Warning: trim() expects parameter 1 to be string, array given in /home/nvsenior/public_html/wp-content/plugins/custom-post-order-category/wp-customcategorypostorder.php on line 492
group | Nevada Senior Guide

Life Extension: The Modern Anti-Aging Movement – Are We Standing at the Threshold of Immortality?

July 17, 2016 by · Comments Off on Life Extension: The Modern Anti-Aging Movement – Are We Standing at the Threshold of Immortality?
Filed under: General 

Why is skincare the focus of longevity research? I guess a cell is a cell, and if you can crack the code for one human cell, it is only a matter of time to solving the puzzle with different types of cell – and skin is without doubt the most visible cells each of us have. And it’s our faces in particular we often judge ourselves and others by, and we are in turn quickly scrutinized, and often opinions reached in a fraction of a second. Our faces often show the most visible signs of aging, and for many in modern society age is by nature “bad” and young or looking young is the ideal. That is why billions and billions of dollars each year are poured by consumers into all sorts of treatments to minimize wrinkles, to push back the effects of gravity, and to turn back the hands of time. And with that much money to be spent by consumers, there are many manufacturers eager to find the next step in arresting Father Time – and at least detaining him until the next stagecoach arrives, where hopefully he can be encouraged to move on before too much damage can be done.

The Entire Issue Explained – In A Pair of Shoelaces

Some time ago a friend gave me a simple analogy that puts this entire issue in perspective. The science may not win a Nobel Prize, but it gave me the necessary ah-ha moment.

The double helix of the DNA strand – our most basic foundation for life – is held together at each end by things that act in the same way as the hard plastic bits on the end of shoelaces do – preventing the DNA from unraveling, and the individual chromosomes scattering across the floor like dropping a string of pearls down a marble staircase. These things are called telomeres.

Somewhere programmed into these tiny telomeres is the entire basis to how long the DNA stays intact – and by inference these are the keys to the length of life of the organism. Somewhere written into the telomere is a great musical score but like all musical scores it has a double bar somewhere to signify the end; but is it to be a minuet or a Wagnerian epic? But sure enough, when the time comes, and the telomeres blow the full time whistle, the DNA strand will unravel and die – and the circle of life begins again. Telomeres govern how often our skin cells are replaced; why a puppy and a child born on the same date may age exactly the same chronologically, but the puppy has become a geriatric before the child reaches puberty.

Telomeres, my friend explained, occasionally go on the fritz (that must have a very specific scientific meaning). One of the ways this occurs is they may forget their programming to release and unravel, and they just hang on, allowing the cells thus affected to multiply again and again without dying. In fact, when this occurs often they become very difficult to kill and to all intents and purposes once the telomeres act in this way, the cell – and those it propagates – are effectively immortal.

This condition has a name which we all know. Cancer.

But, what if we were able in some way to persuade the telomeres within a cancer to behave normally – would that not be the “magic bullet” cure for cancer? And the other side to that equation – if the telomeres in healthy cells could be persuaded to act as they do in a cancer – then is this the recipe for a healthy cell that does not die? Does the cure for cancer and immortality hang on just this one thread?

Whatever your views may be, the reality is that some of the world’s finest research scientists are working on that exact question and some would say it is only a matter of a decade or two before this is neither conjecture nor science fiction, but a reality to face up to. The changes that would take place in society even if life expectancy were to take a leap forward by say 10 or 20 years are enormous, but we should all be thinking that this is a distinct possibility.

From the dab of lanoline a generation ago to what I know hold in my hand as an anti aging skincare treatment is more than just a revolution – and I have no doubt in a few years I will be saying this cream will not just slow the aging process and reduce the visible signs of aging, making your face appear younger – but it will actually be younger.

But before that, let’s look back at how this whole engagement with life extension and anti-aging started. Mankind has always striven for longevity and mused about immortality – but the past 50 years has seen some dramatic steps in reality toward this goal.

Genesis

The thought of extending life has been on the mind of mankind for millennia. References to the search for ways to prolong life can be found as far back as the Epic of Gilgamesh.

Gilgamesh was reputedly the fifth king of the kingdom of Uruk, the modern-day Iraq, around 2500 BC. According to the Sumerian list of kings, he reigned for 126 years. The Torah or Old Testament records Methuselah as living over 900 years, with life spans measured in centuries apparently commonplace before the time of Noah.

Throughout the development of scientific thought from the Reformation onwards, scholars have applied themselves to solving this riddle and these endeavors continue today at the very leading edge of scientific progress.

Unraveling Secrets

As the secrets of our existence are unraveled in ever more minute detail, we are beginning to understand what it is that makes us grow from tiny babies into adults. We now know, for example, that cell functions slow down as the body ages and that production of certain substances required by the body to regenerate decrease or cease completely.

Skin, for instance, needs two substances to retain strength and firmness.
The production of these substances namely collagen (strength, tightness) and elastin (flexibility) decreases with age. The decreases in production together with other factors that include the threat of free radicals make the skin age and become wrinkly. Free radicals are essentially incomplete oxygen molecules causing destructive chain reactions within cells.

The same kind of thing happens in every cell, every tissue and organ around the human body. For example, people develop frown lines, crow’s feet and wrinkles. Nutrients are no longer absorbed easily and vital cell functions, hormones and other substances are produced at decreased rates resulting in the body aging.

A Brief History of the Life Extension Movement

Science has been looking for ways to slow down this process for centuries. The forming of life extension movements, however, did not really begin until around 1970.

➢ In this year, Denham Harman, the originator of the so-called ‘free radical theory of aging’, decided that an organization dedicated to the research and information sharing between scientists working in biogerontology (the field of science concerned with the biological aspects involved in the aging process) was needed. As a result, the American Aging Association was formed.

➢ In 1976, two futurists, Philip Gordon and Joel Kurtzman wrote a book on the research into extending the human lifespan. This popular volume was titled ‘No More Dying. The Conquest Of Aging And The Extension Of Human Life’.

➢ Kurtzman was then invited to speak at Florida’s House Select Committee (HSC) of Aging, which was chaired by Claude Pepper, an American politician and spokesman for the elderly. The aim of this talk was to discuss the impact on Social Security by life extension.

➢ In 1980, Saul Kent, a prominent activist in the field of life extension, published the book ‘The Life Extension Revolution’ and founded the nutraceutical (from ‘nutrition’ and ‘pharmaceutical’, in other words, a nutrition supplement) firm known as ‘The Life Extension Foundation’.

This foundation is a non-profit making organization promoting dietary supplements and publishing the periodical ‘Life Extension Magazine’. Kent was later involved in work relating to cryogenics. He was jailed in the course of this work over a dispute at one point, although charges were dropped at a later stage.

➢ In 1982, American health writer and life extension advocate Sandy Shaw and her co-writer, Durk Pearson, popularized the term ‘life extension’ even further with the bestseller ‘Life Extension: A Practical Scientific Approach’.

➢ Roy Walford, a gerontologist and life-extensionist, published ‘Maximum Lifespan’, another popular book on the subject. He and Richard Weindruch, his student, followed this up in 1988 with their summary on the research they had conducted into the ability to prolong the life of rodents through calorie restriction. The title of this book is ‘The Retardation of Aging and Disease by Dietary Restriction’.

Although this ability to extend life with calorie restriction had been known since the 1930’s, when gerontologist, biochemist and nutritionist Clive McCay did some research into the subject, it was the work of Walford and Weinbruch that gave solid scientific grounding to the McCay’s findings.

Walford’s scientific work was driven by a personal interest in life extension. He practiced calorie restriction as part of his own life and eventually died at the age of 80. The cause of his death was amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a progressive motor neuron disease.

➢ A4M, the ‘American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine’ was founded in 1992 to create a medical specialty for anti aging that was distinctly separate from geriatrics. This allowed scientists and physicians interested in this particular field of science to hold conferences and discuss the latest developments.

➢ The sci.life-extension, a Usenet group, was created by California-born author, philosopher and translator Brian M. Delaney. This represented an important development within the movement of life extension. It made it possible, for example, for the CR (Calorie Restriction) Society to be created.

➢ A more recent development is the proposal of Dr A. de Grey, a biogerontologist at Cambridge University. This proposal suggested that damage to cells, macromolecules, organs and tissues can be repaired with the help of advanced biotechnology. This is evident in hair restoration products, for instance.

More than Books

Although it would appear that most of the work revolving around life extension has been done solely by writing books or founding societies or organizations of some kind or another, the reality is that these books were written in response to or based on very specific, detailed scientific research that have yielded positive results.

They are no longer the works of hopeful minds, but the works of dedicated scientists who have spent their lives working on discovering facts about aging and trying to find ways to slow down, or even reverse the process.

Many breakthroughs have been made, and in many ways, we are already able to extend lives to a certain extent. The average lifespan of a human being is already far greater than it used to be as a result of medical, pharmaceutical and nutritional advances brought about by research and development.

The work continues, and scientists around the world are continually conducting research, comparing results, discussing options and making advances on our behalf.

Driving Forces behind the Development of the Life Extension Movement

What factors are driving this movement into ever greater efforts to find solutions to the extension of Life? The answer to this question actually includes a whole range of factors.

Expectations Have Risen

As the ‘baby boomer’ generation (born between 1946-1964) enters retirement age, expectations of this group are dramatically different from those of the preceding generations. They have greater expectations and desires to enjoy their life as pensioners to the fullest and for as long as is possible. This expectation covers not only length of life, but quality of life as well and this is not a passive request but an active and strident demand in many cases.

Pharmacology

Progress in pharmacology has led to a wide selection of drugs that allow people to live longer and fuller lives being developed over the last two decades or so. The work is still very much in progress and many more drugs are being developed daily.

One of the classic examples of a drug raising the quality of life for older individuals are erectile dysfunction treatments – notably Viagra, Cialis and Levitra. These drugs have dramatically reduced the number of fatalities or serious injury resulting from elderly men rolling out of bed, as well as a number of more qualitative benefits.

Advances in Genetics

Some of the latest scientific research and subsequent advances made in biotechnology and genetics are providing some hope that it may be possible to hold back some of the fundamental causes of aging.

As we outlined previously, chromosomes containing DNA strings are essentially capped with a binding substance known as telomeres. In effect, the telomeres are consumed during cell division and over time, they become shorter and shorter.

This was first observed by a scientist called Leonard Hayflick, and the process of limited cell division was subsequently named the Hayflick Limit. Advocates of life extension work on the thought that lengthening the telomeres through drugs or gene therapy may ultimately extend the Hayflick Limit and thereby fool the cells, and as such the body, into ‘thinking’ it is younger than it actually is.

Developments in Precision Manufacture

Advances made in the fields of nanotechnology, miniaturization, computer chips and robotics also provide hope for potentially life extending solutions.

In the 1970’s, a popular TV series starred Lee Majors as the ‘Six Million Dollar Man’? Science fiction then. Today, it is science fact. Millions of people now walk through life with artificial ankle, knee and hip joints and healthy feet. A generation ago, mass production of this kind of technology was a distant dream.

The same applies to many individuals with artificial limbs. Artificial legs used to be crude wooden contraptions that were just able to keep a person balanced. Today’s artificial limbs are almost fully functional.

The Blessings of Medical Progress

Who would have thought even 50 years ago that it would become possible to bypass a coronary artery, or even replace a heart completely? Yet there are hundreds of thousands, if not millions of individuals enjoying their lives after having this kind of surgery – few of whom would be alive just half a century ago.

Millions of people no longer have to wear glasses, because of the availability of laser surgery. This, too, was science fiction just a few years ago. Today, it is advertised next to shampoo in magazines and on TV.

In other words, science is moving rapidly towards not only extending life, but making the quality of these extra years better as well.

Is it Science, Science Fiction or Lunacy?

What should the average person believe? This question is almost as difficult to answer as finding solutions to extended life. Even among scientists, opinions are divided. Some do believe that extending the quality of life is as possible as extending life in general.

Others brush off the thought as un-scientific nonsense. This is often simply based on the fear of anything ‘new’ disturbing the status quo of established limits. Fortunately, real scientists do keep on looking, because if every single scientist had decided that some of the advancements already in medical, pharmaceutical and technological fields could not be possible, we would all still be dying at 30.

So where does that leave us?

There is no doubt what-so-ever that there are many charlatans out there trying to make a quick buck out of people’s desire to retain their youth. Even today, many products being sold in their millions are essentially non-effective – often given fantastic names and have the most bewildering ingredients to make them look scientific to consumers and justify their cost.

But the facts are while many advancements are being made and research points to the possibility of eventually finding the key to maintaining youth for longer, the scientific community is still warning the public that many of the products being sold today are unreliable to say the least.

➢ Although food supplements may assist in keeping a body healthier – something that can often be achieved by simply adopting a healthier life style and diet – there is as yet no categorical and undeniable proof that they slow down aging as such.

➢ The same goes for many hormone treatments. Although they may have a short term effect of some kind, it is not yet scientifically proven that they will actually work in the long run. The fear that it may not work is based on the fact that taking hormones, a good example is the hormonal acne treatment, will ultimately actually slow down the body’s own production of these hormones.

In addition, many treatments may have potential (and yet unknown) side effects in the long run that could be harmful to the user’s health. This includes the fears that such hormone treatments could increase the risk of cancer, diabetes and other major illnesses.

➢ Other ideas, like the calorie restriction method, are working for rodents. In fact, studies conducted with rats on 30 to 50 per cent restricted diets have shown to almost double the life span of rats.

Similar studies conducted on primates have also shown tendency to extend life to a certain extent and prevent a list of age related illnesses. There are as yet no studies on humans, although some are actually living on calorie restricted diets. Whether this will prolong their lives, however, is a question of having to wait and see.

The theory is that by reducing calorie intake, the metabolism of the body is slowed down, thereby slowing the aging process as well. Nutritionists say there is a certain amount of calories a body of a certain size and weight needs to have to maintain health. Reducing this amount by up to 50 per cent is hardly a good idea in the long term.

Time will tell, as they say, but how will anyone be able to tell the difference? If a person lives to the age of 80, is this because they are on this diet or would they have lived to this age anyway?

Where Will This Lead?

Many believe there is realistic hope and expectation of making significant strides in the area of longevity within the next two decades. This group typically believes the answer will ultimately lie within genetics and biotechnology. It is too early to make definite predictions, but the research so far shows promise and, as mentioned earlier, some of the results of this research are already being used in certain treatments to improve patients’ lives.

At present, overall aging is difficult to slow down, to say the least. Some products indicate they will assist in maintaining overall health/longevity, but the area we are seeing the first commercial products being developed is in the area of skin care and given the size of this market, it is likely that this will continue to be the weather-vane of longevity treatments.

Science or Snake Oil?

It will be difficult to tell these two apart for many years. Charlatans are likely to about, because it is difficult to disprove many theories easily. Equally difficult will be positive proof from those with an ethical perspective on the trail of a real breakthrough, as products based on valid research and using technology or ingredients that will actually have an effect rarely promise overnight results. This is something that anyone looking to find improved youthful looks, etc, will have to bear in mind. None of these products can perform miracles. Even the best of them will take time and regular use in order to achieve the desired effect.

The bottom line is that where we stand now, we can be sure there are some things which are ineffective or even harmful; there are some that show some promise and there are some that are starting to cross the line of being able to demonstrate results – albeit modestly at this point.

In the meantime, it is wise to research products very carefully and to refuse to be baffled by weird and wonderful sounding ingredients or fantastic sounding promises of instant youth. Regeneration will take time – let’s face it, it has taken a lifetime to get to this point, turning back the clock can never be possible over night.

Skin Care and the Life Extension Movement

One may well ask just what all this, and in particular the life extension movement as such, could possibly have to do with skin care, health and beauty products. The fact is, much of the research into life extension is resulting in new approaches to skin care as a kind of by-product.

A greater understanding of how genetics and cellular processes affect the aging and condition of skin allows these research and development teams to investigate different compounds, their compatibility with human cells and genetic make up.

Many compounds found in nature are not just compatible to human skin but in fact the skin cells actually have natural receptors for these compounds. Because life extension research has discovered these receptors, skin care developers can now use this knowledge and create the formulae for their products to provide maximum effect.

Another skin care ‘by-product’ of life extension research is the use of nanotechnology. The use of nanotechnology, or, to be more precise, nanoparticles, has had a huge impact on the way nutrients and other components of skin care products are being delivered to the skin cells. In some ways, nanotechnology has already revolutionized skin care. It is now possible to use active ingredients previously difficult to effectively deliver to the skin, as well as making old, proven ingredients even more effective. Some ingredients used in cosmetics for hundreds, if not thousands of years by certain cultures can now be even more effectively used to improve skin condition and maintain a healthy, youthful look.

Even the moisturizing effect of skin care products can be improved with nantechnology. For this effect, so-called nanosomes are used. Nanosomes are small, pocket-like particles that melt or disintegrate on skin contact. By doing this, the moisturising effect is accelerated, assisting the skin faster and more efficiently.

Nanotechnology plays a key part not only in slowing the aging of skin, but is believed to actively assist in repairing and healing skin cells and tissue.

Another breakthrough in life extension research that is beginning to make itself felt in skin care products is the research into stem cells. Stem cells are elements of all life, plant, animal and human. Stem cells have two properties other cells do not have. These properties are the ability to develop into any kind of cell type and the ability to divide almost indefinitely. The use of plant stem cell extracts in skin care is likely to become one of the next ‘big things’ in the industry. And prepare for the debate when human stem cells are proposed as part of an anti-aging skincare regime, as will inevitably occur!

One thing we can be certain of, is that science will continue to search for answers to the question of life extension, and business will drive the commercialization of discoveries. But whether these lead us to a utopian future or potentially a minefield of strife as we debate who will use and who will benefit from these new godlike powers. In the meantime, at a practical level in the skincare, health and beauty industry we remain hopeful and expectant we will see the emergence of products that not only promise results, but produce them.

David Christensen is a veteran of Asia Pacific business, currently residing in Bangkok, Thailand and heading up the business he was a co-founder of, Royal Siam Natural Health & Beauty – who can be located at [http://www.royalsiam.asia], and the information supporting site at [http://www.royalsiam.info]. Royal Siam was established after careful planning in early 2011, spending 2011 concentrating on building the necessary business infrastructure and concentrating on the domestic Thai market. Early in 2012 Royal Siam launched its international website and online store, and in April 2012 publicly declared the ambition to be among the world’s top 20 premium health and beauty brands by the year 2020. Royal Siam is a unique business, operating in the premium skincare, anti aging, and related fields. At its core, one mission is to commercialize and bring to a global market the immense wealth of knowledge about the healing and beneficial properties of Thai and South East Asian plants – a knowledge base carefully built up over the last thousand years. At the same time, the mission is to bring to market the very latest in scientific advances in the area of anti aging… resulting in the unique position of having a Thai heritage and offering the best of nature, tradition, and science.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/David_D_Christensen/1317312

Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias

June 12, 2016 by · Comments Off on Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias
Filed under: General 

Australian business is starting to see the light when it comes to their hiring policies for mature aged employees, and the positive impact they can have on the workplace. A brief visit to main street shopping centre and you will begin to see a few more weathered faces at work than you would have seen a few years ago.

However, if you scratch below the surface, you begin to see this trend still has a long way to play out. A few older workers get hired into the senior ranks where experience and maturity are greatly valued, more older workers are now being hired at the lower end of the corporate scale into unskilled roles, however the numbers being hired into the mid tier ranks remains low.

This barbell approach to hiring mature workers at the top and bottom of an organisation reflects an ongoing bias that remains difficult to overcome. A company is a microcosm of society, and in a perfect world employers should (within reason) seek diversity in the workplace and value skill, experience and aptitude, regardless of age, race or gender.

Unfortunately, we live in a far from perfect world. When it comes to mature aged workers they tend to be penalised on two fronts. Often the first to be made redundant in uncertain economic times, this setback is then compounded when they are regularly overlooked for someone younger as they begin searching for a new job.

As a result of these two biases towards mature aged job seekers, once out of work, the journey back can often be long and arduous. This is reflected in RBA statistics which indicate long-term unemployment at approximately 40% for those aged 45-64, compared to about 25% for those aged between 25 and 44.

So what are the reasons employers provide for not hiring mature aged workers? Typically, reasons include being overqualified or over-experienced. Taken at face value being overqualified or experienced might not seem so bad, but when you hear the same reason trotted out time and again, it becomes less palatable.

Openly negative feedback from employers tend to include perceptions that mature aged workers are not as IT savvy, do not possess the latest skills, or are not as flexible as their younger counterparts. While these reasons may hold true in many instances, many of the older job seekers I speak to, believe these are often used as convenient excuses to exclude them.

Employer feedback that you are not likely to hear include concerns about health (and subsequent cost) or worse insecurity. There are many poor managers in the workplace that may be intimidated by the experience a mature applicant brings to the role. Rather than leveraging the knowledge and experience an older worker can bring to the workplace, the insecure hirer is concerned about the potential competition, and the presence of someone who may know more than they do.

Dealing with many of these preconceived concerns and fears remains an ongoing challenge for the mature aged job seeker. Perhaps the following facts should be mandatory reading for hiring managers. These facts debunk many of the concerns and myths that persist in the workplace relating to mature aged workers;

    • Mature aged workers can deliver cost savings to employers through increased retention rates. For example, workers over 55 are five times less likely to change jobs compared to workers aged 20-24, reducing both recruitment and training costs. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006)Labour Mobility Survey,
    • Mature workers can deliver an average net benefit of $1956 per year to their employer compared to other workers due to high retention rates, lower rates of absenteeism, decreased recruitment costs and greater return on investment.Business, Work and Ageing (2000) Profiting from Maturity: The Social and Economic Costs of Mature Age Unemployment
    • Australians are living longer and are healthier.2005 ABS survey found the proportion of Australians aged 55-64 reporting their health as ‘good’, ‘very good’ or ‘excellent’ was 75.5% – an increase of four per cent since 1995. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006) National Health Survey: Summary of Results, 2004-05
    • Mature workers were the least likely group to take days off due to their own illness or as a carer. In the two week period prior to the survey nearly half the number of mature workers had days off compared to workers aged 25-34. ibid
    • ABS data shows that Australians aged 55-64 are the fastest growing users of information technology. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2005) Year Book Australia,
  • Australian Health Management which examined the daily work habits of 4000 employees found that workers aged 55 years and over performed at their best for approximately seven hours out of an eight-hour day-an achievement that other workers in the study were unable to match. Australian Health Management (2006), Baby boomers give employers a bang for their buck

While government has been doing its part to address mature aged unemployment through initiatives like DEEWR Experience+, the introduction of the Age Discrimination Act (2004) and appointment of an Age Discrimination Commissioner, it remains imperative that older job seekers directly address some of these age bias issues themselves if they are to enhance their prospects for employment.

Following are some helpful hints that mature aged workers can utilise to make themselves more appealing to employers and thus improve their chances of a speedy return to the workforce;

Government or Community Assistance– Take advantage of government or community based initiatives and assistance. There is a considerable amount of free information and assistance available, and I would strongly recommend looking into these resources. For example, the DEEWR “Experience+” initiative provides free career planning and advice for over 45’s until June 2016, along with an Assistance Program delivering refresher and basic training in IT and social media applications.

Value Proposition– Whether writing your resume or cover letter, or sitting in an interview, ensure the focus of discussion clearly remains on the value that you can bring to an organisation. Discuss how you can help, what you have done in the past and what you can deliver going forward. Outline how your experience might bring special insights and perspectives that other candidates may not possess.

Training– Undertake relevant training or up-skilling. Keeping ‘up to date’ is critical if you expect serious consideration for any position, especially if there is a technical element. The benefit will be that an employer will see that you have not fallen behind and therefore will not require retraining, along with any associated cost.

Resume– You will need a properly structured and well written resume to be considered for most roles. Use an appropriate resume style that is tailored to your strengths, skills and experience. Also ensure primary focus of your resume is on the last 5-10 years (include older information where pertinent). Think about getting assistance from a professional resume writer, whocan add significant value if you are looking to ‘get it right the first time’.

Age Bias – To counter potential impact of age bias, you will need to carefully address the following with any potential employer;

Health– Don’t hesitate to communicate your good health and fitness to potential employers at opportune moments. Inform them if you play sport, run, walk or go to the gym regularly. This should allay any potential concerns about health.

IT Savvy –Take every opportunity to indicate your IT capability. Whether it’s your ability to use specialised systems, the MS Office suite or even your use of Facebook or Twitter, this will highlight your ability to embrace new technology.

Adaptability – Highlight your adaptability in the workplace, providing actual examples where appropriate. If you don’t know something, indicate you are keen to learn (and not that you wouldn’t know where to start). Highlighting your adaptability will help to dispel concerns of rigidness and inflexibility.

Team Player –Communicating that you work well as part of a team is critical. It shows a willingness to take direction and work for the common good, and can present you as less threatening, especially if the hirer feels concerned by a mature more experienced candidate.

Be Positive –Though you need to be fully prepared to discuss negative issues, make every attempt to keep the discussion on a positive footing. Unless specifically requested, there is no need to volunteer information of a negative nature.

While industry is beginning to see the light when it comes to acceptance of mature aged workers, the pace of change remains slow. While providence is on the right side due to the ageing Australian population and the inevitable necessity to hire older workers, the fact remains that age discrimination is still entrenched in much current thinking.

As a result, dealing with age bias will continue to be a challenge for the foreseeable future. However with the combination of positive government policy, changing attitudes and a proactive attitude to making oneself more appealing to employers (as outlined above), the situation is not without promise.

Honing your individual approach and message will take time and effort. To strike the right balance the mature job seeker will need to walk a fine line between sounding experienced, but not old, adaptable, but not inflexible and appear keen, not desperate. There is no magic formula for success except practice, perseverance and occasionally seeking help where necessary.

A.J. Bond, is the proprietor of Absolute Resume Writing Services ( http://absoluteresume.com.au ), an Australian based consultancy specializing in the provision of Resume and Cover Letter writing services.

Absolute Resume assists a broad range of job seekers to find their preferred roles, including mature aged job seekers, individuals out of work for a period of time and those made redundant.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7334746

The Development of Old Age and Related Issues

April 18, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Development of Old Age and Related Issues
Filed under: General 

In traditional Chinese and other Asian cultures the aged were highly respected and cared for. The Igabo tribesmen of Eastern Nigeria value dependency in their aged and involve them in care of children and the administration of tribal affairs (Shelton, A. in Kalish R. Uni Michigan 1969).

In Eskimo culture the grandmother was pushed out into the ice-flow to die as soon as she became useless.

Western societies today usually resemble to some degree the Eskimo culture, only the “ice-flows” have names such a “Sunset Vista” and the like. Younger generations no longer assign status to the aged and their abandonment is always in danger of becoming the social norm.

There has been a tendency to remove the aged from their homes and put them  in custodial care. To some degree the government provides domiciliary care services to prevent or delay this, but the motivation probably has more to do with expense than humanity.

In Canada and some parts of the USA old people are being utilised as foster-grandparents in child care agencies.

SOME BASIC DEFINITIONS

What is Aging?

Aging: Aging is a natural phenomenon that refers to changes occurring throughout the life span and result in differences in structure and function between the youthful and elder generation.

Gerontology: Gerontology is the study of aging and includes science, psychology and sociology.

Geriatrics: A relatively new field of medicine specialising in the health problems of advanced age.

Social aging: Refers to the social habits and roles of individuals with respect to their culture and society. As social aging increases individual usually experience a decrease in meaningful social interactions.

Biological aging: Refers to the physical changes in the body systems during the later decades of life. It may begin long before the individual  reaches chronological age 65.

Cognitive aging: Refers to decreasing ability to assimilate new information and learn new behaviours and skills.

GENERAL PROBLEMS OF AGING

Eric Erikson (Youth and the life cycle. Children. 7:43-49 Mch/April 1960) developed an “ages and stages” theory of human development that involved 8 stages after birth each of which involved a basic dichotomy representing best case and worst case outcomes. Below are the dichotomies and their developmental relevance:

Prenatal stage – conception to birth.

  1. Infancy. Birth to 2 years – basic trust vs. basic distrust. Hope.
  2. Early childhood, 3 to 4 years – autonomy vs. self doubt/shame. Will.
  3. Play age, 5 to 8 years – initiative vs. guilt. Purpose.
  4. School age, 9to 12 – industry vs. inferiority. Competence.
  5. Adolescence, 13 to 19 – identity vs. identity confusion. Fidelity.
  6. Young adulthood – intimacy vs. isolation. Love.
  7. Adulthood, generativity vs. self absorption. Care.
  8. Mature age- Ego Integrity vs. Despair. Wisdom.

This stage of older adulthood, i.e. stage 8, begins about the time of retirement and continues throughout one’s life. Achieving ego integrity  is a sign of maturity while failing to reach this stage is an indication of poor development in prior stages through the life course.

Ego integrity: This means coming to accept one’s whole life and reflecting on it in a positive manner. According to Erikson, achieving integrity means fully accepting one’ self and coming to terms with death. Accepting responsibility for one’s life and being able to review the past with satisfaction is essential. The inability to do this leads to despair and the individual will begin to fear death. If a favourable balance is achieved during this stage, then wisdom is developed.

Psychological and personality aspects:

Aging has psychological implications. Next to dying our recognition that we are aging may be one of the most profound shocks we ever receive. Once we pass the invisible line of 65 our years are bench marked for the remainder of the game of life. We are no longer “mature age” we are instead classified as “old”, or “senior citizens”. How we cope with the changes we face and stresses of altered status depends on our basic personality. Here are 3 basic personality types that have been identified. It may be a oversimplification but it makes the point about personality effectively:

a. The autonomous – people who seem to have the resources for self-renewal. They may be dedicated to a goal or idea and committed to continuing productivity. This appears to protect them somewhat even against physiological aging.

b.The adjusted – people who are rigid and lacking in adaptability but are supported by their power, prestige or well structured routine. But if their situation changes drastically they become psychiatric casualties.

c.The anomic. These are people who do not have clear inner values or a protective life vision. Such people have been described as prematurely resigned and they may deteriorate rapidly.

Summary of stresses of old age.

a. Retirement and reduced income. Most people rely on work for self worth, identity and social interaction. Forced retirement can be demoralising.

b. Fear of invalidism and death. The increased probability of falling prey to illness from which there is no recovery is a continual source of anxiety. When one has a heart attack or stroke the stress becomes much worse.

Some persons face death with equanimity, often psychologically supported by a religion or philosophy. Others may welcome death as an end to suffering or insoluble problems and with little concern for life or human existence. Still others face impending death with suffering of great stress against which they have no ego defenses.

c. Isolation and loneliness. Older people face inevitable loss of loved ones, friends and contemporaries. The loss of a spouse whom one has depended on for companionship and moral support is particularly distressing. Children grow up, marry and become preoccupied or move away. Failing memory, visual and aural impairment may all work to make social interaction difficult. And if this then leads to a souring of outlook and rigidity of attitude then social interaction becomes further lessened and the individual may not even utilise the avenues for social activity that are still available.

d. Reduction in sexual function and physical attractiveness. Kinsey et al, in their Sexual behaviour in the human male, (Phil., Saunders, 1948) found that there is a gradual decrease in sexual activity with advancing age and that reasonably gratifying patterns of sexual activity can continue into extreme old age. The aging person also has to adapt to loss of sexual attractiveness in a society which puts extreme emphasis on sexual attractiveness. The adjustment in self image and self concept that are required can be very hard to make.

e. Forces tending to self devaluation. Often the experience of the older generation has little perceived relevance to the problems of the young and the older person becomes deprived of participation in decision making both in occupational and family settings. Many parents are seen as unwanted burdens and their children may secretly wish they would die so they can be free of the burden and experience some financial relief or benefit. Senior citizens may be pushed into the role of being an old person with all this implies in terms of self devaluation.

4 Major Categories of Problems or Needs:

Health.

Housing.

Income maintenance.

Interpersonal relations.

BIOLOGICAL CHANGES

Physiological Changes: Catabolism (the breakdown of protoplasm) overtakes anabolism (the build-up of protoplasm). All body systems are affected and repair systems become slowed. The aging process occurs at different rates in different individuals.

Physical appearance and other changes:

Loss of subcutaneous fat and less elastic skin gives rise to wrinkled appearance, sagging and loss of smoothness of body contours. Joints stiffen and become painful and range of joint movement becomes restricted, general mobility lessened.

Respiratory changes:

Increase of fibrous tissue in chest walls and lungs leads restricts respiratory movement and less oxygen is consumed. Older people more likelyto have lower respiratory infections whereas young people have upper respiratory infections.

Nutritive changes:

Tooth decay and loss of teeth can detract from ease and enjoyment in eating. Atrophy of the taste buds means food is inclined to be tasteless and this should be taken into account by carers. Digestive changes occur from lack of exercise (stimulating intestines) and decrease in digestive juice production. Constipation and indigestion are likely to follow as a result. Financial problems can lead to the elderly eating an excess of cheap carbohydrates rather than the more expensive protein and vegetable foods and this exacerbates the problem, leading to reduced vitamin intake and such problems as anemia and increased susceptibility to infection.

Adaptation to stress:

All of us face stress at all ages. Adaptation to stress requires the consumption of energy. The 3 main phases of stress are:

1. Initial alarm reaction. 2. Resistance. 3. Exhaustion

and if stress continues tissue damage or aging occurs. Older persons have had a lifetime of dealing with stresses. Energy reserves are depleted and the older person succumbs to stress earlier than the younger person. Stress is cumulative over a lifetime. Research results, including experiments with animals suggests that each stress leaves us more vulnerable to the next and that although we might think we’ve “bounced back” 100% in fact each stress leaves it scar. Further, stress is psycho-biological meaning the kind of stress is irrelevant. A physical stress may leave one more vulnerable to psychological stress and vice versa. Rest does not completely restore one after a stressor. Care workers need to be mindful of this and cognizant of the kinds of things that can produce stress for aged persons.

COGNITIVE CHANGE Habitual Behaviour:

Sigmund Freud noted that after the age of 50, treatment of neuroses via psychoanalysis was difficult because the opinions and reactions of older people were relatively fixed and hard to shift.

Over-learned behaviour: This is behaviour that has been learned so well and repeated so often that it has become automatic, like for example typing or running down stairs. Over-learned behaviour is hard to change. If one has lived a long time one is likely to have fixed opinions and ritualised behaviour patterns or habits.

Compulsive behaviour: Habits and attitudes that have been learned in the course of finding ways to overcome frustration and difficulty are very hard to break. Tension reducing habits such as nail biting, incessant humming, smoking or drinking alcohol are especially hard to change at any age and particularly hard for persons who have been practising them over a life time.

The psychology of over-learned and compulsive behaviours has severe implications for older persons who find they have to live in what for them is a new and alien environment with new rules and power relations.

Information acquisition:

Older people have a continual background of neural noise making it more difficult for them to sort out and interpret complex sensory input. In talking to an older person one should turn off the TV, eliminate as many noises and distractions as possible, talk slowly and relate to one message or idea at a time.

Memories from the distant past are stronger than more recent memories. New memories are the first to fade and last to return.

Time patterns also can get mixed – old and new may get mixed.

Intelligence.

Intelligence reaches a peak and can stay high with little deterioration if there is no neurological damage. People who have unusually high intelligence to begin with seem to suffer the least decline. Education and stimulation also seem to play a role in maintaining intelligence.

Intellectual impairment. Two diseases of old age causing cognitive decline are Alzheimer’s syndrome and Pick’s syndrome. In Pick’s syndrome there is inability to concentrate and learn and also affective responses are impaired.

Degenerative Diseases: Slow progressive physical degeneration of cells in the nervous system. Genetics appear to be an important factor. Usually start after age 40 (but can occur as early as 20s).

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE Degeneration of all areas of cortex but particularly frontal and temporal lobes. The affected cells actually die. Early symptoms resemble neurotic disorders: Anxiety, depression, restlessness sleep difficulties.

Progressive deterioration of all intellectual faculties (memory deficiency being the most well known and obvious). Total mass of the brain decreases, ventricles become larger. No established treatment.

PICK’S DISEASE Rare degenerative disease. Similar to Alzheimer’s in terms of onset, symptomatology and possible genetic aetiology. However it affects circumscribed areas of the brain, particularly the frontal areas which leads to a loss of normal affect.

PARKINSON’S DISEASE Neuropathology: Loss of neurons in the basal ganglia.

Symptoms: Movement abnormalities: rhythmical alternating tremor of extremities, eyelids and tongue along with rigidity of the muscles and slowness of movement (akinesia).

It was once thought that Parkinson’s disease was not associated with intellectual deterioration, but it is now known that there is an association between global intellectual impairment and Parkinson’s where it occurs late in life.

The cells lost in Parkinson’s are associated with the neuro-chemical Dopamine and the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s are associated the dopamine deficiency. Treatment involves administration of dopamine precursor L-dopa which can alleviate symptoms including intellectual impairment. Research suggests it may possibly bring to the fore emotional effects in patients who have had psychiatric illness at some prior stage in their lives.

AFFECTIVE DOMAIN In old age our self concept gets its final revision. We make a final assessment of the value of our lives and our balance of success and failures.

How well a person adapts to old age may be predicated by how well the person adapted to earlier significant changes. If the person suffered an emotional crisis each time a significant change was needed then adaptation to the exigencies of old age may also be difficult. Factors such as economic security, geographic location and physical health are important to the adaptive process.

Need Fulfilment: For all of us, according to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs theory, we are not free to pursue the higher needs of self actualisation unless the basic needs are secured. When one considers that many, perhaps most, old people are living in poverty and continually concerned with basic survival needs, they are not likely to be happily satisfying needs related to prestige, achievement and beauty.

Maslow’s Hierarchy

Physiological

Safety

Belonging, love, identification

Esteem: Achievement, prestige, success, self respect

Self actualisation: Expressing one’s interests and talents to the full.

Note: Old people who have secured their basic needs may be motivated to work on tasks of the highest levels in the hierarchy – activities concerned with aesthetics, creativity and altruistic matters, as compensation for loss of sexual attractiveness and athleticism. Aged care workers fixated on getting old people to focus on social activities may only succeed in frustrating and irritating them if their basic survival concerns are not secured to their satisfaction.

DISENGAGEMENT

Social aging according to Cumming, E. and Henry, W. (Growing old: the aging process of disengagement, NY, Basic 1961) follows a well defined pattern:

  1. Change in role. Change in occupation and productivity. Possibly change in attitude to work.
  2. Loss of role, e.g. retirement or death of a husband.
  3. Reduced social interaction. With loss of role social interactions are diminished, eccentric adjustment can further reduce social interaction, damage to self concept, depression.
  4. Awareness of scarcity of remaining time. This produces further curtailment of activity in interest of saving time.

Havighurst, R. et al (in B. Neugarten (ed.) Middle age and aging, U. of Chicago, 1968) and others have suggested that disengagement is not an inevitable process. They believe the needs of the old are essentially the same as in middle age and the activities of middle age should be extended as long as possible. Havighurst points out the decrease in social interaction of the aged is often largely the result of society withdrawing from the individual as much as the reverse. To combat this he believes the individual must vigorously resist the limitations of his social world.

DEATH The fear of the dead amongst tribal societies is well established. Persons who had ministered to the dead were taboo and required observe various rituals including seclusion for varying periods of time. In some societies from South America to Australia it is taboo for certain persons to utter the name of the dead. Widows and widowers are expected to observe rituals in respect for the dead.

Widows in the Highlands of New Guinea around Goroka chop of one of their own fingers. The dead continue their existence as spirits and upsetting them can bring dire consequences.

Wahl, C in “The fear of death”, 1959 noted that the fear of death occurs as early as the 3rd year of life. When a child loses a pet or grandparent fears reside in the unspoken questions: Did I cause it? Will happen to you (parent) soon? Will this happen to me? The child in such situations needs to re-assure that the departure is not a censure, and that the parent is not likely to depart soon. Love, grief, guilt, anger are a mix of conflicting emotions that are experienced.

CONTEMPORARY ATTITUDES TO DEATH

Our culture places high value on youth, beauty, high status occupations, social class and anticipated future activities and achievement. Aging and dying are denied and avoided in this system. The death of each person reminds us of our own mortality.

The death of the elderly is less disturbing to members of Western society because the aged are not especially valued. Surveys have established that nurses for example attach more importance to saving a young life than an old life. In Western society there is a pattern of avoiding dealing with the aged and dying aged patient.

Stages of dying. Elisabeth Kubler Ross has specialised in working with dying patients and in her “On death and dying”, NY, Macmillan, 1969, summarised 5 stages in dying.

  1. Denial and isolation. “No, not me”.
  2. Anger. “I’ve lived a good life so why me?”
  3. Bargaining. Secret deals are struck with God. “If I can live until…I promise to…”
  4. Depression. (In general the greatest psychological problem of the aged is depression). Depression results from real and threatened loss.
  5. Acceptance of the inevitable.

Kubler Ross’s typology as set out above should, I believe be taken with a grain of salt and not slavishly accepted. Celebrated US Journalist David Rieff who was in June ’08 a guest of the Sydney writer’s festival in relation to his book, “Swimming in a sea of death: a son’s memoir” (Melbourne University Press) expressly denied the validity of the Kubler Ross typology in his Late Night Live interview (Australian ABC radio) with Philip Adams June 9th ’08. He said something to the effect that his mother had regarded her impending death as murder. My own experience with dying persons suggests that the human ego is extraordinarily resilient. I recall visiting a dying colleague in hospital just days before his death. He said, “I’m dying, I don’t like it but there’s nothing I can do about it”, and then went on to chortle about how senior academics at an Adelaide university had told him they were submitting his name for a the Order of Australia (the new “Knighthood” replacement in Australia). Falling in and out of lucid thought with an oxygen tube in his nostrils he was nevertheless still highly interested in the “vain glories of the world”. This observation to me seemed consistent with Rieff’s negative assessment of Kubler Ross’s theories.

THE AGED IN RELATION TO YOUNGER PEOPLE

The aged share with the young the same needs: However, the aged often have fewer or weaker resources to meet those needs. Their need for social interaction may be ignored by family and care workers.

Family should make time to visit their aged members and invite them to their homes. The aged like to visit children and relate to them through games and stories.

Meaningful relationships can be developed via foster-grandparent programs. Some aged are not aware of their income and health entitlements. Family and friends should take the time to explain these. Some aged are too proud to access their entitlements and this problem should be addressed in a kindly way where it occurs.

It is best that the aged be allowed as much choice as possible in matters related to living arrangements, social life and lifestyle.

Communities serving the aged need to provide for the aged via such things as lower curbing, and ramps.

Carers need to examine their own attitude to aging and dying. Denial in the carer is detected by the aged person and it can inhibit the aged person from expressing negative feelings – fear, anger. If the person can express these feelings to someone then that person is less likely to die with a sense of isolation and bitterness.

A METAPHYSICAL PERSPECTIVE

The following notes are my interpretation of a Dr. Depak Chopra lecture entitled, “The New Physics of Healing” which he presented to the 13th Scientific Conference of the American Holistic Medical Association. Dr. Depak Chopra is an endocrinologist and a former Chief of Staff of New England Hospital, Massachusetts. I am deliberately omitting the detail of his explanations of the more abstract, ephemeral and controversial ideas.

Original material from 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

In the lecture Dr. Chopra presents a model of the universe and of all organisms as structures of interacting centres of electromagnetic energy linked to each other in such a way that anything affecting one part of a system or structure has ramifications throughout the entire structure. This model becomes an analogue not only for what happens within the structure or organism itself, but between the organism and both its physical and social environments. In other words there is a correlation between psychological conditions, health and the aging process. Dr. Chopra in his lecture reconciles ancient Vedic (Hindu) philosophy with modern psychology and quantum physics.

Premature Precognitive Commitment: Dr. Chopra invokes experiments that have shown that flies kept for a long time in a jar do not quickly leave the jar when the top is taken off. Instead they accept the jar as the limit of their universe. He also points out that in India baby elephants are often kept tethered to a small twig or sapling. In adulthood when the elephant is capable of pulling over a medium sized tree it can still be successfully tethered to a twig! As another example he points to experiments in which fish are bred on

2 sides of a fish tank containing a divider between the 2 sides. When the divider is removed the fish are slow to learn that they can now swim throughout the whole tank but rather stay in the section that they accept as their universe. Other experiments have demonstrated that kittens brought up in an environment of vertical stripes and structures, when released in adulthood keep bumping into anything aligned horizontally as if they were unable to see anything that is horizontal. Conversely kittens brought up in an environment of horizontal stripes when released bump into vertical structures, apparently unable to see them.

The whole point of the above experiments is that they demonstrate Premature Precognitive Commitment. The lesson to be learned is that our sensory apparatus develops as a result of initial experience and how we’ve been taught to interpret it.

What is the real look of the world? It doesn’t exist. The way the world looks to us is determined by the sensory receptors we have and our interpretation of that look is determined by our premature precognitive commitments. Dr Chopra makes the point that less than a billionth of the available stimuli make it into our nervous systems. Most of it is screened, and what gets through to us is whatever we are expecting to find on the basis of our precognitive commitments.

Dr. Chopra also discusses the diseases that are actually caused by mainstream medical interventions, but this material gets too far away from my central intention. Dr. Chopra discusses in lay terms the physics of matter, energy and time by way of establishing the wider context of our existence. He makes the point that our bodies including the bodies of plants are mirrors of cosmic rhythms and exhibit changes correlating even with the tides.

Dr. Chopra cites the experiments of Dr. Herbert Spencer of the US National Institute of Health. He injected mice with Poly-IC, an immuno-stimulant while making the mice repeatedly smell camphor. After the effect of the Poly-IC had worn off he again exposed the mice to the camphor smell. The smell of camphor had the effect of causing the mice’s immune system to automatically strengthen as if they had been injected with the stimulant. He then took another batch of mice and injected them with cyclophosphamide which tends to destroy the immune system while exposing them to the smell of camphor. Later after being returned to normal just the smell of camphor was enough to cause destruction of their immune system. Dr. Chopra points out that whether or not camphor enhanced or destroyed the mice’s immune system was entirely determined by an interpretation of the meaning of the smell of camphor. The interpretation is not just in the brain but in each cell of the organism. We are bound to our imagination and our early experiences.

Chopra cites a study by the Massachusetts Dept of Health Education and Welfare into risk factors for heart disease – family history, cholesterol etc. The 2 most important risk factors were found to be psychological measures – Self  Happiness Rating and Job Satisfaction. They found most people died of heart disease on a Monday!

Chopra says that for every feeling there is a molecule. If you are experiencing tranquillity your body will be producing natural valium. Chemical changes in the brain are reflected by changes in other cells including blood cells. The brain produces neuropeptides and brain structures are chemically tuned to these neuropeptide receptors. Neuropeptides (neurotransmitters) are the chemical concommitants of thought. Chopra points out the white blood cells (a part of the immune system) have neuropeptide receptors and are “eavesdropping” on our thinking. Conversely the immune system produces its own neuropeptides which can influence the nervous system. He goes on to say that cells in all parts of the body including heart and kidneys for example also produce neuropeptides and neuropeptide sensitivity. Chopra assures us that most neurologists would agree that the nervous system and the immune system are parallel systems.

Other studies in physiology: The blood interlukin-2 levels of medical students decreased as exam time neared and their interlukin receptor capacities also lowered. Chopra says if we are having fun to the point of exhilaration our natural interlukin-2 levels become higher. Interlukin-2 is a powerful and very expensive anti-cancer drug. The body is a printout of consciousness. If we could change the way we look at our bodies at a genuine, profound level then our bodies would actually change.

On the subject of “time” Chopra cites Sir Thomas Gall and Steven Hawkins, stating that our description of the universe as having a past, present, and future are constructed entirely out of our interpretation of change. But in reality linear time doesn’t exist.

Chopra explains the work of Alexander Leaf a former Harvard Professor of Preventative Medicine who toured the world investigating societies where people  lived beyond 100 years (these included parts of Afghanistan, Soviet Georgia, Southern Andes). He looked at possible factors including climate, genetics, and diet. Leaf concluded the most important factor was the collective perception of aging in these societies.

Amongst the Tama Humara of the Southern Andes there was a collective belief that the older you got the more physically able you got. They had a tradition of running and the older one became then generally the better at running one got. The best runner was aged 60. Lung capacity and other measures actually improved with age. People were healthy until well into their 100s and died in their sleep. Chopra remarks that things have changed since the introduction of Budweiser (beer) and TV.

[DISCUSSION: How might TV be a factor in changing the former ideal state of things?]

Chopra refers to Dr. Ellen Langor a former Harvard Psychology professor’s work. Langor advertised for 100 volunteers aged over 70 years. She took them to a Monastery outside Boston to play “Let’s Pretend”. They were divided into 2 groups each of which resided in a different part of the building. One group, the control group spent several days talking about the 1950s. The other group, the experimental group had to live as if in the year 1959 and talk about it in the present tense. What appeared on their TV screens were the old newscasts and movies. They read old newspapers and magazines of the period. After 3 days everyone was photographed and the photographs judged by independent judges who knew nothing of the nature of the experiment. The experimental group seemed to have gotten younger in appearance. Langor then arranged for them to be tested for 100 physiological parameters of aging which included of course blood pressure, near point vision and DHEA levels. After 10 days of living as if in 1959 all parameters had reversed by the equivalent of at least 20 years.

Chopra concludes from Langor’s experiment: “We are the metabolic end product of our sensory experiences. How we interpret them depends on the collective mindset which influences individual biological entropy and aging.”

Can one escape the current collective mindset and reap the benefits in longevity and health? Langor says, society won’t let you escape. There are too many reminders of how most people think linear time is and how it expresses itself in entropy and aging – men are naughty at 40 and on social welfare at 55, women reach menopause at 40 etc. We get to see so many other people aging and dying that it sets the pattern that we follow.

Chopra concludes we are the metabolic product of our sensory experience and our interpretation gets structured in our biology itself. Real change comes from change in the collective consciousness – otherwise it cannot occur within the individual.

Readings

Chopra, D. The New Physics of Healing. 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

Coleman, J. C. Abnormal psychology and modern life. Scott Foresman & Co.

Lugo, J. and Hershey, L. Human development a multidisciplinary approach to the psychology of individual growth, NY, Macmillan.

Dennis. Psychology of human behaviour for nurses. Lond. W. B.Saunders.

[http://www.psychologynatural.com/DepressionBroch.html]

Dr. Victor Barnes is an Adelaide psychologist and hypnotherapist. He has also had three decades of experience in adult education including serving as Dean of a Sri Lankan college (ICBT) teaching several Australian degrees. His overseas experience includes studies and consulting experience in USA, PNG, Poland and Sri Lanka.

Nevada Senior Guide – Shumway & Van Attorneys

April 29, 2015 by · Comments Off on Nevada Senior Guide – Shumway & Van Attorneys
Filed under: Las Vegas, Support Services 

http://www.shumwayvan.com

NSGMayJuneJuly2015_Web38 NSGMayJuneJuly2015_Web39

The law firm of Shumway Van has a regionally known and respected litigation practice and a first-class business and transactional practice that is quickly gaining national presence. These general practices are divisible into the more specific practice areas identified to the right. Each practice group is designed to serve each and every client in the most effective and efficient manner possible. To ensure an optimal result, professionals work across disciplines and collaborate together to resolve a matter.

Las Vegas, Nevada

8985 South Eastern Ave. #100,Las Vegas, Nevada 89123

Phone: (702) 478-7770

Fax: (702) 478-7779

http://www.shumwayvan.com

Free Senior Safety Fair – Seniors And Law Enforcement Together – (S.A.L.T.) Council and the Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)

March 18, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

The Seniors And Law Enforcement Together – (S.A.L.T.) Council and the Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP) are asking for support at an important annually sponsored event.

 

The SALT Council and SMP will be holding it’s free “Senior Safety Fair” on Wednesday, May 14th 2014 at Clark County’s Paradise Community Center located at 4775 South McLeod Drive 89121.

The SALT Council is comprised of core members to include but not limited to the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police, North Las Vegas Police Department, State of Nevada Elder Protective Services, Southern Nevada Senior Law Program, Nevada Senior Services, Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP), Nevada State Attorney General’s Office, City of Las Vegas, Clark County, City of Henderson, Clark County District Attorney, ITN Las Vegas Valley, S. Nevada Transit Coalition, Nevada 2-1-1, Social Service Providers, Professional Senior Service Providers, and Volunteer Senior Citizens and Clark County Coroner and Medical Examiner’s Office just to name a few.

 

S.A.L.T. is a full non-profit 501c3.

 

The group is looking assistance in getting the word out to all southern Nevada senior citizens about this free safety event to help increase all safety and prevention methods for our seniors residents.

 

If you have any questions please contact Kim Harney-Moore (SMP) or Carol Ferranti (LVMPD) (contact info are listed below):

 

Kim Harney-Moore; SMP Director
Nevada Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)
Empowering Seniors to Prevent Healthcare Fraud
702-486-4323
kkharneymoore@adsd.nv.gov

 

OR

 

Carol Ferranti; Crime Prevention Specialist
Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department – South Central Area Command (SCAC)
4860 Las Vegas Blvd. South
Las Vegas, NV 89119
Office: 702-828-8163
C7859F@lvmpd.com

Local New York Life Agent Jennie Kim Offering Added Protection and Security through AARP Products

March 18, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Jennie Kim from the Las Vegas General Office] of New York Life, is now authorized to offer AARP branded life insurance and lifetime income annuity products to AARP members.  It is the first time these group life insurance products are offered by authorized-to-offer Agents.

 

Ms. Kim is among a select group of New York Life agents who became authorized to offer her clients AARP Guaranteed Acceptance Life; AARP Level Benefit Term; AARP Permanent Life Insurance, all from New York Life and New York Life’s Guaranteed Lifetime Income Annuity.  She is a Licensed Insurance Agent andpassed courses specific to AARP.

 

Ms. Kim has been providing insurance and financial services for over 15yrs specializing in Life Insurance, Long Term Care, Retirement Planning and Estate Planning.  She has served on the Boards of Chambers and Non-Profits Boards and works with many multiple charity organizations including United Way.  She is a member of National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors (NAIFA), Women in Finance Industry (WIFI), and many more. She resides in Las Vegas, Nevada with her three children.

 

Since 1994, AARP group life products from New York Life have been available via direct mail to AARP members.  The Company has also been the provider of group lifetime income annuities to AARP members since 2006.

 

New York Life Insurance Company, a Fortune 100 company founded in 1845, is the largest mutual life insurance company in the United States* and one of the largest life insurers in the world.  New York Life has the highest possible financial strength ratings currently awarded to any life insurer from all four of the major credit rating agencies: A.M. Best (A++), Fitch (AAA), Moody’s Investors Service (Aaa), Standard & Poor’s (AA+).**  Headquartered in New York City, New York Life’s family of companies offers life insurance, retirement income, investments and long-term care insurance.  New York Life Investments*** provides institutional asset management and retirement plan services.  Other New York Life affiliates provide an array of securities products and services, as well as retail mutual funds.  Please visit New York Life’s website at www.newyorklife.com for more information.

Living with diabetes? Watch your mouth!

January 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

11723Living with diabetes? Watch your mouth!

 

(Family Features)  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people with diabetes are two times more likely to develop gum disease. In fact, about one-third of people with diabetes have severe gum disease.

 

Why are those with diabetes more vulnerable to gum disease? High blood glucose levels impair the body’s ability to heal from oral infections and uncontrolled diabetes can make treating gum disease more difficult, according to the American Diabetes Association. The Association is joining with Colgate to launch a new “Watch Your Mouth!” campaign to help raise awareness surrounding the often over-looked link between oral health and diabetes. Here are some tips to help you live well with diabetes:

 

  • Watch your mouth! Begin to develop healthy oral care habits, like brushing, flossing and visiting the dentist regularly. Research shows that brushing twice a day with Colgate Total toothpaste can help improve gum health in as little as four weeks.*
  • Don’t miss out on your favorite foods. Just eat healthier versions that everyone in your family can enjoy. Making simple substitutions to most dishes can help increase nutritional value, while not sacrificing on taste.
  • Use the right tools. Stay organized with a journal large enough to keep your diet, exercise, goals and health information together. Keep a week’s worth of prescriptions in one place with a handy pill case.
  • Know your risks. The American Diabetes Association lists the common risk factors for diabetes as being 45 or older, being overweight, not exercising regularly, having high blood pressure and being a part of certain racial and ethnic groups.
  • Visit your dentist. While your doctor and certified diabetes educator play an important role in helping with your diabetes, so does your dentist. If you don’t see a private-practice dentist, you can visit dental schools that provide services at a fraction of the cost to help you keep your mouth healthy.

 

For more expert tips and information, visit www.OralHealthAndDiabetes.com.

 

*Results improve with continued twice daily use, as shown in 6 month clinical studies of the general population.

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Red Cross Blood Products Prolong Life of Two-Year-Old Las Vegan

December 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Two-year-old Sawyer Balonek of Las Vegas has been diagnosed with Bruton Agammaglobulinemia, an inherited immunodeficiency disease.  He has to have an infusion of immunoglobulin every four weeks from plasma extracted from blood given by volunteer donors.

 

The blood products needed by Sawyer are provided by the American Red Cross.  The Red Cross is the predominant blood supplier in Las Vegas and has held several blood drives in Sawyer’s honor to help make sure he gets the blood products he needs.  Sawyer’s parents agree that Sawyer is alive today because of the excellent medical care he has received and the blood products provided by the Red Cross.

 

In 2010 a group of local hospitals invited the Red Cross to bid for the contract to supply blood in southern Nevada.  The Red Cross won the contract, supplanting United Blood Services (UBS) as the provider of blood products for nine of the 14 hospitals in Las Vegas.  In order to meet the demand, the Red Cross strives to collect almost 900 units per week.

 

According to Julia Wulf, chief executive  officer of the American Red Cross Blood Service Region, “It is very challenging for us to collect enough blood in Las Vegas to meet the needs of the southern Nevada hospitals we serve.  We need more donors and we need businesses, churches and other organizations to sponsor blood drives here.”

 

To make an appointment to donate blood, call 1-800-RED CROSS or visit redcrossblood.org.

 

For more information about scheduling a blood drive call (702) 522-3998.

 

#   #   #

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

New Survey Reveals that Aging Parents and Adult Children Aren’t Always On the Same Page!

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

In honor of National Family Caregivers Month, life transition planning and daily money management firm LifeBridge Solutions, LLC surveyed nearly 400 aging parents and adult children. The national survey was conducted online November 12 – 14, 2013.

Survey results indicate that adult children are generally more concerned about their aging parent’s wellbeing than the older adult is about his or her own situation. Both generations are concerned about the older adult’s general health and safety and about driving. However, the aging parents top concerns include worry about running out of money and how they will pay for care, while the adult children worry about their parent not asking for (or accepting) the help they need and about their parent’s inability to manage medications.

LifeBridge Solutions’ President Sheri L. Samotin says, “Unfortunately, adult children often live a long distance from their aging parents and don’t see them as often as they’d like. As a result, they worry about what’s going on with Mom or Dad and feel a need to put mechanisms in place to keep their parent safe. By the same token, many aging parents are adept at hiding their need for assistance from their children as they fear that their children will try to take over.” Samotin is the author of the forthcoming book, Facing the Finish: A Road Map for Aging Parents and Adult Children (www.FacingtheFinish.com).

While only 25% of the aging parents surveyed report that they are stressed because of their adult children, nearly twice as many adult children report being stressed because of their aging parents. Consistent with these results, it is not surprising that more adult children than aging parents would change something about their relationship with the other generation. However, the top thing both groups would change is to live closer to and/or see the other more often. The next most common wish for both groups is to have better relationships with one another.

According to government statistics an estimated 25% of adult children currently provide hands-on and/or supervisory care for one or more of their parents. This number has tripled over the past fifteen years and is expected to increase dramatically as the population ages. Caring for aging parents is often referred to as the new mid-life crisis.

LifeBridge Solutions, LLC, founded in 2009 provides life transition planning, daily money management and medical billing advocacy services to clients nationwide.

For more information contact:
Sheri L. Samotin, President, LifeBridge Solutions, LLC
323.452.2680

Read more news from LifeBridge Solutions.

How to Talk to Aging Parents About Senior Housing

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

One in three adults ages 65 and older will fall each year. Use this podcast to learn how to talk to aging parents about senior living before an accident occurs.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in three adults ages 65 and older fall each year. Of these falls, 20–30 percent result in debilitating injuries limiting seniors’ ability to live on their own. It is more important than ever for seniors and their adult children to plan for senior living accommodations—before an accident occurs.

Of course, the conversation about senior living can be emotional and taxing for aging parents. Seniors may view the change as a loss of independence, and it can be difficult to think about leaving their home and existing lifestyle to join a new community.

In a recent podcast from MySilverAge.com, Lisa Holland—regional director of quality improvement at be.group, a nonprofit provider of California senior living communities—offers expert tips to ease these challenges and strategies to help start the conversation. Holland explains how to approach the subject respectfully and sensitively, and how to offer the right support for each parent’s unique needs.

To hear all of Holland’s tips on talking to aging parents about senior living, including whom to include in the discussion and ways to prepare for potential responses, visit: www.mysilverage.com/thetalk.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

Baby Boomers and Seniors face nutritional triple threat of obesity, weight loss and lack of balanced meals

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Livliga dishware is a new solution to help these two generations eat right and stay healthy 

Americans are living longer than ever, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, but the fight to stay healthy is just as challenging as it has been with past generations. Recent studies show that the Silent Generation, born from 1927 to 1945 and Baby Boomers, born from 1946 to 1964, collectively face three major nutritional challenges.

 

A Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine study shows Baby Boomers have higher rates of hypertension, diabetes, obesity and high cholesterol when compared to their previous generation. The Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations also shows the highest obesity rates are currently found in Baby Boomers.

 

For the Silent Generation, currently ages 68 to 85, the National Institute on Aging says its main challenge is related to lack of balanced nutrition and getting enough calories.

The NIA says this group has:

  • decreased appetite
  • trouble chewing food
  • less socialization around food
  • diminished sense of taste and smell
  • medication interference with food enjoyment
  • fixed incomes

One new solution is Livliga, a tool Baby Boomers and Silent Generation seniors can use to promote right-sized food portions to reach target weights as well as to guide intake of balanced nutritional meals. Created with an Advisory Committee including a cardiologist and certified nutritionist, Livliga offers easy, subtle cues to improve and control the food environment.

 

“Livliga is a solution for every stage of life,” says inventor, Sheila Kemper Dietrich. “It can be used by people who are under eating and need to be reminded to take in more calories or to help those who are struggling to shrink their waistlines. The guide to portion sizes combined with reminders of what comprises a balanced meal are the keys to better health for both groups.”

 

Livliga is Swedish for LIVELY, VIBRANT or VIVID, which is the company’s core philosophy. Kemper Dietrich’s vision was to create an attractive suite of place settings designed for a healthy lifestyle and suitable for entertaining family and friends in both formal and informal settings. The beautiful designs on the dishware offer elegant visual cues to guide appropriate and right-sized servings. The initial product launch was a 4-piece place setting in two patterns, including a dinner plate, salad/luncheon plate, bowl and mug. Livliga also offers a serving bowl, etched water and wine glasses.

 

For Baby Boomers or Silent Generation seniors with grandchildren, Kidliga can also be helpful to promote healthy habits for the entire family. Kidliga is whimsical, fun dishware for kids, accompanied by a health-oriented children’s storybook. Sammie & Sax in the Land of Quinoa: The Search for a Balanced Meal just won a Moonbeam Award in the Health Issues category and is a useful tool and solution to help families in the fight against childhood obesity.

 

Livliga products are specifically designed to help both adults and children address the “psychology of eating”.  The rim sizes, color palette, and designs all combine to encourage slower eating, make portion sizes look larger, as well as make food more visually appealing.

 

A 4-piece Livliga place setting is available on the company website at www.LivligaHome.com at an introductory price of $49.95 (MSRP $59.95). All of the additional products and pricing can be easily found on the website as well. Kemper Dietrich says plans call for further product launches, including additional patterns and a set of LivSpoons that makes for easy, everyday measuring and serving of right-sized portions.

 

To purchase Livliga, visit the online store at www.LivligaHome.com.  “Like” Livliga on Facebook at facebook.com/LivligaHome, follow on Twitter @LivligaHome and visit our blog at LivligaHome.blogspot.com.  Watch our videos on YouTube.com/LivligaHome.

 
Audrey Strong
Agency Zero Public Relations
audrey@agencyzero.com
720.231.6097

U.S. Veterans Honored by Encore.org’s 2013 Purpose Prize

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Seven Awards for People Over Age 60 Solving the World’s Toughest Social Problems

The Purpose Prize has become a “MacArthur genius award for people who develop a second career as social service entrepreneurs.” – The New York Times.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy organizes a network of volunteers across the country to teach disabled veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan how to combat stress — through fly-fishing.

A public relations executive helps wounded warriors find and renovate foreclosed homes – and transforms lives and neighborhoods in the process.

These are two of the seven winners of the 2013 Purpose Prize, awarded by Encore.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who translate decades of skill and experience into “second acts” that contribute to society’s greater good.

Now in its eighth year, The Purpose Prize is the nation’s only large-scale investment in people over 60 who are combining their passion and experience for the social good. Created in 2005 by Encore.org, the prize is aimed at those with the passion to make change and the wisdom to know how to do it, showcasing the value of experience and disproving the notion that innovation is solely the province of the young.

Two winners will receive $100,000 each and five winners will receive $25,000 each.

This year’s winners:

* Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. ($100,000 winner of The Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra)

* Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron taps into her own experience as a cancer survivor to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. ($100,000)

* Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing emotional wounds through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. ($25,000)

* Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
Fennelly runs a unique summer camp behind bars that is transforming federal prisoners into involved parents. ($25,000)

* Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
Huttinger’s project is on a path to eradicate human schistosomiasis, a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. ($25,000)

* Reverend Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. ($25,000)

* Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
Young’s rise from immigrant nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. ($25,000)

The Purpose Prize winners will be honored on December 5, 2013, at an awards ceremony in Sausalito, Ca. NBC’s Jane Pauley will emcee the event for hundreds of Encore leaders and the Purpose Prize winners.

Twenty-one judges – leaders in business, politics, journalism and the nonprofit sector – chose the seven winners from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees. Judges include Sherry Lansing, former CEO of Paramount; David Bornstein, author and New York Times columnist; Eric Liu, writer and founder of CitizenUniversity; and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, The Purpose Prize is a program of Encore.org, which aims to engage millions of boomers in encore careers combining personal meaning, continued income and social impact in the second half of life.

This year, Symetra is sponsoring the $100,000 Purpose Prize for Future Promise, which recognizes an individual whose approach for helping society has the potential to grow steadily over the next five years. The company plans to sponsor another Purpose Prize for Future Promise in 2014.

“While Purpose Prize winners are helping to solve a wide range of pressing social problems, they have one thing in common,” said Marc Freedman, CEO and founder of Encore.org and author of The Big Shift (PublicAffairs Books). “They – and millions of others in encore careers – are turning personal passions and decades of experience into invaluable contributions across sectors, continents and generations, often through entrepreneurship.”

Short summaries for all winners follow. Photos are attached. Longer bios and higher resolution photos are available.

Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas, winner of this year’s Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra, rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. Following a 35-year-career as a fundraising and marketing dynamo, she became the director of communications at Purple Heart Homes in 2008 in an effort to provide greater services for veterans who have service-connected disabilities. In just three years, Thomas helped take the fledgling nonprofit to new heights. She has raised millions for Purple Heart Homes in financial contributions and material donations. Revenue shot up 600% in her first year with the startup. She’s developed an innovative program that matches veterans with foreclosed homes donated by banks, then raises the funds to renovate a home for the individual veteran’s needs. It’s a win-win for all generations—and communities too. It helps veterans to grow assets, towns to recoup lost taxes and neighborhoods that have struggled with foreclosures to stabilize.

Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron is an award-winning journalist with more than 42 years in television broadcasting. She tapped into her own experience as a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. To focus on the plight of low-income Latinos fighting the disease, Duron founded Latinas Contra Cancer (Latinas Against Cancer), an organization committed to educating, supporting and providing essential services to low-income Spanish speakers often overlooked by the health care system. Latinas Contra Cancer has offered a range of programs that have taught more than 3,000 men, women and teens about the disease, resulting in more than 300 preventative cancer screenings. The group has provided psychological and social support to over 100 patients per year. However, the call to action Duron answered has had an impact far beyond the Bay Area. Her passionate commitment is helping Latino communities across the U.S. gain access to cancer support, information and treatment. Her great empathy for cancer patients has made her utterly clear on her bigger purpose in the second stage of life.

Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing the emotional wounds of battle through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. A cancer survivor and war veteran himself, Nicholson was impressed by the fortitude of disabled veterans at the Walter Reed military hospital, where he was treated for prostate cancer in 2005. It spurred him to found Project Healing Waters, a program dedicated to helping disabled soldiers and veterans recover from the trying aftermath of war through the sport of fly-fishing. One-on-one connections have been key to Project Healing Waters’ approach since the beginning. Nicholson knew there were fly-fishing groups and facilities all over the country. His innovation was to convince them to start, manage and lead fly-fishing instruction and outings with veterans through military and Veterans Administration facilities. The quiet bonds forged over fishing lines began to transform lives. Again and again Nicholson heard from family members who said their loved ones had returned from war withdrawn, angry, and difficult to be around. But after fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters, they’ve become happier, more open and engaged. Project Healing Waters works closely with VA Recreational and Occupational therapies to identify those who would most benefit from the program. Many are in wheelchairs or using prosthetics. A few are blind. Participants reflect of full spectrum of disabled veterans and include all ages, genders, ethnicities and disabilities. Nicholson says the impact “goes well beyond the mechanics of fly-fishing.”

Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
A lifelong social activist who ran homeless shelters in the District of Columbia for 17 years, Carol Fennelly abandoned her plans to retire in 1998 when she learned that D.C. inmates had been transferred to Youngstown, OH. One woman made 10-hour round-trip drives twice a week to visit her son. Moved to answer a social need, Fennelly thought about opening a hospitality house in Youngstown for family members visiting inmates. She soon learned that while 93% of the federal inmate population is male, in sheer numbers there are more programs for mothers in prison than there are for fathers. She decided she had what it took to change things. “I had spent years organizing, dealing with government, making change happen, and that emboldened me to think I could go into prisons and start all these radical programs,” Fennelly says. So she launched an encore career with Hope House, an innovative organization that helps prison inmates stay in regular contact with their children. In the past 14 years, Hope House has hosted 200 video teleconferences, 18,000 personalized book readings by fathers and 31 week-long summer camps, which allow kids to spend time with their fathers free of the usual restrictions that come with visitor hours and family chaperones. California recently decided to implement the Hope House model in its 33 state prisons. Prisons in Texas, Idaho and New Hampshire may follow. In 2013 Fennelly was honored at the White House as a Champion of Change.

Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
International public health expert Elizabeth Huttinger spotted a big idea in shrimp, and launched an encore career that could eradicate a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. Huttinger’s project – founded in 2006 – is targeting human schistosomiasis, an infectious parasite carried by river snails. Understanding that the population of prawns that eat those snails had precipitously declined, Huttinger, 63, has devoted her encore career to restoring the prawn population in the SenegalRiver Basin. Projet Crevette’s mission is multifaceted: the restoration of the prawn population diminishes the spread of schisto, provides new economic opportunities to afflicted communities and heals families infected by the disease. Today, Projet Crevette is a prawn-farming microenterprise, operated by locals at public watering holes. It has brought social innovation, new microbusinesses, environmental restoration and improved health to communities. Huttinger is confident Projet Crevette will meet its bold goal to fully restore the indigenous prawn population—and improve countless lives in the process.

Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Reverend Violet Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. After 14 years as parish pastor trained in psychotherapy, Little left behind her traditional congregation to create a religious refuge for the homeless on the streets of the city, which became the “WelcomeChurch.” The church relies mostly on word of mouth, and services can pop up in a city park or on a sidewalk. No questions are asked, and everyone is welcome. The WelcomeChurch coordinates medical services through local universities, helps people get into rehab or jobs, and offers educational services to the public on the causes of homelessness. Little estimates 40 percent of her congregants have moved off the streets into permanent housing and the WelcomeChurch celebrates each and every one of them, many of whom stay connected with Little through their transition. Little’s congregation has grown to include hundreds of homeless as well as non-homeless volunteers in the EvangelicalLutheranChurch in America.

Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
An immigrant from the West Indies who built a meaningful life on meager income, Young’s gritty rise from nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. She’s encouraged thousands to stand up for their right to earn a living wage, and counsels and trains others to become leaders themselves. In 2004, Young began building a movement to legislate a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in New YorkState, which would make overtime, paid time off and rest days mandatory. In 2009, when she heard then Governor David Patterson say on the radio that he’d sign the bill if it made it to his desk, she put on a full court press, becoming the engine behind passage of the law in 2010. The law is the first of its kind in the country, but Young is committed to making sure it isn’t the last. She’s now a key player in the NDWA’s expansion from 11 to 44 affiliated organizations with 15,000 members, up from 5,000 in 2007. Young’s passion for serving her community has only just begun.

Read More About Encore’s Purpose Prize at www.encore.org/prize.

About Encore.org

Encore.org is a national nonprofit that promotes the idea that people in their second acts have the talent and experience to solve some of society’s greatest problems.

About The Atlantic Philanthropies

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. In keeping with the Giving While Living philosophy of founder Charles “Chuck” Feeney, The Atlantic Philanthropies believes in making large investments to capitalize on significant opportunities to solve urgent problems now, so they are less likely to become larger, more entrenched and more expensive challenges later. The Atlantic Philanthropies also seeks to encourage others of significant wealth to engage in major philanthropic pursuits in their lifetime.

About The John Templeton Foundation

The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, supporting research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.

About Symetra

Symetra Financial Corporation (NYSE: SYA) is a diversified financial services company based in Bellevue, Wash. In business since 1957, Symetra provides employee benefits, annuities and life insurance through a national network of benefit consultants, financial institutions, and independent agents and advisors.

 

CONTACT: Sara Ying Rounsaville, srounsaville@encore.org, 415-952-5121, or Russ Mitchell, rmitchell@encore.org, 510-969-0801

Coalition to Protect Retirement Launches Campaign to Safeguard Retirement Savings Incentives

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Nearly 9 in 10 Americans Say Retirement Savings Accounts Should be “Off Limits” As a Source of New Tax Revenue – Part of National Campaign to Raise Awareness About Benefits of Tax Deferral

WASHINGTON, Nov. 7, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Americans overwhelmingly – by a margin of 4 to 1 – oppose changing tax rules for retirement savings accounts, according to a new survey released today by the Coalition to Protect Retirement, a group of America’s leading supporters of retirement savings plans.

The research shows widespread support across political parties for maintaining the current tax treatment for retirement savings vehicles, such as 401(k) plans, 403(b) plans, and traditional IRAs.  According to the survey, which was conducted in mid-October, 87 percent of all Americans and 95 percent of those who have a tax-deferred 401(k)-like retirement plan accounts believe retirement savings should be “off limits” to Congress and not a source of new revenue for the government.

Today’s release of the survey coincides with the Coalition’s launch of a national education and advocacy campaign to preserve the current tax incentives for retirement savings.  The campaign will raise awareness about how current tax deferral rules are helping millions of Americans prepare for their own retirement, and will urge workers and their employers to tell Congress not to change or limit these incentives to save.  Visitors to the Coalition’s website www.HowAmericaSaves.com will be able to send letters to their elected officials and follow developments in Congress.

“Retirement savings incentives play an essential role in encouraging Americans to save and employers to sponsor retirement plans,” said Hank Jackson, President and CEO of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) on behalf of the Coalition.  “This isn’t just smart tax policy – it’s proven good sense.”

Tax Incentives Help Americans Save for Retirement
The current tax incentives have succeeded in helping Americans save for retirement and have increased the number of workers who are covered by retirement plans.  According to the latest available data, more than 67 million people participate in private-sector defined contribution plans alone.  All told, Americans have $20.9 trillion in assets earmarked for retirement.

All Income Levels Benefit from Retirement Plan Tax Incentives
Individuals at all income levels have benefitted from these incentives, particularly middle-income earners.  More than 70 percent of American workers who earn between $30,000 and $50,000 a year contribute to a retirement savings plan when one is offered at work.

“Given the vast numbers of baby boomers who reach retirement age every day, retirement savings incentives are needed more than ever,” said Kenneth E. Bentsen, Jr., President of the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (SIFMA).  “They are doing what they were intended to do – helping people who need them most to take responsibility for their own retirement security.”

The Coalition noted the important role employers play in helping workers prepare for retirement.  Between 2000 and 2009, employers contributed almost $3.5 trillion to public and private retirement plans.  Changes to current incentives could adversely affect employer-sponsored plans, contributions, and the retirement security of millions of Americans.

“Raising new revenue should not come at the expense of Americans’ retirement savings, not now or in the future,” said Brian Graff, CEO and Executive Director of the American Society of Pension Professionals & Actuaries (ASPPA).  “If Congress reduces the benefits of offering and contributing to retirement savings, fewer people will save.  The result: more of tomorrow’s retirees will need to turn to the government for help, and that will mean more federal spending.”

Media Availability
Representatives of the Coalition to Protect Retirement and of Juncture Strategies/ORC International will be available to answer questions and discuss the national survey on Thursday, November 7 from 1:30 – 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time. 
Call-in number:  1-800-745-6370        Passcode:  5356061

About the Coalition to Protect Retirement
The Coalition to Protect Retirement believes that Congress should encourage retirement savings for American workers through the preservation of current tax incentives.  The Coalition is composed of the following associations:  American Benefits Council, American Council of Life Insurers, American Society of Pension Professionals and Actuaries, The ERISA Industry Committee, ESOP Association, Insured Retirement Institute, Investment Company Institute, Plan Sponsor Council of America, Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association, and the Society for Human Resource Management.

The Coalition’s website www.HowAmericaSaves.com was created to raise awareness among workers, employers, policymakers, and the public about the important role that tax deferral plays in helping people plan for their own retirement security.  The site provides tools for individuals and organizations to make their views known to elected officials and to stay informed about proposals being debated in Congress.  To learn more, visit:  www.HowAmericaSaves.com.

About the Survey
Juncture Strategies/ORC International conducted a national on-line survey of 1,011 adults, 18 years of age or older, during October 14–16, 2013.  A summary of the survey results is available at: http://bit.ly/retresearch.

Contact: Bill Maroni BMaroni@howamericasaves.com / 301 802-3375

Holiday Season Is Perfect Time to “Talk Turkey” about End-of-Life Care Wishes

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Compassion & Choices Provides Tips to Families to Discuss Issue Everyone Will Face

The upcoming holiday season is the perfect time to “talk turkey over turkey” with your family about an important issue we all will face: our wishes for end-of-life care. It is the key message in the featured holiday story of the fall 2013 issue of Compassion & Choices Magazine.

Fewer than half of Americans over age 40 have completed an advance directive outlining what medical treatments they would want if they couldn’t communicate, according to a poll by the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Ironically, more than half of the Americans over 40 in the survey have already been caregivers for a sick relative or friend.

Compassion & Choices’ End-of-Life Consultation (EOLC) program has provided confidential, personal support for thousands of people over the last 20 years. People call our toll-free number (800-247-7421) specifically about end-of-life planning, such as preparation of advance directives.

“Everyone wants to die peacefully and with dignity. But it takes more than hope to achieve this end-of-life outcome,” said Compassion & Choices President Barbara Coombs Lee, who was an ER and ICU nurse and physician assistant for 25 years. “Making and communicating end-of-life plans is absolutely necessary to ensure we get the treatment we want – and to avoid treatment we don’t want. This step is especially important to prepare for a time we may be unable to speak for ourselves.”

How do families start this uncomfortable conversation? After many attempts to engage her family, one Compassion & Choices client set her Thanksgiving table with advance directive forms at every place setting and announced: “Nobody gets dinner until these are filled out.”

That tough-turkey tactic may not work for everyone. The best approach is the one that suits you and your family. While it’s important to fill out this paperwork, it’s essential is to get the conversation going.

“Talking Turkey Over Turkey” tips include:

  • “Appetizers” that could lead the way to a satisfying dialogue;
  • Four key questions your conversation should cover; and
  • Free tools you need to guide your conversation and document the results.

For more information, visit www.compassionandchoices.org/what-we-do/advance-planning, or call 800-247-7421 to speak to a Compassion & Choices’ consultant or to request information.

With over 30 local groups and 40,000 members and supporters throughout the United States, Compassion & Choices leads the end-of-life choice movement. We support, educate and advocate. Learn more at: www.compassionandchoices.org.

Contact: Sean Crowley, 202-495-8520-c, scrowley@compassionandchoices.org

Staying Safe on the Road: Senior Driving Guide

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Learn the challenges that may keep older adults off the road and find tips for staying safe behind the wheel

According to a recent study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, drivers in their mid- to late-80s have lower overall crash rates than drivers in their early 20s and roughly half as many crashes as teenagers—making them among the safest drivers on the road.

However, fatal crash rates skyrocket for drivers ages 85 and older. In “The Guide to Driving Safety for Older Drivers” from MySilverAge.com, Jake Nelson, AAA director of traffic safety advocacy and research in Washington, D.C., says it’s important to understand what health factors can compromise safe driving. If senior drivers have ongoing limitations that could put them or their passengers at risk, they may want to reconsider their capacity to continue driving.

Older drivers should evaluate how the following factors affect their driving ability:

  • Vision. How well a driver can see accounts for about 90 percent of his or her ability to drive safely. Weak visual aptitude can be measured by an inability to read signs, street markings, or to see other cars and pedestrians in low-light conditions.
  • Mobility. Loss of strength, coordination and flexibility can make it challenging to control a vehicle. Mobility difficulties may also be signaled by pain and discomfort performing daily activities as well as arthritis in the neck and shoulders.
  • Behavior. Trouble remembering familiar routes, anxiety or confusion while driving, or problems distinguishing the gas from the brake pedal are causes for immediate concern.

For a complete list of driving safety tips, including information on driver improvement courses, new driving technologies and alternate modes of transportation, download the driving guide for seniors.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

Downsizing? 4 Easy Ways to Get Rid of Unwanted Stuff

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

Use these methods from MySilverAge.com to declutter and pare down before moving into a new home.

Members of the National Association of Senior Move Managers recently reported that 98 percent of their senior clients downsized before relocating.

Downsizing before a move can be both liberating and overwhelming. But for seniors who have acquired many possessions over the years, it can be an especially daunting task. Seniors planning a move into smaller living spaces should begin the downsizing process about 90 days before moving, says Greg Gunderson, owner and president of Gentle Transitions, a senior relocation services company located in Manhattan Beach, Calif.

“The most time-consuming part is the decision-making process,” Gunderson says. But even after deciding what stays and what goes, Gunderson says one question remains:  “What’s the best way to get rid of the items I don’t want?” From donating a book collection to selling a grand piano, here are four ways to give possessions a new home.

  1. Hold an estate sale. Partner with an estate sales group that can facilitate the auction or sale of belongings at the home.
  2. Contact an auction house. Consider letting an auction house take over the sale of high-end valuables such as antique furniture, artwork or collectibles.
  3. Donate to a charity. Thinking about passing some possessions to those in need? Call the charity (for example Salvation Army, Goodwill) in advance to give them a list of the items that will be donated.
  4. Hire a paper-shredding service. Because financial, bank and private documents can contain confidential information, Gunderson says it’s important to practice caution when removing them from the home.

Downsizing can be an essential part of seniors’ transition to a new home. Another important step is finding the best housing solution to meet current and future needs. A free guide from MySilverAge.com addresses common questions about senior living and offers helpful resources to ease the transition. Find out:

  • When is the right time to move?
  • What are the available housing options?
  • Are there services to help with the moving process?

Download the full guide for all of these answers and additional senior living tips: http://www.mysilverage.com/seniorhousingguide.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

Eye Drops And Ultraviolet Light — U.S. Clinical Trial Has Potential To Dramatically Change Landscape For Patients With Keratoconus And Corneal Ectasia

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

San Leandro, California Ophthalmologist One of Few Doctors Offering Treatment in Clinical Trials  

An exciting new treatment option for patients suffering from Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia is in U.S. Clinical trials right now.  Corneal Cross-linking is a non-invasive treatment that has the potential to halt the progression of Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia, possibly saving patients from the need for corneal transplant.

Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia

Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia cause the cornea (the clear front part of the eye) to thin and become weak, to bulge and protrude outward thereby causing visual problems. Keratoconus occurs naturally, while Corneal Ectasia can occur when the cornea is weakened by LASIK or PRK procedures. Both conditions can severely compromise eyesight and may lead to legal blindness and corneal transplant surgery.

Corneal Cross-linking

The Corneal Cross-linking treatment being investigated in the clinical study is Avedro’s VibeX eye drops (Riboflavin) and KXL device (Ultraviolet light). Corneal Cross-linking may help improve vision by stabilizing the cornea and reducing astigmatism.  Traditional treatments include Rigid Gas Permeable contact lenses, corneal implants, or corneal transplant.

The study was initiated to investigate an alternative way to treat Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia in patients after LASIK and PRK.  Only a small percentage of patients who have the surgery develop the sight-threatening condition, however, it frequently leads to corneal transplant or loss of vision.

Nicholas Batra, M.D.

Dr. Nicholas Batra, Medical Director of Batra Vision Medical Group in San Leandro, California, is one of only a handful of clinical investigators nationwide enrolling patients in this study.

“As a cornea specialist, I see this therapy has the potential to dramatically change the landscape of treatment for patients with Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia. The United States is the only western industrialized nation where Corneal Cross-linking is not approved for use outside of clinical trials.”

Corneal Cross-Linking therapy is offered to patients in Mexico, Canada and Europe and other countries around the world. Dr. Batra is currently accepting US patients for the post-LASIK and Keratoconus segment of the Cross-Linking study.

Dr. Batra was awarded his Doctorate of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and completed his ophthalmology residency at the University of California, San Francisco. In addition, Dr. Batra received a fellowship from UCSF/Proctor Foundation in Cornea and Refractive surgery and a Fellowship with the prestigious Heed Foundation.

(www.batravision.com)

For media interviews contact:
Zanides Public Relations
Linda Zanides
O:   415.456.8171
M:   415.342.1648

Keepsakes, Family Heirlooms Passed Down More Effectively with New Legacy Builder Tool Chest from LegacyStories.org

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Allianz American Legacy Studies researchers asked a group of Baby Boomers and their parents to rank on a scale of 1-10 (10 being most) what was more important to them when it comes to passing down an inheritance: values and life lessons or financial assets.

Perhaps not so surprisingly, the results showed that passing down values were over seven times more important than passing down valuables.

Yet only a small fraction of these three generations has made any provisions, mostly due to lack of awareness, education and the tools to do the job properly.

In addition to values and life lessons, a lot more should be included when building and passing down a legacy. Keepsakes and awards often represent defining moments and milestone events and can become family heirlooms when the stories behind their acquisitions are documented.

Identifying people in a select group of vintage family photos is one the best ways to document personal history, as some of the people in the old photos might as well be strangers to grandchildren. Those who grew up in the 20th century were first generations to record special events and moments.

Today’s digital technology offers a chance to pass down a purposeful legacy that will survive the ravages of time, and the experts at LegacyStories.org have developed an innovative Legacy Builder Tool Chest to help.

Consisting of fourteen drawers, each “toolkit” focuses on a specific legacy topic with interactive how-to guidebooks, downloadable forms, video tutorials and lots of helpful resources.

Toolkit topics include “Life Lessons and Values“, “Keepsakes & Heirlooms”, “Vintage Legacy Photos”, and one titled “Loved Ones in Care” to help caregivers build a legacy for victims of Alzheimer’s, people in hospice care, or seniors living in assisted or skilled nursing facilities.

“Since passing down life lessons and values is the highest priority, we provide members the ‘Life Lessons and Values’ toolkit at no cost,” says Tom Cormier, co-founder of LegacyStories.org. “Membership in LegacyStories.org is also free so there are no obstacles to prevent anyone from securing an honored place in family history. They just need to take action before regretting it.”

The Legacy Builder Tool Chest is also being recommended by financial advisors, estate planners and elder law attorneys as a means to engage with their clients in a purposeful way.

Content for the individual toolkits is contributed by top legacy experts including members of The International Assoc. of StoryKeepers (I-ASK) and the Association of Personal Historians (APH).

Our goal is to help people establish themselves as “effective elders” while they are alive, and to become “awesome ancestors” when they pass on,” Cormier states. “Our grandchildren and descendants will one day have an interest in learning about their family history. Because so few people will take the time to document their personal history, those who do will live on forever as their descendants’ go-to awesome ancestor.”

Contact info:
Tom Cormier — Co-founder
Phone: 423-295-5904
Email
Website: www.legacystories.org

Read more news from LegacyStories.org

Study Shows that People Who Undergo Cataract Surgery to Correct Visual Impairment Live Longer

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Australian researchers find a 40 percent lower mortality risk among patients who had their vision corrected through the procedure  

SAN FRANCISCO – Sept. 4, 2013 – People with cataract-related vision loss who have had cataract surgery to improve their sight are living longer than those with visual impairment who chose not to have the procedure, according to an Australian cohort study published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. After comparing the two groups, the researchers found a 40 percent lower long-term mortality risk in those who had the surgery.

The research is drawn from data gathered in the Blue Mountains Eye Study, a population-based cohort study of vision and common eye diseases in an older Australian population. A total of 354 persons aged 49 years and older and diagnosed with cataract-related vision impairment –  some of whom had undergone surgery and others who had not – were assessed between 1992 and 2007. Adjustments were made for age and gender as well as a number of mortality risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, smoking, cardiovascular disease, body mass index and measures of frailty and comorbid disease. Follow-up visits took place after five and ten years since the baseline exam.

Previous research had indicated that older persons with visual impairment were likely to have greater mortality risk than their age peers with normal vision, and that cataract surgery might reduce this risk. These studies – unlike the Blue Mountains Eye Study – compared people who had undergone cataract surgery with those in the general population or with those who had not had cataract surgery, and did not link vision status to the surgical status.

“Our finding complements the previously documented associations between visual impairment and increased mortality among older persons,” said Jie Jin Wang, Ph.D., of the Westmead Millennium Institute and one of lead researchers of the study. “It suggests to ophthalmologists that correcting cataract patients’ visual impairment in their daily practice results in improved outcomes beyond that of the eye and vision, and has important impacts on general health.”

The association between correction of cataract-related visual impairment and reduced mortality risk is not clearly understood, but plausible factors may include improvements in physical and emotional well-being, optimism, greater confidence associated with independent living after vision improvement, as well as greater ability to comply with prescription medications.

Dr. Wang noted one limitation of the study is that participants with cataract-related visual impairment who did not have cataract surgery could have had other health problems that prevented them from undergoing surgery, and that these other health problems could partly explain the poorer survival among non-surgical participants. This issue is addressed by the researchers in a subsequent study.

Caused by the clouding of the lens, cataract is a leading cause of treatable visual impairment that will affect more than half of all Americans by the time they are 80 years old.[1]  Surgical removal of the opaque lens with an artificial lens implanted is a successful procedure of cataract treatment. If completing everyday tasks is difficult, cataract surgery should be discussed with an ophthalmologist − a medical doctor specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

Seniors who are seeking eye care but are concerned about cost may qualify for EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, which offers eye exams and care at no out-of-pocket cost to qualifying seniors age 65 and older. Learn more at www.eyecareamerica.org. For more information on cataracts and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology 
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons — Eye M.D.s — with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who has the education and training to treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trusted and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

About Ophthalmology
Ophthalmology, the official journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, publishes original, peer-reviewed, clinically applicable research. Topics include the results of clinical trials, new diagnostic and surgical techniques, treatment methods technology assessments, translational science reviews and editorials.

Checklist Helps Seniors Through Medicare Open Enrollment

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Older adults can follow a few simple tips to avoid uncovered expenses in the upcoming year.

With Medicare open enrollment beginning Oct. 15, now is the time to start preparing for future health care needs.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130710/CG45364LOGO-b)

Frank Nelson, program manager at the Central Coast Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program, regularly educates Medicare beneficiaries about the importance of open enrollment. He urges seniors to use this period to reevaluate their Medicare Part D coverage and make the most of their policies.

In an interview with MySilverAge.com, Nelson said many beneficiaries feel overwhelmed or have questions about their plans: “It can be a complicated maze. There are a lot of ways you can get tangled up in the nuances.” To avoid the headaches that often come with health insurance, Nelson advises seniors to:

  • Check changes to Medicare Part D. Part D plans should be specific to an individual’s medication needs. Seniors will need to make sure their prescriptions are still covered each year during open enrollment.
  • Request local pharmacy pricing. Open enrollment is a good time to check pricing of prescriptions, as each pharmacy can differ.
  • Purchase a supplemental policy. Older adults might consider Medigap to cover health care costs that aren’t already covered by Medicare.

The steps outlined in this checklist help readers successfully navigate the complexities of Medicare open enrollment and stay on top of their health care plans. Read the full checklist here: http://www.mysilverage.com/medicarechecklist.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

The Benefits of Medicare Advantage

October 31, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Dr. Amir Bacchus

The annual election period during which seniors can enroll in Medicare Advantage plans began on Oct. 15 and ends Dec. 7.  During this open enrollment period, many of Nevada’s senior citizens will assess their health care needs and weigh their options carefully to determine whether a Medicare Advantage plan is right for them.

As a physician and the chief medical officer of HealthCare Partners Medical Group, I have a great deal of knowledge and experience related to Medicare Advantage plans, and I urge seniors to make informed decisions this fall.

Medicare Advantage plans can be an excellent choice for seniors without private supplemental insurance, as many offer improved access to coordinated care and protection against high out-of-pocket expenses. Medicare Advantage is an alternative to what is known as Medicare Fee-For-Service or “original Medicare.”  Medicare Advantage plans typically provide prescription drug coverage and eliminate the need to purchase a Medigap policy. The premiums tend to be lower than you would pay by purchasing original Medicare, Part D (prescription drug coverage) and Medigap separately.

When comparing Medicare Advantage plans, it is essential to consider the costs, benefits and health care provider choices within each available plan. You should take time to learn about the “in-network” providers associated with the health insurance plan.  It is important to know whether the providers have a reputation for offering high-quality, coordinate care and if they have a large enough network to meet your health care needs.  Finally, you should also consider access to the primary care physicians, specialists and other providers you use on a regular basis under each plan. Consistency of care has numerous benefits, especially for those who feel comfortable with their current health care providers.

When considering your coverage options this fall, pick the plan that works best for you. It’s a big decision, and I hope seniors explore their options during this year’s enrollment period.

Dr. Amir Bacchus is the chief medical officer and co-founder of HealthCare Partners Medical Group.  Bacchus received his M.D. from Wayne State University School of Medicine in 1993 and is a diplomat of the American Board of Internal Medicine.

 

 

Senior Citizen Travel – Baby Boomer Adventure Made Simple by Susan Elizabeth

October 1, 2013 by · Comments Off on Senior Citizen Travel – Baby Boomer Adventure Made Simple by Susan Elizabeth
Filed under: Articles 

Expert Author Susan Elizabeth

Many people think that when they get to the age of retirement that their opportunity for adventure is over. But the baby boomer generation is an entirely different breed of retiree. They are one of the groups that has made senior citizen travel such a huge and growing ever bigger segment of the travel industry.

There are in fact, probably more travel companies now who specialize in taking older travelers on travel adventures than have ever been in existence before. Part of the reason for this is that there are so many baby boomers; and so many baby boomers who think young, act young and live young.

And part of it is because so many of the baby boomer generation have a little bit of extra money to spend on taking cool trips.

One of the growing sub segments of the travel industry, specifically in the senior travel part is genealogical travel. This is where people want to go back to the country of their family origin to see what life is like back there. Although, this kind of travel focuses on foreign destinations, there are plenty of travel opportunities in the genealogical sector that will allow you to travel to the parts of the US where your family was originally from.

Maybe this is so popular because so many baby boomers were so independently minded growing up that they moved away from their family home, and maybe just because many of the parents and grandparents of the people who are boomers came from other countries. Either way, this is a big deal in travel and if it is something you are interested in, you can easily find all sorts of travel agencies who can help you out with a genealogical travel tour to investigate your own roots.

Another kind of travel that is very popular with baby boomer folks is small group travel. Often in regular travel tours, especially the tour packages, there are as many as a hundred people in the same tour group. And if you are not on a cruise, this is way too many.

The tour companies do this to cut down on the amount of overhead they have to pay the tour guides and the hotels. You will still have to pay whatever fees they charge but you will not get the same amount of personal attention that you would in a small group tour situation. Make sure you check out the tour group size before you book your tour.

Senior citizen travel is alive and well and isn’t going anywhere. As a baby boomer traveler, you can find as many travel opportunities online as you can search for. And more just keep appearing each and every day.

Susan is a full fledged baby boomer and avid internet researcher who writes about baby boomer travel and other senior topics on her site at www.second50years.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Susan_Elizabeth

How to Take Care of a Senior Citizen in the Family – Some Do’s and Don’ts by Ruma Sen

September 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Expert Author Ruma Sen

Although the idea may sound quaint to some, having a senior citizen in your home is something unavoidable. Yes, it is burdensome. Yes, it means having frayed nerves. Yes, it means sacrificing your privacy. Yes, you should not expect any pay-back from your elderly parents…this is their time in the sun.

From the outset,let me explain, that there is no one who will understand the problems faced by the family when an elderly person is a permanent resident, unless he/she too is in a similar position. Elders grow even older, and with increasing age comes unexpected blows, in the form of health issues, visits to doctors, and mounting medical bills. Realize that no one from the extended family or even the closer family members will be there to pitch in. It’s a fact of life….no one wants to INVITE trouble!

Most articles on Senior Citizen care lay stress on the fact that it is an honourable task that you have undertaken, to look after an old person. Few go on to explain what measures you can take to avoid those inevitable moments of depression, craziness, and having the blues, whilst you’re at the job.

Being a seasoned caretaker of a permanent live-in elderly in-law for the past two decades, I can only say this: forget your Ego, forget your cravings for instant happiness and impulsive actions. Look at the long term benefits only. Do you really want to ignore an old person’s problems by staying away and pretending to have fun? In that case, you are only playing with fire. With their lack of presence of mind, the family elder may either leave the house premises, and roam unattended, or leave the gas or geyser on, leading to gravely dangerous situations.

Be kind to the elderly, even though it may raise your hackles at times. Remember, their insensitivity and memory losses are something beyond their understanding or intention. Sometimes, the elderly get violent…handle the situation appropriately. Nowadays there are n number of forums, support groups etc who cater to specific problems involved in caring for the elderly.

Here are some pointers to follow at home, in the event of having an elderly person to take care of.

 

  1. Do keep your house well-ventilated, clean and dust-free.
  2. Try keeping the bathrooms of the elderly clean and DRY, to avoid cases of slipping.
  3. Provide ample reading material and interesting things to do, customized to suit the individual.
  4. Music is a great mood elevator; keep music of their generation easily accessible, with simple to operate music systems.
  5. Constant reminders are needed for the elderly; sometimes they react negatively to such instructions. Be prepared to face bouts of anger.
  6. Keep a doctor’s number, an ambulance number handy.
  7. Inform all the people living around your house about the elderly relative you are looking after. This will help avoid situations in which you will feel flustered.
  8. Keep all medicines out of their reach, and administer medicine in your presence.
  9. Employ a part-time help at home in cases where you feel helpless.
  10. Try to involve them in family outings and fun.
  11. Make them feel respected, loved and wanted. This is an uphill task, as the next generation has no patience to communicate with the elderly.
  12. Keep all the financial support ready. This may be in the form of medical insurance, pensions, savings and other schemes. One never knows when an emergency situation requiring a sudden lumpsum of money may arise.
  13. Make them carry some form of an identity on their person if they happen to be going out for a walk, by themselves.

 

Lastly, do pay attention to their diet.

It finally does not matter whether the senior citizen you are looking after happens to be an in-law or your own parent. In both cases, remember you are dealing with aging problems, and this is not an easy task. It calls for a lot of patience on your part. And when I say Patience, I mean patience! Try not to shout and express your feelings of disgust, anger, and rage: even though these might feelings may be uppermost on your mind.

Balance your own life out by reading, meditation, having friends over, or going out for a break. A strong family bond will ensure that the stressful moments will be counterbalanced with relaxed ones. Lastly, always boost yourself up by reminding yourself that the present situation could have been worse!

This article is an original one. The contents have been garnered from various sources, online, books and real life experiences. In case the reader wishes to add any new dimension to this, I would welcome it.
http://rumasen77.wordpress.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ruma_Sen

Benefits of Cayenne For Senior Citizens’ Diets by Sharon Elrod

September 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Expert Author Sharon Elrod

Alternative and Complementary treatments are finally getting some long overdue recognition. Senior citizens have been among the groups of people lobbying for non-traditional medical treatment of disease. One of those non-traditional methodologies is the use of herbal medicine. Among the herbs getting appropriate accolades these days is Cayenne.

Most of us think of it as a hot pepper, added to soup and sauces for the tangy taste it offers. But Cayenne has healing power that is now being studied in a variety of medical centers. Aryuvedic medicine has known of its curative power for centuries. Folklore describes its healing effects on heart attacks, open wounds, pain, hemorrhaging and digestion. And now medical science is adding its official stamp on the benefits of the herb with studies focusing on the therapeutic benefit of this hot peppe.

The active component of Cayenne is capsaicin. Do an Internet search on that word alone, and you will be amazed at the results. Clinical studies on Cayenne/capsaicin have found many medicinal benefits including antioxidant activity, cytotoxic action, inhibit some cancer cell growth, alleviate oral mucositis pain, treating psoriasis and pruritus, and other benefits.

The great thing about Cayenne is its nutritional value as well as medicinal. This herb is used extensively in all kinds of culinary dishes. Seniors around the globe are beginning to add this herb to many dishes that do not call for it. The addition creates a delight for most palates! When used in combination with other herbs, it acts as a catalyst that increases the effectiveness of other herbs used in the same dishes.

The nutritional value of Cayenne comes from its very high source of Vitamins A and C, the complete B complexes, and its high levels of organic calcium and potassium, which is one of the reasons it is good for the heart.

Readers are encouraged to check further on the validity of information available on the Internet. Bibliographies offer a comprehensive resource on reports of studies. Readers are always encouraged to read the original source to avoid possible misrepresentation, even that offered in good faith. As always, this article is not intended to offer medical advice or to replace the need for all readers to consult their primary care physicians and specialists about their individual medical needs.

Article provided by Sharon Shaw Elrod. Senior Citizen Journal, Your Partner in Productive Aging, provides current and relevant information on topics of interest to seniors. Please visit my web site at http://www.seniorcitizenjournal.com/.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sharon_Elrod

5 Tips for Healthy Aging of the Eyes

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

5 Tips for Healthy Aging of the Eyes

September is Healthy Aging Month, making it an ideal time to shed some light on an important issue that impacts millions as we age – our eyesight. With around 1.75 million people in the country having age-related macular degeneration, according to the National Institutes of Health, and another 2.2 million suffering from glaucoma, vision is a crucial issue as we age. The good news is that there are things you can do in order to help your eyes age healthily.

“Healthy eyesight is one of those things that people don’t pay much attention to until there is a problem,” explains Dr. Edward Kondrot, founder of the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center. “Ideally, it’s best to take measures to avoid those problems. Many of the problems people have with their vision as they age can be avoided, and even reversed.”

Regardless of one’s age, it is never too early or too late to do things to maintain healthy eyes. Here are 5 tips for doing just that:

  1. Be proactive. Those who do nothing to protect their vision may find they have problems as they age. Just like being proactive to have a healthy heart or mind, it is important to make healthy vision a priority. This means purposely including healthy vision measures in your lifestyle.
  2. Eat healthy foods. Diet plays an important role in maintaining one’s vision. It is important to eat plenty of antioxidant-loaded fruits and vegetables. They are nutritional powerhouses that will help to protect the eyes. Also, it is crucial to opt for organic foods, so that your body does not take in all the harmful chemicals. Those chemicals provide a toxic overload, which impacts the eyes, as well as the rest of the body.
  3. Stay hydrated. Many people who have eye problems are also dehydrated. Staying hydrated is essential to maintaining good eye health. Start each morning with a full glass of room-temperature water. Drinking things like tea and coffee do not count. Add a little lemon if you prefer, which will also help to flush toxins.
  4. Watch the shades. Millions of people have taken to wearing sunglasses, but may not be choosing ones that actually protect their eyes. Worse yet, they may choose some that actually weaken them. Dark sunglasses are not necessarily a good choice, as many may believe. When selecting sunglasses be sure to opt for those that block ultraviolet A and B light to really offer your eye protection.
  5. Reduce eye stress. People stress their eyes in ways that they are not even aware of, such as sleeping in a room that has a night light, or light coming from an alarm clock or another room. Another way people stress their eyes is to watch television in a dark room. Both of these things can provide unnecessary stress that can cause damage over time.

“Healthy aging of the eyes can be done and is being done by millions,” adds Dr. Kondrot. “It comes down to being aware of what will help and harm the eyes and then taking measures to do what will benefit them in the long run.”

Dr. Kondrot is the author of three best-selling books, including “10 Essentials to Save Your Sight” (Advantage Media Group, July 2012), and president of the Arizona Homeopathic and Integrative Medical Association. He has founded the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center, located just north of Tampa, Fla., which offers alternative and homeopathic routes to vision therapies known as the “Kondrot Program.” The program focuses on such conditions as macular degeneration, glaucoma, dry eye, cataracts, and others. His advanced programs have helped people from around the world restore their vision. The center sits on 50 acres of land and features a 14,000-square-foot state-of-the art complex, an organic ranch, jogging trails, swimming pool, hot tub, and more. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

About Health The Eye & Wellness Center

The Healing The Eye & Wellness Center is located 30 miles north of Tampa, in Dade City, Fla. Founded by Dr. Edward Kondrot, the Center offers world-class alternative therapies for vision conditions, including color and vision therapy, the treatment of glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration, dry eye, and more. The center also offers a variety of seminars, webinars, and training sessions for others in the medical community. Dr. Kondrot is the world’s only board-certified ophthalmologist and board-certified homeopathic physician. He is also author of three best-selling books in the field. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

“Aging in Place” is the focus of a multi-platform report by the PBS NEWSHOUR

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

“Aging in Place” is the focus of a multi-platform report by the PBS NEWSHOUR

Report is the latest in TAKING CARE: a 6-part series the challenges of long-term care

 NewsHour Online offers tips for seniors, profiles a pilot program in Baltimore, and shares personal stories

As Americans live longer, more-productive lives, many seniors are seeking ways to “Age in Place” – to grow old in their own homes rather than move in with family or to traditional retirement facilities.  As part of its ongoing reporting on the challenges of aging and long-term care, Ray Suarez reports from Boston on a non-profit membership organization that helps seniors grow old in their own homes.  The broadcast report airs Thursday, August 08, 2013 on the PBS NEWSHOUR (check local listings.)

The group, Beacon Hill Village, was founded by Susan McWhinney-Morse and 10 of her friends and neighbors who wanted to find a way to grow old in their homes without having to depend on their children for help.  For an annual membership fee, the group offers transportation, social events, and other low-cost services for seniors. The organization has become a model for the nation – there are now over 100 villages across the country and over 200 in development.

Produced with support from The SCAN Foundation, the report is the second in TAKING CARE: a 6-part series on long-term care that will continue throughout the year with reports that show the magnitude of the problem, the challenges faced by individuals and governments, and some of the models for change being tested.

PBS NEWSHOUR’s reporting on “Aging in Place” continues online:

  • 7 simple repairs to help seniors safely age in place  and an opportunity to share your own tips;
  • a “quilt” of photos and anecdotes of living alone, submitted by seniors and their relatives;
  •  an extended interview with one of the founders of Beacon Hill Village;
  • And on Friday –a video showing the work of CAPABLE, a Johns Hopkins-run, Baltimore-located organization that fixes up homes to increase mobility and function.

The SCAN Foundation is an independent, non-profit public charity devoted to advancing a world where all of us can age with dignity, independence, and choice.

PBS NEWSHOUR is seen by over 5 million weekly viewers and is also available online, via public radio in select markets and via podcast. The program is produced with WETA Washington, D.C., and in association with WNET.org in New York. Major corporate funding for the PBS NEWSHOUR is provided by BAE Systems and BNSF Railway with additional support from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and public television viewers. www.pbs.org/newshour

Columbus Travel Insurance For Senior Citizens by Lee Jacksonlee

September 4, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

perfect-travel-insurance-product

Majority of the senior citizens nowadays opt for insurance whenever they plan for any trips, especially when traveling abroad. It does not matter whether they are experienced travelers or have been waiting for the journey of a lifetime, they would still want to have a safe and enjoyable trip. Moreover, senior citizens and the rest of the people would like to travel with a peaceful mind, knowing that any misfortunes along the way would be well taken care of with minimum distractions.

As a matter of fact, most senior citizens are covered with health insurance at home. So it makes it even more sensible to be safely protected with travel insurance while they are away from home. Where health is concerned, irregardless of how fit and healthy you are, you cannot afford to take the risk of not being insured. The reason being, in the event of any sicknesses or accidents, the medical expenses incurred will be very costly, especially if require hospitalization.

Depending on your destination, less developed countries with unfamiliar and perhaps unhygienic food may be hazardous to health, what more with poor quality drinking water…! The climate may also be another factor contributing to health problems, especially when there is a drastic change in temperature. Besides the issue of health, there are other types of mishaps too, such as flight cancellation, lost luggage or personal belongings, delayed flights, thefts and even accidents.

There are many insurance agencies available online with competitive prices. Some rates provided are more lucrative and affordable than the others so it is wise to scout around for better deals. In fact, there is a variety of comprehensive coverage specially catered to meet the requirements and demands of consumers, namely backpacker and adventure travel insurance, pre-existing medical insurance, business insurance, single and group insurance.

Generally, a customer oriented company will pride themselves on providing quick, efficient and hassle-free service. So go ahead and enjoy your golden years by seeing the world. Travel extensively but do it only under the protection of insurance. Ensure to obtain an adequate coverage to give you and your loved ones peace of mind. Then you can “stop worrying about the potholes in the road and celebrate the journey”… as quoted by Fitzhugh Mullan.

So if your parents want enjoy their vocation with good memories, seek travel insurance from Columbus travel insurance. By doing so, you are not just securing your trip from any unforeseen events but also for a surely wonderful vacation with affordable best travel insurance

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lee_Jacksonlee

Life Insurance Schemes Aimed At Senior Citizens by Bobby E Richardson

August 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Expert Author Bobby E Richardson

I remember reading a news post once about a man in Florida that was arrested in a Life Insurance scam. It had been estimated that he had stolen millions in Life Insurance money from our senior citizens. Just thinking about the story infuriates me, and inspired me to give a few pointers out to seniors considering the purchase of a policy.

One of the craziest facts about the story aside from the stolen money is that he worked in a large financial group. I know that a scam can happen in any business structure but I was expecting it to be a door to door insurance salesman. When I say that, it’s not to take shots at those type of salesman; I used to be one, but those were my expectations.

First let’s take a look at a few of the reasons why seniors would need Life Insurance, and then how they can make sure they don’t get taken advantage of from a few idiots who call themselves salesmen.

There are several factors that could bring about concerns for seniors to leave money behind to loved ones.It is a way for them to cover final expenses for a proper burial and not leave the responsibility to loved ones, they can leave a lump sum of money to heirs that will be tax-free upon receipt, they could be raising grand babies that will need financial assistance, or it could be to just make sure money is in place to cover excess debts if they were to suddenly pass on.

The only drawback to getting Life Insurance as a senior is that finding a low costing policy is not impossible but it can be difficult.The best thing you can do is see if a trusted family member or friend knows an insurance agent or you can spend some time reading to learn about life insurance yourself.Then, go to a few websites or call around to shop to some of the agencies.

There are a few companies that will not allow seniors to purchase a term policy. With those companies the cut off age is usually about 65 and up. With the companies that do allow it, it will be more expensive.

9 times out of 10 seniors will be required to accept a whole life policy. Seniors should keep in mind that in order for them to pay off a whole life policy, the contract has to be maintained for 10 years.This time commitment does vary with a few of the insurance companies.

Here is a few question seniors should ask when considering a Life Insurance policy:

Does the company require a medical exam?

Are monthly premiums locked in for the life of the policy or will they increase with time?

Can I continually renew the policy for the life of the contract?

What are the specific renewal requirements?

Can the monthly premiums be waived in the event of disability or injury that limits my income?

When will the beneficiary receive the death benefit? (Some policies require the insured to be alive for 3 years before the beneficiaries received the face amount. If the insured dies earlier than the requirement, they will receive all of the premiums paid into the policy plus 10% interest, which is still better than putting the money into a bank account that wouldn’t give as much interest.)

Seniors just need to make they plan and effectively select a good policy, to give themselves that peace of mind in knowing that their loved ones will be protected financially in the event of their death. It’s sick to know that there are scam artist out there that will take advantage of those good intentions. But I do want to point out the fact that there are many good insurance brokers who will sincerely help people with finding the best policy to fit their families needs and more importantly their budget.

It is my pleasure to help Americans enjoy their retirement years with financial security. I care about providing products that protect you and your family. I am committed to ensuring peace of mind for your retirement future. My commitment to unsurpassed service and strong contract owner benefits has allowed me to experience consistent growth within my industry. I’m the one to offer you diverse financial planning choices for your retirement dollars.

We represent over a dozen of the nation’s top rated life insurance and annuity providers. We’ll provide you with information and pricing on every service available at your location and let you choose. No more high-pressure, heavily biased sales pitches from pushy insurance salespeople.

Life’s Protection

Bobby E Richardson

Phone: (386) 308-9626

Fax: (407) 210-1602

bobby.richardson@lifesprotection.com

[http://www.lifesprotection.com]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Bobby_E_Richardson

A Comprehensive Look At Senior Citizens Travel by Bruce A. Hoover

August 22, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Expert Author Bruce A. Hoover

Travel is becoming popular among many groups of people. Children are traveling more with their parents, teens are traveling more in groups and people who thought they could not afford to travel are traveling more now because of the availability of so many deals! Senior citizens travel too and today, they are traveling more than ever!

In the past, only seniors who had a substantial retirement savings were able to travel. Today, there are so many deals and opportunities for cheap, quality travel that anyone, including seniors on a budget can see the world without going broke!

Some destinations are cheaper than others such as the Caribbean, Mexico and some countries in Europe. Of course, there are many places to see in your own backyard and The United States and Canada are no exception where deals are concerned. Just like there are cheaper destinations, there are also cheaper methods of travel. Cruising is a great way to see many different parts of the world at a low price and all-inclusive Caribbean vacations are great deals as well.

If you are a senior looking for a great travel deal, there are many things you can do to maximize your chances of finding the best deal. First, ask around. You never know what you might find out from friends and family members who have traveled recently. Do a thorough internet search and sign up for travel deal newsletters that allow you to be among the first to find out about deals. Start looking for your trip and book your trip as early as possible in order to get the best savings.

If you put the proper amount of time and effort into your search, you will have no problem the right vacation for you at the right price and next thing you know, you will be on your way to relax and have some fun in a place you have always wanted to see!

Next, now that you understand how you can get inexpensive senior citizens travel will you take advantage of it?

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Bruce_A._Hoover

A Senior Citizen In Juvenile Hall by Eva Fry

August 9, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

10444547-large

It was my first time speaking at Juvenile Hall, I was terrified! I had seen enough movies to know I didn’t want to be there. As I hurried through the metal detectors, and pushed through the big metal doors, my heart was pounding and I was filled with fear. I wondered if I would get out of this place alive.

I passed the holding tanks, rooms with big windows containing kids who had just been arrested. In there were kids pacing, fighting addictions, fearfully waiting to be assigned to a unit. Some kids were right at home. They knew this place! They had been there before.

When I stepped into the inner sanctum I heard sounds that confirmed my fears. Angry kids were screaming, using profane language. I heard loud pounding on the doors, which dotted the narrow hallways. Juvenile inmates were communicating through the thick cement walls. As I scurried along, I saw empty eyes piercing out at me through the small, eye level windows of their rooms. I passed through more metal doors and hallways, until I came to the unit I was to speak in. Inside sat fifty young men, of all nationalities. I knew from their varying hair color. Their backs were toward me. They were juveniles from the age of 15 to 17.

As I slowly walked to the front of the room, I made sure there was a guard on either side, in case one of them grabbed me. I took a deep breath and turned toward them. My heart stopped! I was shocked! They were just kids! I expected them to look like criminals, but they looked like they could be one of my nine grandkids.

Although some did appear tough, and others rough, there was something about them that touched me. At that moment, my life changed! A still small voice inside me said, “you must try to help them!”

Thus began my continuing, nine-year mission, to help kids who are in trouble with the law. These are my kids. “The Forgotten Kid.” The children we think we can lock up, throw away the key, and forget. The ones who learned most of the bad things they have done, from us, the older generation. They are kids, paying the price for the sins of society. Our scapegoats

There are up to 600 kids locked up, in this facility, at any time. The Hall houses kids from the age of 10 to 18, although I saw a nine-year and ten-year-old carrying blankets and pillows. Were they going camping?
No! They were headed to their rooms, to be locked up, for armed robbery.

BE A WINNER IN LIFE IS MY PROGRAM. I help the kids believe they can still be WINNERS. I teach them they have potential to do amazing things with their life. In fact, I believe God sent them to this earth to do good with their lives. I tell them each one is a genius, in their own way, and can do something better than anyone else can do. They must find their genius. They must go to school, obey the law, obey their parents, be honest and work hard. My goal is to share with them the same truths I taught my kids: the basic truths of right and wrong.

I hope to support the parents who are good parents, but their kids got on the wrong track. I try to teach the ones with bad parents, or no parents, values they were never taught: basic principals of good and bad.

How did I start speaking at Juvenile Hall? It began a long time ago, when I was a little girl, the daughter of an alcoholic father who emotionally damaged my mother and us kids. I grew up in circumstances similar to some of these young wards.

I speak to them because I would have loved to have had someone, who cared, talk to me when I was young.

Some of these kids, like me, are the off spring of parents who didn’t care how their actions affected their kids. We were from homes full of contention caused by parents with addictions. Sick parents who were unable to control their own lives, let alone parent a child. So-called parents, who lived in their own hell and created havoc in the lives of their children. Parents who abandoned their kids.

When I talk to the kids, I relate to the ones who hope to fix their parents, and those who must care for their siblings. I relate because I remember pouring my Dad’s alcohol down the drain, thinking it would fix our problems but instead, I got myself into lots of trouble. I remember taking money from my Dad’s pocket, after he passed out, to give to my Mom. Money for food.

I remember the day I realized that whatever I did at home would change nothing. I would never have the loving family I longed for. Like many of these kids, I turned to friends for the family I needed. Like them, they were usually the wrong kids of friends, peers who were doing bad things. I remember drinking alcohol, even though I hated it, so I could fit in.

I hear my same story, over and over again, at Juvenile Hall.

To help them I share a profound truth, which I discovered in my young life. “Bad things happen for a reason!”

My bad thing: after a wasted life, at the age of 57, my Dad died an alcoholic. His drink of choice was 100% over proof rum. The good thing: My Dad’s death led to me realize I didn’t want to end up like him, or give my kids the life he gave me. I eventually made a commitment to stop drinking and change my life. Thankfully I was young and not an alcoholic, like my Father and Grandfather.

My commitment worked! I share with them how wonderfully my life has turned out, because of one small choice. I used my Dad’s mistakes to choose a better life for myself. I now have the life I dreamed about. My husband and I have been happily married for 45 years and with our children and grandchildren, are a close knit, happy, non-drinking family.

I tell them, “you can turn the bad things which have happened in your life into motivation for a better life too.” I help them believe they still have time to change.

Another reason I speak at Juvenile Hall is because I was a victim of a drunk driver. At the age of 17, the car I was riding in was hit head-on by a drunk driver. My head went through the windshield. My nose and part of my ear was torn off. Thankfully doctors put me back together, but I came to realize the terrible carnage alcohol could cause. I’ve had a mission all my life to teach the evils of alcohol use. I was a speaker for Mother’s Against Drunk Driving for several years. In fact, they were the ones who first sent me to speak at Juvenile Hall.

I teach the kids to abstain from alcohol and drugs. I have commitment cards, which I encourage them to sign and honor. I know if I can help them make a commitment not to drink alcohol, or use drugs; they will have a better chance at changing their lives and reaching their potential. They don’t need alcohol or drugs in their life. Most of the kids are locked up because of their first drink of alcohol, which lead to drug use and criminal behavior.

One of the questions people always ask me is “what is it like to talk to young criminals? Do they listen to you?”

My answer is, “at first it took a little time to know what to say and how to say it, so they would accept me. It took me time to overcome my fear of knowing how to communicate with them and have them accept me.”

One night, one of them asked, “why do you come to Juvenile Hall?” I answered, “why do you think?” His response, “for the money!” I replied, “no one pays me, in fact the first time I spoke, someone stole the hub caps from my car.” His mouth fell open and then he really listened to my program.

I’m happy to say I do very well with them! The kids are very attentive. They know I care. I don’t judge them. In most cases, I don’t know what their crime is. I don’t want to know. I tell them that what they have done is wrong and they must pay the price. On the other hand, I hope to stop them from getting deeper into crime. If I can stop them from hurting someone in the future, I feel my time is worthwhile.

I know I won’t get through to all of them, but I hope to plant seeds, which may take root someday when they have choices to make. My dream is to save as many as I can.

It is very gratifying when I feel I have gotten through to them and when they thank me. One boy said. “You told me bad things happen for a reason. Your right!” I never would have gotten an education if I hadn’t come to Juvenile Hall. I just got my GED. I applied to a college and was accepted. I will be going to school to be come an engineer when I get out.”

I am happy when I feel I have helped them look at life in a more positive way.

I try to help them turn their mistakes and bad experiences into something good. My greatest success is that I encourage the kids at Juvenile Hall to write letters to save other kids from the consequences they are experiencing. They have written incredible letters. Their letters have great impact on other kids because they come from their peers. My latest book “Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids contain the letters.

Here are inserts from some of the letters:

Addiction controlled my life. Don’t let it control you! I wish for all you guys to be safe, and I pray for you kids that don’t know what life is really about, because after that second when you make the bad decision, it goes down hill from there. Only you can change your future. I hope you all understand that there’s a number in prison with your name on it, if you don’t change. Now’s the time to change. Not later. Not when you get out, but now! If you don’t change now you never will.

Gang banging was my worst thing I ever gotten into. If I could take it back, I would. I repeated my Dad’s cycle.

Now I sit here in a one-room cell, facing 25 years to life. I want you to look around and see what kind of situation you’re in. Open you eyes and your minds and soak as much education as you can. I’m 17 years old in a couple of weeks. I will be graduating from high school (in Juvenile Hall). Education is the key to life.

I’m in the Hall, Unit 800. Why? Because I committed a sin while I was on drugs. At the age of 13, I started using drugs because my best friend was asking me to try some. At the age of 16, my charges are DUI, evading a peace officer, driving at an unsafe speed with no license, a firearm in the car and 187 murder.

All the violence that is going on in our community is not solving nothing. The only thing it’s doing is killing us off, one by one. Before you know it the human race will be extinct. Because we are the last of the dying breed. I’m only telling you this so you guys can make the right decision. Your homies probably say they are down for you, but they be faking, and that’s real. The only people that’s going to stick by you is your mama and your family. I seen too much in my life young homies and it’s not what you are thinking. I lost my little homie and that really hit me. All that was on my mind was retaliation but when I thought about it, I knew it wouldn’t bring him back so I thought of another game plan. I prayed!

Eva, I want to thank you for all the help that you have given me. All the little words you’ve spoken in your groups have helped me so much along the way. I have changed in ways that people wouldn’t believe. I have done a whole 360. Without the help of you, I see the change being 100% more difficult. I wish my family was around to see my new life.

As you can see, my experience with my kids, at Juvenile Hall, has been emotionally rewarding and very satisfying to me. These kids give my life meaning. I feel I am making a difference.

I continue to try to help kids. I have written a book called “BE A WINNER IN LIFE”, which I hope to get into the hands of every child in Juvenile Hall’s, all over the country. Also, I want to get it into the hands of parents. I hope to get to kids before they are locked up.

Yes I’m a grateful to be a senior citizen at Juvenile Hall! I’m grateful my senior years have value and that I am doing something with my time, which is worthwhile.

I now know that every senior citizen can use the wisdom they have gained throughout their life to make a difference. We can all do something. I encourage you to find a way to help a child. Our kids need you!

Eva Fry is an author, singer/songwriter and motivational speaker. She had a ten year volunteer program at Juvenile Hall called “Be a Winner in Life” She has three books “You Must Have a Dream” for seniors, “Be a Winner in Life” for kids, troubled kids and their parents, and Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids” – for all kinds, especially those who are locked up and to help kids from being locked up. She started writing and songwriting at the age of 60. Her goal is to encourage seniors to reach their potential and help kids do the same. She has many free articles on her web site to help young and old. She has six CD’s which are spiritually based and inspire young and old. She is avilable as a speaker or performer. Her work is available on her web site Eva Fry – eva@evafry.com http://www.evafry.com ( She has many free articles on her web site)

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eva_Fry

Senior Citizen Assisted Living Can Help Baby Boomers Keep Their Independence by Susan Elizabeth

August 2, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Elderly-Couple-Walks-Retirement

Reaching your golden years is a great accomplishment. It is in fact one of the best things about living in the times that we do. There are so many opportunities and activities available now that did not exist previously, that it is almost impossible to take advantage of them all.

Senior citizen assisted living is one of those ideas that has come of age in a time when there are more people than ever who are retiring. The baby boomer group is the largest demographic group on the planet and many of them are reaching retirement age right now.

This has created a need for all manners of senior retirement arrangements that range all the way from complete and total care, kind of like the nursing homes used to be, through senior assisted living facilities which help seniors maintain all the independence they can for as long as is possible, to active adult retirement communities where often the primary focus is one golf or some other sport.

This range of choices is absolutely unprecedented in our society. Not only that, but with the touch of a few buttons on the computer keyboard, the internet springs to life and brings you tons of information about all these various living arrangements so you can decide exactly what kind of facility you need.

Assisted living facilities do a great job of tailoring specific service plans for their residents. This means that each person gets the care they need on an individual planned out basis. The goal is to not change the senior person’s lifetime of habits or lifestyle but still make it possible for them to receive the care they need to live a great and fulfilling life.

There are many of these facilities in many locations and each of them is a little different in what they have to offer their residents. The types and levels of services offered can be quite different one state to another, and because the industry is overseen more by the individual states rather than the federal government, it is important to make sure that the kind of care you need is available in an assisted living facility in the state that you are thinking of living in.

It is not that any of the care is worse in some states than in others, it’s just that the laws and regulations are a bit different. But as fare as getting the help you might need when you are living in a senior citizen assisted living community, all of them deliver exactly what you need. And not more than you need.

The goal is always is keep the most amount of independence possible and in the retirement community world, the assisted living facilities do the best job overall of juggling between providing care and maintaining independence.

Susan is a full fledged baby boomer and avid internet researcher who writes about active retirement communities and other baby boomer topics on her site at www.second50years.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Susan_Elizabeth

NEW Barbershop Chorus Hits the Stage Running

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

NEW Barbershop Chorus Hits the Stage Running

The Silver Statesmen barbershop chorus, only six months old, is already making a name for itself.
With Jim Halvorson at the helm as our new director, the chorus has met competition head-on in Ontario, CA where they were awarded Plateau A Chorus Champion in their division. They will compete in October in Bakersfield, CA, where the Far Western District competition gets stiffer with choruses from Arizona, Nevada, Southern Utah, California, and Hawaii.
With nearly 80 men on the roster, the Silver Statesmen will be performing locally at four different venues to celebrate the 75th anniversary of their parent organization, the Barbershop Harmony Society.

The show, “Celebrate Harmony”, will be at these locations:

■ Friday, August 2, 7pm, Sun City Anthem – Freedom Hall, 1815 Hovenweep St., Henderson
■ Saturday, August 10, 7pm, Sun City Summerlin – Starbright Theater, 2215 Thomas Ryan Blvd., Las Vegas
■ Sunday, August 11, 2pm, Winchester Cultural Center, 3130 McLeod Dr., Las Vegas
■ Saturday, October 5, 2pm, Desert Spring United Methodist Church, 120 N. Pavilion Center Dr., Las Vegas

The Silver Statesmen chorus is Nevada’s largest men’s a cappella group. It is an award-winning, all volunteer chorus known for its thrilling, close harmonies and commitment to musical excellence.

The chorus is chartered as the Las Vegas Chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society. Proud to perform and preserve the unique sound of “barbershop” harmony, the chorus also sings a broad repertoire of other musical styles.
The chorus provides singing, music and performance education opportunities, as well as Youth In Harmony programs in communities within the Las Vegas Valley and throughout Southern Nevada. The chorus, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit educational organization, is self-sustaining through gifts, performance fees, admission to shows, and other fundraising activities.

The Silver Statesmen invites men of all ages to join. The chorus rehearses at 7pm each Thursday, at Christ the King Community Church, 4925 S. Torrey Pines Dr., Las Vegas, NV 89118. For more information, visit www.silverstatesmen.com

SilverStatesmen Ontario CA 5-11-13 (1)

RENOWN HEALTH WELCOMES 71 NURSE GRADUATES

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

RENO, Nev. (July 5, 2013) – Renown Health is excited to welcome 100 new
employees, including 71 local registered nurse (RN) graduates, several
experienced RNs, and 20 more employees in front-line patient care and other
roles. The new hires will meet for their first day of orientation at Renown
Regional Medical Center on Monday, July 8.

“We are pleased that so many of the area’s graduates choose Renown as the
place to build their career. Renown nurses and other healthcare
professionals have a tremendous opportunity to develop skills in multiple
areas. The Renown Health network includes three acute care hospitals, a
rehabilitation hospital, a skilled nursing facility and a large physician
practice,” said Michelle Sanchez-Bickley, Vice President Human Resources.
“With the wide range of clinical services we offer at Renown, employees have
a wealth of options to explore.”

As a private employer, Renown has developed programs to train healthcare
professionals and works closely with the university and community colleges
to offer residencies, clinical rotations, mentoring programs and local
faculty. The newly graduated RNs will participate in Renown’s nurse training
programs, which provide clinical support, education and mentoring. According
to Sanchez-Bickley, “Our residency and preceptorship programs are extremely
beneficial for new nurses they transition from the classroom to the
bedside.”

Renown is the region’s largest private employer and according to a recent
report from the Center for Regional Studies at University of Nevada, Reno,
the healthcare sector is a chief driver of western Nevada job growth. In
fact, healthcare employment grew by 9.6 percent over the past five years
while other sectors experienced a decline in jobs.

“We are committed to hiring, developing and retaining local employees,” said
Sanchez-Bickley. “To have a recruitment class of this size is very exciting
for Renown, and I hope for the new employees as well.” In total, Renown
employs 5,200 people and more than 1,400 of those are RNs.

Renown is a strong supporter of regional nursing programs, partnering with
the University of Nevada, Reno Orvis School of Nursing, Truckee Meadows
Community College, Western Nevada College and Carrington College. “Through
these partnerships,” said Sanchez-Bickley, “we are able to strengthen our
community ties, helping to provide education and support to individuals who
are looking to enter into the healthcare industry.”

# # # #

About Renown Health
Renown Health is Reno’s only locally owned, not–for–profit integrated
healthcare network. As the region’s largest private employer with a
workforce of more than 5,000 members, Renown provides more services than all
other local healthcare networks combined. It is comprised of three acute
care hospitals, a rehabilitation hospital, a skilled nursing facility, the
largest medical group and urgent care network and the region’s largest and
only locally owned not-for-profit insurance company, Hometown Health. Renown
also carries a long tradition of being the first in the region to
successfully perform the most advanced procedures.

Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center
recently achieved the Pathway to Excellence® designation, becoming the first
and only hospital in Nevada to receive this designation by the American
Nurses Credentialing Center. As a Pathway to Excellence designated
organization, Renown is committed to nurses’ satisfaction.

Caring.com’s New Referral Program Supported by Leading Assisted Living Operators

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Caring.com’s New Referral Program Supported by Leading Assisted Living Operators

Caring.com Named Preferred Provider by Assisted Living Federation of America (ALFA)

SAN MATEO, Calif., May 6, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — A group of the nation’s largest senior living providers — including Brookdale Senior Living (NYSE: BKD), Emeritus Senior Living (NYSE: ESC), Benchmark Senior Living, and Senior Star — have chosen Caring.com as their agency of record for national buying of Internet leads for families looking for housing and care for their elderly loved ones. Separately, the Assisted Living Federation of America (ALFA) named Caring.com as its preferred partner for Internet marketing services.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20070921/AQF020LOGO)

With surging demand in the U.S. senior housing market, more Americans than ever before are turning to the Internet and online word of mouth to find and select the best senior living providers for their senior loved ones. About 30-50% of the senior living industry’s leads are coming from the Internet and that number is expected to rise, as tech adoption among baby boomers and seniors alike continues to increase. Whether seeking independent livingassisted living, or memory care, about two million consumers every month turn to Caring.com to find expert guidance about their options, research local providers, and get help in making well-informed selection decisions.

The country’s top senior living providers have chosen Caring.com to increase visibility of their senior living communities, optimize inquiry-to-visit rates, and leverage Caring.com’s resources to better nurture leads from the moment the search begins, through the research and decision-making phases, all the way to community selection and move-in.

In Q4-2012, Caring.com expanded its service offering with the launch of a new toll-free referral help line. Available seven days a week to those seeking senior housing, Caring.com’s family advisors explain different types of senior living options, help identify local senior communities matched to the prospective resident’s needs and preferences, schedule tours, share and encourage consumer reviews, and answer a range of senior living questions. With this added consumer support infrastructure, as well as other new and expanded capabilities for lead qualification and nurturing, the group of senior living community partners announced Caring.com as the agency of record for lead qualification and development, starting January 1. The help line is now referring nearly four thousand prospective residents per week.

“Caring.com has been great to work with as they’ve added the referral model to their business,” said Jayne Sallerson, executive vice president of sales and marketing at Emeritus Senior Living. “Emeritus wanted to consolidate our Internet lead buying with a company we could trust, and Caring.com has demonstrated their commitment to consumers, to us, and to the industry. Their new program is showing positive signs of increased tours and conversions.”

“Caring.com has proven themselves to be a strong partner for Brookdale,” said Jim Pusateri, senior vice president of sales at Brookdale Senior Living. “Working with fewer Internet lead sources has improved our operational efficiencies, lowered our marketing costs, and improved consumers’ experience with Brookdale Senior Living.”

Separately, ALFA, the largest national association of providers of professionally managed communities for seniors, signed Caring.com as its preferred provider for Web-based lead services as well as to power the organization’s new ALFA Senior Living Community Directory.

“Caring.com is our preferred provider of Web-based services because they are an exceptional online resource,” said Richard P. Grimes, president and CEO of ALFA, which is the largest national association exclusively dedicated to professionally managed, consumer-driven senior living communities. “Caring.com’s high-quality content, easy-to-use directory, and online reviews help prospective residents and their families find the right solutions for their needs — this is good for consumers and good for senior living.”

“From the beginning, we’ve focused on building the most comprehensive and most credible online resource to help those caring for a senior parent, spouse, or other loved one,” says Andy Cohen, co-founder and CEO of Caring.com. “Unlike some other Internet resources that will only share information about those providers who pay them, we’ve stayed true to our social mission and help connect consumers to a variety of quality resources for their needs. Working with ALFA and the leading senior living communities helps enable our ability to best serve those in need of senior care — and we continue to offer referral to free and low-cost support resources as well.”

More information for senior living providers interested in partnering with Caring.com is available here: http://providerinfo.caring.com/ProviderGetListed.html Consumers can begin their search for senior housing here: http://www.caring.com/local

About Caring.com
Caring.com is the leading website for family caregivers seeking information and support as they care for aging parents, spouses, and other loved ones. Caring.com provides helpful caregiving content,online support groups, and the most comprehensive Senior Care Directory in the United States, with 35,000 consumer ratings and reviews and a toll-free senior living referral line (1-866-824-8174). In January 2012, Caring.com launched the Caring Stars award program recognizing America’s best assisted living communities based on consumer reviews. This year, 383 communities in 40 states were named the Caring Stars of 2013. Based in San Mateo, California, Caring.com is a private company funded by DCM, Intel Capital, Shasta Ventures, and Split Rock Partners. Connect with Caring.com onFacebookTwitterGoogle+, PinterestLinkedIn and/or YouTube.

CONTACT: PR@caring.com, 650-762-8190

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

At a time when thousands of Baby Boomers are reaching the age of 65 every day, the issues of senior rights, elder laws, and anti-ageism have never been more important, more volatile, or more questioned. After all, this is the generation that was ready to take down the establishment fifty years ago, and they haven’t lost any of their desire to change the world for the better. And, they have the numbers to do it. Here are our 100 top blogs for seniors dealing with senior rights, law & policy, and anti-ageism.

Boomers Against The Law

  1. Elder Law Plus: lawyer Evan H. Farr blogs about topics concerning elder law, including probate strategies and parental care.
  2. Michigan Elder Law Blog: the attorneys at Barsch & Joswick provide seniors and their loved ones with sage advice on a variety of Elder law issues.
  3. Everything Elder Law: Evan Farr is back at it again, this time focusing on Elder Law news, concepts, and innovations from around the country.
  4. Massachusetts Estate and Elder Law Blog: lawyer and blogger Stephanie Konarski gives tips on estate planning and other elder law topics.
  5. New York Elder Law Attorney Blog: your source for elder law news and comment in New York, this blog analyzes nursing home legislation and elder care costs.
  6. Elder Law Prof. Blog: Elder Law professor Kim Dayton authors a really nice blog that covers a wide range of Elder law issues, from Supreme Court cases to seminars.
  7. The Pop Tort: can a consumer advocates blog dealing with civil justice be cute? This blog proves it can, complete with an adorable “Pop Tort” logo, even while exploring such issues as Medicare and Medicaid lawsuits, nursing home scams, and medical malpractice against the elderly, among other legal issues.
  8. Supportive Senior Solutions: this blog from a geriatric care management practice in New York covers issues related to geriatric care, caregiving, and healthcare laws for the elderly and infirm.
  9. Aging Beats the Alternative: elder care specialist Lorie Ebers uses her blog to talk about overcoming the challenges of aging, caring for aging parents, and the less talked about side of elder law: Boomer divorce.
  10. Elder Law Blog: lawyer Ronald C. Morton’s elder law blog is full of sage advice for seniors looking how to tap into Veteran’s benefits, how to plan for their golden years, and more.
  11. The Best Elder Law Blog: published by the attorneys at Lamson & Cutner, this blog discusses elder law cases, the Affordable Care Act, and same-sex marriage.
  12. Elder Law Tips and News: the lawyers at Cooper, Adel & Associates bring you posts on living trusts, aging issues, and general estate planning.
  13. The Connecticut Elder Law Blog: lawyer Michael Keenan provides his readers with estate planning tips, elder fraud, and Medicare rules.
  14. The Teddy Bear Lawyers: attorney Rick Law gives readers a great resource for Elder Law in the Chicagoland area. Find articles on protecting vulnerable seniors and financial planning.
  15. Oregon Elder Law: attorney Orrin Onken blogs on elder law, estate planning, and probate proceedings in plain, easy to understand language.
  16. Florida Elder Law and Estate Blog: this informative blog includes great articles on VA benefits, estate planning, and trusts.
  17. Golden Law Center: written by attorney Sasha Golden, the Golden Law Center blog discusses elder law, special needs planning, guardianship, wills and trusts, and estate administration.
  18. Kraft Elder Law: attorney Robert Kraft blogs about Medicaid, Medicare, wills, trusts, probate, veterans benefits, and other elder law topics.
  19. Pennsylvania Law Blog: this elder law blog by the attorneys at the law offices of Shober & Rock discusses Medicaid, taxes, Veterans, banks, and annuities.
  20. Long Beach Elder Law Blog: this blog focuses on elder abuse, estate protection, the Cal MediConnect program, and reform of health law.
  21. Houston Elder Law Blog: the folks at Wright Abshire Attorneys blog about care planning, estate planning, Medicaid Planning, Probate & Estate Administration, and and Veteran’s Benefits.
  22. Hauptman Law Blog: readers of this blog can learn more about elder, estate, and special needs law. Includes articles on the Medicare Settlement and VA Aid.
  23. Fulkerson Elder Law Blog: the function of this elder law blog is for the firm to respond to common questions clients have about elder law and review developments in the law impacting elder law and estate planning.
  24. CMLP Estate Planning and Elder Law Blog: readers can look forward to reviewing articles on simplifying their estate plan and elder law news items of note.
  25. Massachusetts Estate Planning and Probate Blog: attorney Matthew Karr keeps readers up to date on estate planning and probate news and information.
  26. Marshall Elder and Estate Planning Blog: the author of this elder law blog has over 30 years experience in estate planning, special needs planning, and estates.
  27. Hartford, CT Elder Law Blog: the attorney’s at Ruggiero Ziogas & Allaire discuss estate planning, care planning, Medicaid, Veteran’s Benefits, and Probate.
  28. El Paso Elder Law Blog: the law firm of Stephanie Townsend Allala and Associates blogs on estate planning, guardianships, Medicaid Planning, Nursing Home Abuse, and Trust & Probate.
  29. Miami Probate Law Blog: the folks at the Byrant law firm keep readers up-to-date on estate administration, probate court, estate litigation, and the nuisances of will and trust disputes.
  30. Elder Law News: attorney Brian A. Raphan is based in New York City and specializes in Wills, Estates, Trusts, and Elder Care issues. His blog is full of great resources.
  31. Aging & Law in West Virginia: this blog contains news in law and aging in West Virginia, written by the West Virginia Senior Legal Aid organization.
  32. Florida Elder Law and Estate Planning: this Florida Certified Elder Law attorney provides in depth insights and news to help Floridians protect themselves and preserve their assets.
  33. Family Law Blog Maryland: while this blog looks at all matters pertaining to Family Law, elder law sneaks in as a prevalent theme in many of the cases discussed. They look at legal matters like when divorce and retirement coincide, or when grandparents wish to take custody of their grandchildren.
  34. Phoenix AZ Family Law Blog: looking at issues older couples face in Arizona, this family law blog explores the specific challenges elders face in divorces and custody battles, complete with the latest policy changes and laws.
  35. Otherspoon: hospice volunteer and blogger Ann Neumann talks about care-giving and the realities, politics, and senior rights involved in death and dying.

Seniors Talk Policy And Politics

  1. Aging in Place: this blog is concerned with seniors who are dealing with shrinking benefits and increasing costs—seniors find answers on how to protect themselves.
  2. Estate in Denial: providing news, analysis, and commentary on abusive practices occurring in probate courts. Features original perspective and direct communication.
  3. Florida Estate Planning Lawyer Blog: this blog covers estate planning legal issues, cases of interest, and news with a focus on Florida elder law.
  4. McGuire Woods: the people at McGuire Woods author this great blog on long term care legal issues, including timely news, articles, and white papers.
  5. Illinois Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: published by the law office of Wilson & Wilson, this blog covers asset protection, banking, estate planning, and trusts.
  6. Illinois Nursing Home Abuse Blog: covers Illinois nursing home law, including Supreme Court cases and other information relating to residents and family members.
  7. Law Office of Donald D. Vanarelli Blog: provides readers in New Jersey with information on elder law, estate and special needs planning, and mediation services.
  8. Maryland Nursing Home Lawyer Blog: this blog offers insight on nursing home abuse reports, legislation, and legal opinions of elder law in Maryland.
  9. Massachusetts Estate Planning, Probate & Elder Law: elder law attorney Brian Barreira writes on legal issues involving death, taxes, special needs, and long-term elder care.
  10. New Jersey Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: blog posts explore life and death in New Jersey from a perspective of estate planning, elder law, taxation, probate, and estate administration.
  11. Medina Law Group: postings provide readers with advice on estate planning and management, estate taxes, elder law, and VA benefits.
  12. North Carolina Wills and Trusts: this blog provides readers with estate planning and elder law news with a North Carolina focus.
  13. California Nursing Home Abuse Law Blog: covers nursing home abuse, elder law abuse, and features many quality articles relating to California elder law.
  14. Nursing Home Law Blog: this well written blog discusses elder issues, legislation, legal news, protections of elder rights, and helpful health tips.
  15. PA Elder Estate and Fiduciary Law Blog: focuses on elder law, long-term care, end-of-life and health care surrogate decision-making, and estate planning.
  16. Patti’s Blog: find information about this lawyer’s practice, which concentrates on advocacy for seniors. She shares personal interests and her passions.
  17. Pennsylvania Nursing Home Abuse Lawyer Blog: this blog discusses nursing home abuse laws, cases, and news items from Pennsylvania.
  18. Barbara Cashman Blog: Barbara blogs about elder law and policy issues, and often hosts guest bloggers to share their insights on elder law and news.
  19. NJ Elder Law: lawyer Kenneth Vercammen blogs about topics related to estate planning and elder law. He was once awarded the NJ State Bar Municipal Court Practitioner of the Year.
  20. The Senior Sentinel: a blog compiling news and information for Baby Boomers, the Senior Sentinel concentrates on the intersection of ageism and public policy both nationally and world-wide.
  21. Elder Consult: this geriatric medicine blog not only covers Alzheimers, dementia, financial decision making, and medications, it also discusses related legal issues such as elder financial abuse.
  22. Grey Pride: a UK blog by the Anchor Digital Marketing team is dedicated to keeping older people at the top of the political agenda and petitioning the government to create a Minister for Older People to ensure their needs are met.
  23. Over 65 Blog: project organizers from Harvard, Yale, and The Hastings Center host this blog for “seniors seeking solutions for health care and security, mainly looking at health care system reforms, elder law policies and practices, and how seniors can achieve a stronger role in the future of health care.
  24. Reaping Hope Blog: a blog from an NGO in Nepal promoting dignified aging and elder rights, Reaping Hope explores elder abuse and elder oppression while actively helping elderly people claim their rights and challenge discrimination.

Age Against The Machine: Anti-Ageism

  1. Ageist Beauty: the musings, product reviews, and random thoughts of a woman who is fighting against her age.
  2. Everyday Ageism Project: this blog aims to capture people’s everyday experiences dealing with ageism. The author has discovered that ageism is the most commonly experienced form of prejudice.
  3. The Lonely Gerontologist: professor Kelly Yokum blogs about all things aging—including aging stereotypes and other aging topics that come to mind.
  4. My Elder Advocate: this blog provides comprehensive coverage of ageism, the dangers of nursing homes, elder abuse, and elder care.
  5. The Roaming Boomers: David and Carol are great examples of a couple who doesn’t let age get in the way of living life to the fullest.
  6. The Gypsy Nester: Veronica and David show readers how to rock the empty nest and get the most out of life as you age.
  7. Changing Aging: this multi-blog platform challenges conventional views on aging. The authors believe aging is a strength, rich in developmental potential and growth.
  8. The Elders: founded by Nelson Mandela in 2007, the Elders is a group of seniors committed to addressing global challenges, including child marriage and climate change.
  9. Beauty and Wisdom: the blog of photographer Robbie Kaye, who traveled to salons throughout the US to photograph and interview women in their 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s and discovered that beauty is ageless.
  10. Advanced Style: don’t tell these women they are too old to model hip and alluring fashions. This blog teaches women how to dress to impress and that age is only a number.
  11. RL TV: the only cable network and online destination for folks 50+, features a nice blog that provides tips on elder issues and promotes active living.
  12. The 70-Something Blog: blogger Judy informs readers how to live a full and engaging life as she chronicles her journey of aging.
  13. Retirement is Work: newly retired librarian and blogger resolves to post one good thing about retirement every day for a year, but along the way struggles with senior rights and anti-ageism.
  14. Yo Is This Ageist?: a humorous blog by Ashton Applewhite dedicated to determining whether age-related remarks are offensive, “challenging the stereotypes that segregate us by age.”
  15. This Chair Rocks: a smart and sassy blog by Ashton Applewhite that challenges the ideas of ageism with humor and snark. All stereotypes and insensitive remarks are grounds for brilliant blog posts.
  16. Senior Planet: “aging with attitude” is the tagline of this blog community of older adults using technology to connect with each other and take on the issues of ageism and senior rights.
  17. Changing Aging: a blog founded by Dr. Bill Thomas to promote “a radical reinterpretation of longevity” which focuses on anti-ageism and senior rights, as well as getting the most out of a long life.
  18. Time Goes By: Ronni Bennett takes on aging, ageism and related issues with humor, exploring the truth of “what it’s really like to get old.” She starts by rejecting the “cutesy” terms for old people – they’re called “elders” around here!
  19. The Magic of Middle-Aged Women: author Daniel Even Weiss – a man – blogs on the theme of his latest book, The Magic of Middle-Aged Women, where he challenges the prevailing ageist idea that women don’t get better as they age. They do.
  20. Advanced Style: Ari Seth Cohen, a young-ish photographer, roams the New York City streets photographing stylish and creative elders. Here, art challenges the paradigm that age and beauty can’t co-exist.
  21. The New Old Age: the New York Times blog on aging takes advantage of the newspaper’s top writers to explore the unprecedented intergenerational challenge of the Baby Boomers.
  22. The Little Old Lady Stays Put (or doesn’t): explores the “lives, lifestyles and issues of interesting older people,” touching on the issues surrounding ageism, elder rights, living with dementia, and overcoming the struggles of aging with strength and good humor.
  23. Naked at Our Age: advocate of ageless sexuality, Joan Price, talks about sex and aging, taking on Senior Rights subjects like safer sex for seniors while providing helpful tips.
  24. Aging & Work at Boston College: scholars, academics, and researchers share their findings on ageism in the workplace and the challenges aging workers face in this PhD-heavy blog by The Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College.
  25. Ethnic Elders: this newsy blog by New America Media examines the Senior Rights issues and Elder Law of minority groups such as age discrimination, lawsuits related to Social Security, and elder healthcare reform.
  26. The Everyday Ageism Project: blending blogging and research, this site’s goal is to capture the experience of age discrimination. The forum is full of people sharing their experiences in a supportive environment.
  27. Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens Blog: the Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens sub-blog offers wide ranging posts on issues including senior rights and ageism – with its signature left-wing perspective.
  28. Clinical Geriatrics: created as more of a peer-reviewed clinical journal by the American Geriatrics Society, some of the top scholars in geriatrics converge on this blog to discuss geriatric health and wellness issues, which often cross over into legal and anti-ageism issues.
  29. Age Action Alliance: this organization brings together a network of 300 organizations and individuals committed to helping older people. Its blog is dedicated to improving older people’s lives through advocating against ageism, particularly in Britain.
  30. Manitoba Senior Centres: this Canadian blog covers the rampant ageism in Canada and promotes world elder abuse awareness. It also has a list of resources for older adults.
  31. Fierce with Age: defying ageism goes mainstream at this blog, created by veteran journalist Dr. Carol Orsborn. Having written about the Boomer generation for major newspapers and blogged for the Huffington Post and NPR’s Next Avenue, Orsborn is well equipped to take on the spiritual and policy hurdles of aging.
  32. Live Better Boomer!: a Philadelphia-based blog, by social worker Tiffany Matthews, devoted to helping educate and empower Boomers advocate for their own improved healthcare.
  33. Third Age: billed as “health for Boomers and beyond,” Third Age offers relatively fluffy fare, like “Change your Mood with Color,” to the legal issues surrounding Boomer divorce and care-giving.
  34. The Old Gunhand: one facet of senior citizen rights you don’t see every day is elder gun advocates. This website not only tells you the best types of guns for elderly wielders, it also goes into gun policy and senior self-defense.
  35. Age Discrimination Info: a simple name for a one-stop source of statistics and information on age discrimination, including legislation, cases, news, publications, events and training. The perfect resource for the activist.
  36. Age UK: the largest organization in the United Kingdom for working with and for older people, this website has an entire section dedicated to age discrimination and ageism.
  37. National Youth Rights Association: not just for youngsters, the National Youth Rights Association combats ageism in all its forms. In fact, they probably wouldn’t appreciate being called “youngsters.”
  38. Disability and Representation: a blog by writer, photographer and activist Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg that discusses (and tries to change the discourse about) disability rights and ageism, along with autism.
  39. Over 50: Career coaching and workshops for the over-50 crowd, this blog doesn’t stop at finding a job. This site explores Baby Boomer activism in and out of the workplace.
  40. Activist Post: while this blog deals with many topics requiring advocacy, they often include issues that regard Senior Rights, Elder Law and anti-ageism.
  41. California Booming: an informational blog dedicated to California Baby Boomers, this blog covers everything from sex, to diet, to politics of the Boomer generation, including issues concerning senior rights and ageism in the workplace.

Even Senior Citizens Can Make Money From Adsense by Christopher Kyalo

May 30, 2013 by · Comments Off on Even Senior Citizens Can Make Money From Adsense by Christopher Kyalo
Filed under: Articles 

For senior citizens the really good news is that one can never be too old to make money from Adsense. And like any other online opportunity Google Adsense’s strict terms and conditions do not include an upper age limit.

In fact senior citizens willing to learn in their old age and also to shrug off things that they may have believed in too closely, in the past, AdSense is the perfect way for them to make money. This is because when a person has reached that age, there are plenty of useful experiences and skills that they have picked up over the years. It should not be too difficult finding what they experiences and skills that a senior citizen can mine to make money from Adsense.

Senior citizens usually love to reminisce over their long lives and past experiences both good and bad and this can be used to make money from Adsense. This is because this is just the sort of ingredients that can go to setting up a fascinating AdSense blog. These are usually the sort of personal experience blogs that have a huge potential of picking up traffic pretty quickly. Everybody knows that high traffic on an AdSense blog is a license to print money.

Nothing should really be a hindrance to senior citizens joining the ranks of those who make serious money from Adsense.

Find out how you can learn more about the best Adsense make money secrets from an expert who makes over $19,000 a month from Adsense. Or grab my ezine on Adsense secrets for free by sending a blank email now to clickaffiliatesecrets-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Christopher_Kyalo

Planning Fun Activities for Senior Citizens by Matthew G Young

May 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many senior citizens do not want to or cannot leave the house. There are many reasons for this, some are physically impaired and have trouble getting around, and others simply don’t leave because they believe that they have nothing to do. Either way, getting out of the house is important sometimes, if only for the sake of the joys that social gatherings bring. Maintaining existing friendships and creating new ones can mean a lot to elderly folks, especially if they have not left the house for a while.

There are many senior citizen friendly activities out there, the trick is to match an activity with an interest that they hold, and therefore will be more accepting of going out of the comfort zone that is their home. Many people enjoy playing cards or board games. This is a much better solution than something like going to a movie will create; when playing games, it is hard not to be social. Movies are not the best choice because, although fun, there is little opportunity for social exchange. Games foster relationships, especially games like canasta or trivial pursuit where you can play on teams.

Another great activity for senior citizens is craft making. A group of people being instructed in how to put together a scrap book or design simple jewelry for the first time promises to be very fruitful. Not only will they learn a fun new skill, but they will inevitably interact with others at nearby at their table.

Going to a zoo or to a museum is another great choice. If there are any disabilities or hindrances to mobility, this can be a frustrating thing, but most public gatherings and places now allow people to rent wheelchairs. This will make getting around a much easier task, even if the people you are with have difficulty walking. Electric wheelchairs are perhaps the best choice since these require minimal effort in using.

Finally, you can always just go to a coffee shop. Social gatherings don’t need to be big group affair; sometimes people feel more comfortable in an intimate setting. Taking a friend out for coffee is a great way to interact on a one on one basis. It’s hard not to have a good time when you are with a close friend or relative. Coffee shops are great public places to go to with a couple friends because of this.

The most important thing about choosing an activity is to make sure that the person you are with has fun. If the senior citizen you are caring for does not have fun, they will not be likely to give social outings a second chance. As a caretaker, it’s your job to care for them physically as well as emotionally. Making activities fun isn’t hard, but you do need to choose the right activity that will match their desires and wishes.

Matthew G. Young is a freelance writer who specializes in financial, sports, and health-related topics. To learn more about in home health care visit Paradise In Home Care

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Matthew_G_Young

Health Insurance For Senior Citizens – Why Are They So Hard To Insure? by Zandra Jones

May 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Private health insurance for senior citizens is very hard to come by. As you get older, it becomes more prevalent that commercial insurance companies don’t want to cover older Americans. Since the creation of Medicare, there is no incentive to cover senior citizens because most buy into the Medicare system any way. Even though this may be true, there are still some older Americans who need to buy private health insurance. So let’s take a look at some of the main reasons why getting insurance for them can be difficult.

Your Age Is a Dominant Factor.

There are a number of reasons why senior citizens can’t get health coverage. For starters, a lot of health insurance companies look at your age. When people start getting over the age of 50, they are prone to have more illnesses, they see the doctor more often, and they might have more hospital stays. So the risks of insuring an older person far outweigh the benefits. We all age so why is this such an important factor?

The Cost Of Insuring An Older Person Is High.

Due to the fact that the elderly are prone to so many conditions and will need so much care, there are many companies who consider them to be a big risk. The average hospital stay of a person over the age of 50 is longer than some one in their 20’s and 30’s. Younger people heal and recover a lot quicker then older adults so their cost per treatment is less. Insurance companies know approximately how much they have to pay out for each age group and take all these things into consideration when pricing policies.

Pre-Existing Conditions are Not Insurable.

If you have a pre-existing condition like diabetes or high blood pressure, it is most of the time not insurable. May be with the new health care reform this will change. However, what does a pre-existing condition tell an insurance company? It tells them that you may not do a good job in taking care of yourself or you have bad eating habits. So why insure someone who could have possibly prevented such conditions by not drinking, not smoking, and not overeating. This may not be fair but insurance companies are in the business of making money for their investors.

Affordability May Be A Problem.

The last thing that you will find is that many times, senior citizens can’t afford the insurance. Even if they find a company willing to insure them, many are retired and are on a limited income. The cost of premiums alone can eat up any retirement check or pension income. Many have to choose between insurance or keeping a roof over their heads.

Getting health insurance for senior citizens is still a big problem for many. Many have never paid into the social security system and are not eligible for medicare and private insurance is way too expensive. Hopefully, the new health care reform will address many of these issues otherwise what options do these seniors have.

Getting good Health Insurance Information to stay update with the ever changing laws can be difficult. Visit www.healthbenefitstoday.com to get all the fact before you make a decision to purchase health insurance.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Zandra_Jones

Government Grants For Senior Citizens – Specific Grants Set Up For the Elderly by Matthew Salvinger

May 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

The government has grants set up to help every group of people in the  country, including senior citizens. In some cases these grants may be approved  to the senior citizens themselves, but the grants can also be awarded to people  who assist the citizens on a regular basis. Whether it’s medical research for  the elderly or increasing the safety of old folks homes there are grants that  will provide funding to those who need it.

Government grants for senior citizens will often go to organizations that  work with the elderly and charities that support senior citizen groups. These  organizations can be businesses or volunteer groups, as long as they work with  the elderly in some capacity. The grants can be used for special classes for  people over 65, providing cheaper medical services for the elderly, keeping  volunteer groups that run errands for disabled older adults funded, and just  about anything else an organization can think of to help the elderly  community.

Various websites have provided lists of where to find these government  grants. They have information on what government organization is funding the  grant, when the deadline for the grant application is, what the grant is  intended for, and how to apply for those specific grants. Anyone can apply for  government grants for senior citizens as long as they qualify for the grant. It  tends to be easier for individuals to go through organizations if they are  seeking grant money although individuals are permitted to apply also. Certain  grants for the elderly such as education grants and housing grants are simple to  get without the assistance of an agency. More information on who can apply for  these grants is available through government websites and some local government  agencies.

The US Government and private foundations award MILLIONS IN GRANTS to people just like you who are in need of  financial help. The best part is, most grants come with absolutely NO INTEREST!  Get More  Details

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Matthew_Salvinger

Mobile Carwash; Senior Citizens and Mobile Homes by Lance Winslow

May 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Senior citizens are generally not a large marketing segment for mobile  detailers or car washers, however, they should not be ignored.  You will find in  a near by area a seniors-only mobile home park.  You will also find square dance  clubs and senior centers.  All of these places can be extremely good places to  look for new business.  If you want to accelerate word of mouth advertising, you  should meet with people in these groups.  Wash cars at senior centers while they  play cards.  Hand out flyers, etc.

In mobile home parks you should hand out flyers and put flyers on bulletin  boards in the recreation rooms.  If you wash one mobile home in a mobile home  park, the word of mouth will spread the news of your service like wildfire.   Next thing you know, you’ll be washing every mobile home in the place.   Sometimes a simple visit to the park’s manager who usually lives on-site is  enough to get the ball rolling.

Many senior citizens belong to groups like: veteran’s groups, AARP, Masonic  Lodges, temples, churches, senior volunteer programs, Shriners Clubs, garden  clubs, sewing clubs, antique auto clubs, Audubon Society, arts councils and  various political groups. Many of the more affluent seniors play golf and many  of the local courses have senior discount days where you can meet the senior  crowd.  They are usually members of well-known local clubs and organizations;  great for word of mouth networking.  Many times they will have their cars washed  while golfing.  Usually most municipal or older golf courses have senior day  discounts once per week.  Some seniors simply use the driving range during  senior day.  This is good as it provides good turn over in the parking lot.   Every hour new golfers come to hit balls.

Square dances are very popular amongst the older crowd.  A city with a  population of over 50,000 could have as many as four to five groups.  Each group  may have a membership of fifteen to one hundred people.

Any city or community worth its salt has a senior center.  It is imperative  to develop a good working relationship with the program director.  She (usually  a she) is in contact with all senior groups, activities, field trips and such.   Senior centers usually have racks of pamphlets near their entrance with  interesting information, schedules of upcoming events and lists of names, phone  numbers and addresses of the board of directors of various non-profit  organizations throughout the area.  You will be amazed at the incredible network  seniors have and how fast word of mouth information spreads.  Many seniors are  involved in more than one group or activity.  You may be at a bridge club  meeting washing cars one day and the next day you will get called by the  instructor at the square dance club.  Then the following day you wash cars for a  political action committee while volunteers stuff envelopes.  This can go on day  after day.  You can significantly speed up the word of mouth advertising with  this segment by showing up at various senior centers.

You must also remember that negative word of mouth topics permeate from these  groups too.  Don’t let this happen to you.  Spend an extra minute or two with  each senior customer.  Ask them if they wouldn’t mind giving two or three flyers  to their very best friends.  Usually they will.  Get to know each senior  customers by name; you’ll be glad you did.  Name dropping amongst seniors is  great, a they value relationships with friends with much higher regard than the  younger crowd does.  They will try to help you by offering advise about how you  might attain more business and places you might go to.  Acknowledge these  tidbits even if you think they are ridiculous.  It is sometimes the ridiculous  things that bring you to a new idea.  Even if you don’t want any new business,  listen anyway. Many of the greatest ideas we ever go to help our company  innovate came from talking with seniors with a slightly different perspective  than today’s rat race.

Accept all tips from seniors even if you think they can’t afford it.  This is  one of the greatest compliments they can give you.  It means they accept you.   This is not an easy thing for a senior to do, especially since younger  generations constantly fail to even acknowledge their existence and fail to meet  their work ethic expectations.  The gap has been widened before you got there  and it is your job to close the gap.  By uniting the seniors and your company  and uniting the kids of the multitude of fundraising groups you help, you can  unite the entire community.  You can be something everyone can talk about.   Grandparents and grandkids can all talk about your company.

Too get information on car wash fundraisers, search Google; “car wash  fundraisers”

“Lance Winslow” – Online Think  Tank forum board. If you have innovative thoughts and unique perspectives,  come think with Lance; www.WorldThinkTank.net/. Lance is an online writer in  retirement.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lance_Winslow

Health Insurance for Senior Citizens – Why Do You Need It? by KV Gopalakrishnan

May 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

When you are more than fifty years of age, it is natural that your  requirements for medical assistance increases. Periodical visits to Medical  centers become important now for safeguarding you from health problems and also  for making it possible for you to recoup should you fall ill. Until now, you had  been keeping mostly healthy and your own medical requirements have either been  paid by your company or organization or effortlessly been managed with your  earnings and savings.

Now that you are contemplating to retire and enjoy life, this is the time to  consider choosing a health insurance policy for senior citizens to take care of  your (and your spouse’s) health-related expenditures. Here are some more points  to consider:

  • Hospital Expenses tend to be skyrocketing these days particularly since most  of us have the tendency to choose treatment in branded Private Hospitals. This  can create a dent on your retirement savings in the event you do not have  medical insurance for senior citizens.
  • For anyone who is preparing to retire and survive on pension or interest  earnings from savings, a medical emergency can lead to a monetary crisis. To  steer clear of this, it is advisable to consider a comprehensive policy of  health insurance.
  • The medical coverage, which you had in the course of your career, generally  ceases when you retire. Suitable Medical insurance can replace this insurance  cover.
  • It may not be a good idea to count on your children to avail their  employee/group insurance for you as this insurance cover would also cease when  they happen to change occupation.
  • Pre existing ailments are excluded from health related insurance for senior  citizens for a period of two to four years in most instances. If you join early,  you can avail the policy even for treatment of existing illness (after the  stipulated period), before the illness develop into a serious one.
  • If you are confused as a result of the countless choices available in the  field of insurance available to senior citizens, do not hesitate to seek  guidance of an independent insurance adviser.
  • In normal instances, for availing insurance, medical checkups are essential  for anyone above 45. In case you are reluctant to undergo such tests, you will  even be able to find policies, which are provided without these tests.  Nevertheless, it is best to declare your pre-existing illnesses truthfully, to  steer clear of rejection of your future claims.
  • Please be aware that recently Government of India has issued some  stipulations (July 1, 2009) which makes it mandatory for all health insurance  companies to refund 50% of the expenses made by you on medical tests related to  the policy, in case they accept your policy.
  • Government of India has also issued guidelines that every health insurance  company has to offer insurance coverage for individuals up to 65 years of age.  There is also a provision for shifting insurers if you are not satisfied with  the current provider.

 

Please keep it in mind that there is a great deal of differences in terms and  conditions in the policies of health insurance for senior citizens provided by  various companies. You will even find companies which even offer “No age  restriction for enrollment” and “assured renewal for life”. Take your time to  choose a suitable health insurance policy which meets your personal needs.

Wish you a happy, healthy and enjoyable time after 50.

KV Gopalakrishnan Senior Citizens Consultant

http://enjoyafter50.com/

Visit this website for tips and tricks to make your retirement life happy and  enjoyable.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=KV_Gopalakrishnan

Gifts for Senior Citizens by David Stillwagon

May 13, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Whether it is at Christmas time or a birthday coming up buying gifts for some  people seems to take up time and a lot of pondering. Do you want to buy  something practical that they can use all the time or maybe surprise them with  something unique, much of the decision depends on the person that you are buying  for. One group of folks that tend to be difficult to buy for is senior citizens.  Gifts for senior citizens shouldn’t be any harder to find than for any other age  group. The perception is that since they are older they are pickier about what  they will like, which really isn’t the case. Another misconception is at their  age they probably have received just about every gift that you can think of,  which is also incorrect.

One of the best and easiest gift choices is books. Although you may think  that not everyone is a reader you would be surprised especially if you find a  subject that is interesting to the person you are buying it for with the World  Wide Web buying books like everything else is pretty easy. Not only can you  order the books from your home you can also send them directly to the gift  recipient. But take your time looking there are a million books out there; try  to find one that would be interesting the whole way through.

Is gardening an interest of the person you are getting the gift for. Although  gardening can only be done during the growing season it is great for older folks  because they get to stay active and they are outside. Tool sets or possibly a  garden caddy that makes it easier to cultivate the ground are great choices. It  is probably best to let them buy the plants, you never really know what kind of  flowers or vegetable they want in their gardens.

As we get older we help with certain things like keeping our balance,  remembering to take medication or remembering doctor’s appointments. There are  many products out there specifically for the elderly or senior citizens. Of  course you have to be careful getting something like this for some folks because  they may not feel that they need these things. But then again practical gifts  are always good especially if they can be put to use.

Funny or gag gifts are great ways to lift the spirit and bring on a good  laugh. There are many places on the internet that you can find such gifts, but  just remember to think about the person that you are giving it too. Are they  sensitive or can they take a joke?

If you take some time and a little effort buying gifts for senior citizens  isn’t that difficult at all.

David Stillwagon blogs about health and age issues like Gifts for Senior Adults

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Stillwagon

Planning Senior Citizens Trips – The Benefits of Bus Tours by Bronwyn White

May 13, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Are you retired, or planning to retire? Would you like to see the world  without the hassle of preparing for a vacation?. Planning your future senior  citizens trips can be hassle free if you decide to consider bus tours Read on to  see how much easier it is to join a bus tour instead of planning your vacation  from scratch.

The Problem With Vacations

The main problem with vacations is the preparation you have to do beforehand.  All that effort put into booking flights, finding hotels, creating an itinerary,  finding travel insurance providers, etc. can really take its toll, which is  ironic when you remember you’re a senior trying to relax!

That’s why bus tours and group tours for seniors are gaining popularity as a  hassle-free alternative to the traditional way of vacationing, particularly  those planning their senior citizens trips in retirement or semi-retirement. All  you need to do is find the tour package that suits your expectations, pay the  price, and then follow the travel agency’s instructions!

The Advantages Of Bus Tours

The main advantage of bus tours is the fact that it’s stress-free and  hassle-free on your part — the travel agencies have done all the work for you!  All you have to do is to choose the package, pay up, be there in time for the  bus, and then start taking photos!

Another advantage of bus tours is the cost. When you plan a vacation the  traditional way, almost every move costs money. When you book your flights —  money. When you make hotel reservations — money. When you take cabs to the six  tourist spots you plan to see today — money!

But when it comes to bus tours, you pay a single fee for the whole package,  which can last several days. What’s more, seniors bus tours often come at a  discount, making the whole vacation even more affordable and enjoyable for you!  Just sign the dotted line, and off you go.

How To Prepare For A Bus Tour

The first step in preparing for a bus tour vacation is choosing your  destination. What part of the world would you want to see? What town or country  has been on your “must-visit” list for the past few decades? Now’s the time to  take your pick without having to think about work when you get back!

Next, find suitable travel agencies that have tour packages in your chosen  destination(s). Choose the travel agency with the package that fits your budget  and schedule perfectly. You can also check if the travel agency offers travel  insurance — very important if you REALLY want to enjoy yourself!

And finally, start packing! Bus tour packages can last several days, so make  sure to pack enough clothes, medicine, and toiletries for the entire trip. Take  a backpack if your back is strong enough, but if you don’t mind having only one  free hand most of the time, take a lighter travel case on wheels.

Don’t Believe The Bad Hype!

Most younger vacationers dismiss bus tours as “boring” and “predictable,” but  they don’t enjoy the sophistication that only age can bring. As seniors, we tend  to enjoy a more relaxed, more cultured pace. So leave the stress to the young  ones and take that vacation you’ve been waiting for all these years!

Bronwyn White has over 20 years experience in the travel industry. She has  gained her experience as a travel agent, with airlines, government tourism  boards and as a professional travel researcher (yes there is such a dream job).  She consults on a regular basis to the travel industry and is often quoted in  the press. Bronwyn has specialized in senior citizen clientele – both as a  travel agent and as a travel researcher. For tons of free travel advice, just  for seniors, visit www.seniorstraveltips.com  [http://www.seniorstraveltips.com/seniors-bus-tours/]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Bronwyn_White

Quality Personal Security Devices for Senior Citizens by Dharmendar Kumar

May 13, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Some of the sectors of human society are largely vulnerable to criminal  atrocities. Besides women and children, the two most vulnerable groups, there is  another that is slowly but steadily coming to the forefront. It is the senior  citizens.

Security Aspects for Senior Citizens

Even the best of athletes and strong men grow weaker and vulnerable with the  advancements in age. It is the inevitable law of nature and no one is going to  escape the eventualities. That is why security becomes a concern for such people  as they advance in ages and become less and less capable of taking own care  without some external support.

Easy Prey for Hoodlums

In fact, senior citizens in United States as well as across the world have  been easy prey for the hoodlums and anti socials. Often due to their physical  frailty they become prime targets for such unscrupulous people. This is one  phase of life where gender variations make little difference. Even if the old  men usually hold canes, but that they can hardly use for any self  protections.

Old and Vulnerable Need Not Stand as Victims

Good news for the senior citizens is that it is no more required for them to  remain passive victims and they can become active self protectors using the  gifts of modern science. Such gifts are personal security devices.

Some Popular Personal Security Devices

Some of the popular personal security devices that can be effectively used by  senior citizens are –

• Pepper spray, that is easy to use and can be held with a key chain or  concealed inside the shirt or coat pockets. In fact, it can be stored in any  place that the user considers handy. When sprayed on the assailant’s face it  will result in swelling of his eyes and the effect will last for 45 minutes  almost blinding him.

• However, in some states, pepper spray is prohibited under the law.  Hence any senior citizen should remain conversant with the local laws before  using one.

• Also popular among women is the stun guns that will have a stunning  effect on the attacker and he will not be able to get out of the impact for the  next three quarters of an hour.

• Teasers and security alarms are also used by the elderly people quite  extensively.

SelfDefenseExpress.com not only provides excellent personal security devices  like stun guns [http://www.selfdefenseexpress.com/] and various others but also  provides some of the best surveillance  [http://www.selfdefenseexpress.com/surveillance-cameras/] devices including  cameras and sensors.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Dharmendar_Kumar

Senior Citizen Travel Insurance – Baby Boomer Travelers Need This Protection by Susan Elizabeth

May 13, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

One of the favorite activities of senior citizens and baby boomers is  traveling. There are large numbers of travel agencies and tour groups that  specialize in providing travel adventures to seniors. And one of the things that  is most important when you are a boomer and you are out traveling around the  country or the world is senior citizen travel insurance.

This kind of insurance helps you if you need medical help when you are on  your trip. In particular if you are overseas, the doctors and the hospitals may  not want to treat you unless you can guarantee that they are going to receive  payment. And sometimes, you just don’t have the amount on your credit card to  afford the treatment you really need.

Just to make it clear, getting senior travel health insurance is a very  important thing to do before you leave n your trip.

Here are a couple of tips when you are asking insurance agents either online  or offline about senor travel insurance.

You want to be sure what age they are calling seniors. It doesn’t help much  if you are 64 and the cutoff age is 65. You are not going to be able to take  advantage of that insurance e coverage no matter what. So it is very important  to get that right out in the open right away. You will probably be able to get  some kind of health coverage from that particular agency but it might not be  senior citizen coverage.

Another point to consider is mode of transportation on your trip. There are  some health insurance policies that have exclusion provisions for particular  modes of travel. Not so much airplanes or cruise liners but odd kinds of things  like mule trains and bicycles. You want to be sure that however you are going to  be traveling on your trip that you get insurance that is going to cover you for  that form of transportation.

None of these things are deal breakers as far as getting travel insurance  goes. You just want to be sure that you have your bases covered before you set  off on your adventure. Oftentimes, the best deals with the best insurance agents  and companies are found on the senior websites. They can offer you excellent  group packages on discount insurance because their membership is so big.

And even though you really need senior citizen travel insurance to cover your  health while you are on your trip, it doesn’t mean you can’t take advantage of  any discount you can find. And that is one thing that the internet is really  good at finding for you – discounts.

Susan is a full fledged baby boomer and avid internet researcher who writes  about baby  boomer travel and other senior topics on her site at www.second50years.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Susan_Elizabeth

Home

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under:  


banner

The Nevada Senior Guide is your comprehensive resource directory for seniors and those who support them.

Are you looking for something in particular?  

An assisting living facility in a certain area, perhaps?  

Whatever it is, just let us know by filling in the form you see below and we will do our very best to help!

Your Name

Your Email

Your Telephone Number

How can we help you?
* Important Note: If you wish us to send you a physical copy of the Nevada Senior Guide, please provide your postal address, including zip *

 

button-apartments button-assistedliving  button-healthhomecare button-homes  button-supportservices

COMPLETE SENIOR GUIDE LISTING

Homes

Apartments & Independent

 Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing & Memory Care

Health & Home Care

Services

Leisure


 

The Nevada Senior guide provides information about homes, health, services and leisure activities.

Featuring wonderful health care providers such as Circle of Life:

COL-Logo-New_CS6-2

The print version of Nevada Senior Guide is free and is available throughout Las Vegas, Henderson, Green Valley, Boulder City, North Las Vegas, Pahrump and Summerlin.

 






The Nevada Senior Guide contains the Senior Services Directory including government and non-profit agencies that offer services to seniors in Nevada. These services include food and housing assistance, transportation for medical appointments and other life enhancing services.

A Level of Care Directory is included to assist in the selection of appropriate services in assisted living faculties.

Previously known as the Las Vegas Senior Guide, Mathis began the publication in 2001 because she recognized the need to inform seniors about services that were available to them. It is distributed in Von’s Grocery Stores, Whole Foods Grocery Stores, all libraries and hospitals through-out southern Nevada.

 


 

NSG_NovDecJan_2013-14_Web42

Our Mission Statement:  To Publish the most popular, user friendly, visible, results-based, free publication & website

The publication is filled with informative articles that relate to Senior issues including health care, home health and leisure activities.

NSG_AugSeptOct2014_Web12a

“Seniors are a unique group because they have so many needs that aren’t met as easily as those of the younger generations,” Mathis stated. “They are the largest percentage of our country’s population and are always looking for resources and good deals, no matter what their income level. The directory is also useful to baby boomers who can use it to find resources for their aging parents.”

“I do not know of any other advertisement that gives you so much for the price and not only produces results, but also has a staff that goes out of its way to help their advertisers through education and networking. Megan and her staff WANT you to be successful. To not advertise in Nevada Senior Guide is like giving your competition referrals.”  – Mark A. Simmons, QDCS, Exploring Life Transitions, Memory Care Consultant

 

By Google+

Google+

 

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!