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Study by Harvard Medical School Researchers Examines Senior Living’s Role in Changing Health Care System

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Individuals in senior living communities require an array of health and supportive services to maintain an optimum quality of life. Often, these older adults receive fragmented care through multiple providers and payers, resulting in unnecessary health care expenditures and lower quality-of-care. To address these challenges, Brookdale is partnering with researchers at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and other senior living industry peers to establish the Assisted Living Sector Healthcare Policy Research Fund.

“This support allows us to examine what role senior living providers have in the new models of care that have emerged under health care reform,” says David Grabowski, PhD, professor of health care policy at HMS, who is leading this research study.

Grabowski and his team will examine whether providing more comprehensive, coordinated services in the senior living sector reduces the need for Medicare-paid services and Medicaid-financed nursing home services.

According to Will Clark, Brookdale’s senior vice president of strategy and brand and a member of the HMS Health Care Policy Advisory Council, society’s ability to meet the needs of an aging population is an important political, economic, clinical, and social imperative.

“Harvard’s reputation for tackling some of health care’s biggest challenges and generating meaningful insights that shape our nation’s policy is unparalleled. We are confident Dr. Grabowski and his colleagues’ research will be influential in determining the appropriate role senior living can and should play in our evolving health care system,” Clark said.

Brookdale’s goals for this effort are to create awareness for the potential senior living has to positively impact the health, well-being and overall cost of care for seniors; to identify barriers to creating more integration among senior living and the health care system; influence policy; and identify innovative models that integrate senior living with our health care system.

The initiative is funded through a cumulative contribution of $150,000 from Brookdale and eight other senior living providers — Atria Senior Living, Elmcroft Senior Living, Emeritus Senior Living, Erickson Living, HCP, Inc., Health Care REIT, Inc., Sunrise Senior Living, and Ventas, Inc. Together, these organizations hope to begin a dialogue among health care providers, policy makers, regulators, and consumers on the value of senior living and its role in creating an integrated, outcomes-driven health care system.

The study will occur in two phases. The first phase will consist of analyzing the role of assisted living in new payment-delivery models and presenting a conceptual model of how an integrated model might work, as well as the opportunities and challenges associated with such an approach. Building on the results of the first phase, the second phase of the project will consist of primary data work and potentially the development of a pilot program.

For additional information about the study, contact David Cameron, HarvardMedicalSchool’s director of science communications, at 617-432-0441 or david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu.

For more information about Brookdale, visit www.brookdale.com.

Brookdale Senior Living Inc. is a leading owner and operator of senior living communities throughout the United States.  The Company is committed to providing senior living solutions within properties that are designed, purpose-built and operated with the highest-quality service, care and living accommodations for residents.  Currently, Brookdale operates independent living, assisted living, and dementia-care communities and continuing care retirement centers, with more than 650 communities in 36 states and the ability to serve approximately 67,000 residents.  Through its Innovative Senior Care program, the Company also offers a range of outpatient therapy, home health, personalized living and hospice services. For more information, visit http://www.brookdale.com.

Contact: Andrea Turner, 615-564-6829, aturner2@brookdaleliving.com

Debt and Senior Citizens by David Cunningham

August 28, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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We are in a consumer driven world. There are so many things all around us that make our lives easier and, in a way, influence us to think that we must have them. There are always things that we want which we simply cannot afford. As banks and credit card companies mushroom out of control, we are barraged with opportunities to accept so-called help from these financial institutions just so we can buy more merchandise we want but do not need.

The best part is that you do not even have go to them asking for the credit that you want. They will be at your beck and call offering credit cards, store credit cards (from those stores you wanted to purchase from anyway), merchandise cards (you’re given hundreds of dollars in credit to purchase from the company’s specific catalog), and leasing arrangements that allow you to pay over time.

The only problem with buying on credit is paying it off. Using an analogy, it is easier to step into quicksand than it is to get out. There isn’t always a branch lying around attached to a willing helper. Credit may be no problem if your current job earns enough money to repay your debts completely each month. It simply becomes part of your overall expenses. What happens, though, when your debt overextends your pay check?

Unfortunately, retired senior citizens are more susceptible to this pitfall. In prior years, they worked and earned a certain amount of money, but upon retirement are saddled with little more than Social Security – definitely a blow to the pocket book. Their income is not as flexible as it once was. There are solutions, however, from which seniors can benefit. Some are even geared specifically toward them.

As a senior citizen, you can request the help of a professional. Financial advisors are available to help tackle your problems. Asking for the aid of one such professional can save you a great deal of anxiety, credit ruin and, more importantly, stress. Your financial advisor can act as a mediator between you and creditors to develop “payoff amounts” that won’t leave you destitute – and usually at a fraction of your current payments. If you feel that you’re drowning financially, you shouldn’t wait until the water is over your head. Contact a financial advisor now for assistance.

Before meeting with an advisor, there are steps you should take to be best prepared for the discussion. Grab a notebook and pen to list all your creditors. List them in order of importance, starting with your mortgage (or rent or community fees, etc.) and ending with small payments like store credit cards. List their amounts as well. If you owe $50,000 on your home then list $50,000 and your current monthly payment. For example:

ABC Mortgage Company $50,000 (debt), $775 (monthly payment)

Listing the information this way will show your credit advisor that you are serious about getting your debt in order. It also is incredibly useful for the advisor in contacting your creditors since your financial advisor can then, at a glance, see what you owe and to whom. A sample short list follows below.

It is important that you have a clear comprehension of your financial situation. The best solution to debt is to not get into any that you cannot handle. However if you have already reached that “destination,” especially as a retired senior, then utilizing a financial advisor is certainly a great option to help rid yourself of the burden.

And now, the sample I promised:

John Smith

Total Monthly Income: $1200

DEBTS / MONTHLY PAYMENTS

ABC Mortgage $50,000 (debt), $750 (monthly payment)

Car Payment $20,000 (debt), $450 (monthly payment)

Credit Bank #1 $3,000 (debt), $25 (monthly payment)

Credit Bank #2 $1,200 (debt), $15 (monthly payment)

Store Credit Card #1 $5,000 (debt), $75 (monthly payment)

House Phone $50 (monthly payment)

Cell Phone $55 (monthly payment)

Total Debt $79,200

Total Monthly Payments $1,400

As you can see from this example, this person is losing $200 every month ($1400 monthly payments minus $1200 income). A financial advisor can usually negotiate with the credit card companies. They may even suggest that this person discontinue either their home phone or cell phone, for example, as most can probably get along with just one or the other.

For practical debt & credit assistance [http://www.debt-credit-assistance.com/credit_card_debt_solutions.shtml] information, please visit [http://www.debt-credit-assistance.com], a popular site providing great insights concerning how to address your issues and worries related to nagging debt struggles [http://www.debt-credit-assistance.com/usa_debt_management.shtml].

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Cunningham

 

A Senior Citizen In Juvenile Hall by Eva Fry

August 9, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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It was my first time speaking at Juvenile Hall, I was terrified! I had seen enough movies to know I didn’t want to be there. As I hurried through the metal detectors, and pushed through the big metal doors, my heart was pounding and I was filled with fear. I wondered if I would get out of this place alive.

I passed the holding tanks, rooms with big windows containing kids who had just been arrested. In there were kids pacing, fighting addictions, fearfully waiting to be assigned to a unit. Some kids were right at home. They knew this place! They had been there before.

When I stepped into the inner sanctum I heard sounds that confirmed my fears. Angry kids were screaming, using profane language. I heard loud pounding on the doors, which dotted the narrow hallways. Juvenile inmates were communicating through the thick cement walls. As I scurried along, I saw empty eyes piercing out at me through the small, eye level windows of their rooms. I passed through more metal doors and hallways, until I came to the unit I was to speak in. Inside sat fifty young men, of all nationalities. I knew from their varying hair color. Their backs were toward me. They were juveniles from the age of 15 to 17.

As I slowly walked to the front of the room, I made sure there was a guard on either side, in case one of them grabbed me. I took a deep breath and turned toward them. My heart stopped! I was shocked! They were just kids! I expected them to look like criminals, but they looked like they could be one of my nine grandkids.

Although some did appear tough, and others rough, there was something about them that touched me. At that moment, my life changed! A still small voice inside me said, “you must try to help them!”

Thus began my continuing, nine-year mission, to help kids who are in trouble with the law. These are my kids. “The Forgotten Kid.” The children we think we can lock up, throw away the key, and forget. The ones who learned most of the bad things they have done, from us, the older generation. They are kids, paying the price for the sins of society. Our scapegoats

There are up to 600 kids locked up, in this facility, at any time. The Hall houses kids from the age of 10 to 18, although I saw a nine-year and ten-year-old carrying blankets and pillows. Were they going camping?
No! They were headed to their rooms, to be locked up, for armed robbery.

BE A WINNER IN LIFE IS MY PROGRAM. I help the kids believe they can still be WINNERS. I teach them they have potential to do amazing things with their life. In fact, I believe God sent them to this earth to do good with their lives. I tell them each one is a genius, in their own way, and can do something better than anyone else can do. They must find their genius. They must go to school, obey the law, obey their parents, be honest and work hard. My goal is to share with them the same truths I taught my kids: the basic truths of right and wrong.

I hope to support the parents who are good parents, but their kids got on the wrong track. I try to teach the ones with bad parents, or no parents, values they were never taught: basic principals of good and bad.

How did I start speaking at Juvenile Hall? It began a long time ago, when I was a little girl, the daughter of an alcoholic father who emotionally damaged my mother and us kids. I grew up in circumstances similar to some of these young wards.

I speak to them because I would have loved to have had someone, who cared, talk to me when I was young.

Some of these kids, like me, are the off spring of parents who didn’t care how their actions affected their kids. We were from homes full of contention caused by parents with addictions. Sick parents who were unable to control their own lives, let alone parent a child. So-called parents, who lived in their own hell and created havoc in the lives of their children. Parents who abandoned their kids.

When I talk to the kids, I relate to the ones who hope to fix their parents, and those who must care for their siblings. I relate because I remember pouring my Dad’s alcohol down the drain, thinking it would fix our problems but instead, I got myself into lots of trouble. I remember taking money from my Dad’s pocket, after he passed out, to give to my Mom. Money for food.

I remember the day I realized that whatever I did at home would change nothing. I would never have the loving family I longed for. Like many of these kids, I turned to friends for the family I needed. Like them, they were usually the wrong kids of friends, peers who were doing bad things. I remember drinking alcohol, even though I hated it, so I could fit in.

I hear my same story, over and over again, at Juvenile Hall.

To help them I share a profound truth, which I discovered in my young life. “Bad things happen for a reason!”

My bad thing: after a wasted life, at the age of 57, my Dad died an alcoholic. His drink of choice was 100% over proof rum. The good thing: My Dad’s death led to me realize I didn’t want to end up like him, or give my kids the life he gave me. I eventually made a commitment to stop drinking and change my life. Thankfully I was young and not an alcoholic, like my Father and Grandfather.

My commitment worked! I share with them how wonderfully my life has turned out, because of one small choice. I used my Dad’s mistakes to choose a better life for myself. I now have the life I dreamed about. My husband and I have been happily married for 45 years and with our children and grandchildren, are a close knit, happy, non-drinking family.

I tell them, “you can turn the bad things which have happened in your life into motivation for a better life too.” I help them believe they still have time to change.

Another reason I speak at Juvenile Hall is because I was a victim of a drunk driver. At the age of 17, the car I was riding in was hit head-on by a drunk driver. My head went through the windshield. My nose and part of my ear was torn off. Thankfully doctors put me back together, but I came to realize the terrible carnage alcohol could cause. I’ve had a mission all my life to teach the evils of alcohol use. I was a speaker for Mother’s Against Drunk Driving for several years. In fact, they were the ones who first sent me to speak at Juvenile Hall.

I teach the kids to abstain from alcohol and drugs. I have commitment cards, which I encourage them to sign and honor. I know if I can help them make a commitment not to drink alcohol, or use drugs; they will have a better chance at changing their lives and reaching their potential. They don’t need alcohol or drugs in their life. Most of the kids are locked up because of their first drink of alcohol, which lead to drug use and criminal behavior.

One of the questions people always ask me is “what is it like to talk to young criminals? Do they listen to you?”

My answer is, “at first it took a little time to know what to say and how to say it, so they would accept me. It took me time to overcome my fear of knowing how to communicate with them and have them accept me.”

One night, one of them asked, “why do you come to Juvenile Hall?” I answered, “why do you think?” His response, “for the money!” I replied, “no one pays me, in fact the first time I spoke, someone stole the hub caps from my car.” His mouth fell open and then he really listened to my program.

I’m happy to say I do very well with them! The kids are very attentive. They know I care. I don’t judge them. In most cases, I don’t know what their crime is. I don’t want to know. I tell them that what they have done is wrong and they must pay the price. On the other hand, I hope to stop them from getting deeper into crime. If I can stop them from hurting someone in the future, I feel my time is worthwhile.

I know I won’t get through to all of them, but I hope to plant seeds, which may take root someday when they have choices to make. My dream is to save as many as I can.

It is very gratifying when I feel I have gotten through to them and when they thank me. One boy said. “You told me bad things happen for a reason. Your right!” I never would have gotten an education if I hadn’t come to Juvenile Hall. I just got my GED. I applied to a college and was accepted. I will be going to school to be come an engineer when I get out.”

I am happy when I feel I have helped them look at life in a more positive way.

I try to help them turn their mistakes and bad experiences into something good. My greatest success is that I encourage the kids at Juvenile Hall to write letters to save other kids from the consequences they are experiencing. They have written incredible letters. Their letters have great impact on other kids because they come from their peers. My latest book “Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids contain the letters.

Here are inserts from some of the letters:

Addiction controlled my life. Don’t let it control you! I wish for all you guys to be safe, and I pray for you kids that don’t know what life is really about, because after that second when you make the bad decision, it goes down hill from there. Only you can change your future. I hope you all understand that there’s a number in prison with your name on it, if you don’t change. Now’s the time to change. Not later. Not when you get out, but now! If you don’t change now you never will.

Gang banging was my worst thing I ever gotten into. If I could take it back, I would. I repeated my Dad’s cycle.

Now I sit here in a one-room cell, facing 25 years to life. I want you to look around and see what kind of situation you’re in. Open you eyes and your minds and soak as much education as you can. I’m 17 years old in a couple of weeks. I will be graduating from high school (in Juvenile Hall). Education is the key to life.

I’m in the Hall, Unit 800. Why? Because I committed a sin while I was on drugs. At the age of 13, I started using drugs because my best friend was asking me to try some. At the age of 16, my charges are DUI, evading a peace officer, driving at an unsafe speed with no license, a firearm in the car and 187 murder.

All the violence that is going on in our community is not solving nothing. The only thing it’s doing is killing us off, one by one. Before you know it the human race will be extinct. Because we are the last of the dying breed. I’m only telling you this so you guys can make the right decision. Your homies probably say they are down for you, but they be faking, and that’s real. The only people that’s going to stick by you is your mama and your family. I seen too much in my life young homies and it’s not what you are thinking. I lost my little homie and that really hit me. All that was on my mind was retaliation but when I thought about it, I knew it wouldn’t bring him back so I thought of another game plan. I prayed!

Eva, I want to thank you for all the help that you have given me. All the little words you’ve spoken in your groups have helped me so much along the way. I have changed in ways that people wouldn’t believe. I have done a whole 360. Without the help of you, I see the change being 100% more difficult. I wish my family was around to see my new life.

As you can see, my experience with my kids, at Juvenile Hall, has been emotionally rewarding and very satisfying to me. These kids give my life meaning. I feel I am making a difference.

I continue to try to help kids. I have written a book called “BE A WINNER IN LIFE”, which I hope to get into the hands of every child in Juvenile Hall’s, all over the country. Also, I want to get it into the hands of parents. I hope to get to kids before they are locked up.

Yes I’m a grateful to be a senior citizen at Juvenile Hall! I’m grateful my senior years have value and that I am doing something with my time, which is worthwhile.

I now know that every senior citizen can use the wisdom they have gained throughout their life to make a difference. We can all do something. I encourage you to find a way to help a child. Our kids need you!

Eva Fry is an author, singer/songwriter and motivational speaker. She had a ten year volunteer program at Juvenile Hall called “Be a Winner in Life” She has three books “You Must Have a Dream” for seniors, “Be a Winner in Life” for kids, troubled kids and their parents, and Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids” – for all kinds, especially those who are locked up and to help kids from being locked up. She started writing and songwriting at the age of 60. Her goal is to encourage seniors to reach their potential and help kids do the same. She has many free articles on her web site to help young and old. She has six CD’s which are spiritually based and inspire young and old. She is avilable as a speaker or performer. Her work is available on her web site Eva Fry – eva@evafry.com http://www.evafry.com ( She has many free articles on her web site)

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eva_Fry

Even Senior Citizens Can Make Money From Adsense by Christopher Kyalo

May 30, 2013 by · Comments Off on Even Senior Citizens Can Make Money From Adsense by Christopher Kyalo
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For senior citizens the really good news is that one can never be too old to make money from Adsense. And like any other online opportunity Google Adsense’s strict terms and conditions do not include an upper age limit.

In fact senior citizens willing to learn in their old age and also to shrug off things that they may have believed in too closely, in the past, AdSense is the perfect way for them to make money. This is because when a person has reached that age, there are plenty of useful experiences and skills that they have picked up over the years. It should not be too difficult finding what they experiences and skills that a senior citizen can mine to make money from Adsense.

Senior citizens usually love to reminisce over their long lives and past experiences both good and bad and this can be used to make money from Adsense. This is because this is just the sort of ingredients that can go to setting up a fascinating AdSense blog. These are usually the sort of personal experience blogs that have a huge potential of picking up traffic pretty quickly. Everybody knows that high traffic on an AdSense blog is a license to print money.

Nothing should really be a hindrance to senior citizens joining the ranks of those who make serious money from Adsense.

Find out how you can learn more about the best Adsense make money secrets from an expert who makes over $19,000 a month from Adsense. Or grab my ezine on Adsense secrets for free by sending a blank email now to clickaffiliatesecrets-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Christopher_Kyalo

Caring For Elderly Parents? Jitterbug Cell Phones & Medical Alert Devices For Senior Citizens Help! by Kaye Swain

May 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Are you one of the many members of the never-aging Baby Boomers Generation  caring for elderly parents who don’t live nearby? Or perhaps they are close, but  work keeps you too busy to get over to check on them daily? Would you like  something made just for them to help them in the event of a fall or sudden  illness?

My senior parents and their friends have wrestled over this situation  themselves and we’ve come up with a couple of good resources. One dear senior  prefers a personal emergency response system using an emergency pendant around  her neck. Relatively inexpensive and very easy to use, these necklaces as well  as the wristwatches they also offer, are usually monitored 24/7 by the alarm  company.

If your senior parent falls or feels suddenly ill and can’t get to the  telephone, they just push the button on their medical alert device and an  operator should answer right away. If they push the button but are unable to  speak, the operator should then call 911 for them automatically. Our friend has  used hers 2-3 times over the last few years and been so grateful she had it.

Of course, you’ll want to use a reputable company. I always like to check for  a good recommendation such as the Better Business Bureau or Good  Housekeeping.

Another option that my senior mom and I prefer is a cell phone specifically  made for senior citizens. We personally think that Jitterbug makes the best cell  phone for seniors, as she has been using one for the past two years and loves  it! It’s a flip-phone style of cell phone which means she can’t accidentally  call someone from her purse or pocket. (My old “candy bar” style phones used to  do that all the time! It drove me crazy and it would totally confuse our sweet  elderly relatives.)

It has large numbers which are easy to read – always a great thing for cell  phones for senior citizens! It is geared to work easily with hearing aids.  Seniors have the option to dial their own phone numbers, use the menu to select  the person they are calling, or just dial 0, like they once did when they were  much younger. Just like then, an operator will come on the phone to help them in  any way they need, including placing the call for them.

The reason we prefer the Jitterbug cell phone for our elderly parents is  because they can keep it with them in their pocket. If they go for a walk and  have a problem, they’ll have it right there with them. Unlike the medical alert  device, it will work anywhere, not just at their home. And I love it for  shopping! When we go to a big store, my senior mom can enjoy shopping at her own  pace, while I grab my items or sit and write. When one of us is ready to meet  up, we’re each just a simple phone call away. You will love the peace of mind it  will give you!

The Jitterbug large and simple cell phones for seniors are a  wonderful gift for our senior parents AND for our own peace of  mind. To find out more about how these great senior cell phones can help you and your beloved elderly  relatives, just pop over to SandwichINK – http://www.SandwichINK.com. There you will find plenty  of resources to help you, as you are busy caring for your elderly  parents.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kaye_Swain

Marketing Real Estate to Senior Citizen Buyers by Marte Cliff

May 9, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Have you noticed? Senior citizens aren’t as old as they used to be. At least  some aren’t. And that means you cannot market to all seniors in the same  way.

Senior buyers come in two varieties. The first are those who are actually  suffering from the ravages of age – and are only too happy to tell you all about  it. They’ll give you a list of ailments and things they can no longer do, so  your job in finding them a home is a bit more straightforward.

You can openly discuss issues like stairways, counter heights, doorway  widths, and space to install grab bars in the bathroom. They’ll tell you what  they need and want so you can go out and find it for them.

When you’re selling to this group, go preview homes before you take them  along.

When people are having a hard time getting around, need a wheelchair or  walker, or are just unsteady on their feet, they don’t need to be dragged around  looking at all the wrong homes. They won’t appreciate you wasting their energy  by showing them homes that are obviously wrong.

So pay careful attention to their needs, and if you eliminate a house they’ve  asked about, tell them why. It might be because the bathrooms and bedrooms are  on the second floor and the laundry room is in the basement – or perhaps because  of steep steps leading to the house. Maybe the garage is too narrow to allow  them room to put a wheel chair in and out of the car, or the bathroom door is  too narrow for the wheel chair to get through.

Do your homework, tell them the straight facts, and you’ll earn their  loyalty.

This segment of the senior population may be focused on living within minutes  of a medical facility, and they’ll probably tell you which one.

But what about the second group? What about the ones who are  officially senior citizens, but have no intention of acknowledging the fact?

You’d do well not to mention the words “Senior citizen” in their  presence.

Instead, find out more about them and their lives. Many are still working, so  see if they want to locate near the workplace. After that, inquire about hobbies  and other leisure time activities. Your new seniors may be avid golfers, they  may want to hit the gym three days a week, they make require fast access to a  swimming pool, or perhaps want to locate near a boarding facility where they can  keep a horse.

They may even want a home with a bit of pasture so they can take care of that  horse themselves.

Don’t assume anything. Some seniors are anxious to leave yard care  behind so they can pursue other interests, while others have been waiting for  retirement to have time to landscape a yard and grow a huge garden.

Take the time to listen. Listening is important no matter who your  client is, but when you’re selling to senior citizens, you need to listen to the  subtle hints as well as the open statements.

Remember, in the back of their minds, they’re recognizing the possibility of  ill-health in the future. How could they avoid it, with the television and  newspapers shouting it at every turn?

They know that the day could be coming soon when they won’t be able to easily  navigate those stairways – and they know that a wheel chair could be a part of  their future. They may even have a secret fear of living too far from a medical  facility.

But many simply do not want to talk about that. So don’t bring it up  unless they do.

Selling to seniors isn’t really all that different from selling to anyone  else. Your job is to listen and pay  attention to what you hear. When you do  that with each and every customer and client you’ll be head and shoulders above  your competition – because listening is almost a lost art.

Marte Cliff is a Freelance Copywriter and former real estate broker who  specializes in writing for real estate and related industries.

Marte offers a free mini-course for Realtors trying to build a business, as  well as web copywriting and lead generation packages. Learn more about them at  http://www.copybymarte.com

Marte offers a weekly ezine for real estate professionals and others with an  interest in marketing themselves or their property. To subscribe, and get a copy  of her report: How to Get Referrals & Testimonials, visit her at http://www.marte-cliff.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Marte_Cliff

 

Where Are Senior Citizens Job Opportunities? by Raymond Angus

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Are There Really Senior Citizens Job Opportunities Out There?

Are you a senior, and have you convinced yourself that there aren’t any more  senior citizens job opportunities lurking in the underbrush these days, let  alone walking down main street U.S.A.? Do you subscribe to the notion that all  senior citizens job opportunities are now being grabbed up by smooth  complexioned youngsters that don’t remember a world with Ted Williams and Frank  Sinatra in it doing their thing?

Wake up! Look around you. Sure the economy is in some pretty sorry straits,  but this kind of down turn has happened numerous times throughout history and  men and women have all survived it. There are real, honest to goodness senior  citizens job opportunities out there right now needing someone with your unique  talents and skills to fill them. You’re right. Maybe you don’t know where the  senior job openings are. But they don’t know where you are either and they’re  sure not going to come knocking on your door while you’re watching TV soap  operas.

You have to stand up straight and tell yourself your new mantra. I am  proactive. Write it on a piece of paper and stick it on your refrigerator with  one of those little magnet gizmos made for such things. Things don’t happen to  you, you’re now going to take charge of your senior citizens job opportunities  search and make things happen. Sit down at your table or desk, grab a tablet of  paper and a pen and make a list of five topics. Understand that first of all  this is your personal work sheet and is not available for public consumption.  It’s not a resume or a pitch for employment. This is your outline for a  proactive battle plan to find the perfect employment for you.

1. What kind of job do you really want. Don’t list employment that you  suspect is available. Write down what you really and truly want to do.

2. List the jobs that you’ve actually held during your life. Did you deliver  newspapers as a kid? Write it down and decipher the skills needed later.

3. List the jobs you actually performed for past employers. If you cleaned  floors, washed windows, ran machinery, waited on customers, kept records; list  them, they are building blocks for your action plan.

4. How did your personal activities at each employer affect the overall  operation of the business?

5. This is a tough one and it will require giving some clarity of thought.  Why did you leave each job? If you were terminated, it would be best to be less  than forthright.

You’re not finished yet. Make a list of your hobbies. Don’t laugh! Think  about it. Do you like bowling or fishing? How about gardening? Can you imagine  the skills you’ve amassed from these endeavors, let alone the factual knowledge  related to them. Are you a guy and do you do some of your automobile work  yourself.

Think about all of this and then contact employers that would find your  skills invaluable. Most important! There are senior citizens job opportunities  all over the landscape. But only go after the ones your actually would enjoy  doing.

Be proactive! After all is said and done, getting a job is in your hands  alone.

Raymond Angus is the best selling author of http://www.TheSeniorsLife.com. He writes about how seniors  find employment in today’s ever changing world. Are you a senior and do you want  tips on how to work and live in this bleak economy? Go to http://www.TheSeniorsLife.com and click on  employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Raymond_Angus

 

Nevada Senior Guide – Senior Safeguards – Easier Independent Living

www.seniorsafeguards.net

Senior Safeguard

Senior SafeGuards specializes in Ramping, Handrailing and Independent Living Aids. We are a family oriented small business in the Reno, Sparks area of Nevada. We sell Modular, Suitcase, Multifold, Threshold, Solid, and Van Ramps. We also carry Independent Living Aids and disability equipment.

We are one of the few companies in the area that will install your ramp for you. We also have RENTAL RAMPS available if you are laid up for just a few months.

Give us a call at (775) 359-3889 for a free quote. We look forward to working with you.

Email:  rick@seniorsafeguards.net

 

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!