possible:

· Check on the availability of exercise DVD’s that cater specifically to  senior citizens · Watch exercise videos online · Check forums online for  the expertise of others regarding this subject · Visit a senior citizen  center to view their typical routine · Be open to listen to and learn from  instructors and experts

In Conclusion:

As you and the patient continue in the exercise program you will develop the  ability to understand what exercises and amount of intensity works best to  achieve the desired results. It is also important to remember that in addition  to the proper exercise regimen, your senior needs the right amount of rest and  diet program to create a total healthy lifestyle.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Judy_Conway

Can Senior Citizens Still Find a Partner? by Robert Shorn

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Senior citizens who are left single, divorced or widowed are often confronted  with the question of whether one can still find a partner who will see them  through till the end of their lives.

Luckily, they do not have to go far to start a date. Finding the next true  love of their life may be easier than they ever thought it could possibly be. At  the comforts of their home, they can start dating through websites offering  services of meeting other people, particularly to this age group. Senior  citizens who are consciously searching for their partners are believed to be  able to extend their life just by aggressively searching.

How can this be? Statistics reflects that senior citizens who are regularly  meeting people in search of a life-long partner stay in good health. Clearly,  there is a dual advantage here. Find a partner and live longer. The studies  aren’t wrong and our mental well being has a profound impact on our overall  health and our life expectancy. There are so many benefits that come with  spending your time with someone you love.

Websites that offer online meeting for senior citizens covers the general  concerns of the senior citizens in dating. These sites makes it easier for this  market segment to meet and match. Most of the senior citizens use the following  sites: Senior Friend Finder, Dating For Single Seniors Meet, Senior People Meet,  and Dating For Seniors. There are more that could satisfy one’s need. There are  many by region and others that orient themselves by interest, whether it be  ethnicity, religion, hobbies, political orientation or nearly anything else. The  options are virtually limitless when it comes to these sites.

The sites offer different ways to communicate with the other person. Some  would provide a window to one’s bio data called profile. Still, others allow  people to chat through their websites.

The more sophisticated ones would provide articles on advising people on how  to date. The articles provide the way to bring people together who think the  same way.

Naturally, senior citizens would be cautious in joining such activity because  they feel uncomfortable discussing their age. Why is it difficult when the ones  who will be there share the same concern because they are mostly senior citizens  too?

These people carry similar concerns. They are looking for an opportunity to  love and the person to share it with. They may think positive about the  situation, but are also vigilant.

Looking for truck  tires for sale and roll  up garage doors? Try eBay.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Robert_Shorn

Hearing Loss in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many senior citizens are affected by some hearing problems. If left  untreated, any extent of hearing loss may worsen over time. It is important that  senior citizens with difficulty hearing consult their doctor. Companions or  caregivers who notice a senior citizen is experiencing trouble hearing should  facilitate and encourage the senior to seek medical attention. Knowing the  symptoms and taking appropriate treatment measures can help stop and, in some  cases, even reverse hearing degradation.

Hearing is very important for daily functioning so problems with hearing are  quite serious and should be addressed as soon as possible. Senior citizens who  experience hearing problems may feel isolated or embarrassed as a result. Still,  if you find that you have trouble hearing, talk to your doctor about the many  treatment options available.

Symptoms

Senior citizens who have hearing loss often complain of:

  • Having trouble hearing on the phone
  • Difficulty with following conversations, especially when multiple people are  talking
  • Needing to have volume levels of electronics so high that others notice and  complain
  • Difficulty hearing things over background noise
  • Sensing that people always seem to mumble
  • Cannot understand when women or children speak to  you

Diagnosis

 

If a doctor finds that you have hearing loss, they may refer you to an  otolaryngologist who specializes in the ear, nose, and throat. After this doctor  conducts diagnostic tests, they may refer you to an audiologist who is trained  to measure hearing function. Audiologists can test your hearing for certain  pitches and loudness levels in order to find if a hearing aid is needed. These  tests are painless.

Hearing loss is caused by degeneration of nerves with age, one of the reasons  it is prevalent among senior citizens. Other common contributions to hearing  loss are earwax build-up, exposure to very loud noises over long periods of  time, viral and bacterial infections, heart conditions, head injuries, tumors,  medications, and heredity.

Types of Hearing Loss

Some different types of hearing loss include:

Presbycusis: This is age-related hearing loss. Senior citizens  affected by this condition can either have a hard time hearing or have low  tolerance for loud noises. It can be caused by damage to the inner ear known as  sensorineural hearing loss.

Tinnitus: This condition is characterized by hearing ringing, roaring,  or some other continuous noise in the ears. It can be caused by exposure to loud  noises, hearing loss, medications, other health problems, allergies, and  conditions of the heart and blood vessels. The source of noise caused by  tinnitus is unclear and varies in how long it affects the sufferer. Senior  citizens can treat the condition by either using a hearing aid to make other  sounds louder or using a masker that makes tinnitus noise less noticeable.  Others use music to drown out the extra noise. Avoiding smoking, alcohol, and  loud noises can decrease the effects of tinnitus.

Conductive hearing loss: This is caused by blockage between eardrum  and the inner ear. This can be caused by ear wax build-up, fluid in the middle  ear, abnormal bone growth, punctured ear drum, or ear infections. For ear wax  blockage specifically, it is suggested that sufferers use mild treatments like  mineral oil, baby oil, glycerin, or commercial ear drops to soften ear wax. If  you think the eardrum may be damaged, you should contact a doctor.

Treatment

Senior citizens who suffer from hearing loss have many options for treatment  and alleviating symptoms of decreased hearing functioning. These include:

Hearing aids: these are small devices placed on the ear that make  certain noises louder. Audiologists can help find the right hearing aid for you  and may allow you to test it in a trial period. Pick a hearing aid manufacturer  who will work with you while you adjust to wearing the product, and be sure that  you are aware of how to maintain a hearing aid, such as replacing batteries and  how to use it properly.

Assistive / Adaptive devices: There are a variety of products that fit  within this category like:

  • Telephone amplifying device: can be a receiver or entire phone that makes  phone conversations louder
  • TV and radio listening systems: avoids having to turn the volume up on  regular devices
  • Assistive listening systems: these are sometimes available in public venues  like theaters, churches, synagogues, and meeting places
  • Alerts: allow for signals that replace doorbells, smoke detectors, and alarm  clocks in order for the hearing impaired to hear them properly. These usually  employ vibrations or flashing lights to replace noise.

Cochlear  implants: If hearing loss is severe, a small electronic device can be placed  under the skin, behind the ear. It allows sound to bypass the malfunctioning  part of the ear and send signals directly to the brain. This process is not  helpful for all cases of hearing loss or deafness.

 

Tips for Senior Citizens

For senior citizens affected by hearing loss, here are some helpful hints for  communication:

  • Let people know you have trouble hearing them
  • Ask people to face you, talk slower, or ask them to speak without  shouting
  • Pay attention to facial expressions and gestures
  • Let people know when you don’t understand them
  • Ask people to reword things for you when you don’t  understand

Tips for Caregivers

 

Elder caregivers taking care of senior citizens who suffer from hearing loss  can use these helpful hints when speaking to their patients:

  • Face the person and talk clearly
  • Speak at a normal speed and do not cover the mouth
  • Stand in good lighting and avoid background noises
  • Use facial expressions and physical gestures
  • Repeat yourself if necessary
  • Keep a hearing impaired person involved in a conversation rather than  talking to others  about the individual while in their presence
  • Be patient,positive and relaxed during the interaction
  • Ask how you can help them understand you

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects  caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for  families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking  employment.

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Light Bulbs For Senior Citizens By Atte Aaltonen

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Seeing the Light: Why Lighting Is Important for Senior  Citizens

As people age, they consider home improvements that will make their living  spaces both safer and more enjoyable. Some senior citizens choose to downgrade  to a smaller and easy-to-manage home, while others improve the safety of their  current household by making sure railings are tightly installed, rugs are put on  slippery floors and stairs are covered in soft carpet. One factor that is often  overlooked is the lighting throughout the home. While it may seem simple,  lighting is one of the most important features of the home, especially as people  get older.

According to SeniorJournal.com, senior citizens need three times the amount  of light than younger people do in order to see clearly. This is because the  lenses on the eye thicken and the pupils shrink, causing the eyes to react  slower to lighting conditions. Senior citizens with dementia also suffer from  additional eye impairment because they have a difficulty in distinguishing  objects from their backgrounds.

Not only is lighting necessary for senior citizens because of the effects of  aging, but they also need adequate lighting for safety. Senior citizens are at  an increased risk for slips and falls, so it’s important that they can see  clearly throughout the home.

Where Should Seniors Have Lighting?

It’s essential that every room has adequate lighting for both safety and  comfort, but there are certain areas that require careful attention. Make sure  that stairways and walkways have enough lighting, as these are some of the most  common places for slips and falls. Ideally, seniors should have a light switch  at both the top and bottom of the stairs so that they can switch the lights on  and off without being stuck in the dark. The lights should point toward the  stairs so that each step is well lit.

The kitchen is another room that needs adequate lighting, as this is where  seniors prepare all of their meals and handle appliances. Seniors must be able  to read the labels on food items, buttons on appliances and also be able to  handle cutting and chopping confidently. To increase lighting, consider  installing lights underneath cabinets. Other good choices include low-hanging  lights to go over a breakfast bar or recessed lighting in all corners of the  kitchen.

Another room that deserves attention is the family room or den, where  reading, watching television and relaxing is done. There is no need for seniors  to strain their eyes when engaging in their hobbies, so choose lighting that  will complement activities. For example, floor lamps that have 3-way bulbs are  ideal, since each bulb can be positioned differently, providing light from a  variety of angles.

Nightlights are also important to have throughout the home, especially  because seniors find themselves getting up during the night to use the washroom.  Consider the areas that are dark and often traveled through during the late  hours, such as hallways, stairs and bedrooms. Nightlights are easy to place in  both high and low outlets to provide sufficient lighting, at least until a  senior can reach the light switch.

What Types of Light Bulbs are Best for Seniors?

The standard and most basic type of light bulb is an incandescent bulb. What  makes an incandescent bulb a great option for seniors is that it is easy to  change, easy to keep clean and fits in standard lamps and fixtures. Because  incandescent bulbs contain no mercury or lead, they can be disposed of or  recycled with the regular trash.

Fluorescent light bulbs are another great option for seniors because they are  efficient, produce little heat and last up to 20,000 hours. A longer life means  seniors won’t have to change the bulbs as much. Fluorescent light bulbs do  contain mercury however, so it’s important to dispose of them properly.

Turning Light Bulbs On and Off with Ease

Light bulbs and fixtures aren’t the only important factors to consider;  seniors must also think about how their light bulbs will be turned on and off.  If possible, make sure that all light bulbs can be turned on using a light  switch so that the room is well lit upon entering or exiting. As an added  benefit, choose to install dimmers onto light switches so that the intensity of  the light can be altered using the switch.

Other great options are rocker switches, which are larger than standard  switches and can be turned on and off using an arm, elbow or even a cane. If  there are rooms where the lights are not hooked up to a light switch, clap-on  lights should be considered. These friendly alternatives make it easy for  seniors to gently clap their hands in order to activate light bulbs.

How to Safely Change a Light Bulb

Providing a senior citizen’s home with enough light is not only essential for  safety, but it also allows seniors more independence and confidence. Best of  all, once proper lighting is installed, seniors can maintain their light bulbs  and fixtures themselves. To change a light bulb is simple and requires no tools,  as long as the bulb is in a lamp or fixture that does not contain a glass  reflector. If a glass reflector is present, a small screwdriver can be used to  loosen the screws and remove the bulb.

1. Turn off the electricity and let the bulb cool for 5 minutes.  2. Hold  the base of the bulb firmly with one hand, while turning it counterclockwise  until it is released from the socket. 3. Insert the new light bulb into the  socket, making sure it fits snug. 4. Turn the light bulb in a clockwise  direction until is locked in. 5. Switch the electricity to “on” and make  sure that the bulb is working properly.

What to Look for When Choosing Light Fixtures

There may not be much that seniors can do about existing lighting, but if  updating fixtures or purchasing a new home, there are certain light fixtures to  consider. Look for ceiling fixtures that do not contain globes around them.  These need to be removed and cleaned often in order to maintain their look and  proper lighting. Not to mention, in order to reach these fixtures, seniors will  need a ladder or step stool, which only increases the risk of slips and  falls.

Floor lamps make great lighting options since they are easy to maintain.  Light bulbs can simply be swapped out and a cloth or paper towel can be used to  wipe down the bulbs and fixtures. Best of all, floors lamps are inexpensive, can  be matched to any décor and can be moved throughout the home.

Wall sconces are other great alternatives to ceiling lighting, especially in  stairwells and bathrooms. Wall sconces make it easy to change out light bulbs  and most models have openings on both the top and bottom. Sconces are easy to  clean, have decorative appeal and provide ample lighting, especially is awkward  places and corners.

Proper lighting is vital for the safety and independence of senior citizens.  Fortunately, senior centers and retirement homes have improved their standards  in regards to lighting, but it’s important that the homes of seniors are not  ignored. Take the time to consider new and updated light bulbs and fixtures, as  well as increasing the wattage where applicable. Ultimately, seniors will find  their homes more enjoyable and comfortable with these minor home  improvements.

Visit this site for information about fluorescent light bulbs.

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What Kinds of Job Opportunities Are There For Senior Citizens? By Stephen Chua

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Because of improved health and the desire to stay active more and more senior citizens are looking for job opportunities. Certainly because of this the job market for those that are now over 50 is improving. Certainly projections are showing that by 2010 senior citizens will make up 1/3 of the entire workforce in the United States. So just what types of senior citizens job opportunities are there available to them?

In this article we take a look at a number of different opportunities that are available for senior citizens. Although it can be quite intimidating for anyone who has been out of work for sometime finding a new job there are now employment resources specially dedicated to helping senior citizens make the transition back into the job market. There are many Governmental, private and public organizations which provide assistance to senior citizens in relation to career guidance, education, job training, job placement and resume and interview skills.

However there are some job opportunities available for senior citizens which need little or no qualifications in order to do them.

1. Baby Sitting

Unfortunately there are lots of children out there who do not have Grandparents. Certainly more and more parents would be happy to leave their children with a more experienced and mature senior than a 14 year old. It is quite easy to get set up just place an advert on your local supermarket bulletin board, home owner’s association newsletter or at your church. You will soon be amazed at the responses you will get.

2. House Sitting

Many people are now traveling to see their children or friends. So these people will spend long times away from their home and there are plenty of opportunities now for senior citizens to offer their services as house sitters. Many people will know that their homes will be well cared for by such people.

As you can see from above no longer do senior citizen’s need to stay at home and wile away the hours doing nothing. There are plenty of senior citizens job opportunities available. So why not contact your local senior citizen group or one of the employment resource centers that have been specifically set up to find employment for those senior citizens who want to do more with their lives.

For more information to seniors living [http://seniorselderly.com], please visit [http://seniorselderly.com]

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Nevada Ballet Theatre Presents Romeo & Juliet for an unforgettable season finale

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Las Vegas, Press-Media Releases 

SHAKESPEARE’S PLAY AND PROKOFIEV’S ENDURING SCORE BRINGS THE ‘MONTAGUES’ AND ‘CAPULETS’ TO LIFE IN THIS RIVETING BALLET CHOREOGRAPHED BY JAMES CANFIELD 

 “For never was a story of more woe, than this of Juliet and her Romeo.”- William Shakespeare

 

Romeo & Juliet is Co-Sponsored by: Madeleine & Don Andress and Wendy & Richard Plaster

 

LAS VEGAS, NV (Wednesday, April 10, 2013) – Nevada Ballet Theatre (NBT) concludes its inaugural season at The Smith Center for the Performing Arts with the beloved Shakespearean tragedy, Romeo & Juliet. The classic tale of ill-fated love will be presented on Mother’s Day weekend: Saturday, May 11 at 7:30 pm and Sunday, May 12 at 1 pm in Reynolds Hall at The Smith Center for the Performing Arts, 361 Symphony Park Avenue. Ticket prices range from $35-$128 (plus fees) and can be ordered by calling The Smith Center Box Office at (702) 749-2000 or by visiting www.nevadaballet.org.

Based on the play by William Shakespeare, NBT will transport audiences to 15th Century Verona through Sergei Prokofiev’s well-loved score, Romeo & Juliet, Op. 64. Minimalist – yet lush – sets and costumes, reminiscent of the time period, will complement the inventive choreography of Artistic Director James Canfield. Through comedy and tragedy, movement and miming, feuding families tell the tale of innocent love through street fighting, swordmanship and traditional court dancing in this two-act full-length ballet.

One of Shakespeare’s most performed and notable plays, Romeo & Juliet has successfully been adapted for various performance mediums over the centuries, including stage, opera and film. A challenging ballet for any professional dancer, it requires unique preparation in that performers must master a historically stylized look as well as a deep exploration into the art of acting. With an emotionally charged storyline, a concentration on character development is essential, so that the growth and change in each character is evident to audiences.

Romeo & Juliet is a significant ballet because it serves as a unique educational tool; in addition to the historical importance of William Shakespeare’s play, Romeo & Juliet explores cultural, familial and societal issues that are applicable to young people in our society today,” said Artistic Director James Canfield.  “Clark County students who attend our school matinee on Friday, May 10 at The Smith Center for the Performing Arts will gain a unique understanding into the growth and maturation of a character, similar to how we as human beings develop and change throughout our lives.”

As a benefit for Romeo & Juliet ticket holders, NBT will present Insights, a pre-performance perspective designed to engage, enlighten and entertain audiences in preparation for the performance they are about to see. Led by NBT’s Director of Education & Outreach, Terané Comito, Insights will be presented inside The Smith Center’s Troesh Studio Theater and will take place 45 minutes prior to curtain (Saturday, May 11 at 6:45 pm and Sunday, May 12 at 12:15 pm).

MOTHER’S DAY TEA with

Join us for the Mother’s Day Tea and a “Mommy and Me” Fashion Presentation featuring the designs of Paul Smith in The Smith Center Courtyard (adjacent to the box office). Guests will enjoy tea sandwiches, petit fours and specialty tea selections. Add to the beauty of the ballet experience by attending this special event prior to the matinee on Sunday, May 12 from 11 am – 1 pm. Tickets can be purchased for an additional $75 by calling 702-243-2623 ext. 222 or via email at specialevents@nevadaballet.org.

 

JEWELRY BOX” OPPORTUNITY with

Exclusively for Romeo & Juliet, purchase a “Jewelry Box” of 4, 6 or 8 seats. Purchase includes access to the Founders Room, concierge service as well as a $100 gift card for each guest to The Jewelers of Las Vegas. Call 702-243-2623 ext. 224 to make a reservation.

 

ABOUT NEVADA BALLET THEATRE

Under the artistic direction of James Canfield, Nevada Ballet Theatre is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization based in Las Vegas and the largest professional ballet company and dance Academy in the state. Committed to the highest artistic standards, this classically-based company is at home in an eclectic repertory, moving easily from the classics to the high-energy contemporary ballets. The mission of Nevada Ballet Theatre is to educate and inspire statewide, regional and national audiences and vitally impact community life through professional company productions, dance training and education and outreach. Nevada Ballet Theatre is the resident ballet company of The Smith Center for the Performing Arts.

NEVADA BALLET THEATRE SEASON 42:   

 

October 2013

A CHOREOGRAPHERS’ SHOWCASE

Nevada Ballet Theatre and Cirque du Soleil

Sunday, October 6 at 1 pm & Sunday, October 13 at 1 pm  

Mystère Theatre – Treasure Island

This October, we bring back A Choreographers’ Showcase, the collaboration by Cirque du Soleil® and Nevada Ballet Theatre presented at Treasure Island’s Mystère Theatre. This critically acclaimed partnership features new works created and performed by artists from both organizations.

 

November 2013

SWAN LAKE Act II and SLEEPING BEAUTY Act III (Aurora’s Wedding) A Tribute to TchaikovskyFriday, November 1 at 7:30 pm & Saturday, November 2 at 7:30 pm The Smith Center – Reynolds Hall

In November, ballet’s greatest love stories take the stage with Swan Lake Act II and the enchanting Act III of Sleeping Beauty (Aurora’s Wedding). These immortalized characters come alive on stage set to the timeless scores of ballet’s legendary composer Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky.

Swan Lake Act II tells the classic tale of Odette – a beautiful maiden transformed into a swan by an evil sorcerer – and the prince who swears his enduring love for her. Sleeping Beauty Act III celebrates Aurora’s royal wedding with a cast of fanciful characters and luxurious scenery and costumes by Peter Cazalet.

 

December 2013

THE NUTCRACKER The Magic Continues December 14 – 22, 2013 (10 performances) The Smith Center – Reynolds Hall

 

The magic continues this December with The Nutcracker. From the moment the curtain rises, find out just how thrilling a tradition can be as you are transported to a world of magic and wonder. The first production of its kind built for the Reynolds Hall stage features grand sets, costumes and the choreography of Artistic Director James Canfield. This larger than life production returns this winter in its second year with added elements. This is the centerpiece of the holiday season and as a subscriber, you will be first in line for tickets.

March 2014 (FOR SUBSCRIBERS ONLY)

THE STUDIO SERIES: OUTSIDE IN  A Spotlight on Dance in its Purest Form March 27 – 30, 2014 (6 performances) The Smith Center – Troesh Studio Theater

 

March brings The Studio Series, reserved exclusively for subscribers and gives audiences a rare glimpse into the essence of dance, as our dancers perform commissioned works and original pieces within the intimate setting of the Troesh Studio Theater. With production elements at a minimum, you will experience true emotion and enthusiasm.

 

May 2014

SPRING FINALE  A Performance Not To Be Missed Friday, May 9 at 7:30 pm & Saturday, May 10 at 7:30 pm The Smith Center – Reynolds Hall

Don’t miss this emotionally charged program as NBT crescendos to a grand finale including James Canfield’s own tango inspired Cyclical Night and the return of acclaimed choreographer Matthew Neenan’s bold work, At the border, with live musical accompaniment.

2013-2014 SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION  

Subscriptions will be available to the general public in early May. They can be ordered online at: www.nevadaballet.org  or by calling The Smith Center Box Office at 702-749-2847. Subscribers receive many benefits over single ticket purchasers including priority seating, free ticket exchanges, personalized service, invitations to special events and first opportunity to purchase additional Nutcracker tickets. Group Sales also available.

The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor by Nina Kramer

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Las Vegas, Press-Media Releases 

The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor by Nina Kramer

“‘You have cancer’ are three of the scariest words you will ever hear,”
says Nina Kramer, author of the new book, The Harrowing Medical Journey of
a Cancer Survivor. “But how you react after hearing those words can mean
the difference between thriving and deteriorating.”

Kramer’s journey through the world of cancer treatment began in 2000 when
she was diagnosed with bladder cancer. Every year over 73,000 people are
diagnosed with the disease in the United States. Men are three times more
likely than women to develop it and about 5% will die from the disease, but
the death rate has been declining over the past twenty years.

Like many, Kramer’s journey began with a routine physical. What followed was
anything but routine.  Her first detour began with a trusted doctor. She liked him and
followed his instructions faithfully but, as she was to learn, he was not giving her the best and most advanced treatments. The number one rule when facing an illness as serious as cancer, she quickly discovered, is to do your research and seek out the best doctors and institutions that treat your disease.

The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor is Kramer’s courageous
story as she copes with a severe illness that lasted more than a decade. It began with a diagnosis of low-grade bladder cancer, continued with the removal and/or reconstruction of vital organs, and ended with dialysis and a kidney transplant. Although the story is specific to bladder cancer and its aftermath, it covers aspects inherent in any serious,
and sometimes life-threatening, illness.

With candor, honesty and life-affirming messages, The Harrowing Medical
Journey of a Cancer Survivor shares:

* The impact of emotions on surviving a serious illness – fear, denial, anger, anxiety and depression can have devastating results
* The search for experts – the single most important thing you can do when
battling a severe illness is to find the best hospitals and doctors specializing in your disease
* The focus on other passions – engrossing yourself in activities other than the illness to relieve your mind from the constant anxiety of worrying about it
* The importance of cancer support groups and psychotherapy – talking to other people can help you explore your feelings so they don’t interfere with or hamper your recovery
* Spending time on what you love – do everything you can to fight your illness, but spend time doing the things that bring you pleasure and satisfaction
* Having sex – the human contact and intimacy, as well as the erotic pleasure, can be a wonderful antidote to pain and misery

“I wanted to share my story with other cancer victims,” adds Kramer. “As I travelled this frightening medical journey, I learned a lot about how to survive and even thrive under sometimes terrifying circumstances. I wanted to share this experience in the hope that it would help others undergoing frightening medical journeys.

Nina Kramer, is a published novelist and author of the new nonfiction ebook,
The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor. She has held various
positions from journals manager to assistant vice president with medical,
scientific and technical publishers while pursuing her craft as a writer.
While undergoing cancer treatment, she made an arduous trip through some
remote locations in China—described in her Medical Journey book—as
research for her next novel set in the Middle Kingdom, Phoenix Rising; Tigers Flying. She divides her time between New York City and Stockbridge, MA.

Blog: http://ninaikramer.wordpress.com/cancer

The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor is available in ebook format
through www.authorhouse.com. www.amazon.com, www.barnesandnoble.com,
and all online booksellers.

Review Copies Available Upon Request

Walters Golf To Offer Complimentary Round of Golf

In honor of the men and women who served our great nation,

Walters Golf is offering complimentary golf at their three nationally-ranked

Las Vegas Golf Courses.

Las Vegas, NV – April 4, 2013 – Walters Golf has announced it will offer a complimentary round of golf to all active and retired military personnel this Memorial Day weekend. On Sunday, May 26, 2013, all veterans with military issued ID are invited to enjoy one free round of golf at any of Walters’ three properties: Bali Hai Golf Club, which is located right on the world-famous Las Vegas Strip, offering golfers 7,002 yards of pure, tropical golf paradise; Royal Links Golf Club, which faithfully recreates 18 of the best holes of the British Open; and Desert Pines Golf Club, a Dye-designed taste of the Carolinas.

 

“In honor of your service, we are at your service,” said Bill Walters, CEO and Founder of Walters Golf. “We wanted to find a special and unique way to thank our veterans and active duty personnel for their service to our country. We hope this shows our gratitude to everyone who has served” he added.

 

This is offered on a first-come, first-to-reserve basis and is based on available space. Reservations must be made in advance by calling 702-450-8159. For more details please visit online at http://www.WaltersGolf.com/MemorialDay

 

About Walters Golf:

Walters Golf, a division of The Walters Group, has become one of the fastest-growing and most widely respected golf companies in the country. From its first venture into the private country club market in 1995 to today’s ownership and operation of top-quality, daily fee golf courses, Walters Golf continues their commitment to quality and profitability while offering customers excellent value.

 

Led by businessman and avid golfer Bill Walters, Walters Golf is known in the national golf industry for developing first-class golf facilities. According to Executive Golfer, Walters is “Nevada’s leading golf entrepreneur” who “recognized the need for visitor and corporate friendly golf facilities and packages, and seized on the opportunity, investing millions in three magnificent properties.” In Las Vegas, the company owns and operates Bali Hai Golf Club, Royal Links Golf Club, Desert Pines Golf Club, Las Vegas Golf Getaways and Cili Restaurant.

Registration For Senior Idol Talent Showcase Auditions Under Way

April 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Las Vegas, Press-Media Releases 

Registration For Senior Idol Talent Showcase Auditions Under Way

Auditions To Be Held May 8-9 

Registration for the 2013 Senior Idol Talent Showcase auditions is under way for the 10th annual competition that will be held Thursday, June 13, at 3 p.m., at the Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St.

This showcase is for talented, performers age 50 years and older, and includes a variety of categories for individuals and groups to compete in. Categories include, but not limited to, singing, dance, musical instruments and comedy. Each year the array of talent has been some of the best Las Vegas has to offer, and this year will be no different.

To get a registration packet, contact the Las Vegas Senior Center at 229-6454, or stop by at 451 E. Bonanza Road. Packets must be completed and returned to the Las Vegas Senior Center by 6 p.m., Friday, April 26. Invitations to audition will be mailed out, and auditions will be held May 8 and 9at the Las Vegas Senior Center.

Dewey Street, First of its kind Home for Crafting in Las Vegas Opens Doors

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Family business is only in the area to offer wide variety of  crafting lessons and long arm quilting 

LAS VEGAS, Nev. — Three generations of love for crafting are the foundation for the newly opened Dewey Street, a store that offers lessons and long arm quilting, on South Durango in Las Vegas. Dewey Street prides itself as the only single gathering place for “crafty creatives” in Southern Nevada. Courses and quilting will be led  by the three founders: Cindy Nickerson and her two daughters, Lindsay and Laurie. Dewey Street is also welcoming other craft experts to teach in the professional space. The business additionally offers “open studio” time when the general public may come in to work on crafts with the assistance of Dewey Street staff.

Dewey Street is launching with several types of lessons including: indie, textile and art. Indie covers a wide range of techniques including a “mash-up” of traditional lessons with a modern aesthetic, book binding and paper printing. Textile uses fabrics as a canvas with exploration including bleach printing, pattern design and fabric printing. Art blurs the lines between craft and art, and focuses more on self expression with projects including collage and decoupage.

Additionally, Dewey Street is offering several types of series. Examples include sewing, home and garden, and guest teacher, which brings experts from across the Las Vegas area to teach the skill or craft they know best, broadening the offerings of Dewey Street. This translates into Dewey Street constantly evolving and incorporating new and innovative methods to customers.

Lessons at Dewey Street reach all ages and ability levels. Instruction will appeal to everything from the contemporary crafting movement to traditional techniques. All people aged from child to senior will find a niche and class at Dewey Street, or may take advantage of the “open studio” time.

The name and foundation of Dewey Street find roots with 90-year-old Joan Faust who lived on Dewey Street in West Springfield, MA for nearly all of her life and raised a family as she literally turned trash into treasures. Her influence inspired daughter Cindy, and Cindy’s daughters, to launch the new business in Joan’s memory. The lessons they pass to the Las Vegas community are Joan’s legacy.

Founder Cindy Nickerson has been sewing almost all of her life and can perform nearly all forms of stitchery. The gifted seamstress also ran a successful embroidery business for nearly 25 years in Massachusetts. Cindy operates one of the largest professional grade long arm sewing machines in the area. Her service offers a speedy and professional alternative to work that is commonly done in homes and a level of perfection through state-of-the art computerized technology. The precise stitching creates a high-quality, yet personalized piece that will last for generations.

Cindy’s daughter Lindsay carries on the legacy of quilting and sewing. She is a mother of two (soon to be three) and brings innovation to crafting with small children. Lindsay also  has a green thumb, which morphed into a complementing talent of creating vintage spoon plant markers.

Laurie, Cindy’s other daughter, cannot sew a straight line. However, she offers balance to the women of her family with strong artistic talent. Laurie keeps busy with her day job as Art Director for a leading Las Vegas firm and teaching a course at the Art Institute. Surprisingly, she finds enough spare time to move the artsy side of Dewey Street in the right direction. Her skills include painting, assemblage, book binding and perhaps most fun of all, puppet making.

Dewey Street’s interior reflects Laurie’s artistic vision. Lessons are taught around antique tables and a close look at the chair cushions will reveal a pattern of the Dewey Street logo. The walls are a soft blue and hanging art was designed and framed by Laurie.

The owners also advance Joan’s legacy by helping the community. The last Sunday of every month, Dewey Street offers its space, knowledge and time to a non-profit organization.

Dewey Street, located at 2960 S. Durango Suite 111 in Las Vegas, is open 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday, Thursday and Friday in addition to regularly scheduled class times and appointments. More information is available by going to www.dewey-street.com.

ICBA Kicks off 2013 ICBA National Convention and Techworld® in Las Vegas

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Las Vegas, Nev. (March 11, 2013)—Today more than 3,300 community bankers and industry leaders gathered for the opening of the 2013 Independent Community Bankers of America® (ICBA) National Convention and Techworld® at the Wynn Las Vegas and Encore. The convention, which runs through Friday, March 15, is the largest gathering of community bankers in the world and features an all-star lineup of speakers, more than 60 educational workshops and numerous networking opportunities.

“Community banks drive local economies throughout the nation by serving local residents and small businesses, so bringing them together in one place to discuss top-of-mind  issues and the future of the industry is something we all look forward to year after year,” Jeff Gerhart, ICBA chairman and chairman, president and CEO of Bank of Newman Grove, Neb., said. “This ICBA event is always a tremendous forum for community bankers and industry leaders to exchange ideas, discover the latest trends and learn about new developments. Most of all, it’s the perfect time for community bankers to come together and discover even more ways to empower their local towns and cities across the nation.”

Highlights of the convention include remarks from national newsmakers, including Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Chairman Martin Gruenberg, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray and Comptroller of the Currency Thomas Curry.

Other featured speakers include Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace, Wikipedia and the Wikimedia Foundation founder Jimmy Wales and legendary NFL quarterback Joe Montana.

Attendees can stay tuned to up-to-the-minute information on the convention with the ICBA 2013 Mobile App and by following the #ICBALV13 hashtag on Twitter.

For more information and a schedule, visit www.icba.org.

About ICBA
The Independent Community Bankers of America®, the nation’s voice for nearly 7,000 community banks of all sizes and charter types, is dedicated exclusively to representing the interests of the community banking industry and its membership through effective advocacy, best-in-class education and high-quality products and services. For more information, visit www.icba.org.

Seasons at Prince Creek West Celebrates 15,000 Square Feet Expansion– Grand Clubhouse Welcomes First Visitors

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Murrells Inlet, SC–Seasons at Prince Creek West, the active adult lifestyle community that has made its mark as one of the country’s most luxurious locales for active adults 55+, has announced the opening of its grand clubhouse.

Featuring 15,000 square feet, the new facility greets visitors with a breathtaking view of its resort-style outdoor pool.  A spacious foyer extends a warm welcome and houses a library and card room. Easily subdivided to host multiple events simultaneously, the grand hall/ballroom features a catering kitchen and dance floor and is outfitted with the latest in audio-visual equipment and lighting.  A well-appointed billiards room rounds out the facility and includes large-screen TV’s, pool tables, game tables and a wet bar. Opening onto a covered lanai with an expansive outdoor entertainment area, the clubhouse allows residents to take full advantage of this coastal community’s temperate climate year-round.

Amid much fanfare, the clubhouse recently welcomed its first guests: residents of Seasons at Prince Creek West. Long-time resident, Marge Mugno, praised the developer, Dock Street Communities, for delivering a product that according to Mugno, “is a perfect addition to an already perfect community.”

“The clubhouse was designed to meet the needs of our residents who enjoy a fun and active lifestyle. That’s exactly what Marge and her fellow residents did last week as they kicked up their heels at our inaugural dinner/dance. Our motto, ‘don’t just change your address; change your life’ paints an accurate description of our residents,” said Activities Director, Gail Lewis. “People love the fact that something is always going on.”

Seasons’ latest amenity complements an existing sports park which encompasses more than 30,000 square feet of tennis courts, bocce and shuffle board courts, indoor and outdoor pools, a state-of-the art fitness center, an outdoor kitchen/fireplace with a seated dining area, and a wilderness trail and dock.

Located within the pristine Prince Creek development in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, Seasons is in close proximity to the well-known Tournament Players Club, a five-star golf club operated by the PGA, and within minutes of world class shopping, dining, entertainment venues and medical facilities.

Developed by Dock Street Communities, Seasons at Prince Creek West has an estimated 450 single-story homes that today are enjoyed by approximately 700 residents. Luxury features include large covered and screened porches, natural gas, granite countertops, GE appliance packages, large master suites and spa-inspired baths.

Visitors are always welcome at Seasons. The sales center, located at 125 Sugar Loaf Lane in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, is open Monday through Friday from 10:00 am to 5:30 pm, Saturday 10:00 am to 5:00 pm, and Sunday from 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm.  Tours may be scheduled by calling 843-650-6627.

For more information on the community and its exclusive lifestyle, visit Seasons at Prince Creek West online at: www.seasonsmi.com

About Seasons at Prince Creek West:

Seasons at Prince Creek West is an active adult lifestyle community for individuals 55+. Situated in Murrells Inlet, SC, this gated community twenty miles south of Myrtle Beach, SC features over 30,000 SF of amenities that include a sports park, fitness center, and grand clubhouse. Hiking and bike trails, the Atlantic Ocean and championship golf courses nearby really appeal to the outdoor enthusiast Seasons is served by the nearby Myrtle Beach International Airport.

About the Dock Street Communities:

Dock Street Communities, Inc., founded in 2005 by Sam Burns, is a privately held company specializing in acquisition, finance, development, construction, selling and management of communities including live/work townhomes, single family residential, and 55+ active adult lifestyle communities. Their developments span North and South Carolina, Florida, and Tennessee.

Photos on the new clubhouse and grand opening, as well as fact sheets on both Seasons at Prince Creek West and Dock Street Communities, are available by clicking on the following link:

http://www.marketingstrategiesinc.com/clients/seasonsatprincecreek.html

Link Includes:

Images:

•Clubhouse, Foyer

•Ribbon Cutting/Grand Opening (l-r) Dennis Ouellette, Project Manager Dock Street Communities; Scott Trembley, Vice President of Sales Dock Street Communities; George Kieft, Resident and HOA Board Member; and Gail Lewis, Activities Director, Seasons at Prince Creek West

•Clubhouse, Covered Lanai

•Residents & Guests Welcome the New Clubhouse

Word Documents:

•Fact Sheets: Dock Street Communities and Seasons at Prince Creek West

Renwon Offers Colorectal Cancer Home Screening Kits

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

To emphasize Renown Institute for Cancer’s commitment to quality cancer care and the importance of getting screened, Renown Health is offering a colorectal cancer home screening kit for only $15 ($5 savings) during the months of March and April. The $15 screening kit, Fecal Immunochemical Test (FIT), is a home screening for annual colon cancer detection.

 

Dr. John Gray and Dr. William Pfau created a fun, educational rap video on You Tube to raise awareness of the FIT Test and encourage patients to take the easy, at-home test which only requires “a swish and a flush.”

 

Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death in the US with more than 100,000 Americans being diagnosed each year. Despite the alarming statistics, if detected early though regular screenings, colorectal cancer is preventable.

 

Colon cancer has an 85 percent survival rate if caught early. It is estimated that as many as 30,000 lives could be saved each year through regular screenings and exams.

 

In 2008, the AmericanCollege of Gastroenterology (ACG) published updated guidelines for colorectal cancer screening. ACG recommends either a colonoscopy every 10 years or an annual FIT screening as the preferred test for colorectal cancer screenings starting at age 50. African Americans should begin screenings at age 45. Patients with a family history of colorectal cancer should speak with their doctor about a different screening schedule.

 

The new ACG guidelines list FIT as a preferred strategy because it has more extensive data than the guaiac-based Hemoccult SENSA test, and because fecal DNA testing is expensive.

 

Home Screening Kit – This screening detects blood in the stool often caused by cancers and polyps. The FIT Test detects blood more successfully than older and more widely used stool-screening tests.
Key patient benefits of the test include:

  • More convenient for patients because it is easy to prepare and complete in the privacy of your own home
  • Only one sample required, as opposed to three consecutive samples with the previous guaiac tests
  • Higher sensitivity resulting in fewer false readings
  • No dietary or medication restrictions required
  • No physician referral required

 

. To order a kit, visit renown.org/FITTest or call 775-982-6830.

 

About Renown Institute for Cancer

Renown Institute for Cancer offers fully integrated cancer services right here at home allowing patients and their families access to advanced treatment options. With three cancer physicians, patients experience coordinated care, appointments and treatments all at one location. For general inquiries, contact 775-982-6830 or visit www.renown.org.

City Of Las Vegas April 2013 Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle!

 

Spring Celebration and Foster Connect (all ages)
Saturday, April 6, noon to 4 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road, (702) 229-8100.
Families will enjoy a spring celebration with amusement rides, jump houses, crafts, games, farmers’ market, community vendors, music and much more. Interested families will be able to receive information on becoming a foster family.

 

Summer Themed Specialty Camp Registration (ages 6-15)

Thursday, April 11, 8 a.m. registration packets are available for pick up.

Thursday, April 11, 5 p.m., registration opens for Summer 2012 alumni at Mirabelli.

Saturday, April 13, 8 a.m., open registration at both sites in person. No online registration.

Cost: $115 per week for the first child; $110 each additional child from the same family.

MirabelliCommunity Center, 6200 Hargrove Ave., (702) 229-6359.

VeteransMemorialLeisureServicesCenter, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.

Two community centers will offer themed specialty camps with additional activities, cooking, and/or field trips from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday, beginning June 10. A few specialty camps have higher prices. Mirabelli special camp list is available online.

For more information on summer camps, call 229-6175.

 

Summer Camp Registration (ages 6-15)

Registration opens Saturday, April 13, 8 a.m. in person at the following sites.

Cost: $75 per week for the first child; $70 for each additional child from the same family.

Lorenzi Adaptive Summer Camp, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-6358.

CimarronRoseCommunity Center, 5591 N. Cimarron Road, (702) 229-1607; ages 6-11 only.

DoolittleCommunity Center, 1950 N. J St., (702) 229-6374.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

StupakCommunity Center, 251 W. Boston Ave., (702) 229-2488.

Camps will be offered from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays, beginning June 10; Lorenzi Adaptive camp will begin at 7:30 a.m. For more information on summer camps, call 229-6175. No online registration.

 

Ward 6 Free Shredding Event
Saturday, April 13, 10 a.m. to noon.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive.
Bring your documents that need to be shredded. Complimentary shredding takes place in the Centennial Hills Community Center Active Adult Center parking lot. Limit of five boxes per vehicle.

Dula Gymnasium Indoor Pickleball Tournament (ages 18+)

Friday, April 19, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Cost: $15 if registered by April 5; $20 if registered after April 5.

Dula Gym, 441 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6307.

Enter the Inaugural Promotional Pickleball Tournament. Four indoor courts will host Men’s Doubles, Women’s Doubles, Mixed Doubles and 50+ groups with A and B divisions. This is a double-elimination tournament. Minimum registration of four teams per division with a guarantee of three matches. First-place winners will receive awards. Please call 229-6307 for more information and registration flyer.

 

Ward 6 Free Movie in the Park – “Odd Life of Timothy Green”
Friday, April 19, 6:30 p.m.

Free admission.
Centennial Hills Park Amphitheatre, 7101 N. Buffalo Drive, Buffalo and Deer Springs.
Enjoy the PG-rated family film, the “Odd Life of Timothy Green” in the park. Bring a blanket or folding chair to be more comfortable. For more information, call (702) 229-5463.

 

Ward 1/Ward 2 Free Shredding Event

Saturday, April 20, 10 a.m. to noon.

All AmericanSportsPark, 1551 S. Buffalo Drive

Bring your documents that need to be shredded. For more information, call (702) 229-4645.

 

Mayor’s Health Walk (all ages)

Saturday, April 27, 8 to 9:30 a.m.

Free admission and open to the public

Kellogg Zaher Sports Complex, 7901 W. Washington Ave. at Buffalo Drive.
For more information, call (702) 229-6720.

Adaptive Recreation

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)

Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m.  Closed school district staff development days and holidays.

Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

Participants will enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

 

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)

Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

 

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)

Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed school district staff development days and holidays.

Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.

CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Call 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence

City Of Las Vegas April 2013 Senior Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Las Vegas Residents Invited To Celebrations, Luncheons & Activities At City Centers

 

The city of Las Vegas active adult and senior centers offer exercise, fitness, craft, arts, dance, music and computer classes; cards; games; discussion and social groups; luncheons; sports; and special events Monday through Friday to residents age 50 and better. Many of these activities contribute to wellness and a healthy lifestyle. A listing of classes and activities is published in the Beyond the Neon Leisure Guide, available in the centers and online at www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. All activities are subject to change. Most activities require $2 annual membership to city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all senior and active adult centers.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, through April 12, by appointment only.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Low-income residents can get free assistance in preparing their personal income tax forms.  Some restrictions apply; call 229-6454 for details and appointment.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Mondays and Thursdays, through April 11 by appointment only.
Free with appointment only.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Income restrictions apply. Call 229-1702 for information and appointments.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesday afternoons, through April 9.
Free with appointment only.
LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Income restrictions apply. Call 229-1600 for information and appointments.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesdays, through April 9, by appointment only.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern, (702) 229-1515

Income restrictions apply.  Call 229-1515 for information and to make an appointment.

 

VITA Free Tax Form Preparation

Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., through April 11, by appointment only.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program is an Internal Revenue Service program designed to help low- and moderate-income taxpayers complete their annual tax returns at no cost. All ages with income under $49,000 are welcome. Call 229-6125 for appointments.

Senior Idol Auditions (ages 50+)

Application packets available April 1-26.

Auditions May 8-9, by appointment only.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Residents interested in performing during the annual Senior Idol Talent Show are invited to complete an audition application packet. Singers, dancers, comedians, magicians, and musicians, both individuals and groups, are encouraged to apply. All performers must be at least 50 years old. Application packets will be available April 1 at the Las VegasSeniorCenter, and are due no later than April 26. Auditions will be selected from completed applications; applicants will be given an appointment May 8 or 9 at the Las VegasSeniorCenter. The show will be performed Thursday, June 13. Tickets go on sale May 1. Call 229-6454 for information and application packets!

 

Centennial Hills Active Adult Book Club (ages 50+)
First Wednesday of each month at 12:30 p.m.; April 3.

Cost: Free with a current annual $2 senior programs membership.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Come prepared to discuss this month’s book.

April’s book: “The Art of Racing in the Rain” by Garth Stein.

May’s book: “Defending Jacob” by William Landay.

Hop into Spring Brunch (ages 50+)
Thursday, April 4, 10 a.m. Advance registration is required by March 29.
Cost: $3.
EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.

Start this spring off right with a sp-egg-tacular breakfast! Hop on over April 4! Registration opens March 1.

 

Scrapbooking and Card Making (ages 50+)

Monday, April 8, 1 to 4 p.m.  (second Monday of each month)
Free with a current annual $2 senior programs membership.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Bring a project you’re currently working on and share/receive crafting ideas. Registration opens March 18. Call 229-1702 for more information.

 

Root Beer Float Day (ages 50+)

Tuesday, April 9, 10 a.m. Register by April 2. Space is limited.

Cost: $1.

DoolittleSeniorCenter, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Have a tasty root beer float while enjoying good conversation.

 

International Guitar Month Luncheon (ages 50+)
Wednesday, April 17, 11:30 a.m. Advance registration is required by April 12.
Cost: $5.
EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.

Enjoy lovely guitar music while you dine during the International Guitar Month Luncheon.  Registration opens March 1.

Picnic at the Garden (ages 50+)

Wednesday, April 17, noon. Register at DoolittleSeniorCenter by April 10. Space is limited.

Cost: $3.

DoolittleCommunityGarden, 1200 block of Blankenship Ave., (702) 229-6125.
Enjoy grilled burgers and hot dogs, feast on delightful side dishes and desserts, enjoy the scenery and catch up on all the fruits and vegetables grown in our community garden.

 

AARP Defensive Driving (ages 50+)

Thursday, April 18, 11 a.m.

Cost: $12 AARP member/$14 non-members AARP; plus $2 senior programs membership.

LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Bring snacks and drinks to enjoy while you take this defensive driving course to improve your skills!

 

Red Hat Rally (ages 50+)

Thursday, April 25, 11:30 a.m. Register by April 19. Registration opens March 1.

Cost: $10, plus current senior programs membership.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Calling all Red Hatters!  Join the city of Las Vegas and the Purple Passions Red Hat group from the Las VegasSeniorCenter for a luncheon and entertainment to celebrate you.  Door prizes will be awarded. Space is limited, so register early!

 

Seniors Helping Seniors (ages 50+)

Monday, April 29, 1:30 p.m. Register by April 25.

Free admission.

LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Learn about energy-saving programs coordinated by Southwest Gas.

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts April 2013 Calendar Of Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts

April 2013 Calendar Of Events

495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101

Contact:  Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993                              Feb. 28, 2013

Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org

City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

 

 

 

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

 

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)

Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m.
Admission: $4 dollars per person per week at the door.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of fun learning international dance styles, including Arabic, Armenian, Bulgarian, Chinese, Greek, Israeli, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian and Turkish folk dances. No need to bring a partner. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.

 

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)

Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.

Admission: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

 

Contra Dance (ages 8+)
Saturday, April 13. Group lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7 to 10 p.m.
Admission: $10 adults; $5 members, students & military; $3 children under 16 & non-dancers; pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance to a live acoustic band playing joyful fiddle tunes, driving reels and a waltz or two. All dances are taught and called; newcomers and families welcome. No need to bring a partner. Wear comfortable flat-soled shoes and casual clothing. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

 

Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’Ole Concert (all ages)
Saturday, April 13, 7 p.m.
Cost: $10 in advance, $15 event day.
Historic Fifth Street School Auditorium, 401 S. 4th St., (702) 229-3515.
Five-time Na Hoku Hanohano Award-winner Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’ole was honored at the 2009 awards as Male Vocalist of the Year.  An accomplished hula dancer and singer in the Hawaiian language, he brings a love of the Hawaiian culture to his performance. For more information on the artist, go to www.kaumakaiwakanakaole.com/. For tickets and information, call (702) 229-3515 or (702) 229-6469, or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Downtown Cultural Series – Rocky and Ruthie Lombardo Songs from the “American Songbook” (all ages)
Friday, April 19, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.

Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
Bring your lunch to enjoy a concert by Rocky and Ruthie Lombardo. The jazz duo will offer selections from the American Songbook featuring American composers from 1920 to the present. For more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org, or call (702) 229-3515.

Poets’ Corner

Friday, April 19, 7:30 p.m.

Admission is free.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.

Hosted by Keith Brantley, this monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants features the best local poetry talent.

 

USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, April 20, 7 to 11 p.m. Dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Admission: $5 members, military and students ages 13-25; $10 for non-members. Pay at door.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St. (702) 229-6383.
Presented by USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. For more information, call (702) 813-6694 or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org.

 

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Presents “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale”

April 26 and 27, May 3 and 4 at 7 p.m.; April 28, May 4 and 5 at 2 p.m.

Cost: $7 adults; $5 teen/senior/military; $3 children age 12 and younger.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The classic fairy tale of Rapunzel comes to life in this lively musical appropriate for the whole family. Enjoy the new twist on the old tale, from the writing team that created “How I Became a Pirate.” This production is ideal for anyone of any age who loves to laugh! For tickets and information, call 229-6383 or 229-6553, or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

 

African-American Midwives Film Series — “Bringin’ In Da Spirit” (ages 14+)

Saturday, April 27, 3 p.m.

Admission is free.  Call (702) 229-4800 to reserve a space.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.

“Bringin’ In Da Spirit” is a film about the history of African-American midwives from slavery to current times. This film was able to capture the interviews of “grand” midwives that worked in the segregated South. Most African-Americans born in the segregated South prior to the mid-1960s were born into the hands of a midwife. The sparse number of black physicians and the poverty of many blacks meant that not only did midwives “catch” babies, but they did most of the “doctoring” in the community. With the development of Medicaid and other social and political changes, midwives were no longer relied upon for healthcare. Martha-Marie Drohobyczer will moderate a discussion after the film to examine some of the reasons African-American women have the highest infant mortality rate in the United States, three times the rate of white Americans, and what we can do to reduce this rate.

Exhibitions

 

“African-American Heritage”

Artist Lolita Develay

Through April 18, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.

Free admission and open to the public.

Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.

Lolita Develay is a 2014 Master of Fine Arts candidate at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She lived in Hollywood, Calif., prior to moving to Las Vegas in 2008. Her works are well painted surfaces which reflect her interest in traditions of realism, often focusing on the intrigue of light acting on an object. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Sculptures in Glass”
Artists Larry Domsky and Barbara Domsky

Through May 30, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.

Free admission and open to the public.

Las Vegas City Hall Grand Gallery, 495 S. Main St., First floor, (702) 229-1012.

Glassworks designed and created by this husband-and-wife team will be displayed. The work will include newer pieces that fit the format and space of City Hall as well as pieces from their collection of glassworks. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Spirit Journeys”

Artist Rainer Bertrams

March 21-May 4, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Artist’s reception March 21, 6 to 8 p.m.

Free admission and open to the public.

CharlestonHeightsArtCenter, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.

The images will focus on meditative subjects and themes that explore human kind’s existential struggles for a universal understanding of human nature. For questions about this exhibit or the gallery program, call 229-1012 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Equinox”

March 28-June 8, during reception and by appointment only.

Artists’ reception March 28, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

Admission is free.

HistoricFifthStreetSchool, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.

For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Celebrating Life! 2013” (ages 50+)

Tuesday-Wednesday, April 23-24 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. entry submission drop off.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.

This is the 13th annual juried exhibit for ClarkCounty resident artists age 50 and better. It is free to enter and each artist may submit only one entry. There are six media categories, each awarded first, second, third and honorable mention awards: Drawing/Pastel, Painting, Mixed Media, Photography, Sculpture and Ceramics, Watercolor and Gouache. There is also a best of show award. This program is sponsored by the city of Las Vegas Arts Commission. For more details, or to receive a prospectus, call (702) 229-1012.

# # #

Editor’s Note: Photos are available for download at

ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/Exhibitions/.

ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/April_2013/

No password is required.

The Vision Council Launches Online Resource for Low Vision and Saving Sight

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

The Vision Council is pleased to announce the launch of www.whatislowvision.org — a new web site created to educate the public on low vision, its symptoms, and the resources available to help.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130228/PH61076LOGO-a )
(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130228/PH61076LOGO-b )

As America’s baby boomers enter their senior years, they may notice a gradual loss in some areas of sight. Loss of peripheral or central vision could indicate low vision, a visual impairment that cannot be corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses, pharmaceuticals or surgery. More than 2.9M people in the U.S. suffer from low vision and it is most common in people age 60+.

What is low vision?
“More likely than not, everyone knows someone with low vision — maybe a mother, sister, neighbor, or co-worker,” said Dr. Paul Michelson, Chair of The Vision Council’s medical arm — known as the Better Vision Institute — and  a low vision consultant.  “Recognizing the symptoms of low vision early and taking the proper actions may help preserve sight and in some cases, lessen the advance of low vision.”

Low vision can impair the ability to complete activities of daily living or follow routines and enjoy pastimes — such as reading — that people take for granted.

Symptoms
At first, people might notice a bit of distortion in their vision.  An object that is straight in reality — a telephone pole, for example — may appear curved or wavy to a person with low vision.  A low vision diagnosis is often the result of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, or another aging eye disease.

Low vision differs from presbyopia, which is when the ability to focus on near objects diminishes. Presbyopia, which can be corrected with reading glasses or other optical solutions, typically emerges between ages 40 and 45.  Signs of low vision are broader than presbyopia and include:

  • Areas of blurred or distorted vision or spots and blotches in your vision
  • Shadowed or darkened field of view or noticeable loss of peripheral vision
  • A gradual loss of central vision
  • Cloudy and blurred vision or exaggerated “halos” around bright lights
  • Blind spots in your field of view

Preventive Measures and Resources
Seeing an eye doctor at the first sign of any visual changes can help to detect the diseases that result in low vision.  In general, seeing an eye doctor is an important step in maintaining eye health.  The onset of low vision is a slow progression of symptoms and the ultimate goal is to maintain remaining sight and prevent further deterioration in vision.

Sometimes, a pharmaceutical or surgical solution may stop further development of one of the diseases associated with low vision, but there are also eye care providers who specialize in low vision.  These specialists can introduce patients to low vision devices such as stand magnifiers, closed-circuit TVs, and telescopic lenses that help people affected by low vision maintain independence and improve their ability to perform daily tasks.

Dr. Michelson continued, “We urge people to check on family, friends, and neighbors who might be experiencing some of the signs of low vision. Vision training, vision rehabilitation, and low vision devices can help people maintain and optimize visual function, and preserve as much sight as is possible.”

At the onset of any symptoms of low vision, The Vision Council reminds people to:

  • Seek an accurate diagnosis and develop a good relationship with an eye care provider
  • Know the risk factors of not maintaining sight and the overall prognosis

To learn more about low vision and find resources, visit www.whatislowvision.org.

”The information and resources on this new website can teach people more about the changes they are experiencing and help them make the most of their remaining vision — which can lead to increased independence and quality of life,” said Dr. Michelson.

About The Vision Council
The Vision Council is the global voice for vision care products, practices, and services.  We represent eyewear manufacturers and suppliers in the optical industry by providing education, consumer outreach and advocacy.  The Vision Council also serves as a resource to the public who want to learn more about options in glasses and sunglasses, eyewear trends, and advances in technology.  Learn more at www.thevisioncouncil.org or find us on Facebook.

 

CONTACT: Erin Hildreth, The Vision Council, +1-703-548-5089; or Susan Caldwell, Access Public Relations, +1-540-204-4033

City Of Las Vegas March 2013 Senior Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City Of Las Vegas March 2013 Senior Events

Las Vegas Residents Invited To Celebrations, Luncheons & Activities At City Centers

 

The city of Las Vegas active adult and senior centers offer exercise, fitness, craft, arts, dance, music and computer classes; cards; games; discussion and social groups; luncheons; sports; and special events Monday through Friday to residents age 50 and better. Many of these activities contribute to wellness and a healthy lifestyle. A listing of classes and activities is published in the Beyond the Neon Leisure Guide, available in the centers and online at www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. All activities are subject to change. Most activities require $2 annual membership to city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all senior and active adult centers.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, through April 12, by appointment only.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Low-income residents can get free assistance in preparing their personal income tax forms.  Some restrictions apply; call 229-6454 for details and appointment.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Mondays and Thursdays, through April 11 by appointment only.
Free with appointment only.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Income restrictions apply. Call 229-1702 for information and appointments.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesday afternoons, through April 9.
Free with appointment only.
LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Income restrictions apply. Call 229-1600 for information and appointments.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesdays, through April 9, by appointment only.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern, (702) 229-1515

Income restrictions apply.  Call 229-1515 for information and to make an appointment.

 

VITA Free Tax Form Preparation

Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., through April 11, by appointment only.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program is an Internal Revenue Service program designed to help low- and moderate-income taxpayers complete their annual tax returns at no cost. All ages with income under $49,000 are welcome. Call 229-6125 for appointments.

Bunco (ages 50+)
Wednesday, March 6, 10 a.m. Advance registration required.
Cost: $5 with a current annual $2 senior programs membership.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Enjoy playing Bunco and having a light snack afterwards.

Centennial Hills Active Adult Book Club (ages 50+)
First Wednesday of each month at 12:30 p.m.; March 6.

Cost: Free with a current annual $2 senior programs membership.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Come prepared to discuss this month’s book.

March book: “The Given Day” by Dennis Lehane.

April’s book: “The Art of Racing in the Rain” by Garth Stein.

May’s book: “Defending Jacob” by William Landay.

8th Annual Vision Forum (all ages)

Thursday, March 7, 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Free admission. Those who pre-register by Feb. 27 are guaranteed a free lunch, raffle ticket and expedited Paratransit service, if requested.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Registration and vendors exhibit hall in the adjacent Dula Gym will be open 8-10 a.m. Workshops scheduled 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. include fitness, nutrition, technology tips, goal setting, ADA guidelines, blindness training, transportation, education, health advocacy, low-vision information and a family session. The day is sponsored by the city of Las Vegas, Blindconnect, Nevada Council of the Blind and the Veterans Administration Vision Program. For more information and a registration form, call 229-6454.

 

Springtime Tea Party (ages 50+)

Thursday, March 7, 10 a.m. Register by March 1. Space is limited.

Cost: $2.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Wear your fancy spring hat and bring your favorite teacup to enjoy a variety of teas, fruit, cookies, cakes, music and a raffle.

 

Waffle Day Brunch (ages 50+)
Thursday, March 7, 10 a.m. Advance registration is required by March 1.
Cost: $3.
EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.

Enjoy waffles, waffles, and more waffles at this brunch.  Come hungry!

Final Arrangements and Wills Lecture (ages 50+)

Monday, March 11, 1:30 p.m.  Must register by March 8.
Free admission.
LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Palm Mortuary representative will lecture on final arrangements and wills.

St. Patrick’s Luncheon, Under the Rainbow (ages 50+)

Thursday, March 14, 11:30 a.m. Advance registration required by March 8. Space is limited.

Cost:  $5; must have senior programs membership.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Enjoy a meal of corned beef and cabbage, a traditional St. Patrick’s Day lunch, and entertainment by the Sun City Aliante Songsters.

 

Luck of the Irish Luncheon (ages 50+)

Thursday, March 14, noon. Register by March 8.

Cost: $5.

DoolittleSeniorCenter, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Enjoy corned beef, cabbage, potatoes, cornbread, dessert, green punch and great company!

 

St. Patty’s Luncheon (ages 50+)

Friday, March 15, 11:30 a.m. Must register by March 12.

Cost: $5.

LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Enjoy corned beef and cabbage with all the fixings.

 

St. Patrick’s Day Luncheon (ages 50+)
Wednesday, March 20, 11:30 a.m. Advance registration is required by March 15.
Cost: $5.
EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.

Enjoy a traditional St. Patrick’s Day meal.  Wear green, so you don’t get pinched!

Waffle Day Breakfast (ages 50+)

Monday, March 25, 8:30 to 10 a.m. Advance registration required.

Cost: $4

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

It’s National Waffle Day!  Enjoy waffles, eggs and bacon for breakfast.

Café Latte owner brings deep Italian and culinary roots to new coffee spot

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Las Vegas – Café Latte has two new locations in downtown Las Vegas: inside  the Plaza Hotel on Main Street at 1 South Main Street; and on the first floor of inside the Molasky Corporate Center, 100 N. City Parkway.

 

According to owner Luigi Bomparola, both are doing well and filling a need for a perfect cup of coffee for those who work and live downtown. “I love the coffee business, there is nothing like the perfect cup of coffee any time of day. I only use the finest coffee, Illy, the premier coffee from Italy. My customers can taste the difference and sometimes travel great distances just for a cup of Illy.” In addition to coffee, Café Latte offers bakery items, smoothies, shakes, to-go lunch items and a retail outlet.

 

Bomparola, who says he will open more Café Latte restaurants as demand increases, plans to expand his menus to include new breakfast and lunch options.

 

Bomparola is from Milan, Italy where he learned to cook from his family, always with simple, good ingredients. His brother owns and operates one of arguably the best Italian delis and retail stores in Las Vegas, Siena Italian Authentic Trattoria & Deli 9500 West Sahara Avenue. Bomoparola also serves as vice president of the Italian food division for Shetakis Wholesalers, specializing in fine food products for local executive chefs and restaurants. He has been an executive chef for 32 years and came to Las Vegas to open Il Fornaio restaurant currently located in the New York New York Hotel & Casino. He also owns self-serve yogurt shops in Destine, Florida.

 

About Café Latte:

A stylish European espresso bar located inside the Plaza Hotel and Casino and at the MolaskyCorporateCenter.  Cafelatte offers a wide variety of coffee drinks, smoothies, shakes, panini, grilled pizzas, salads, continental pastries, desserts and an attractive selection of Italian ice creams and sorbets.

Café Latte offers to-go orders, special events catering, room service, and much more.

 

 

MON-SUN 6am-10pm

Cafelatte

Plaza Hotel and Casino

1 S. Main St.

Las Vegas, NV  89101

tel: 702-386-2232

fax: 800-821-0926

cafelatteplaza@gmail.com

 

MON-FRI 6am-4pm

Cafelatte

MolaskyCo.Center

100 City Parkway

Las Vegas, NV89106

tel:702-629-3400

fax: 800-821-0926

cafelattemolaksy@gmail.com

The Little Engine That Could Earns Her Whistle

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Believing that anything is possible, believing that magic can be found anywhere, and above all believing in oneself are all lessons to be found in ArtsPower National Touring Theatre’s new musical version of the beloved children’s classic The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle.  The Little Blue Engine, against all odds, finds a way to conquer her fears and demonstrate the extraordinary strength of “I think I can!”  This original production is being presented by the city of Las Vegas March 9, at 10:30 a.m., at the Historic Fifth Street School located at 401 S. Fourth St. All tickets are $3. Visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-3515 or 229-6469 for more information.

 

At the Piney Vale Train Station, the overbearing the Silver Engine keeps things running efficiently and always on time.  Silver has no patience for the Little Blue, who – to everyone but dependable old Rusty – seems far too small to pull the Piney Vale Express.  Little Blue, not to be discouraged, expresses her desire to see the exciting world outside the train yard in the song “All Aboard!”

When Silver forces Rusty to retire, however, Little Blue’s dreams start to look like they may never be realized.  Even her erstwhile “best friend” Little Red, promoted to pull the Piney Vale Express in Rusty’s place, begins to question Little Blue’s resolve.

Little Red hurts her wheel and can’t pull the Piney Vale Express after all.  Suddenly, everything depends on Little Blue.  Rusty’s unflagging encouragement gives her even more confidence, and she tackles her challenging mission in “The Big Journey.”  At the show’s joyful conclusion, Little Blue completes the route successfully and can finally say “I thought I could!”

The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle features a dynamic, Broadway-style score and colorful, inventive sets and costumes.  The production was adapted and directed by ArtsPower’s artistic director Greg Gunning; Greg also wrote the lyrics, while Richard DeRosa created and orchestrated the musical score.

Mark Blackman and Gary Blackman founded ArtsPower in 1985 and have been steering its course ever since.  ArtsPower has grown into one of America’s premiere producers of professional theatre for young and family audiences. Its 27 professional touring musicals and dramas have been seen by 12 million people in 48 states – from Alaska to Florida – in hundreds of the nation’s top cultural centers, including the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC and Lincoln Center in New York.

“For many children, The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle may be the first stage production they ever see,” says executive producer Gary Blackman.  “Our goal is not only to teach them valuable lessons about self-reliance, but also to instill in them a genuine love of theatre.”

For more information on the Verona, New Jersey-based company or any of its programs, please call 973.239.0100 or visit ArtsPower’s website at www.artspower.org.

 

Note to editors: Downloadable images of ArtsPower’s musical productions are available at www.artspower.org.  To request a hard copy photo or to arrange an interview with Gary Blackman, Mark Blackman, or Greg Gunning, please contact ArtsPower at 973.239.0100.

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts March 2013 Calendar Of Events

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts March 2013 Calendar Of Events

495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101
Contact: Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993 Feb. 11, 2013
Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org
City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Spring Class Registration at Charleston Heights Arts Center (ages 2-adult)
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
March 1-April 3 registration for 7- to 8-week session of classes April 3-May 24.
Offered courses include ballet, jazz, hip hop, ballroom dancing, visual arts and private lessons in music and dance by appointment. For more information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org. Register for classes at www.artslasvegas.org/classes/register.htm beginning March 1.

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Spring Drama Class Registration (ages 4-17)
Registration Opens March 1 for 7-week class sessions that begin the week of April 3.
Cost: Fees range from $49 to $70.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
To register or for more information, call (702) 229-6553 or 229-6383, or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m.
Admission: $4 dollars per person per week at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of fun learning international dance styles, including Arabic, Armenian, Bulgarian, Chinese, Greek, Israeli, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian and Turkish folk dances. No need to bring a partner. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Contra Dances (ages 8+)
Saturdays, March 2 and 23. Group lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7 to 10 p.m.
Admission: $10 adults; $5 members, students & military; $3 children under 16 & non-dancers; pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance to a live acoustic band playing joyful fiddle tunes, driving reels and a waltz or two. All dances are taught and called; newcomers and families welcome. No need to bring a partner. Wear comfortable flat-soled shoes and casual clothing. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.
Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Auditions for “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale”
Saturday, March 2, 2013, 1 p.m.
No fee to audition.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Auditions for the Rainbow Company musical production of “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale” will start promptly at 1 p.m. Roles are available for ages 12 through adult. Comfortable clothes that allow for movement should be worn and a prepared song is strongly recommended. The show will be performed April 26-May 5. For more information, call 229-6553.

“The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle” presented by Target and ArtsPower (all ages)
Saturday, March 9, 10:30 a.m.
Cost: $3 general admission.
Historic Fifth Street School Auditorium, 401 S. 4th Street, 229-3515.
ArtsPower’s “The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle” tells the uplifting story of an ordinary train that performs an extraordinary feat of strength and courage. The story follows the adventures of The Little Blue Engine, who dreams of someday pulling the Piney Vale Ex¬press just like her best friend Rusty. For tickets and information, call 229-3515 or 229-6469 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, March 9, 7 to 11 p.m. Dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Admission: $5 members, military and students ages 13-25; $10 for non-members. Pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St. (702) 229-6383.
Presented by USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. For more information, call (702) 813-6694 or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org.

Downtown Cultural Series – Bill & Kate Isles Concert (all ages)
Friday, March 15, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
Bring your lunch to enjoy a concert by Bill and Kate Isles, an acoustic singer/songwriter duo based in Duluth, Minn. They tour nationally, entertaining audiences with a wide variety of musical styles, catchy melodies and memorable songs. For more information, visit www.billandkateisles.com or www.artslasvegas.org, or call (702) 229-3515.

Poets’ Corner
Friday, March 15, 7 p.m.
Admission is free.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Hosted by Keith Brantley, this monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants features the best local poetry talent.

St. Patrick’s Day Dance (adults)
Saturday, March 16, 7 p.m.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Admission: $10 in advance; $15 event day.
It’s easy to be green! Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day early by dancing to songs from the 1940s- 70s, from swing and foxtrots to Latin and jazz, performed by the Carl Grove Combo.
For tickets or information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.
Women and Young Women’s Conference 2013 (ages 14+)
“The Spirit Of A Woman…Body & Soul”
Saturday, March 23, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Admission is free, but advance registration is required. Call (702) 229-4800 to register.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
This dynamic event will promote personal empowerment and mentorship, with a focus on sisterhood. The purpose of the event is to strengthen communication between women and young women, creating and enhancing opportunities for understanding. A series of specialized workshops will be offered throughout the day to benefit and assist women as they share, teach, and learn from each other. Participants are asked to wear comfortable active wear for the workshops. Each adult participant is encouraged to bring a young lady or mentee of high school age, friend, mom, sister, or aunt to the event. The event is cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District.

Spring II Class Registration at the West Las Vegas Arts Center (all ages)
March 23-April 6 registration for 6-week session of classes April 10-May 18.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Cultural arts classes include African Drum; African Dance for Children and African Dance for Teens/Adults; Keep it Moving…Ballet & Tap; Ballet–Beginner/Intermediate; Modern Dance; Hip Hop; Zumba; Tae Kwon Do; Video & Documentary Creation; Music Production; Arts & Crafts – Kids Create and Craft It Up; and Private Piano/Voice lessons. To register, or for more information, call (702) 229-4800 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Folk Celebration and Stage Performance (all ages)
Saturday, March 23, 12:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Admission: $10.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Admission includes a 2 p.m. theatre concert performance in the Jeanne Roberts Theatre, featuring international dance artist “Zarnia,” who specializes in Middle Eastern dances with elaborate costuming, musician RJ Fox playing Flamenco-style guitar accompanied by flamenco dancers, and talented Las Vegas Kaminari Taiko Drummers, a performance group affiliated with the Japanese American Citizens League. View demonstrations and information 12:30-1:45 p.m., take dance lessons 3:30-6:30 p.m. A concert ticket stub will provide half off admission to the Contra Dance at 6:30 p.m. A food vendor will be on site from 12:30 to 6 p.m. This event coincides with the 2013 National Folk Organization’s Las Vegas conference. For tickets or information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Rainbow Company Spring Break Drama Workshop (grades 2-6)
Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Cost: $135. Advance registration is required.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Students will enjoy five full days of drama, with a performance on the main stage Saturday, March 30. For information and registration, call 229-6553 or 229-6383 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Spring Break Dance Camp (ages 12-18)
Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 3:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Cost: $75. Advance registration is required. Registration opened Feb. 1.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dedicated young dancers will flourish within this weeklong intensive and disciplined atmosphere available to intermediate- and advanced-level students (or students with a minimum of one year of dance instruction). Instruction led by Jackie Koenig and Jennifer Kidder. Dance attire required; please bring snacks. A student demonstration for family and friends at 6:30 p.m. Friday will conclude the camp. To register or more information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.
Spring Break Arts Workshop (ages 10-18)
Wednesday-Friday, March 27-29, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Admission is free, but advanced registration is required.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
This will be a heritage development workshop, exploring traditions and discovering individualities. Call (702) 229-4800 for information and registration.

Life Skills & Job Readiness Workshop (ages 14-19)
Saturday, March 30, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Admission is free, but registration is required.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Life Skills Training is a dynamic, skills-based program that promotes health and personal development. It is designed for those facing the new roles and responsibilities of becoming young adults transitioning into the workplace. The workshop focuses on goal setting, communication, decision making, risk, and maintaining relationships. The program is cosponsored by Nevada Partners. For more information and registration, call (702) 924-2134.
Exhibitions

“Narratives of Progress”
Artist Armin Mühsam
Through March 16, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
About his work, Mühsam says, “My work focuses on the relationship between the natural and the human-built. I imagine the land after technology has rendered it nearly uninhabitable, despite its promises to create a better world. I paint the absence of humans but not of humanity — man-made, sterile landscapes after the disappearance of the natural.” For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

“African-American Heritage”
Artist Lolita Develay
Through April 18, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
Lolita Develay is a 2014 Master of Fine Arts candidate at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She lived in Hollywood, Calif., prior to moving to Las Vegas in 2008. Her works are well painted surfaces which reflect her interest in traditions of realism, often focusing on the intrigue of light acting on an object. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

“Sculptures in Glass”
Artists Larry Domsky and Barbara Domsky
Feb. 26-May 30, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Grand Gallery, 495 S. Main St., First floor, (702) 229-1012.
Glassworks designed and created by this husband-and-wife team will be displayed. The work will include newer pieces that fit the format and space of City Hall as well as pieces from their collection of glassworks. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.
Nevada Watercolor Society’s 2013 Signature Members’ Exhibit
Feb. 28-March 23, during the reception and by appointment.
Artists’ reception Feb. 28, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information about the city gallery programs, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org. More information about the Nevada Watercolor Society can be found at www.nvws.org/.

“Spirit Journeys”
Artist Rainer Bertrams
March 21-May 4, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Artist’s reception March 21, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The images will focus on meditative subjects and themes that explore human kind’s existential struggles for a universal understanding of human nature. For questions about this exhibit or the gallery program, call 229-1012 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

“Equinox”
March 28-June 8, during reception and by appointment only.
Artists’ reception March 28, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Great Las Vegas Music

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The bars, lounges, supper clubs and joints around town are filled with another week of great entertainment.

Start the weekend early with Mark Giovi at Casa di Amore. Reviewed by one website as, “Vegas, the way it used to be,” Casa di Amore remains a favorite of locals and a destination for visitors worldwide. A 7-year Strip headliner, Giovi’s classic music stylings have been tailored for the supper club venue perfectly. Giovi performs regularly Wednesday-Saturday, 6:30-10:30 PM. Casa di Amore is just minutes east of Las Vegas Blvd., 2850 E Tropicana Ave. Click here to view the menu.

For Boulder City folks, Mike Vaughn, another Checkmates alumnus, has a Wednesday-Saturday run at the Hacienda Hotel, 7:30 PM-Midnight. Vaughn has assembled a great band that pays tribute to legendary blues artists, including Stevie Ray Vaughn, Bo Diddley, the Allman Brothers and more.

“Casual” is the word for Thursday, when Kent Foote and the Vegas Good Fellas bring their 5-member band to Siena Deli, 9500 W. Sahara. Foote’s vibe welcomes all guests and Chef Giancarlo’s menu satisfy nearly every taste with a menu ranging from great appetizers to specialty sandwiches, salads, not-your-everyday pasta selection, meat, fish and chicken entrees. The 3-hour music set begins at 7:30 PM. Friday, Foote and his keyboard plater, Chicago Paul Stevenson Sinatra-cizes their repertoire beginning a 4-hour set at 6:00 PM at Ferraro’s, rated by one magazine as the #1 restaurant…period! Ferraro’s, at 4480 Paradise Road, offers a 50% food discount to locals. Whether visiting. Siena or Ferraro’s, go early…and stay. You’ll love it!

Lisa Gay and hubby Tony Drake have quickly established themselves as one of Las Vegas’ “must sees.” Resident headliners at Alexis Park Resort’s newly remodeled Pegasus Room, the couple, whose roots go back to Lou Rawls, the Fifth Dimension and many more walk-of-famers have developed a following that attracts local and visiting celebrities. The 9:00 PM Friday show features guests Toscha Comeaux and Donna Lynne. Alexis Park is across from the Hard Rock Casino, 374 E. Harmon Av.

Get ready to sweat! Ricco “The Las Vegas Showman” Diamante expects everyone (but me) on the dance floor. He’s packed his glitter and sequins, loaded up the car and is on a local mini-tour, first Friday night at the Silverton Casino 7:00-10:00 PM Friday night, Feb. 8 before returning to the Fiesta Rancho Saturday night, 8:30 PM – 12:30 AM. This Las Vegas Showman regularly attracts an audience that provides as much glitz, glamor and excitement off stage as Ricco does on stage. Ricco packs his high energy performances with rock, Motown, R & B and the great dance songs of the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s with a touch of classic ballads like “the Platters “Only You.” Watch for a bit of Elvis thrown in. If you haven’t seen Ricco before, the time is right because he’s coming to a venue near you. If you have seen him before…well, if you have seen him before, you’ll probably be back this weekend. No cover either night.

America’s Got Talent finalist Seth Grabel brings what he calls his own brand of “acromagic” to the stage, blending flips, leaps with sleight-of-hand and large-scale illusions. Grabel’s real appeal is his easy comedic charm and his ability to grasp nail-biting dramatics to make his shows an exercise in nerve-wracking tension and breath-catching release. On America’s Got Talent, Grabel amazed millions of viewers by making a DeLorean appear out of thin air but the surprises weren’t over yet. Emerging from the futuristic vehicle were mini versions of the shows judges, Sharon Osbourne, Howie Mandel and Piers Morgan. Grabel appears every Thursday through Sunday at the Royal Resort (formerly Debbie Reynolds Casino), 99 Convention Center Dr., just a half block off The Strip. Showtime is 6:00 PM. If you hurry, there may still be discount tickets available on line. Go to www.Groupon.com
Vocalist Treasure Guffy and her band have made the Stratosphere’s 107 Lounge high on many people’s must-visit list. The sultry singer keeps it mellow with her jazz, light blues and R & B, all tailored to the room, the mood and the audience, both in the lounge and a flight down in the Stratosphere’s revolving restaurant. The breath-taking views of The Strip are unequaled as are the mood and music created by Guffy and her three fine musicians. Treasure’s band is scheduled to perform 6:00-10:00 PM Wednesday through Sunday through the end of March. Happy hour specials run 4:00-7:00 and include half price amazing appetizers and everybody’s favorite martini, the 2-For-1 in a variety of blends. Hurry in though, because rumor is that management is bringing in a DJ and music-in-a-box. Goodbye atmosphere.

Don’t know what to expect Sunday night at Artifice, described on their website as an “urban lounge” and having “three rooms with an eclectic mix of music and entertainment,” but that’s the thrill of discovery. Sunday Artifice hosts a rare performance by Wendy Fleming, who will be appearing in one of those three rooms. I first saw Wendy backing up Bobby Brooks Wilson at Bootlegger when he respectfully handed her the mic and she stunned the audience with her slow, sultry version of “Summertime” from Porgy and Bess. Since then, Wendy’s local appearances have been few but Sunday night she’ll be part of KC Live with saxophone player Sid the Kid beginning at 7:30 PM. Artifice is located at 1025 S 1st Street.

Some Save-The-Dates…or You’ll Wish You Had

February 15: Peter Pavone is the guest of Lisa Gay, Tony Drake and their Gentlemen of Thrill Band at Alexis Park. Pavone has appeared extensively around the world paying tribute to Dean and Frank in Rat Pack Shows. He’s also a regular around Las Vegas, often appearing with Sandy Hackett’s Rat Pack Tribute. Pavone has also won rave reviews for his Hello-I’m-Johnny-Cash tributes. Alexis Park is across from the Hard Rock Casino, 375 E. Harmon Av.

February 21: The Vegas Underground that’s writing Las Vegas entertainment history takes their show to House of Blues prestigious Foundation Room in Mandalay Bay. Vegas Underground, subject of a front page story in the Los Angeles Times, burst on the scene two years ago with a classic Rat Pack-type anything-goes show every Monday at west side’s Tap House. Drummer LJ Harness promises the same you-never-know who-will-show-up type of top entertainers but has leaked that Paul Shortino (of Quiet Riot) Frankie Scinta and David Perrico of Pop Evolution have expressed an interest. Vegas Underground regulars include host Mark Giovi, saxophone player Steve Poncar (of Las Vegas Good Fellas), Ned Mills on keyboard and guitar player Keith Neal.

February 23: Pia is Back! Flying under the radar for too long, Pia Zadora (pictured) has returned to the stage after a 15-year absence with the grace, style and energy that belies that decade and a half hiatus. After a stunning performance on stage at the Smith Center, Pia knocked ’em dead at the Vegas Underground’s sponsored Toys for Tots gala, singing and kibitzing with comedian and Academy Award performer Steve Rossi. Tickets for her Sun Coast performance are available on line by clicking here.

April 13 and 14: The Bronx Wanderers who makes us remember what we loved about the Doo Wop era return to the South Point Casino to reprise the sold out shows the past two years. The 5-man band is anchored by vocalist dad Vinnie and sons Vinnie Jr and Nicky. More than a tribute band to “The Wanderer” icon Dion DiMucci, the stage erupts into excitement when surprises too good to reveal jump off the stage to the delight of all audiences. Although tickets are not yet available, mark your calendars to see this exciting group.

FOR A MORE COMPLETE LIST OF UPCOMING EVENTS, VISIT

WWW.EVANDAVISJAZZ.COM

More Than 7,300 Youth From Around The World To Participate In Las Vegas Mayor’s Cup International Soccer Showcase Feb. 16-18

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Event Will Bring An Estimated $10+ Million Into Local Economy

The largest international youth soccer tournament in the country will take place in Las Vegas Presidents’ Day weekend, Feb. 16-18. An expected 452 youth soccer teams from around the world will compete during the annual Las Vegas Mayor’s Cup International Showcase tournament. More than 7,300 soccer players, ages 14 to 19, from 12 foreign countries and 28 U.S. states, will square off in soccer fields around the valley. The event is co-hosted by the city of Las Vegas and the Downtown Las Vegas Soccer Club, and is expected to bring more than $10 million into the local economy, according to Downtown Las Vegas Soccer Club President Roger Tabor. The event also will attract more than 250 college soccer coaches and recruiters from across the country to scout for both male and female athletes. Spectator admission and parking are free at all games.

“We look forward to welcoming these young athletes from all over the world,” said Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman. “They will enjoy our wonderful spring weather, make new friends, play the sport they love, connect with college recruiters and have the time of their lives in fabulous Las Vegas. They boost our local businesses with the money they spend here and bring our Las Vegas youth some great soccer competition. This will be our biggest Mayor’s Cup tournament yet, and a win-win for everyone involved. Can it get any better?”

Matches will be played from 8:45 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Teams are guaranteed four games. Championship games will be played on Monday at Bettye Wilson Soccer Complex, 7353 Eugene Ave., starting at 10 a.m. Medals and trophies will be presented to winning teams following each championship game, beginning about 11 a.m. Monday and continuing to approximately 4 p.m. There will be no matches Friday, Feb. 15, to allow teams to attend the Las Vegas ProSoccer Challenge between the Colorado Rapids and Chivas USA at Sam Boyd Stadium.

Teams are expected from Australia, the Cayman Islands, Canada, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Guatemala, Mexico, Poland and the United States.

Accepted teams, player profiles, college coaches expected to attend, tournament schedule and program, participating hotels, and more information is available on the event website at www.LVMayorsCup.com. Updated information and results will be posted there as they are finalized. The tournament has received the top rating — Premier Elite Tournament — from Gotsoccer.com, the nation’s top rating service for youth soccer.

Downtown 3rd hosts the International Vendor Village during the second annual Chinese New Year in the Desert

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Festival takes place in downtown Las Vegas February 8-10

LAS VEGAS – The Year of the Water Snake kicks off with the second annual Chinese New Year celebration in downtown Las Vegas, February 8 -10, as the area is transformed into a spring festival. Throughout the three-day event, guests can visit the International Vendor Village, located at Downtown 3rd – 3rd Street between Ogden Avenue and Stewart Avenue. As its name implies, the International Vendor Village features international flavors from multiple food vendors, including SATAY, Dragon Grille, Sauced, Wok Express, Gyoza-San, Triple George, Coast 2 Coast, Sin City Snoballs, Haulin’ Balls food truck, Ben’s BBQ and more.
Prizes and giveaways will be offered throughout the weekend.
Chinese New Year in the Desert starts Friday, Feb. 8 at 6 p.m. on the 3rd Street Stage at Fremont Street Experience. It includes three days of events such as the Miss Asian American Pacific Islander USA Pageant, a fashion show by Macy’s, the American Heart Association Heart Walk and the McDonald’s Las Vegas Spring Festival Parade. The International Vendor Village is open at Downtown3rd throughout the entire two and a half-day event.
About Fifth Street Gaming
Fifth Street Gaming (FSG) is a Las Vegas, Nevada-based casino management company led by CEO Seth Schorr and founded by Schorr and his partner, Jeffrey Fine. Fifth Street Gaming will own and operate seven Las Vegas gaming locations, including the Lucky Club Casino and Hotel, Opera House Saloon and Casino, Silver Nugget Casino, Little Macau Ultra Tavern, Gold Spike Casino & Hotel, Siegel Slots and Suites and MOB Bar. Combined, these properties operate over 1000 machines, two dozen table games and 400-plus employees. FSG is also overseeing redevelopment and eventual operations of Downtown Grand Hotel & Casino, formerly Lady Luck Hotel & Casino. Downtown Grand is scheduled to open in late 2013 and is planned to include 600 slot machines 35 table games and 650 employees. Through their successful management of these properties, Schorr and his highly experienced team have garnered a strong reputation for reinvigorating dated properties with new technology, systems and enhanced amenities. The principals of Fifth Street Gaming also control, through affiliates, the LEV Restaurant Group, a Food & Beverage operation that owns and operates more than 35 restaurants in the Las Vegas area with combined revenues exceeding $25 million. The LEV Restaurant Group is the local area developer for The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf and Jamba Juice, and has a number of internally developed concepts including i♥burgers, Lobster ME and The Daily Kitchen & Wellness Bar. For more information, visit www.fifthstreetgaming.com.

US Senator Dean Heller, recently appointed member of Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, to Tour Veterans Village Las Vegas Tomorrow

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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WHAT: US Senator Dean Heller will tour Veterans Village Las Vegas tomorrow. Recently appointed as a member of the Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, Heller will learn first-hand about Veterans Village Las Vegas, a comprehensive and highly innovative housing and resource facility for U.S. veterans and their families.

Veterans Village opened in 2012 in a renovated Econo Lodge Motel with 120 rooms. Thanks to the ongoing generosity of the Home Depot Foundation and hundreds of hours provided by Home Depot employees, the facility is undergoing a comprehensive retrofit and update. In addition to providing temporary housing for vets and their families, Veterans Village provides a comprehensive roster of services through partnerships with other community organizations and government agencies, including employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events.

WHEN: Friday, February 1
10:30 – 11:15 a.m.

WHERE: Veterans Village Las Vegas
1150 Las Vegas Blvd. South (Just south of Charleston Blvd. on the west side of the street)
Las Vegas, NV 89104

WHO: US Senator Dean Heller
Sylvia Allen, president, 100 Black Women of Las Vegas
Arnold Stalk, founder and visionary, Veterans Village Las Vegas
About Veterans Village:
Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel. It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed. Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need. SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.

City Of Las Vegas Presents Musical Theatre And Concerts Feb. 15-17

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Enjoy Rainbow Company’s “Across The Truckee” At The Historic Fifth Street School

The city of Las Vegas offers family entertainment options Feb. 15-17. The Rainbow Company Youth Theatre’s upcoming production of “Across The Truckee” combines musical theatre, Nevada history and audience participation in a “one-of-a-kind” experience that is bound to please audiences of all ages. “Across the Truckee” is the latest original chapter in the company’s on-going “Nevada Series.” Each year a play with music is developed that highlights Nevada’s exciting history and colorful characters. This season, four of Nevada’s most unusual historic figures are included: Eilley Oram, known as “The Washoe Seeress”; Henry T. Comstock, of Comstock Lode fame; Timothy H. O’Sullivan, ground-breaking photographer of the Civil War; and Adolph Sutro, known as the “the king of the Comstock.” The ending of the play may vary from performance to performance, since the audience will participate with choices! The show will be performed Feb. 15-17 at the Historic Fifth Street School, located at 401 S. Fourth St. Showtimes are 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, with additional 2 p.m. shows Saturday and Sunday. Ticket prices are $7 for adults, $5 for teens/seniors/military and $3 for children ages 12 and younger. For tickets and information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-6553 or 229-6383.

Bring your lunch at noon Friday, Feb. 15, to enjoy the latest installment of the city of Las Vegas’ Downtown Cultural Series of free concerts at the Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse Jury Assembly Room at 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South. Open to the public, the hour-long concert will feature the Emanuel Schmidt Quartet, led by guitarist Emanuel Schmidt. Swiss-born Schmidt earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Music Performance at the Wesley Institute in Sydney, Australia, as well as a doctorate in Communication Processes in Jazz Performance from the Sydney Conservatorium of Music. A versatile musician, he plays drums, keyboards, bass and guitar, and composes/arranges music for a full orchestra. For more information on the artist, go online to http://emanuelschmidt.com/ or call (702) 229-3515 for more details.

Tickets are on sale now for the 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, Guy Davis concert at the Charleston Heights Arts Center, located at 800 S. Brush St. Davis is a musician, composer, actor, director and writer. But most importantly, Davis is a bluesman. The blues permeates every corner of Davis’ creativity. Throughout his career, he has dedicated himself to reviving the traditions of acoustic blues and bringing them to as many ears as possible through the material of the great blues masters, along with African-American stories and his own original songs, stories and performance pieces. For more information on Davis, visit www.guydavis.com/. Priced at $10 in advance and $15 on event day, tickets are available online at www.artslasvegas.org or by calling (702) 229-6383.

Nine simple ways you can improve your heart health

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Ten minutes a day is all you need to be heart healthy. Walking the dog, knowing your numbers, eating your greens – those are a few heart-healthy things that only Take 10.

Since 1963, to urge Americans to join the battle against heart and vascular diseases, Congress has advised the president to proclaim February “American Heart Month.” To celebrate American Heart Month this year, Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health is offering a variety of educational and screening events and opportunities for disease prevention and to support the fight against heart disease and stroke.

1. Beginning Feb. 1 though Feb. 28, Renown is helping people commit to improve their heart health in just 10 minutes a day. Every day in February, visit the Take 10 tab on the Renown Health Facebook page. From heart-savvy information and healthy recipes to useful apps, Renown will reveal a simple health tip that takes 10 minutes or less. Also enter to win an Ultimate Health Screening Package ($219 value).

2. Friday, Feb. 1, people are encouraged to promote awareness of heart disease by dressing in red on National Wear Red Day.

3. Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 5 and 6, Renown South Meadows Medical Center will host the life-saving services of Life Line Screening, the nation’s largest provider of preventive screenings. The screening event is designed to help local residents identify their risk of stroke, vascular disease and osteoporosis before the life-changing effects of these conditions can occur. The event is from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Northview Conference Room. Call 1-800-690-0295 to schedule an appointment.

4. Throughout February: Low-cost health screenings. These events include a variety of health screenings for cholesterol, diabetes, arthritis, heart disease and more. No appointment required. The schedule includes:

Feb 6, 8 – 10 a.m.: Renown Medical Group, 202 Los Altos Parkway.
Feb 13, 8 – 10 a.m.: 850 Mill St.
Feb 20, 8 – 10 a.m.: Renown Medical Group, 1343 W. Newlands Drive, Fernley
Feb 27, 8 – 10 a.m.: Renown South Meadows Medical Center, Northview Conference Room

5. Saturday, Feb. 9, Renown will participate in the Save a Heart – Simple 7 Health Expo featuring the American Heart Association’s Simple 7, steps to heart healthy living: Get Active, Control Cholesterol, Eat Better, Manage Blood Pressure, Lose Weight, Reduce Blood Sugar and Stop Smoking. The expo takes place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Scheels, Legends at Sparks Marina. The event is open to the public. No RSVP needed.

6. Friday, Feb. 15, at 12 noon, Renown will host a free Online Health Series webinar on the link between gout and heart disease. Renown Health Rheumatologist Malin Prupas, MD, FACP, will be the featured presenter. Register for this webinar at renown.org/onlinehealthseries.

7. Wednesday, Feb. 27, at 12 noon, Renown will host a free Online Health Series webinar on the early warning signs of heart attacks. Karen Meskimen, DNP, RN, will be the featured presenter. Register for this webinar at renown.org/onlinehealthseries.

8. Thursday, Feb. 28, Renown will host its annual Save Your Heart Luncheon featuring Letitia Anderson, MD, FACC. The educational luncheon will be from 12 noon to 1 p.m. at the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa, Paradise Ballrooms D & E. Doors open at 11:30 a.m. Cost is $10 and includes lunch. To RSVP, call 775-982-6483.

9. Friday, March 1, the American Heart Association will host its annual Go Red For Women Luncheon from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa:

Free Personal Income Tax Form Preparation Assistance At City Of Las Vegas Senior Centers

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Trained Volunteers Will Assist Seniors And Lower-Income Residents

Volunteers from AARP will offer residents age 50 and older free assistance with personal income tax form preparation and electronic filing at four city active adult and senior centers beginning in February. In addition, participants in the Internal Revenue Service Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program will offer similar free assistance to Nevada residents at the Doolittle Senior Center starting Feb. 19. Income restrictions will apply to qualify for assistance. Advance appointments are required at all locations. Bring a copy of your 2011 income tax return and all of your applicable 2012 paperwork to the appointment. Call a center below between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. weekdays to schedule an appointment. Centers will be closed Feb. 18 for holiday observance.

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, Feb. 1-April 12, by appointment only.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Call 229-6454 for details and to make an appointment.

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Mondays and Thursdays, Feb. 4-April 11, by appointment only.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Call 229-1702 for information and appointments.

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesday afternoons, Feb. 5-April 9, by appointment only.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.
Call 229-1600 for information and appointments.

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesdays, Feb.12-April 9, by appointment only.
East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern, (702) 229-1515.
Call 229-1515 for information and to make an appointment.

VITA Free Tax Form Preparation
Tuesday-Thursday; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Feb. 19-April 11; by appointment only.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
The VITA program is designed to help low- and moderate-income taxpayers complete their annual tax returns at no cost. All ages with income under $49,000 are welcome. Call (702) 229-6125 for appointments after Feb. 5.

Caesars Foundation Presents the 12th Annual 5K Run for a Wish to benefit Make-A-Wish Southern Nevada

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Who: Make-A-Wish® Southern Nevada
What: 5K Run/Walk and 1-Mile Fun Walk
When: Registration 7:00 a.m., Saturday, February 2, 2013; Run begins at 9:00 a.m.
Where: Town Square Las Vegas, Stoney’s Rockin’ Country Parking lot
(Las Vegas, Nev.) January 30, 2013 – Caesar’s Foundation presents the 12th Annual “5K Run for a Wish” to benefit Make-A-Wish Southern Nevada. The walk will be held on Saturday, February 2nd at Town Square Las Vegas in the parking lot in front of Stoney’s Rockin Country.
“By sponsoring Make-A-Wish’s 12th Annual 5K Run For a Wish, Caesars Foundation is proud to bring the community together to help children and their families during trying times,” said Thom Reilly, Executive Director of Caesars Foundation. “Even if just for a few days, the pain and fear of treatments and numerous hospital visits disappear as they create wonderful memories that last a lifetime.”
The Honorable Mayor Carolyn Goodman will act as grand marshal, and KSNV News 3 and Mix 94.1 are the main media sponsors. Platinum Sponsor Allegiant will offer participants and attendees free sunscreen and a chance to win a weekend getaway to Phoenix or Reno.
“UnitedHealthcare has been a supporter of the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Southern Nevada for many years,” said Don Giancursio, chief executive officer for UnitedHealthcare Nevada. “As a health and well-being company, we work every day to make a difference in our community. In addition to events such as the Run for a Wish, each year UnitedHealthcare helps Make-A-Wish Southern Nevada grant wishes to children.”
“Last year we raised over $170,000, and our goal this year is $250,000,” said Caleen Johnson, Executive Director of Make-A-Wish Southern Nevada. “All of the funds raised stay right here in southern Nevada to help make wishes come true for children with life-threatening medical conditions. We are so grateful for our many supporters and friends who make this event possible!”
For more information or to pre-register, call 702-212-WISH (9474) or go to www.runforawish.com.
Since 1980, Make-A-Wish® has given hope, strength and joy to children with life-threatening medical conditions. From our humble beginnings with one boy’s wish to be a police officer, we’ve evolved into an organization that grants a child’s wish in the U.S. every 40 minutes and has blossomed into a worldwide phenomenon reaching for than 250,000 children around the world.” For more information about Make-A-Wish Southern Nevada, visit www.snv.wish.org.

City Of Las Vegas Offers Weekend Concerts Feb. 22-23

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Music Aficionados Have Multiple Concert Choices

Everyone is invited to share an evening with the legend¬ary singer/songwriter Peter Yarrow Friday, Feb. 22, starting at 8 p.m. at the Historic Fifth Street School, located at 401 S. Fourth St. A member of the renowned folk-rock group “Peter, Paul and Mary,” Yarrow will look back over his career, telling stories and singing some of the many hits that won Peter, Paul and Mary worldwide acclaim. For more information on the artist, visit http://peteryarrow.net/.

Tickets, priced at $10 in advance and $15 on event day, are available at www.artslasvegas.org or by calling (702) 229-3515. Limited free parking is available at the Historic Fifth Street School. Metered parking is available across the street in parking lots both directly south and west of the school.

Audiences of all ages will enjoy a classical music concert by Walt Boenig’s Dynamic Trombone Quartet Saturday, Feb. 23, beginning at 2 p.m. at the Charleston Heights Arts Center, located at 800 S. Brush St. Tickets are free but require a reservation. For more information on the entertainers, visit www.waltboenigbigband.com/bio.html. For more information or to reserve tickets, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-6383.

The Jester Hairston Music Association, Inc. and community youth will present “Why Do We Sing – The Evolution of African-American Music” Saturday, Feb. 23, beginning at 3 p.m. at the West Las Vegas Library Theatre, located at 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd. The historical music genres of jazz, spirituals and gospel will be explored and performed at this festive occasion. Admission is free, but tickets are required and may be picked up in advance at the West Las Vegas Arts Center, located next door at 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd. Call (702) 229-4800 for tickets and information. For more information on the performers, visit www.facebook.com/pages/Jester-Hairston-Music-Association/165817596783533?sk=info. The program is cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District.

Singing Valentines Will Keep Las Vegas Singing in February

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They’ll be saying “I love you” in song — and they’ll be leaving hundreds of lucky romantics speechless.

On Wednesday and Thursday, February 13 and 14, a group of barbershop quartets will fan out across the Las Vegas Valley to deliver Singing Valentines to hundreds of special sweethearts. The sound of harmony will ring out in offices, restaurants, schools and homes throughout the city and surrounding communities. Wherever they appear, they’ll draw a crowd — and sometimes a few tears.

The quartets belong to the local Las Vegas Chapter of the 34,000-member Barbershop Harmony Society, which is headquartered in Nashville, TN.

A typical Singing Valentine costs $50 and includes two love songs sung in barbershop harmony, a personalized Valentines card and a beautiful red rose. Men and women alike are on the receiving end — with moving results.

“It’s especially fun to deliver a Singing Valentine from a woman to her husband or boyfriend,” says Dennis Johnson, of the Silver Statesmen Chorus. “Last year, my quartet went to an elementary school and caught a male teacher at lunchtime. He was stunned. His students and other teachers gathered around, and were ready to start razzing him — until they saw the tears welling up in his eyes.”

To order a Singing Valentine, contact the Silver Statesmen Chorus at 702-525-9484.

Orders can also be placed online at www.silverstatesmen.com.

Natalie Cole to Headline at Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc. GENERATIONS Concert to Raise Funds for Music Education

February 16, 2013 by · Comments Off on Natalie Cole to Headline at Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc. GENERATIONS Concert to Raise Funds for Music Education
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Nine-time GRAMMY® award-winning singer and songwriter Natalie Cole will headline at the second annual GENERATIONS, a Nat King Cole Generation Hope Inc. concert benefit to raise funds for music education on Friday, March 1, 2013 at the Keith C. and Elaine Johnson Wold Performing Arts Center at Lynn University in Boca Raton, Florida (the venue of the final 2012 Presidential Debate).

Twin daughters of music legend Nat King Cole, Timolin and Casey Cole of Boca Raton, launched Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc. to honor the legacy, music and life of their father Nat King Cole in 2008 after learning of budget cuts in public schools directly affecting the arts. Since that time, donations in excess of $66,000 have benefited more than 5,000 children with “the greatest need and fewest resources” in Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties.

“Our family history is one of musical excellence and charitable giving,” said Timolin Cole. “Our father was a trailblazer in the music industry and will live forever through his style, grace and unforgettable music. Our mother Maria, also an entertainer, sang with Duke Ellington and was known for supporting multiple causes throughout her life. By giving students the opportunity to enhance their musical talents and abilities, our family’s legacy lives on.”

Casey Cole added that “In keeping with that legacy, the concert will showcase generations of musical greatness, including performances by our sister Natalie Cole, students from the Nat King Cole Generation Hope Summer Strings Camp, and local teen performance artists Andrew Foreman and Zoe Fromer.”

“We believe that every child should be exposed to music education,” continued Timolin. “Studies prove that participation in school music has a positive impact on areas considered outside the realm of music including dexterity, coordination, self-discipline, self-esteem, thinking skills, listening skills, and personal expression.”

This past summer 105 students from 7 Title 1 Palm Beach County schools were transported to Lynn University in Boca Raton to attend the inaugural Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc. Summer Strings at Lynn University, a camp that provided elementary students without means an opportunity to receive the highest quality string instruction. Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc., the School District of Palm Beach County and Lynn University Conservatory of Music worked together to make this week-long program happen with Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc. funding the cost of running the camp, the school district providing transportation and lunches for the campers and the university donating the space. Students received small group section instruction and private lessons with Lynn’s conservatory students serving as their mentors. The week-long camp culminated in a concert performed in the Keith C. and Elaine Johnson Wold Performing Arts Center.

“Plans are currently underway to expand the camp program next year based on fundraising from this GENERATIONS Concert,” noted Casey. “While giving has been predominantly in Palm Beach County, the organization has supported programs in Broward and Miami-Dade Counties with a goal to replicate successful programs, like our recent Summer Strings opportunity, across the country.”

The GENERATIONS concert event begins at 7:00 p.m. with a reception hosted by Celebrity Cruises featuring music performed by students from the Lynn Conservatory of Music and an ensemble of children they mentored during Nat King Cole Generation Hope Summers Strings and a silent auction that will include a 4-foot x 3-foot original painting of Nat King Cole by Salvatore Principe, a vintage handbag from the private collection of Maria Cole, wife of Nat King Cole and mother of the Cole sisters, Natalie, Timolin and Casey; and a limited edition print of the legendary artists who performed and recorded “We Are The World”, including Michael Jackson, Quincy Jones, and Diana Ross with each artist’s signature and portrait, along with the musical score of the song. At 8:00 p.m. the attendees will enjoy music from the talented, local youth performers Andrew Foreman, Zoe Fromer and pianist Jermaine Teague, followed by the performance by headliner Natalie Cole.

VIP tickets priced at $350 include premier seating, open bar at the Celebrity Cruises pre-concert reception, a private meet-and greet with performers, and post-event dessert reception; Donor tickets priced at $150 include priority seating and two drink tickets for the Celebrity Cruises pre-concert reception; and General Admission tickets priced at $75 with cash bar at Celebrity Cruises pre-concert reception are available, but limited.

GENERATIONS Concert sponsors include Silver Sponsor Celebrity Cruises; Bronze Sponsors Allied Health Institute and West Boca Medical Center; Patron Sponsor Florida Power & Light; Partners Boca Raton Bridge Hotel, Cruisin-America, Kaye Communications, Inc., Lynn University and SmartCruiser.com; Media Sponsors The Boca Raton Observer, The Boca Raton Tribune, Seaview Radio and LivingFLA.com.

The mission of Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc., a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, is to provide music education to children with the greatest need and fewest resources. It is accomplished by funding programs that provide for instruction, mentoring and resources. Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc. accepts grant applications throughout the year, which are reviewed by its Board of Directors and grants are awarded twice yearly based on the merit of application and availability of funds. Organization board members include Timolin Cole, president; Casey Cole, vice president; Robin Coven – Levin HomeCare; Rainford Knight – Florida Institute of Finance, LLC; Toni Mastrullo – Telecom Resources of America, Inc.; Sharon Gordon Mullane, Esq.; Thais Piotrowski – Ameriprise and Milana Walter.

To purchase benefit concert tickets visit natkingcolefoundation.org/concert or call 561-237-9000. For more information on Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc., call 561-213-8209 or email info@natkingcolefoundation.org.

Five Easy Steps to a Low Maintenance Eco-friendly Landscape

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Gardening expert Melinda Myers provides a step-by-step plan to transform your landscape while saving time, money and a natural resource

It’s possible to create a beautiful landscape and be kind to the environment even with a busy schedule and while staying within budget. “All it takes is a bit of planning and a few low maintenance strategies,” says gardening expert and author Melinda Myers.
Myers recommends these five strategies to create a low maintenance eco-friendly landscape this season.

Be Waterwise

Save money on the water bill, time spent watering and this precious resource, water. Start by growing drought tolerant plants suited to your growing environment. Once established they will only need watering during extended dry spells. Mulch with shredded leaves, evergreen needles, woodchips, or other organic matter to conserve moisture, reduce weeds, and improve the soil as they decompose.

Fertilize with a low nitrogen fertilizer, like Milorganite, that promotes slow steady growth instead of excessive greenery that requires more water. Plus, it won’t burn even during drought.

Put rainwater to work all season long by using rain barrels to capture rainwater off your roof or directly from the sky.

Recycle Yard Waste in the Landscape

Minimize the amount of yard waste produced, reuse what can be in other areas of the landscape and recycle the rest as compost. These are just a few strategies that will save time bagging, hauling, and disposing of yard debris. And better yet, implementing this strategy will save money and time spent buying and transporting soil amendments, since it will be created right in the backyar

Start by leaving grass clippings on the lawn. The short clippings break down quickly, adding organic matter, nutrients and moisture to the soil. Grow trees suited to the growing conditions and available space. That means less pruning and fewer trimmings that will need to be managed.

Make Compost at Home

Recycle yard waste into compost. Put plant waste into a heap and let it rot. Yes, it really is that simple. The more effort put into the process, the quicker the results.
Do not add insect-infested or diseased plant material or perennial weeds like quack grass, annual weeds gone to seed, or invasive plants. Most compost piles are not hot enough to kill these pests. And do not add meat, dairy, or bones that can attract rodents.

Manage Pests in Harmony with Nature

A healthy plant is the best defense against insects and disease. Select the most pest-resistant plants suited to the growing conditions and provide proper care.
Check plants regularly throughout the growing season. It is easier to control a few insects than the hundreds that can develop in a week or two. And when problems arise, look for the most eco-friendly control. Start by removing small infestations by hand. Consider traps, barriers, and natural products if further control is needed. And as always be sure to read and follow label directions carefully.

Energy Wise Landscape Design

Use landscape plantings to keep homes warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer. Homes will have a more comfortable temperature throughout the seasons and energy costs will be reduced.

Plant trees on the east and west side of a house to shade windows in the summer and let the sun shine in and warm it up through the south-facing windows in winter.
Shade air conditioners, so they run more efficiently and be sure to collect and use any water they produce for container gardens.

Incorporate these changes into gardening routines and habits over time. Soon these and many more strategies that help save time and money while being kind to the environment will seem to occur automatically.

Nationally known gardening expert, TV/radio host, author & columnist Melinda Myers has more than 30 years of horticulture experience and has written over 20 gardening books, including Can’t Miss Small Space Gardening. She hosts the nationally syndicated Melinda’s Garden Moment segments which air on over 115 TV and radio stations throughout the U.S. She is a columnist and contributing editor for Birds & Blooms magazine and writes the twice monthly “Gardeners’ Questions” newspaper column. Melinda also has a column in Gardening How-to magazine. Melinda hosted “The Plant Doctor” radio program for over 20 years as well as seven seasons of Great Lakes Gardener on PBS. She has written articles for Better Homes and Gardens and Fine Gardening and was a columnist and contributing editor for Backyard Living magazine. Melinda has a master’s degree in horticulture, is a certified arborist and was a horticulture instructor with tenure. Her web site is www.melindamyers.com

Governor Reveals the Recipients of Annual Volunteerism Award

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Governor Brian Sandoval announced the six recipients at the 11th Annual Governor’s Points of Light Awards held Friday, January 18th. The awards luncheon was held in conjunction with the Volunteer and Corporate Engagement Summit. The Summit featured national and regional speakers and included Michael Yackira, CEO of NV Energy and Phyllis James, Vice-President of Corporate Responsibility for MGM Resorts International.

Governor Sandoval stated during his speech, “In the two years that I’ve been privileged to serve as your Governor, I’m reminded time and time again of the resilience of Nevadans, of their inner strength and of course their desire to serve. It’s a side of Nevada that doesn’t get as much coverage in the national media, but you and I know it’s all there. Nevada Volunteers and the people we honor today are at the very core of that side of Nevada.”

The 11th Annual Governor’s Points of Light Award Recipients Include:

Individual Volunteer: Southern Nevada
Raquel O’Neill (Las Vegas)

Individual Volunteer: Northern Nevada
Christina Thomas (Reno)

Individual Volunteer: Rural
Fern Payne (Pahrump)

Volunteer Managers
Dustin Rains (Las Vegas)

Nonprofit Volunteer Programs
R&R Partners Foundation (Las Vegas)

Corporate and Business Volunteer Programs
The MGM Resorts International Employee Volunteer Program (Las Vegas)

Governor Sandoval closed his keynote with a challenge to the audience encouraging all to get involved in volunteering. With the 150th Anniversary of Nevada’s statehood around the corner, it is up to the Nevada citizens to make that celebration the true success it can be through volunteering and getting involved. To find volunteer opportunities throughout Nevada, visit nevadavolunteers.org.

Neon Lit Presents Six Readers

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Fiction and poetry writers from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas’ Creative Writing Masters of Fine Arts program read monthly at the Arts Factory

(January 21, 2013– Las Vegas) – Neon Lit, a monthly literary event presented by the UNLV MFA and PhD programs, will present student readers and guests Friday, January 25, at Trifecta Gallery in the Arts Factory, 107 E. Charleston Blvd. Doors open at 6 p.m., reading starts at 7 p.m. Prior to the event, enjoy beer and specialty cocktails at Bar + Bistro in the Arts Factory.

Reading this month will be Regina Ernst, Jessica Durham, Jean Ho, Mark Lennon, Joleen Long, and Doug Unger. Sam Samson will MC.

Often attracting more than 80 attendees monthly, the downtown literary event has showcased the work of the university’s creative writing students and guest writers since 2009. The readings reflect the diverse student body, and offer the opportunity to hear a variety of fiction and poetry created in Las Vegas. Neon Lit is hosted monthly in one of the most renowned contemporary art galleries in the arts district.

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ABOUT NEON LIT:
Supported by the Black Mountain Institute, UNLV and the Arts Factory Las Vegas, Neon Lit is a monthly downtown literary event showcasing the university’s creative writing MFA and PhD students. For more information visit http://neonlit.org/.

Celebrate the Year of the Water Snake with Chinese New Year Festivities at Fremont Street Experience

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Celebrate the Year of the Water Snake with Chinese New Year Festivities at Fremont Street Experience

Second Annual Chinese New Year in the Desert to Take Place in Downtown Las Vegas Feb. 8-10

Celebrate the Year of the Water Snake as Fremont Street Experience, the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority (LVCVA) and Golden Catalyst present the second annual Chinese New Year in the Desert festival in Downtown Las Vegas from Feb. 8 – 10. Chinese New Year is the most important of the traditional Chinese holidays. It is known as “Spring Festival” in China, “Tet New Year” in Vietnamese and “Seol-lal” in Korean.

Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman will kick-off the three-day festival during the opening ceremonies which will feature a live authentic dragon dance by the Las Vegas Lohan School of Shaolin. Throughout the weekend guests will also experience live International Cultural Performances; taste authentic dishes from around the world in the International Vendor Village; watch contestants compete for the chance to be crowned Miss Asian American Pacific Islander USA which will include a Macy*s Fashion Show, Talent Show and interview segment; view stunning parade floats in the McDonald’s Las Vegas Spring Festival Parade; and create their own lantern to display on Fremont Street Experience to commemorate the Lunar Lantern Festival.

“Last year we hosted the first-ever Chinese New Year festival in Downtown Las Vegas which was a great success,” said Jeff Victor, president of Fremont Street Experience. “We are excited to once again host this important holiday and encourage everyone to come downtown for a fun-filled weekend to usher in the Year of the Snake and wish wealth, health and good fortune to all.”

“Chinese New Year in the Desert will be a three-day cultural party with several new marquee events, making Downtown Las Vegas truly one of the best places for everyone to come together and ring in the Year of the Water Snake,” said Jan-Ie Low, of Golden Catalyst.

“Las Vegas is excited to usher in Chinese New Year with a variety of cultural amenities, attractions and celebrations,” said Michael Goldsmith, vice president of international sales for the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority. “China is an important market for the destination as it is our number one source of international travel from Asia.”

Opening Ceremonies – Friday, Feb. 8 at 6 p.m. on the 3rd Street Stage
Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman will help usher in the new year by participating in the Opening Ceremonies and ribbon cutting on Friday, Feb. 8 at 6 p.m. on the 3rd Street Stage (next to the D, Four Queens and Fremont). The new year will be greeted with a live authentic dragon dance performed by the Las Vegas Lohan School of Shaolin complete with virtual firecrackers on Viva Vision (the largest video screen in the world measuring 1,500 feet long and suspended 90 feet above the street), an eye painting ceremony and performers dressed in elaborate costumes.

International Vendor Village and Cultural Performances
Throughout the three-day festival, guests will be taken on a journey around the world as they experience performances from several Asian entertainers on the 3rd Street Stage and visit the International Vendor Village, located on 3rd Street North between Fremont Street and Stewart Avenue, to taste the international flavors from renown food vendors. The International Vendor Village and Cultural Performances will take place on Friday, Feb. 8 from 5-10 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 9 and 10 from noon-9 p.m.

Lunar Lantern Festival
To commemorate the Lunar Lantern Festival, which officially ends the Chinese New Year celebrations, primary grade students of Clark County School District will be constructing paper lanterns marked with their “wish” for 2013. The lanterns will then be on display throughout Fremont Street Experience during the Chinese New Year in the Desert festival. Additionally, guests and passersby are invited to stop in at a booth located near the 3rd Street Stage to build their own lantern to display on Fremont Street Experience. The Lunar Lantern Festival is sponsored by St. Jude’s Women’s Auxiliary Group.

Miss Asian American Pacific Islander USA Pageant
Throughout the three-day event, several women will compete in the Miss Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) USA Pageant. Contestants will participate in the Macy*s Fashion Show, modeling the latest cutting edge Spring fashion lines from Macy*s, a Talent Show emceed by Ian Ziering from Beverly Hills 90210, and interview segment for the chance to be crowned Miss AAPI USA. The winner will receive a combination of cash and gift prizes with a retail value of $10,000. The First Runner-Up and Second Runner-Up will receive a combination of cash and gift prizes with a retail value of $5,000 and $2,500 respectively.

The schedule for the Miss Asian American Pacific Islander Pageant is as follows:
*** All events take place on the 3rd Street Stage.

Friday, Feb. 8
8 p.m. – Introduction of Miss AAPI USA Contestants
9 p.m. – Macy*s Fashion Show

Saturday, Feb. 9
8 p.m. – Talent Show: Miss AAPI USA Contestants

Sunday, Feb. 10
8 p.m. – Interview and Crowning of Miss AAPI USA Contestants

Heart Walk Benefitting the American Heart Association
On Saturday, Feb. 9 thousands of walkers from all over the valley will step out to support the American Heart Association during the Heart Walk. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. at the 3rd Street Stage with the walk taking place from 8:30-10:30 a.m.

McDonald’s Las Vegas Spring Festival Parade
On Sunday, Feb. 10 local businesses and organizations will come together to celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year during the McDonald’s Las Vegas Spring Festival Parade. Parade participants will showcase their talent and creativity with the most extravagant floats in vibrant colors to commemorate the rich history of the most important holiday of the Asian community. Starting at 10 a.m. at the intersection of Gass Avenue and 4th Street, the McDonald’s Las Vegas Spring Festival Parade will travel up 4th Street through Fremont Street Experience and end at the intersection of 4th Street and Ogden Avenue.

For a detailed entertainment schedule go to www.cnyinthedesert.com. All entertainment is free and open to the public.

About Fremont Street Experience
Fremont Street Experience is a five-block entertainment complex located in historic downtown Las Vegas. Fremont Street Experience features Viva Vision, the world’s largest video screen which is 1,500 feet long, 90 feet wide and suspended 90 feet above the pedestrian mall. Viva Vision features nightly spectacular light and sounds shows with 12.5 million LED lights and a 550,000-watt sound system. Fremont Street Experience is a one-of-a-kind venue which includes free nightly concerts and entertainment on three stages. With direct pedestrian access to 10 casinos, more than 60 restaurants and specialty retail kiosks, Fremont Street Experience attracts over 17 million annual visitors. Fremont Street Experience can be found online at www.vegasexperience.com.

Looking for Success in 2013?

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

MYVEGAS IS ALL ABOUT SUCCESS!
YOURS! PERSONAL, OR BUSINESS!

We’ll be providing tips from the pros over the next year,
And here’s just one to get you going…

A few days a go, my good friend and colleague,
Jeff Rogers, released a new ebook called

“How to Live an Aligned Life:
Find the Life, Purpose, and Passion You Were Made for.”

I had a chance to read it — and it’s fantastic. It’s a quick, enlightening read that will introduce you to the 7 core principles that will allow you to create a life completely congruent with your gifts and dreams. And no, this isn’t the same re-hashed stuff you hear from personal development seminar gurus or “law of attraction” DVDs. These are powerful, proven principles that dig deep and help you get to the heart of who you are and how to get what you really want in your life.

Best of all?

Because Jeff and his team have just launched their new website, they’re giving the ebook away.

This ebook is a game-changer.

I highly recommend you check it out.

To your success,

MYVEGAS MAGAZINE!

The 20 Pearls Foundation Inc. Presents An Evening with Violin ‘Soul-o-ist’ Karen Briggs In Support of the HerShe Group Foundation, Inc.

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

The 20 Pearls Foundation Inc. Presents An Evening with Violin ‘Soul-o-ist’ Karen Briggs
In Support of the HerShe Group Foundation, Inc.

Thursday, January 31, 2013, 6:30 p.m.
The Smith Center for the Performing Arts
Tickets are $65 & $70, plus any additional service fees
To purchase tickets, please visit The Smith Center Box Office, call 702.749.2000, or visit http://www.thesmithcenter.com

Las Vegas – January 07, 2013 – The 20 Pearls Foundation Inc., is the charitable arm of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Theta Theta Omega Las Vegas Chapter, is proud to present “An Evening with Violin ‘Soul-o-ist’ Karen Briggs,” a concert in support of the HerShe Group Foundation, Inc., an organization preparing girls in foster care for successful transition into adulthood.

Karen Briggs is a world renowned violinist who has earned the nickname “The Lady in Red” by her adoring fans after extensively touring with celebrated instrumental musician Yanni and joining him on his critically acclaimed and live multi-platinum recorded album Yanni Live at the Acropolis (1993) which became one of the top selling PBS specials of all time and broadcast in 65 countries. Her musicianship is reflective of her exposure to countless music genres including jazz, gospel, Latin, classical, African and Middle Eastern. She is a highly sought after featured soloist who has perfected the melismatic style captivating audiences at Carnegie Hall, Royal Albert Hall, the Apollo Theater, and the Kennedy Center.

Briggs has collaborated with many influential musicians including Wynton Marsalis, Swinging into the 21st (2012) and Selections from Swingin’ into the 21st (2011); Ledisi, Lost & Found (2007); Kenny Loggins, More Songs from Pooh Corner (2000); Vertu’, Stanley Clark, Lenny White and Richie Kotzen (1999); Diana Ross, Every Day Is a New Day (1999); and Kirk Franklin, Donnie McClurkin and Yolanda Adams, The Hopeville Tour/DVD (2009), to name a few.

She began her professional career with the Virginia Symphony Orchestra after graduating from Norfolk State University in Norfolk, Virginia. Several years later she released her self-titled debut album Karen (1992), her sophomore album Amazing Grace (1996), followed by Soulchestral Groove (2009).
Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. Seating is at 6 p.m., showtime is 6:30 p.m. The Smith Center Box Office is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. and is located on the west entrance of Reynolds Hall at 361 Symphony Park Avenue.

About the 20 Pearls Foundation, Inc.
The 20 Pearls Foundation, Inc. is a nonprofit organization committed to serving the Las Vegas community in support of educational achievement, scholarship programs, and philanthropic endeavors. The Foundation, in partnership with Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Theta Theta Omega Las Vegas Chapter, also supports other programs for all segments of the public including cultural and historical activities and community and health services. The 20 Pearls Foundation is a 501(c)3 charitable organization. For more information please visit 20 Pearls Foundation, Inc.

About the HerShe Group Foundation, Inc.
The HerShe Group Foundation, Inc. was founded in 2004 by Kenadie Cobbin Richardson to help transform the lives of girls who have been neglected, abused and abandoned. Its mission is to prepare youth in foster care to successfully transition into adulthood through the performing arts, mentoring, college and career readiness, leadership training and exposure to extraordinary experiences. For more information please visit www.hershegroup.org.

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For information regarding The 20 Pearls Foundation, Inc., please contact:
Kim Martin
702-526-6426
Kim457@cox.net

For information regarding the HerShe Group Foundation, Inc., please contact:
Kenadie Cobbin-Richardson
(310) 641-4400 office
kenadie@hershegroup.org

For information regarding Karen Briggs, please contact:
Winston Sanders
702-242-8944
winstonzanders@yahoo.com

Springs Cafe Announces the First Cooking Workshops for 2013 – Presented by the Culinary Academy of Las Vegas

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Las Vegas- January 9, 2013 – The Culinary Academy of Las Vegas is kicking off the New Year with the first set of Springs Cafe Cooking Workshops for the 2013 season. Learn how to cook with gourmet vegetables found at the local farmers markets and master the many uses of fresh herbs and tomatoes from the experienced chefs of the Springs Cafe. Cooking demonstrations include plenty of scrumptious samples, recipes, and discussion with questions from attendees encouraged.

All classes are located inside Springs Cafe at Springs Preserve, 333 S. Valley View Blvd. at US 95. Reservations are required. Space is very limited. For more information and to register please call (702) 822-7700.
WHEN: Third Saturday of the month, 10 a.m.-Noon

COST: $30 members, $40 non-members per workshop
Member bonus: $75 all 3 three workshops purchased together
CLASS SCHEDULE
January 19: Exploring Gourmet Vegetables
Explore gourmet vegetables, seasonal cooking, and the rare delicacy of truffles and truffle oil. Discover produce only found at local farmer’s markets; Chefs will create a dish from the fresh produce as well as vegan and non-vegan vegetable curry with crispy tofu and Thai basil.
February 16: Herbs Everywhere
Learn how to make herb-infused oils including rosemary, thyme, basil and cilantro in addition to learning how to create an herb-crusted pork loin, white bean ragout and wilted spinach with preserved lemon. There will be an abundance of flavorsome samples and great recipes to try at home.

March 16: Attack of the Killer Tomatoes
Tomatoes are a killer taste sensation. Learn to create fresh salsas like pico de gallo, salsa verde and salsa roja. Become a pro at whipping up marinara and turning it into Bolognese sauce, and then create regional favorites- spicy tomato gazpacho and fried green tomatoes with Cajun remoulade.

About Culinary Academy of Las Vegas
Founded in 1993, Culinary Academy of Las Vegas (formerly the Culinary Training Academy), the country’s leading nonprofit culinary and hospitality training institute, was developed through a joint labor-management trust representing private sector employers, the Culinary Union Local 226 and the Bartenders Union Local 165. The Academy is licensed by the Nevada Commission on Post-Secondary Education and trains several thousand students per year for participating employers in the hospitality industry. Offerings include a 50-seat bistro-style restaurant, Westside Bistro, and a 400-seat banquet and events center located at the 710 West Lake Mead Blvd. campus. The Academy is the caterer of record for The Smith Center for the Performing Arts and operator of the cafe and catering services at Springs Preserve. Culinary Academy of Las Vegas is an equal opportunity employer/program. For more information, call 702.924.2100 or visit www.theculinaryacademy.org. Stay up to date on happenings on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and YouTube.

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts – February 2013 Calendar Of Events

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
Centers will be closed Feb. 18 for holiday observance.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $5 dollars per person per week at door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $4 dollars per person per week at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of international fun learning Armenian, Bulgarian, Israeli, Arabic, Macedonian, Russian, Greek, Turkish, Chinese, Serbian folk dances, and more. No need to bring a partner. Cosponsored by the Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing Club of Las Vegas, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 562-9889 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Spring Class Registration Opens Feb. 2 (all ages)
Registration for the six-week spring 2013 classes Feb. 20-March 30 is open Feb. 2-16.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Cultural arts classes include African Drum; African Dance for Children and African Dance for Teens/Adults; Keep it Moving…Ballet & Tap; Ballet–Beginner/Intermediate; Modern Dance; Hip Hop, Yoga–Health & Wellness; Tae Kwon Do; Video & Documentary Creation; Music Production; and Private Piano/Voice lessons. The West Las Vegas Arts Center also will offer two new exciting classes exploring the creativity and sheer fun of arts and crafts. They are: Kids Create and Craft It Up. To register, or for more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-4800.
Sweethearts Square Dance (ages 8+)
Saturday, Feb. 2; introductory lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7:30 to 10 p.m.
Admission: $12 per person at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Enjoy square dancing to callers such as Andy Finch, Joe Valvo, Vern Vernazarro and Ron Sowash of Las Vegas and with guest cuer Ron Hartzell. No need to bring a partner. Class-level dances, Plus and Round dances will be included, as well as a chance to win door prizes. Refreshments will be available. Cosponsored by the Stardusters, Las Vegas Square & Round Dance Club, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 348-4906 or (702) 229-6383, or visit www.lasvegassquarenrounddancers.org

Valentine Dance with Boyd Coulter & the Good Times Band
Saturday, Feb. 9, at 7 p.m.
Tickets: $10 advance purchase; $15 per person at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance the evening away with Big Band music. Step back to a sweeter time when Big Band swing was the thing and romance was the theme. Enjoy an evening of dancing to great tunes made famous by the bands of Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey and Benny Goodman; romantic standards from the ‘50s and ‘60s; cha-chas, tangos, and more. For more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call 229-6383.

Downtown Cultural Series – Emanuel Schmidt Quartet “The Music of Miles” (all ages)
Friday, Feb. 15, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
An excellent and experienced musician, Emanuel Schmidt has performed at schools, clubs, cafés and festivals – for intimate crowds as well as for thousands – in Australia, Switzerland and in the U.S.A. According to Schmidt’s peers and educators, he is “an outstanding and versatile guitarist of exceptional ability, and an extraordinarily thoughtful and hardworking musician.” Described by The Australian Music Centre’s Ian Shanahan as an “accomplished and imaginative composer,” Schmidt has written for a full orchestra and performs reflective, emotive and adventurous original compositions with his groups. This group will perform selections from albums such as “Kind Of Blue,” “My Funny Valentine,” “ESP,” and more. Call (702) 229-3515 for more details.

The Poets’ Corner
Hosted by Keith Brantley
Friday, Feb. 15, 7 p.m.
Admission is free.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
A monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants, featuring the best local poetry talent.

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Presents “Across The Truckee” (all ages)
Friday-Sunday, Feb. 15-17; 2 p.m. shows Saturday and Sunday; 7 p.m. shows Friday and Saturday.
Tickets: $7 for adults, $5 for teens/seniors/military; and $3 for children under age 12.
Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St., (702) 229-3515.
Who knew Nevada’s history could be so rich in entertainment? Don’t miss the chance to see the main stage version of “Across The Truckee,” the newly created and lively production about Nevada history, before it goes on tour. Meet colorful characters galore and tap your toes to music that sets you to humming—whatever your age! For tickets and information, call (702) 229-6383 or 229-6553, or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.
Guy Davis in Concert
Saturday, Feb. 16, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $10 advance purchase; $15 per person at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, Jeanne Roberts Theatre, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Guy Davis is a musician, composer, actor, director, and writer. But most importantly, Guy Davis is a bluesman. The blues permeates every corner of Davis’ creativity. Throughout his career, he has dedicated himself to reviving the traditions of acoustic blues and bringing them to as many ears as possible through the material of the great blues masters, along with African-American stories and his own original songs, stories and performance pieces. For more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call 229-6383.

An Evening with Peter Yarrow (all ages)
Friday, Feb. 22, 8 p.m.
Tickets: $10 in advance/$15 event day
Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St., (702) 229-3515.
Share an intimate evening with legendary singer/songwriter and activist Peter Yarrow (Peter, Paul & Mary, Puff the Magic Dragon, Operation Respect). Inspirational as well as humorous, Peter will look back over the career of Peter, Paul & Mary, telling stories and singing some of the many hits that won them acclaim worldwide. Call 229-3515 for more information.

The Jester Hairston Music Association, Inc. Presents “Why Do We Sing – The Evolution of African-American Music” (all ages)
Cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District.
Saturday, Feb. 23, 3 p.m.
Admission is free, but tickets are required and may be picked up in advance at the West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd.
West Las Vegas Library Theatre, 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 507-3989.
The Jester Hairston Music Association (JHMA) chorus, along with youth from the community, share reasons and circumstances of why we sing. The historical music genres of jazz, spirituals, and gospel will be explored and performed in this festive occasion. Please call (702) 229-4800 for more information.

USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, Feb. 23, 7 to 11 p.m.; dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Cost: $10 per person at the door; $5 for USA Dance members, military, and students ages 13-25.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Cosponsored by the USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national organization USA Dance. USA Dance Las Vegas is a volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. Call (702) 813-6694 or (702) 229-6383 for more information, or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org.
Exhibitions
“Second Wind” Exhibition
Artist Robin Stark
Nov. 26, 2012-Feb. 14, 2013; Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Grand Gallery, 495 S. Main St., First floor, (702) 229-1012.
Inspiration for this work was influenced by the work of American sculptor David Smith. The artist’s ceramic sculptural forms have a reference to the traditional ceramic vessel, yet deviate from functionality and focus on expressive formal elements (surface shapes defined by sharp edges and bold color) to suggest visual movement and momentum. The pieces treat the surface as a two-dimensional format to imply motion already established in the three-dimensional form through repetition and layering of various shapes and colors. The purity and intensity of the hues generate an emotional quality, which is critical to the overall nature of the pieces.

“Narratives of Progress” Exhibit
Artist Armin Mühsam
Jan. 18-March 16, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Snake Exhibit
Jan. 31-Feb. 23, by appointment only. Artists’ reception Jan. 31, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
Chinese Year of the Snake begins Feb. 10. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

African-American Heritage Exhibit
2013 Featured Artist: Lolita Develay
Feb. 7-April 18, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Nevada Watercolor Society’s 2013 Signature Members’ Exhibit
Feb. 28-March 23, during the reception and by appointment.
Artists’ reception Feb. 28, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

# # #
High-resolution photos are available for download at ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/Feb_2013_Events/ and ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/Exhibitions/.
No password is required.
Media Contact:
Margaret Kurtz
Public Information Officer
City of Las Vegas
495 S. Main St., 7th Floor
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702) 229-6993
Cell (702) 249-1828
E-mail: mkurtz@lasvegasnevada.gov

Governor Sandoval to Recognize Volunteers and Volunteer Programs

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Governor Sandoval to Recognize Volunteers and Volunteer Programs on January 18

RENO/LAS VEGAS – January 17, 2013 – Forward-thinking community partners like NV Energy, MGM Resorts International, Howard Hughes Corporations, and IGT, will join Governor Sandoval and Nevada Volunteers in celebrating Nevada’s outstanding volunteer efforts at this year’s 11th Annual Governor’s Points of Light Awards. The luncheon will take place at the Bellagio this Friday, January 18th, at 11am.

During the event, the recipient in each category will be announced and receive the prestigious Points of Light award from Governor Sandoval. The 11th Annual Governor’s Points of Light finalists include:

Individual Volunteer: Southern Nevada
Brendon Dillman (Las Vegas)
Elsie Lavonne Lewis (Las Vegas)
Raquel O’Neill (Las Vegas)

Individual Volunteer: Northern Nevada
Steve Burns (Reno)
Ashlee Smith (Sparks)
Christina Thomas (Reno)

Individual Volunteer: Rural
Nancy Barrett (Incline Village)
Alaine Kliewer-Nye (Winnemucca)
Fern Payne (Pahrump)

Volunteer Managers
Sharon Harding (Las Vegas)
Dustin Rains (Las Vegas)
Dorothy Zucker (Las Vegas)

Nonprofit Volunteer Programs
CASA Foundation (Las Vegas)
Goodie Two Shoes Foundation (Las Vegas)
R&R Partners Foundation (Las Vegas)

Corporate and Business Volunteer Programs
Lovelock Correctional Center (Lovelock)
The MGM Resorts International Employee Volunteer Program (Las Vegas)

###
Lindsay Bridges
Communications/Events Coordinator

Phone: 775.825.1900
Fax: 775.825.1901
lindsay@nevadavolunteers.org
www.nevadavolunteers.org

Two Health Screening Events Offered Through Renown

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Two Health Screening Events Offered Through Renown

RENO, Nev. (Oct. 23, 2012) – Renown Health Institute for Heart & Vascular Health is pleased to host the life-saving services of Life Line Screening, the nation’s largest provider of preventive screenings, to help local residents identify their risk of stroke, vascular disease and osteoporosis before the life-changing effects of these conditions can occur.

The event is open to local residents and will be held Thursday, Nov. 8, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., at Renown Regional Medical Center, 1155 Mill Street., in the Mack Auditorium, and Friday, Nov. 9, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at South Meadows Medical Center, 10101 Double R Blvd., in the Capri Conference Room. To pre-register for a screening contact Life Line Screening at www.lifelinescreening.com, or call 1-800-690-0295 to make an appointment. For directions, please dial 775-982-4100.

Offering these preventive services can help save lives and are painless and affordable. Symptoms are rarely present, and if they are, they are generally subtle, almost unnoticeable. In fact, half of all stroke victims don’t have any symptoms prior to their stroke. A simple screening may save you or your loved one’s life.

Screenings provided will include:
• Carotid Artery Screening – painless, non-invasive Doppler ultrasound used to visualize the carotid arteries, the arteries that bring blood to the brain. The majority of strokes are caused by plaque build up in these arteries.

• Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening – Ultrasound is used to visualize the abdominal aorta, the largest artery in the body, to measure the diameter of the aorta. This measurement can indicate if there is a weakening in the aortic wall which can cause a ballooning effect known as an aneurysm. Abdominal aortic aneurysms can burst. When they do, it is usually fatal.

• Peripheral Arterial Disease Screening – PAD is also known as “hardening of the arteries.” Individuals with PAD have a 4 to 6 fold increased risk of heart disease. Risk is evaluated through a measurement called the “Ankle-Brachial Index,” which is obtained by reading the systolic pressure in the ankle and arm.

• Osteoporosis Screening – Ultrasound is used to estimate the bone density of the heel. This can indicate if there is a reduction in bone density, which may indicate the presence of osteoporosis. The heel is used because it is similar in composition to the hip, where disabling fractures often occur.

• Atrial Fibrillation is an abnormal heart beat (arrhythmia) that affects the atria – the upper chambers of the heart – and is the most common form of sustained arrhythmia. 2.5 million Americans have been diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, and for those over age 40, there is a one in four chance of developing the condition.

Renown Provides Advanced Training for Healthcare Professionals

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Renown Provides Advanced Training for Healthcare Professionals

RENO, Nev. (Oct. 30, 2012) – Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health is teaming up with the Nevada Academy of Family Physicians (NAFP) to provide advanced training for healthcare professionals across northern Nevada this weekend in a three-day educational conference.

The 23rd Annual Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine Conference will be held at the Resort at Squaw Creek in Olympic Valley, Calif., Friday through Sunday, Nov. 2 – 4. This continuing medical education program is designed for internal medicine and family physicians, hospitalists, cardiovascular specialists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, pharmacists, nurses and all other physicians and healthcare personnel.

Topics include the most recent advances and current established guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, stroke and diseases or problems associated with heart disease.

The conference is sponsored by Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health. For more information and to register for the conference, visit renown.org/UpcomingEvents. Registration will also be available at the conference. To download a copy of the event program, click here.

About the Nevada Academy of Family Physicians:
The NAFP promotes the profession of family practice by preserving the scope of practice, promoting primary care research and encouraging family physicians to assume leadership roles. The NAFP works as an advocate for family physicians and their patients to various government and non-governmental organizations affecting healthcare access and delivery.

About Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health
Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health has more than 30 years of recognition as the region’s leader of heart and vascular care. More heart procedures are performed at Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health than anywhere else in northern Nevada. Renown’s heart physicians have access to sophisticated diagnostic and surgical equipment such as the D-SPECT camera that detects heart attacks faster, the da Vinci® S HD™ Robotic Surgical System, 64-slice CT scanner, nuclear medicine, MRI and cardiac catheterization so patients can be diagnosed and treated quickly. For more information, visit renown.org/heart.

Helping Hands Surgical Care Selects Eight Uninsured Nevadans to Receive no-cost surgeries on Second Annual Charity Surgery Day

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Helping Hands Surgical Care Selects Eight Uninsured Nevadans to Receive no-cost surgeries on Second Annual Charity Surgery Day

WHAT: Eight uninsured Nevadans suffering from a variety of conditions will receive surgeries at no cost from Helping Hands Surgical Care (HHSC), a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization founded by Dr. Kevin Petersen and his wife, Kelly Petersen, who also serves as HHSC’s unpaid executive director. The surgeries will be performed by Dr. Petersen and other Las Vegas surgeons, with the assistance from the medical staff at Valley View Surgery Center – all of whom are volunteering their services for the day. A medical advisory board screened the applications to select patients to receive no cost surgeries. HHSC’s mission is to fund and facilitate surgeries for uninsured and underinsured Nevadans without the means to pay for medically necessary surgeries.

WHEN: CHARITY SURGERY DAY – HELPING HANDS SURGICAL CARE
November 13, 2012
Surgeries scheduled on the hour from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (First arrivals starting at 8 a.m.)
Patients and doctors are available to media prior to or on surgery day.

WHERE: Valley View Surgery Center
1330 S. Valley View Blvd.
Las Vegas, NV 89102
PATIENTS:
Jeffery Silverman, 52, Hernia repair, mesh removal
Silverman had an initial hernia repair in 2009 and has been in constant pain ever since. With very little money left in the bank and no insurance, he is embarrassed to ask for help, but grateful Dr. Petersen is willing to remove the mesh that was used in his initial surgery and repair it again without mesh. He has formed a large support group on Facebook comprised of people around the country suffering from the same condition, and he is grateful to be chosen for free surgery. He can’t wait to reclaim his life.

Donald Sykes, 51, Umbilical hernia repair
Sykes is minister of Pentecostal Temple Church of God in Christ, married with four children and eight grandchildren. He had insurance at one point but lost it due to his inability to keep up with the payments. Sykes has suffered from his hernia condition for nine years and is in considerable pain. He is grateful that the pain will be gone soon, that his life will be extended and the hernia will no longer be visible through his clothing.

Mariana Flores, 26, Umbilical hernia repair
Flores is married with two sons, ages 2 and 7. She is excited she will be able to help her sons and be active again. She feels she has not been a good mother since her mobility has been so limited by excessive pain. In fact, she has not been able to clean her home. She is so grateful she was chosen to receive charity surgery so she can become a better mother and wife and not dependent on others.

Mark Babcock, 54, Umbilical and Right inguinal hernia
Babcock, who is single with three children, is unable to work because of his medical condition. He currently lives with a friend free of charge. He has been to the emergency room twice and was turned away both times because the surgery to cure his condition is considered elective. He is looking forward to regaining the confidence he has lost over the last seven years as he has struggled with debilitating pain. He is extremely thankful to finally receive the help he needs to get back his life.

Mario Zaccone, 49, Right inguinal hernia
Zaccone has suffered from his hernia for five years and is unemployed because of his inability to work due to pain. Previously, he worked in the food industry where he was required to lift, which is impossible for him now given his current condition. He is single with four children and lives with his mother because of his inability to provide for his children and care for himself. He is extremely grateful for HHSC and looks forward to beginning his life again.

Paul Labarre, 42, Umbilical hernia repair
Labarre is a veteran construction worker who with specific skills in flooring and laying carpet. He is unable to work due to his hernia and has lost his home and insurance. He currently lives with his parents and is looking forward to being healthy again and passing a physical so he can go back to work and provide for his family.

Michael Haws, 53, Left inguinal hernia repair
Haws has worked for years in the construction and oil industries. He has not been able to lift due to his hernia condition. Unable to provide for himself, he has been forced to move in with his brother. His current situation has had a major effect on his self-esteem, and he feels drained both physically and emotionally. He is thrilled to be chosen and looks forward to a bright future.

Linda Willis, 59, Trigger finger
Willis has been without medical insurance since she lost her job several years ago. Right-handed, she has not been able to do anything with her right hand for a long time. This includes preparing food, writing and simple daily tasks. Willis has been forced to move in with her daughter for both financial support and assistance with her daily care. She is excited about the future and the possibility of regaining some independence. She particularly looks forward to resuming things she enjoys, including sewing and refinishing furniture.

PARTICIPATING DOCTORS:

Dr. Kevin C. Petersen, General Surgeon
Dr. Bishr Hijazi, Hand Surgeon
Dr. Jon Darwin Halling, Anesthesiologist
Dr. Hosny Habashy, Anesthesiologist

COMMUNITY SUPPORT:
The Las Vegas community is coming together to support the efforts of HHSC.
• Valley View Surgery Center is donating the use of the one operating room for an entire day.
• The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf is providing coffee and breakfast for the physicians and medical staff (up to 35 people) on surgery day.

About Helping Hands Surgical Care
Helping Hands Surgical Care is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization whose mission is to fund and facilitate surgeries for uninsured and underinsured individuals without the means to pay for medically necessary, quality of life surgeries. Founded by Dr. Kevin Petersen of Las Vegas, Nevada based No Insurance Surgery, Helping Hands Surgical Care values the health and well-being of each individual regardless of their ability to pay. The organization is guided by its focus on the physician-patient relationship and its dedication to transforming and improving the lives of those it serves. For more information, visit www.HelpingHandsSurgicalCare.com or call 702-242-5393.

How to Set a Fantastic Holiday Table

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

How to Set a Fantastic Holiday Table

(Family Features) The holidays are about making memories with friends and family. When it’s your turn to host, you can set a truly memorable holiday table – without breaking the bank.

Celebrity chef and event planner Travis London, of Healthy Chic Eats, shares three great ideas for creating fantastic holiday table settings and a great recipe:

• Don’t be afraid to mix and match. It’s okay to mix patterns and textures because it adds another level of interest to the table. Mikasa offers many different dinnerware patterns that can be easily mixed with each other to create a great look. For example, start with red metallic chargers and add white Cameo Platinum dinner plates and festive salad plates such as Love Story Holiday. Or go for a fun, contemporary look by layering Christmas Cheers Dots and Christmas Candy Cane dishes.

• Be creative with table decorations. Try using what you have in new ways. Fill a Pfaltzgraff Winterberry serving bowl with cranberries, or line a Winterberry platter with pretty votives and evergreen sprigs you snip from the back yard.

• For an easy, long-lasting centerpiece use potted plants. Many supermarkets sell potted plants at great prices. Rosemary plants make a beautiful and fragrant addition to the holiday table. Try setting out two pots of rosemary wrapped in red foil, then put them on either side of a glass vase or jar filled with red ornaments.

No matter how you dress your table for the holidays, the food is the real star of the show. This delicious cheesecake recipe from Travis will look good on any plate – and taste even better. For more entertaining tips and recipes, visit www.facebook.com/mikasadining.

Holiday Bliss Low Calorie White Chocolate and Ricotta Cheesecake
Serves 8-10

12 ounces low fat cream cheese
1 1/2 cups fresh ricotta
2 tablespoons sugar
5 ounces chopped white chocolate, melted
1 large egg
2 egg whites
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 325°F and lightly spray a 10-inch spring form cake pan with vegetable oil.

Using a mixer, beat together cream cheese, ricotta and sugar until soft. With the mixer set to low speed, beat remaining ingredients into mixture and mix until completely smooth.

Pour cheesecake mixture into prepared cake pan and place in oven to bake until set, 30 minutes.

Once done, remove from oven and allow cheesecake to cool completely before removing sides.

Place in refrigerator for at least 4 hours to continue to set before serving.

Tip: When serving, use a round mold to create individual portions, or cut slices and top each with mixed berries and a mint spring.

 

Stir up Some Party Fun

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Stir up Some Party Fun

(Family Features) No matter what the reason for the party, you can stir up some fun with easy-to-make appetizers that are sure to please the whole crowd.

These four recipes are a breeze to make and all share one simple secret ingredient – Musselman’s Apple Butter. Here are some delicious ideas for turning these dips and sauces into great party appetizers.

Quick and Easy BBQ Sauce: Brush on chicken wings or shrimp during the last few minutes of grilling. It is simple to make BBQ pulled pork, as well as the sauce for a crockpot of meatballs or bacon-wrapped smoked sausages.

Apple Butter Mustard Dip: Delicious with just hard or soft pretzels. Set out a plate of cheese cubes or mini egg rolls for dipping, and you have easy snacking.

Kickin’ Horseradish Sandwich Spread: This tastes great with roast beef, chicken, or pork – try mini sandwich sliders or pinwheel wraps. Another great idea is to use the spread as a dip for chicken tenders, sweet potato fries or even veggie chips.

Caramel Apple Dip: Set a dish of this warm dip on a pretty tray and surround it with freshly sliced apples or pears, and simple gingersnap cookies. For a family fun dessert, dip marshmallows and then roll them in chopped nuts.

For more ways to stir up some fun at your party, visit www.musselmans.com.

Quick and Easy BBQ Sauce
Makes: 6 to 8 servings

1 cup Musselman’s Apple Butter
1 cup chili sauce

Mix ingredients.

Apple Butter Mustard Dip
Makes: 6 to 8 servings

1 cup Musselman’s Apple Butter
1/2 cup Dijon mustard

Mix ingredients.

 
Kickin’ Horseradish Sandwich Spread
Makes: 6 to 8 servings

1 cup Musselman’s Apple Butter
Creamy horseradish sauce depending on spice level (1/4 cup for light, 1/2 cup for mild, 1 cup for hot)

Mix apple butter with desired amount of horseradish.

Caramel Apple Dip
Makes: 6 to 8 servings

1 cup Musselman’s Apple Butter
1/2 cup caramel sauce

Mix ingredients.
Photo Captions
Main:
Caramel Apple Dip, Quick and Easy BBQ Sauce, Kickin’ Horseradish Sandwich Spread, Apple Butter Mustard Dip

Secondary:
Quick and Easy BBQ Sauce

 

How to Make Your Online Shopping More Social

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

How to Make Your Online Shopping More Social

(Family Features) Finding new products and gifts can often mean spending hours shopping at the mall or searching through different websites. But as the Internet has become more social, many people are now tapping into their personal networks to get recommendations on which products to buy for themselves, their family and their friends. In addition, users now have the option of easily sharing a wish list with their social connections to get what they really want.

One way to decide what to buy friends and family is to use a social recommendation site such as www.shopsquad.com, which allows you to get product advice from a community of experts. The site is set up in such a way as to take the salesperson out of the store and put them onto the web. Just type in your shopping question and hit the “Get Advice” button.

You can also let people know what you want by publicizing your wish list from popular websites such as www.Amazon.com. Once you’ve added products to your list, simply click the Facebook and Twitter icons to post your list to these social networks, so your friends and family will see a link to your list in their news feeds.

Facebook itself has also become a vibrant social shopping destination and even has its own virtual “Shopping Mall.” Introduced a year ago by social commerce company Payvment, the Shopping Mall on Facebook allows you to browse millions of products – everything from original artwork to vehicles and electronics – and make purchases with just a few clicks.

The Shopping Mall, which you can find by searching on Facebook or by visiting www.fbmall.com, also lets you see what your friends like so you can discover and evaluate new products. Products your friends “Like” are prominently displayed as you enter the mall, and with a few clicks you can browse the mall through their eyes.

The Shopping Mall also makes the gift-giving process more social. By clicking the “Want” button on products in the Shopping Mall, you add these items to a social “Wish List” that you can share with your friends in their Facebook stream. Your wish list is also posted on your profile page in the mall so friends and family can use it when it’s time to pick out just the right gift for you.

With all these new social shopping tools, you can pick out the perfect gift for friends and family and make sure you get what you really want – eliminating the hassle of returns.

Learn more about the Facebook Shopping Mall at www.fbmall.com.
Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Global Vitamin D Interactive Map Illustrates Vitamin D Insufficiency Among U.S. Population and Worldwide

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Worldwide: Rates of vitamin D insufficiency are higher among women than men with older women being at most risk for developing osteoporosis.

The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) has launched an interactive global map of vitamin D status, which presents a snapshot of vitamin D levels worldwide. The map and accompanying publication1 confirm that vitamin D insufficiency is a major public health issue in both the developing and industrialized world, with more than one third of all the populations studied, showing insufficient levels of vitamin D2.

Osteoporosis is a serious chronic disease which affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Vitamin D improves bone mineral density, which lowers risk of fracture, while also improving muscle strength, balance, and leg function which decreases the risk of falling and sustaining a fracture in the first place. As a consequence, vitamin D insufficiency has been linked to a higher risk of osteoporotic fractures. Studies show that adequate vitamin D intake can reduce the risk of falls and fractures by around 30 percent3.

Additional key findings include:
„h Older people are especially at risk for vitamin D insufficiency, including older women who are a risk group for osteoporosis, and those living indoors in institutionalized care;
„h Overall, insufficient vitamin D levels were detected in more than one third of the study population4;
„h Vitamin D insufficiency affects both the developing world and industrialized world;
„h The main source of vitamin D is sunlight, but even in sunny countries, vitamin D levels are generally low and below recommended levels (taking India as example: a sunny country; yet, with low vitamin D status);
„h It is estimated that 50-70 percent of the European adult population have insufficient levels of vitamin D.
1 A Global Representation of Vitamin D status in healthy populations, Wahl et al. Archives of Osteoporosis, August 2012
2 Understood as mean 25 (OH)D values below 50 nmol/l
3 A pooled analysis of vitamin D dose requirements for fracture prevention. Bischoff-Ferrari HA et al New England Journal of Medicine. 2012.
4 Blood levels below 50 nmol/l considered as insufficient

In the U.S., approximately 30 percent of the study population had sub-optimal vitamin D levels, rising to around 70 percent among participants with darker skin color, highlighting skin color as a risk factor for vitamin D insufficiency. Overall the U.S. vitamin D status was significantly higher compared to other regions, which may in part, be attributable to the routine fortification of foods with vitamin D (such as milk, juice and cereals).

The map has also created a very clear picture as to where the vitamin D insufficiency knowledge gaps exist and where further research is required. Dr. Eggersdorfer added, ¡§There is far too little data available, for example, in relation to adolescents and young people, and across the developing world in general. These maps are an important starting point, but it is essential that research continues to better understand the scale of vitamin D insufficiency.¡¨

DSM joins IOF in calling on healthcare policymakers to raise awareness of vitamin D insufficiency and to take action to ensure intake of recommended vitamin D levels, including through safe and effective measures such as food fortification, access to proper supplements and better consumer education.

Additional country findings include:
„h In Germany 57 percent of men and 58 percent of women had vitamin D status below recommended levels, rising to 75 percent among 65-79 year olds
„h U.K. studies focused on older people reveal that nearly two thirds of women (57 percent), and half of men (49 percent) are not getting enough vitamin D
„h In the Netherlands, around half of all study participants had sub-optimal vitamin D levels
„h The Middle East revealed lower vitamin D status compared to Europe which could result from cultural factors such as clothing and lifestyle
„h Asia showed a widespread insufficient vitamin D status across different countries, with a few exceptions (vitamin D status was ranked desirable in Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam)
„h Most regions offer some data, however no information was available for Central America, South America (except Brazil) and much of Africa
„h The most striking data gaps were found in children and adolescents
DSM ¡V Bright Science. Brighter Living..

Royal DSM is a global science-based company active in health, nutrition and materials. By connecting its unique competences in Life Sciences and Materials Sciences DSM is driving economic prosperity, environmental progress and social advances to create sustainable value for all stakeholders. DSM delivers innovative solutions that nourish, protect and improve performance in global markets such as food and dietary supplements, personal care, feed, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, automotive, paints, electrical and electronics, life protection, alternative energy and bio-based materials. DSM¡¦s

More information can be found at www.dsm.com

Dr. Quinn Pauly Joins Premier Care at Renown Medical Group

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Dr. Quinn Pauly Joins Premier Care at Renown Medical Group

To help meet the need of patients in northern Nevada seeking more convenience and greater access to their primary care physician, Renown Medical Group is pleased to announce the addition of Quinn Pauly, M.D. as a new Premier Care physician.

Dr. Pauly is board certified in family medicine. He received his medical degree from the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine and completed his residency at Natividad Medical Center in Salinas, Calif.

The Premier Care Program, first introduced to the region through Renown Health last October, offers patients greater access to their primary care physician beyond traditional scheduled office visits. The program is based on a national trend and is made possible through a reduced practice size.

“Patients are requesting enhanced access and expanded personalized care,” said Larry Trilops, vice president of Ambulatory Services at Renown Health. “This program allows us to meet customer demand.”

What’s the difference?
Renown Medical Group offers same or next day appointments with your doctor if he’s available or another doctor, within Renown’s Medical Group consisting of more than 80 providers and 15 locations, if he’s not.

In contrast, the Premier Care program offers more access through a reduced practice size. With monthly membership fees (not covered by insurance) ranging from $35 – $55, you may communicate directly with your primary care physician 24/7, including weekends.

“My focus has always been to take time to listen to my patients so I can attend to their healthcare needs thoroughly,” Dr. Pauly said. “I enjoy getting to know my patients and their families and strive to give my patients personalized, compassionate care”.

Key Premier Care Benefits include:
• A smaller, low volume practice.
• Convenient appointments with your dedicated Premier Care physician with little to no waiting guaranteed.
• Online communication directly with your physician, regarding scheduled appointments, sick visits or general medical advice, with a response within 24 hours, seven days per week.
• Extended office time for appointments.

For more information about Premier Care, please visit renown.org/premiercare or call 775-982-8265.

About Renown Medical Groups
Renown Medical Group has more than 80 providers at 15 locations including Reno, Sparks, Fernley and Silver Springs.

Earlier this year, Renown announced awards that recognized two Renown Medical Group sites for initiatives for excellence in patient quality. In 2010, Renown became the first NCQA recognized Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) in Nevada, and in 2011, Renown became the fourth organization in the country to be recognized as a Level III PCMH under the new 2011 standards.

Renown Medical Group physicians provide preventive care and health education for all ages and treat most common illnesses and injuries including colds, flu, and aches and pains. They also coordinate their patients’ medical care including checkups, immunizations, referrals to specialists, lab and x-ray services and hospital admissions. Physicians see patients by scheduled appointment. Medical Group locations accept most insurance plans, including Hometown Health, UnitedHealthcare, Anthem Blue Cross/Blue Shield, Cigna, Great West, Coventry/First Health, Humana, Principal, Tricare and Medicare.

For added convenience, Renown Medical Group is the only primary care provider in the region that offers a secure, online venue for patients to manage their healthcare. With MyChart, patients can schedule and keep track of appointments, obtain certain test results and request prescription refills 24 hours a day. To sign up, ask a Medical Assistant for your access code at your next office visit. Same-day appointments are available by calling 982-5000, Monday through Thursday between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m., and Fridays between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. For more information, visit renown.org/medicalgroup.

Cultural Arts – December 2012 Calendar Of Events

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Cultural Arts
December 2012 Calendar Of Events
495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101
Contact: Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993 Oct. 2, 2012
Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org
City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

 

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
Centers will be closed Dec. 25 for holiday observance.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Winter Class Registration Opens (all ages)
Saturday, Dec. 1, 8 a.m.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Registration is open through Dec. 29, for six-week class sessions to be held Jan. 2-Feb. 9, 2013. Offered cultural arts instruction includes African Drum – Beginner / Intermediate / Advanced; African Dance for Children; African Dance Teens/Adults; Baby Ballet & Tap; Ballet – Beginner / Intermediate; Modern Dance; Hip Hop – Beginner / Intermediate; Yoga – Health & Wellness; Tae Kwon Do – Beginner / Intermediate / Advanced; Video & Documentary Creation; Music Production; and Private Piano / Voice lessons. To register or for more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call 229-4800.

Winter Class Registration Opens (ages 2-adult)
Saturday, Dec. 1, 10 a.m.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Registration is open through Jan. 9, 2013, for 10-week sessions of classes to be held Jan. 12-March 23. Offered courses include Ballet, Jazz, Hip Hop, Zumba, Salsa Rueda, Drawing, Art for Youth & Teens, private music lessons, private or semi-private dance lessons and Saturday tots classes in dance for ages 2 years and up. Registration is open the same dates for Rainbow Company youth theatre classes for ages 4-17. To register or for more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-6383.

Toys for Tots Square Dance (ages 8+)
Saturday, Dec. 1; introductory lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7:30 to 10 p.m.
Cost: $6 with new unwrapped toy; $8 without toy. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Square dance to help the U.S. Marines make children’s Christmas wishes come true. Enjoy callers Andy Finch, Joe Valvo, Vern Vernazarro and Ron Sowash of Las Vegas and caller Arlen Miller of Northridge, Calif., with guest cuer Ron Hartzell. Newcomers and families are welcomed. No need to bring a partner. Class-level dances, Plus and Round dances will be included, as well as a chance to win door prizes. Refreshments will be available. Cosponsored by the Stardusters, Las Vegas Square & Round Dance Club, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 348-4906 or 229-6383, or visit www.lasvegassquarenrounddancers.org.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m., Dec. 5 and 12.
Cost: $4 dollars per person per week. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of international fun learning Armenian, Bulgarian, Israeli, Arabic, Macedonian, Russian, Greek, Turkish, Chinese and Serbian folk dances, and more. No need to bring a partner. Cosponsored by the Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing Club of Las Vegas, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 562-9889 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.
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Afternoon Delight Tea Dances (adults)
Thursdays, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., Dec. 6 and 13.
Cost: $5 general admission per person. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Great music and a friendly atmosphere welcome dancers of all levels to the center’s beautiful ballroom dance floor. Loy Au will lead the dance instruction and demonstrations for new dances each week. A themed dance will be featured each month. Invite your friends and bring snacks to share. No dance will be held Dec. 20 or 27. For more information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m., Dec. 7 and 14.
Cost: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Presents “Honk!” (all ages)
Dec. 7, 8, 14 and 15 at 7 p.m.; Dec. 9, 15 and 16 at 2 p.m.
Cost: $7 adults; $5 teen/senior/military; $3 children age 12 and younger.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
And for the holidays, join the Rainbow Company Youth Theatre for “Honk!,” the musical story of Ugly, whose odd looks incite prejudice among his family and neighbors, until he discovers his true and glorious destiny. Tickets are available by calling 229-6383 or 229-6553, or online at www.artslasvegas.org.

Downtown Cultural Series – Danny Wright “An Intimate Christmas” (all ages) – canceled
Friday, Dec. 21, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
Call (702) 229-3515 for more details. A replacement performer may be scheduled.

The Poets’ Corner
Hosted by Keith Brantley
Friday, Dec. 21, 7 p.m.
Admission is free.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
A monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants, featuring the best local poetry talent.

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Kwanzaa 2012 (all ages)
A Celebration of Culture and the Rites of Passage Graduation ‘Crossing Over’ Ceremony
Cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District
Saturday, Dec. 22, 3 p.m.
Admission is free, but tickets are required and may be picked up in advance at the West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd.
West Las Vegas Library Theatre, 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 591-3989.
Join the community celebration to share the meaning of Kwanzaa and embrace and celebrate the accomplishments of our youth graduate participants in the annual Rites of Passage mentoring workshops. Please call (702) 229-4800 for more information.

Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks Present “Holidaze in Hicksville” (all ages)
Saturday, Dec. 22, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $10 in advance, $15 at the door.
Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St., (702) 229-3515.
Hicksville show will feature a live performance of songs from the acclaimed album Crazy for Christmas, as well as several Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks classics. Free limited parking available at the Historic Fifth Street School; metered parking available in metered lots across the street both west and south of school. For tickets and information, call 229-3515 or 229-6383, or go online to www.artslasvegas.org. For more information on the performers, visit www.danhicks.net/.

Exhibitions

Public Employee Art Exhibit
Oct. 18-Dec. 6, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
The Public Employee Art Exhibit was open to any artist who resided in Southern Nevada and is employed by the state, county or city government. Only original artwork was accepted. If you have any questions, contact gallery coordinator, Jeanne Voltura, at 229-1012 or e-mail to jvoltura@lasvegasnevada.gov. For more information, go to www.artslasvegas.org.

“Mountains and Valleys Without End”
Artist Daniel Gottsegen
Through Dec. 8; Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The artist’s experience working in and studying the environment from both a scientific (naturalist) and personal orientation has shaped the way he considers (and constructs) his world and his work. He is interested in the tension and duality between our romantic conceptions of nature and the reality of the potential environmental calamities we are facing. He seeks to embody this tension in his work by the use of technology (video that he shoots) to derive image sources, or in recent work (the Wanderungen series) by juxtaposing images. For more information on the gallery program call (702) 229-1012 or go to www.artslasvegas.org.

“Gnot The Proper Gnomenclature” (all ages)
Through Jan. 17, 2013, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall, 495 S. Main St., second-floor outside patio, (702) 229-4631.
The public is invited to enjoy two whimsical garden gnome sculptures by Las Vegas artist Jesse Smigel. On display for viewing, photos and videos, the gnomes are carved from dense foam. One standing gnome is 9 feet tall; the second reclining gnome is approximately 9 feet long. No sitting or standing on the sculptures, please.
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City of Las Vegas Halloween & Harvest Happenings

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City Offers Many Special Events And Activities For Children And Adults

The city of Las Vegas offers special events and activities for children and adults for Halloween and harvest fun. These activities are just a sampling of the many programs available throughout the year. For a full list of classes and activities available, go online to download the Fall/Winter 2012-2013 Recreation Guide at www.lasvegasparksandrec.com or call any of the facilities below. All activities are subject to change. Please call to confirm before attending. Most centers are closed Oct. 26. Most activities require advance registration. Most programs at senior centers and active adult centers require a $2 annual membership in the city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all city of Las Vegas senior and active adult centers.

Oktoberfest Luncheon (ages 50+)
Thursday, Oct. 18, 11:30 p.m.
Cost: $5.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Celebrate the rich heritage of the German people with bratwurst, sauerkraut and a great party!

Halloween Luncheon (ages 50+)
Friday, Oct. 19, 11 a.m. seating; 11:30 a.m. luncheon. Advance reservations required.
Cost: $5.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.
Dress in costume for this annual luncheon that includes salad, dessert, beverages, and dinner served in a pumpkin!

Free Ward 6 Movie In The Park
Friday, Oct. 19, 7 p.m.
Centennial Hills Amphitheatre, 7101 N. Buffalo Drive, at Deer Springs Way.
Enjoy the PG-rated family film, “Scooby-Doo,” in the park, sponsored by Lexus of Las Vegas. Bring your picnic, blankets or folding chairs to be more comfortable. Food will be available for purchase from Curbside Café. For more information, call 229-6154 or visit www.lasvegasnevada.gov/ward6.

Cooking Club: What Can You Make from a Pumpkin? (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 23, 11 a.m.
Cost: $5.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Ghost & Ghouls Breakfast (ages 50+)
Thursday, Oct. 25, 8:30 to 10 a.m.
Cost: $3.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Enjoy a ghoulish serving of pancakes with bloody scrambled eggs and slices of bacon.

Howling Halloween Carnival (all ages)
Thursday, Oct. 25, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
Doolittle Community Center, 1950 N. J St., (702) 229-6374.
There will be a costume contest, games, drawings and candy for the kids. There will also be a Haunted Hallway designed to frighten all who enter.

Halloween Costume Dance with the Jerry Tiffe Band (adults)
Saturday Oct. 27, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $10 in advance, $15 event day.
Charleston Heights Arts Center Ballroom, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Get in the spirit of the season and “monster mash” at the annual Halloween-themed dance. Dress in your favorite costume and dance the night away to the music of Jerry Tiffe and his combo band. Band members are Jerry Tiffe (leader/singer/trumpet), Dale Sweetland (drums/vocals), Thomas San Filippo (keyboards/bass) and Brian Bissell (guitar). Call 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org for tickets and information. For more information on the band, go online to www.jerrytiffe.com.
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Halloween Costume Luncheon & Celebration (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Oct. 31, 11:30 a.m. Advance registration required.
Cost: $5.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Dress in costume to enjoy a spooky meal and carnival-style games. Prizes will be awarded to the best costume, creepiest costume, funniest and more. Space is limited, so sign up early.

Halloween Fun! (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Oct. 31, 1 to 3 p.m. Advance registration required by Oct. 26.
Cost: $2.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.
Come dressed in costume to celebrate Halloween and two lesser-known holidays, Carve a Pumpkin Day and National Candy Corn Day! “Carve” a pumpkin and enjoy treats made with candy corn!

Scarecrow Making (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Nov. 7, 10:30 a.m. Registration begins Oct. 22.
Cost: $5 with a current annual $2 senior membership. Advanced registration is required.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
The PVC “skeleton” and base will be provided; the rest is up to you! Bring an old pair of jeans and shirt, or dress and shoes — it’s up to you to create a scarecrow that will be used to decorate the center. You’ll also enjoy a fall snack. Call 229-1702 for more information.

Harvest Festival Potluck (ages 50+)
Thursday, Nov. 8, 11:30 a.m.
Free with a dish to share.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.

Healthy Aging: Up2Me

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Healthy Aging: Up2Me
According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than 125 million people suffer from at least one chronic illness. If you are an adult with a chronic condition such as diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, heart disease, chronic pain or anxiety, this Healthy Aging : Up2Me workshop can help you.

It’s also important for family caregivers to avoid developing a chronic illness due to stress and neglect of their own health and well being.
• Join this FREE 2 1/2 hour workshop held each week for six weeks.
• Learn from trained volunteer leaders who have cared for those with chronic
health conditions.
• Set goals for yourself.
Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health
888 W. Bonneville Ave • Las Vegas, NV 89106
Fridays: September 28 – November 2, 2012
12:30 – 3 p.m.
Sign up with Susan Hirsch at hirschs2@ccf.org or 702-483-6023.

City Of Las Vegas November 2012 Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City Of Las Vegas November 2012
Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle! Most facilities are closed Nov. 12, 22 and 23 for holiday observance.

“Souper” Family Swim Day (all ages)
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Cost: One can of soup or other canned goods If you bring more than one item, you will receive an additional one-day pass to use any day during open swim.
Municipal Pool, 431 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6309.
No school — come to the pool! Canned goods will be donated to a local food bank. Regular fees apply without donation.

E! Club (ages 6-13)
Friday, Nov. 16, 6 to 9 p.m.
Cost: $25 per child.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Parents can enjoy a night on the town while children enjoy a fun evening of activities.

Ward 4 Free Holiday Movie in the Park (all ages)
Friday, Nov. 30, 6:30 p.m.
Police Memorial Park, 3250 Metro Academy Way.
Enjoy the family movie, “The Grinch,” featuring Jim Carrey, as well as free holiday crafts, hot chocolate, candy canes, popcorn and cookies, while supplies last. Get your picture taken with the Grinch for free.
Please dress warmly and bring a blanket or chair to sit on; movie will be outside on the grass.

Adaptive Recreation
Adaptive Cycle Club (all ages)
Saturday, Nov. 3, 9 to 11 a.m. or 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Cost: $2 per person.
Wayne Bunker Family Park, 7351 W. Alexander Road, at Tenaya Way.
Call (702) 229-4796 to reserve your spot in the early or late session. Adaptive cycles provided.

Project D.I.R.T. Tent Camping (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Saturday-Sunday, Nov. 10-11, 11 a.m. Saturday to 11 a.m. Sunday. Advance registration required.
Cost: $30 per person.
Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road, (702) 229-8100.
Meet at Floyd Lamb Park to enjoy tent camping, hiking and fishing. Call (702) 229-4796 for registration and information. Cost includes meals and tent. Bring your own sleeping bag.
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Paralympic Sport Free Activity Nights (kindergarten-grade 12)
Wednesday, Nov. 14, 5 to 8 p.m.
Rancho High School, 1900 Searles Ave.
Register at main school entrance. Call (702) 229-4796 or e-mail jfoster@lasvegasnevada.gov for additional information and locations.

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed staff development days and holidays.
Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Call (702) 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence.

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m. Closed Nov. 6, 12, 22-23.
Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Participants will enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

Wheelchair Athletes Open Gym (high school-adult)
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., excluding Nov. 22.
Fee: $2 per practice.
Fremont Middle School Gymnasium, 1100 E. Saint Louis Ave.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Wheelchair Basketball Practice (high school-adult)
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. No practice Nov. 22.
Fee: $20 per person.
Fremont Middle School Gymnasium, 1100 E. Saint Louis Ave.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Quad Rugby Team Practice (high school-adult)
Fridays, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. No practice Nov. 23.
Fee: $20 monthly
Chuck Minker Sports Complex, 275 N. Mojave Rd.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

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Medical Alert Provider Rescue Alert of California(TM) Announces Improved Senior Blog Rescue Alert of California

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

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Medical Alert Provider Rescue Alert of California(TM) Announces Improved Senior Blog
Rescue Alert of California™, has announced a newly updated senior blog in an effort to improve the user-experience for their network of seniors and caregivers.

Rescue Alert Medical Alert System
We want to provide the vital information on eldercare and senior health in an easy-to-find, user friendly way so that more people benefit from this valuable information.
Rancho Santa Margarita, California (PRWEB) August 23, 2012

Medical alert provider Rescue Alert of California,™ in a continued effort to provide helpful resources and information on a variety of health and safety topics for seniors, has announced a restructure of it’s senior blog. Rescue Alert of California’s™ enhanced blog is one place to find information on everything from changes in Medicare to flu shots to retirement.
“Our website is an important tool for us and for our customers,” said Lindsey Brewster of Rescue Alert of California™. “we want to provide the vital information on eldercare and senior health in an easy-to-find, user friendly way so that more people benefit from this valuable information.”
Rescue Alert of California™ has improved its senior blog by adding more resources, in a variety of categories such as senior safety, health, technology, medical alert systems, caregiver resources, and senior assistance. There is now more content, and easier navigation, so that seniors and caregivers can find what they want to know with ease and efficiency.
About Rescue Alert of California™:
Rescue Alert of California™ has been enabling senior citizens to live safe, happy and independent lives through education and quality medical alert systems for over a decade. They offer EMD certified responders available 24 hours a day, and the peace of mind that comes with knowing that help is available at the push of a button.
To view the resources available for seniors and caregivers, visit our website:
http://rescuealertofca.com
To join a supportive network of senior resources and experts in the field, follow us on Twitter @rescuealertofca, or “Like” us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/RescueAlertofCA

Community Partners for Better Health 8th Annual Choose and Move Festival

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

Community Partners for Better Health (CPBH) is hosting the 8th Annual Choose and Move Festival on Saturday, September 8, 2012, from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., at the Doolittle Community Center, 1950 North J Street, Las Vegas, Nevada. We invite you to join us as an exhibitor at this educational, interactive, and fun event. The festival has proven to be a very popular event for health care providers, health care agencies and Southern Nevada residents. With more than 200 participants last year, we anticipate new additions will draw over 300 people to the event.

The festival encourages our community to adopt healthier lifestyles especially when it comes to regular physical activity and selecting more nutritious foods. Festival planners include the Southern Nevada Health District, City of North Las Vegas, Governor’s Office for Consumer Health Assistance, Clark County Fire Department, 100 Black Men-Las Vegas Chapter, Las Vegas Metro Police Department, American Lung Association, HealthInsight, Nathan Adelson Hospice and numerous other community stakeholders. The festival will feature a variety of free and low-cost health screenings, healthy food demonstrations and information, and free physical activity classes including African dance, belly dance, Latin dance, hula, and Zumba. Additionally, we are working with Jump for Joy Foundation to offer physical activities for our younger attendees.

Attached you will find an exhibitor registration form. We truly appreciate your consideration to participate in the event. We believe that you will find involvement beneficial to your organization’s mission and to the community you serve. You are a valuable resource in helping our community citizens live healthy lives and make positive health choices. The planning committee is developing a strategy to engage attendees more fully with vendors. Look for more on this in July.

If you have questions, please call Community Partners for Better Health, at 702- 256-2724 or Jackie Knudsen, Choose & Move Co-Chairman at 702-755-9035 or email: jacqueline.knudsen@emeritus.com

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 – Recreation, Adaptive Recreation, Sports & Community Special Events

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 – Recreation, Adaptive Recreation, Sports & Community Special Events

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle! Most facilities are closed Oct. 26 for holiday observance.

Ward 5 Coffee With The Councilman
Thursday, Oct. 4, 9 to 10 a.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Starbucks, 751 N. Rancho Drive, at Bonanza Road.
Join Ward 5 Councilman Ricki Y. Barlow for coffee and conversation about your ideas to improve Ward 5 and Las Vegas.

Ward 4 Walk & Roll For ALS (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 13, 6 a.m. registration. 5K begins 8 a.m., Walk begins 8:15 a.m.
Cost: $25 minimum donation to participate in walk; $35 for runners ages 18+; $25 runners ages 5-17; free for under age 5.
Police Memorial Park, 3250 Metro Academy Way, at Cheyenne Avenue.
Sign up your team at http://als.kintera.org/WalknRoll. Call (702) 777-0500 for more information.

Ward 2 Trunk or Treat Car Show and Free Kid’s Halloween Festival (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public. There is a fee for vendors and car show participants.
Veterans Memorial Leisure Services Center, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.
Please join Councilman Bob Beers for a fun day filled with music provided by DJ Brando, along with Halloween activities for the kids, including craft projects, costume contest, games, face painting and jump houses. Kids have the opportunity to “trunk or treat” at the cars decorated for Halloween in the car show. Help pick the spookiest! All makes, models and years welcome in the car show. Vendors are welcome. The event is sponsored by Ward 2 Councilman Bob Beers.

Contact John Bear at 229-2420 or e-mail to jbear@lasvegasnevada.gov, if you want to register your car in the show, become a vendor at the event, or volunteer to help. Early registration for the car show is $25 and is due by Thursday, Oct. 4. You also can register a car in the car show on the event date for $35. The vendor fee is $25, which includes a table.
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Free Ward 6 Shredding Event
Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to noon.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive.
Bring your documents that need to be shredded. Complimentary shredding takes place in the Centennial Hills Community Center Active Adult Center parking lot. Limit of five boxes per vehicle. This is a safe and convenient way to get rid of old documents.

Movie at the E! (all ages)
Friday, Oct. 19, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
East Las Vegas Community Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Enjoy a family movie in the plaza. This will be a perfect chance for the family to relax and enjoy a safe and special night under the stars. Bring low folding chairs for your comfort.

E! Club (ages 6-13)
Friday, Oct. 19, 6 to 9 p.m.
Cost: $25 per child.
East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Avenue, (702) 229-1515.
Parents can enjoy a night on the town while children enjoy a fun evening of activities.

Ward 1 Trunk or Treat (all ages)
Wednesday, Oct. 24, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
Anthem Institute Parking Lot, 2320 S. Rancho Drive, at Sahara Avenue.
Enjoy a community celebration with trick-or-treating, jump house and more, hosted by Anthem Institute and co-sponsored by the city of Las Vegas.

Howling Halloween Carnival (all ages)
Thursday, Oct. 25, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
Doolittle Community Center, 1950 N. J St., (702) 229-6374.
There will be a costume contest, games, drawings and candy for the kids. There will also be a Haunted Hallway designed to frighten all who enter.

Las Vegas Mayor’s Cup International Tournament
Friday-Sunday, Oct. 26-28.
Free for spectators. Advance registration required for teams.
Bettye Wilson Soccer Complex, 7353 Eugene Ave., and other parks.
For teams ages 8-15. This soccer tournament is co-hosted by the city of Las Vegas and the Downtown Las Vegas Soccer Club. This top-ranked event drew teams from 11 different states, as well as Canada and Mexico last year. Teams are guaranteed three games. Individual awards are offered for 1st and 2nd place. The entry fee is only $515 for U8-U10 and $735 for U11-U15. Entry deadline is Sept. 6. For more information, go online to www.lvmayorscup.com.
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Adaptive Recreation

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed staff development days and holidays.
Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Call (702) 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence.

Wheelchair Athletes Open Gym (high school-adult)
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., through December.
Fee: $2 per practice.
Fremont Middle School Gymnasium, 1100 E. Saint Louis Ave.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m. Closed Oct. 12, 26.
Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.
East Las Vegas Community Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Participants enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

Adaptive Cycle Club (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 6, 9 to 11 a.m. or 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Cost: $2 per person.
Wayne Bunker Family Park, 7351 W. Alexander Road, at Tenaya Way.
Call (702) 229-4796 to reserve your spot in the early or late session. Adaptive cycles provided.

Helter Skelter Quad Rugby Tournament
Oct. 12-14, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday.
Free for spectators.
Dula Gymnasium, 441 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6307.
Six teams from across North America will compete for medals for first through third place. Teams will include: Las Vegas Sin City Skulls; Northern California Quake; Sierra Strom from Reno/Sacramento; University of Arizona Wildcats; Boise Idaho Bombers; and the Ottawa Stingers from Canada. Spectators are welcome. Call (702) 229-4796 or e-mail jfoster@lasvegasnevada.gov for more information.
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20th Annual Disability Awareness Day (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Free admission and lunch.
Pioneer Park, 7449 Braswell Drive.
Attend a free “Work Incentives Seminar on Ticket to Work & Employment for SSI/SSDI Beneficiaries Age 14 to 64.” This seminar will be held from 10 to 11:30 a.m. in conjunction with Disability Awareness Day. Also enjoy live entertainment, a free wheelchair safety check and a free lunch. Call (702) 889-4216 to reserve your space.

Free Paralympic Sport Activity Nights (kindergarten-grade 12)
Wednesday, Oct. 17, 5 to 8 p.m.
Rancho High School, 1900 Searles Ave.
Register at main school entrance. Call (702) 229-4796 or e-mail jfoster@lasvegasnevada.gov for additional information and locations.

Quad Rugby Team Practice (high school-adult)
Friday, Oct. 19, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Minker Sports Complex, 275 N. Mojave Road, (702) 229-6563.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Vi Marks 25 Years As a National Leader in Senior Living

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

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Vi Marks 25 Years As a National Leader in Senior Living

Vi – the developer, owner and operator of older adult living communities – is celebrating its 25th anniversary in August. Vi operates 10 continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) nationwide.

“We are extremely proud of the accomplishments we have achieved during the past 25 years,” said Randy Richardson, President of Vi. “In an era of uncertainty, our employees and residents can take pride in the fact we are a stable, national presence within the senior living industry, free from third-party debt in our CCRC communities and managed by a strong, long-tenured team.”

Vi was established in 1987 as Classic Residence by Hyatt. The company changed its name to Vi in 2010. The company was created by Penny Pritzker, whose family founded Hyatt Hotels, to leverage Hyatt’s hospitality expertise in the growing retirement living industry to better cater to the needs and lifestyle of discerning older adults.

Vi (pronounced vee) is the Latin root for the word “life.” It was chosen as the name for the company because it captures the positive opportunities to live a more engaging and fulfilling life as an older adult.

Vi’s ability to merge its hospitality heritage with quality senior living is what differentiates the brand from others. Visitors and residents can sense this commitment to quality and service from the moment they walk into one of Vi’s communities, according to Richardson. “Hospitality is in our DNA; and every detail is meant to convey quality service, from the decor to our lifestyle and fitness programs and to our employees who’ve been specially trained in the art of making residents feel at home.”

In addition, Vi communities feature stylish dining venues that enable residents to eat well and dine in style. Menus offer a wide variety of options to suit residents’ nutritional needs and taste preferences. Meals are prepared by chefs who receive specialized training at The Culinary Institute of America.

As testament to Vi’s approach, a recent survey of independent living residents at Vi’s 10 CCRC communities finds them happy with their decision to live at Vi. The survey finds that 94 percent of Vi’s independent living residents who completed the survey are very satisfied or satisfied with the community. Almost 95 percent say they would recommend their Vi community to family or friends.

Late last year, Vi commissioned a report by Ken Dychtwald Ph.D., renowned gerontologist, psychologist, best-selling author, and CEO of Age Wave that challenges the “prevailing myths and misperceptions” about CCRC living. The report, “The Five Myths and Realities of Continuing Care Retirement Communities,” is available here.

About Vi
Vi, formerly Classic Residence by Hyatt, is celebrating its 25th anniversary as a developer, owner and operator of older adult living communities. The company was founded in August 1987. The company is dedicated to enriching the lives of older adults by providing quality environments, services and care. Vi currently operates ten continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) nationwide. For more information about Vi communities, visit

http://www.ViLiving.com.

Contact: Tim Hermeling, 312-803-8480

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 Senior Special Events

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 Senior Special Events

Las Vegas Residents Invited To Celebrations, Luncheons & Activities At City Centers

The city of Las Vegas active adult and senior centers offer exercise, fitness, craft, arts, dance, music and computer classes; cards; games; discussion and social groups; luncheons; sports; and special events Monday through Friday to residents age 50 and better. Many of these activities contribute to wellness and a healthy lifestyle. A listing of classes and activities is published in the Beyond the Neon Leisure Guide, available in the centers and online at www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. All activities are subject to change. Most activities require $2 annual membership to city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all senior and active adult centers.

Golf Lessons (ages 50+)
Mondays at 9 a.m. or 10:15 a.m. Registration for October sessions begins Sept. 17.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Bring in a couple of clubs that you need to work on.

Oktoberfest Brunch (ages 50+)
Thursday, Oct. 4, 10 a.m. Registration open Sept. 3-28.
Cost: $3.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.
Celebrate Oktoberfest with some Bavarian brunch delicacies!

Breakfast Nook (ages 50+)
Friday, Oct. 5, 8:30 a.m.
Cost: $3, includes French toast casserole, sausage, fruit, coffee and juice.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Flu & Pneumonia Shots (all ages)
Tuesday, Oct. 9, 9 a.m. to noon.
Cost: Call for information. Various insurances accepted.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Southern Nevada Health District staff will administer flu and pneumonia vaccinations. Call 759-0850 for more information on pricing and which insurances will be accepted.

Chili Cook-off
Wednesday, Oct. 10, noon.
Cost: Free to enter; $2 to taste.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Make your best chili to enter in the annual chili cook-off. Prizes will be awarded to the winner. Salad and cornbread provided for those who taste and help judge the best chili!
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Helping You Understand Your Medicare Benefits and Options (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct., 16, 10 a.m. Registration opens Sept. 17.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Receive information to help you make your best Medicare choices.

Flu Shots (all ages)
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 10 a.m. to noon.
Cost: Call for information.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Southern Nevada Health District will provide annual flu shots. A list of accepted insurances will be available closer to the date of the clinic. Please call to be put on the reservation list.

Annual Texas Hold’em Poker Tournament (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 12:30 p.m.
Cost: $4.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Prepare for this fun tournament by joining the Thursday class at 1 p.m. or playing in the weekly games on Tuesdays and Fridays at 12:30 p.m. Enjoy hot and cold refreshments. Top three winners will receive a prize basket!

Getting Paid to Talk (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 1 to 3:30 p.m. Must be registered by Oct. 5.
Cost: $15.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.
This exciting workshop will teach you how to get paid to talk – by reading for audio books, animated shows and more. The field is wide open. Learn how to market yourself, where to go to find voice-over jobs, how to do voice-overs, etc.

World Food Day Luncheon (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Oct. 17, 11:30 a.m. Registration open Sept. 3-Oct. 12.
Cost: $5.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.
Give back to our community in honor of World Food Day. Bring a non-perishable food item with you and enjoy a delicious lunch. Feel good, doing good!

Oktoberfest Luncheon (ages 50+)
Thursday, Oct. 18, 11:30 p.m.
Cost: $5.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Celebrate the rich heritage of the German people with bratwurst, sauerkraut and a great party!

Flu and Pneumonia Shots (all ages)
Tuesday, Oct. 23, 9 to 11 a.m.
Call the beginning of October for pricing.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Southern Nevada Health District staff will administer flu and pneumonia vaccinations for a fee. Pneumonia vaccination is recommended for adults age 65 and older. For more information on flu vaccines, go online to www.southernnevadahealthdistrict.org/immunizations/flu-shots.php.
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Cooking Club: What Can You Make from a Pumpkin? (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 23, 11 a.m.
Cost: $5.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Lillian’s Fashion Divas (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Oct. 24, 11:00 a.m. for fashion show; brunch immediately following.
Fashion show is free and open to the public. Brunch cost: $3. R.S.V.P. by Oct. 17 for brunch.
West Las Vegas Library Theatre for fashion show, 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd.
Doolittle Senior Center for brunch, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Active adults from Doolittle Senior Center present fashions created in the master seamstress classes. They will showcase fall fashions, including casual wear, evening wear and Sunday’s best. The event is presented by the Doolittle Senior Center and hosted by the city of Las Vegas and Las Vegas-Clark County Library District. Call 229-6125 for more information.

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Cultural Arts – September 2012 Calendar Of Events

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Cultural Arts – September 2012 Calendar Of Events

495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101
Contact: Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993 July 26, 2012
Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org
City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Centers will be closed Monday, Sept. 3, for holiday observance.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m.
Cost: $4 dollars per person per week. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of international fun learning Armenian, Bulgarian, Israeli, Arabic, Macedonian, Russian, Greek, Turkish, Chinese and Serbian folk dances, and more. No need to bring a partner. For more information, call 229-6383.

Afternoon Delight Tea Dances (adults)
Thursdays, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Cost: $5 general admission per person. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Great music and a friendly atmosphere welcome dancers of all levels to the center’s beautiful ballroom dance floor. Loy Au will lead the dance instruction and demonstrations for new dances each week. A themed dance will be featured each month. Invite your friends and bring snacks to share. For more information, call 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Cost: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – Crystal Bookmark Award Nominations
Aug. 13-Sept. 21.
The Vegas Valley Book Festival launches its annual awards project to honor a local individual and an organization for advancing the cause of literature in the Las Vegas Valley. Nominations from the public are requested Aug. 13-Sept. 21. Nominations can be submitted online at www.vegasvalleybookfestival.org, or call (702) 229-5431 for a nomination form. The deadline for submittal is 5 p.m. Sept. 21. Nominees must reside in Southern Nevada. The two awards will be presented at the festival at 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, p.m. in the auditorium of the Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St.
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Contra Dances (ages 8+)
Saturday, Sept. 1, 15. Group lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7 to 10 p.m.
Cost: $10 adults; $5 members, students and military; $3 children under 16 and non-dancing adults. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance to the live music of an acoustic band playing joyful fiddle tunes, driving reels and a waltz or two. All dances are taught and called; newcomers and families are welcomed. No need to bring a partner. Wear comfortable flat-soled shoes and casual clothing. For more information, call 656-9513 or 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – “Create an Artist’s Sketchbook” (ages 3-12)
Sept. 1-2; Saturday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m.
Programs are free with paid admission. $10 for adults; $8 for seniors, military and children 12 and over; $5 for ages 3-11; free for children 2 and under.
Las Vegas Natural History Museum, 900 Las Vegas Blvd. N., 384-3466.
In this workshop inspired by the famed book series, “Dinotopia,” written and illustrated by James Gurney, kids ages 3-12 can create an imagined dinosaur utopia using watercolors and sketchbooks. Paleontology experts will answer questions on Saturday.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – “Smart Chicks Kick It Tour” (ages 13+)
Tuesday, Sept. 11, 7 to 9 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Shakespeare Las Vegas, Reed Whipple Cultural Center, 821 Las Vegas Blvd. North.
Seven best-selling young adult authors stop in Las Vegas as part of their six-city tour of North America. Authors Kelley Armstrong, Melissa Marr, Rachel Caine, Kim Derting, Kami Garcia, Richelle Mead and Veronica Roth will read excerpts from their own works, followed by a spirited question-and-answer session, book signings and reception. Call 229-5431 for more information.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – “The First Lady of Las Vegas” (all ages)
Saturday, Sept. 15, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Cost: $1 for ages 13+; free for ages 12 and younger.
Old Las Vegas Mormon Fort State Historic Park, 500 E. Washington Ave., (702) 486-3511.
Nevada author Carrie Townley Porter talks about the life of the pioneer heroine who helped found our city — and signs her book, “Helen J. Stewart: The First Lady of Las Vegas.”

Downtown Cultural Series – The Sweet Potatoes (all ages)
Friday, Sept. 21, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd South.
Bring your lunch to enjoy this noontime concert. The Sweet Potatoes play original, acoustic Americana- style music with a fresh twist. This trio will bring a smile to your face with their sweet harmonies and finely crafted songwriting. Call (702) 229-3515 or visit www.artslasvegas.org. For more information on the band, visit http://thesweetpotatoes.com/.

The Poets’ Corner
Hosted by Keith Brantley
Friday, Sept. 21, 7:30 p.m.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
A monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants, featuring the best local poetry talent.
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USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, Sept 22, 7 to 11 p.m.; dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Cost: $5 for USA Dance members, military, and students ages 13-25; $10 for non-members. Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Cosponsored by the USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national organization USA Dance. USA Dance Las Vegas is a volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. Call (702) 813-6694 or (702) 229-6383 for more information, or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org. Pay at the door.

Community Artist Series: Mohummed-Rafee Shakir “Shamanic Syntax”
Saturday, Sept. 29, 3 p.m.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Mohummed-Rafee Shakir provides an unusual opportunity for audience members to connect with the mysteries of the ancient world through a variety of artistic mediums within an environment of “sacred sound.” The concept of “sacred sound” is a reference to the concept that vibration is the underlying connective force of the universe.

Pride & Prejudice and Zombies English Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, Sept 29, 7 to 10 p.m.
Cost: $10 adults; $5 members, students and military; $3 children under 16 and non-dancing adults. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Featuring a combination of English and Scottish dances and more. Costumes are encouraged, but not required. Caller Marsden Macrae leads a program that is enlivened by her vast knowledge of the history, historical setting and social customs of each dance. Only a brief reminder of choreography will be available, prior to the start of each dance. Attendees can gain a familiarity of the dances by attending dance sessions that are available before Sept 29. For more information, call 656-9513 or 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization.

Exhibitions

“You are Here” Exhibition (all ages)
Artist David Lindsay
June 29-Sept. 1; Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Arts Center Gallery, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
David Lindsay grew up in the San Francisco bay area. After high school, he lived in northern Italy for two years. Although his purpose was not to study art, he could not help but be influenced by the art and architecture of that country. The influence of Italian painting and architecture can be seen in his work, but in a combination that is unique and creative. His work has been exhibited all over the United States, as well as in Italy and Romania. He currently is working on projects for venues in Las Vegas, Texas, Germany and Italy.

“Celebrating Life! 2012 Winners Circle” (all ages)
July 26-Sept. 6, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
Enjoy this collection of award-winning pieces from the annual juried exhibit for adults 50 and better that takes place each spring.
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“Νeothta” (Youth)
Aug. 23-Oct. 27, by appointment only and during artists’ reception.
Meet-the-Artists reception Aug. 23, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. 4th St.
A selection of artists explore idealistic images of children. Call (702) 229-1012 for more information.

“Object Illusion”
Artist Joanne Vuillemot.
Aug. 30-Nov. 15, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Terrace Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
This local artist and educator will exhibit her silver and mixed-media metalwork.

“Mountains and Valleys Without End”
Artist Daniel Gottsegen
Sept. 7-Nov. 21; Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The artist’s experience working in and studying the environment from both a scientific (naturalist) and personal orientation has shaped the way he considers (and constructs) his world and his work. He is interested in the tension and duality between our romantic conceptions of nature and the reality of the potential environmental calamities we are facing. He seeks to embody this tension in his work by the use of technology (video that he shoots) to derive image sources, or in recent work (the Wanderungen series) by juxtaposing images. For more information on the gallery program call (702) 229-1012.

Hispanic-American Heritage Exhibit
Sept. 13-Oct. 11, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Meet-the-Artists reception Sept. 13.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.

“Absolutly Abstract”* *Editor’s Note: Spelling of exhibit name is correct as listed.
Artist Thurman Hackett
Sept. 15-Nov. 17, Wednesday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Meet-the-Artist Reception: Saturday, Sept. 22, 3 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
After spending 25 years as an interior designer, Thurman Hackett came to realize his artistic talent. He began to find new freedoms of expression through painting. As years passed, Hackett developed his own style of abstract painting. Although his subjects relate to American and African history, American jazz artists and automobiles of the 1940s, this show focuses on Africa.

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Million Hearts™ Social Media- Caregiver Video Contest

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Million Hearts™ Social Media- Caregiver Video Contest
Twitter @MillionHeartsUS

Week One (7/9)- We are launching our first video #contest next week in partnership with @CDCgov! Check back for details on #prizes and more!

Week Two (7/16)- Our first video #contest launches today! We invite #caregivers to join and share their stories. http://go.usa.gov/vEq @CDCgov

Week Three (7/23)- Please RT: Join the Million Hearts™ Caregiver Video Challenge. Submit your video by Aug. 31. http://go.usa.gov/vEq

Week Four (7/30)- Only 1 month left to show us how you control #bloodpressure! Submit your video and you could win a $500 #prize. http://go.usa.gov/vEq

Week Five (8/6)- #Caregivers, made your video yet? Share your story of how you keep your loved ones or clients heart-healthy! http://go.usa.gov/vEq

Week Six (8/13)- Show off your creativity. Make a video that shares how YOU help control the #bloodpressure of those you care for. http://go.usa.gov/vEq

Week Seven (8/20)- Just 2 weeks left until our Caregiver Video Challenge closes on 8/31. Enter your video for a chance to win $500! http://go.usa.gov/vEq

Week Eight (8/27)- Still want to join our video contest? You aren’t too late! Submit your video by FRIDAY at 5 PM. http://go.usa.gov/vEq

Facebook
Week of 7/16- We are excited to announce our caregiver video contest with @CDCgov launching this week! Share the story of how YOU help someone you care for control or maintain blood pressure. To join the contest, submit a video before August 31! http://go.usa.gov/vPF

Week of 7/30- One month left to submit a video to “Million Hearts™ Caregiver Video Challenge.” Share the story of how you help others control their blood pressure. The contest closes at 5 PM EST on August 31. http://go.usa.gov/vPF

Week of 8/13- Check out our Video Contest on http://go.usa.gov/vPF. Create a video for a chance to win up to $500 in prize money donated by our partners at the @CDCFoundation and share your tips for blood pressure control with thousands!

Week of 8/27- This is the last week to share your story of how you help your loved one control their blood pressure and maintain their heart health! Submit your video before 5 PM EST on Friday, August 31 at http://go.usa.gov/vPF.

Next Page »

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!