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health care | Nevada Senior Guide

Nevada Senior Guide – Visiting Angels Reno

April 26, 2014 by · Comments Off on Nevada Senior Guide – Visiting Angels Reno
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Homecare, Reno, Support Services 

www.visitingangels.com/reno

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Visiting Angles, serving Reno, Sparks and the surrounding communities

 

Why Elderly Care by Visiting Angels

At Visiting Angels, we realize it is never easy bringing someone into your home to provide elderly care services.  That’s why we strive to make staying at home a positive experience.  We do this by allowing you to select your caregiver from a group of experienced  elderly care providers, allowing you to maintain your schedule and providing you or your loved one with personalized elderly care services.

 

You Are In Charge – We’re On “Your” Schedule

With Visiting Angels, you’re in charge of everything.  Your Visiting Angels elderly care provider will not dictate to you what your schedule is to be (i.e. what time to get up, when to bathe, meal schedules, etc.).  It is our job to adjust to your schedule and to see to it that you remain comfortable in your home.  Visiting Angels – Senior Home Care at its Best!

 

Bonded, licensed and insured

Your locally owned and operated Visiting Angels office is licensed by the state of Nevada and is insured and bonded.  This can give you the peace of mind that a trustworthy elderly care provider will be in your loved one’s home.

 

Monitoring is essential

At Visiting Angels’ we continually monitor our elderly care providers through our system of continued personalized contacts.  Through telephone check-in’s and home visits, we will be checking regularly with your loved one.  We want to ensure that our elderly care recipients receive the best possible care.

 

Tailor your care to your needs

No two people are the same.  Therefore their elderly care needs are going to be very different.  Whether you need respite care, in home care, part time or full time care, or care at an assisted living facility, Visiting Angels can provide an experienced elderly care provider that is right for you.  Our agency tailors your program of elderly care based on your needs.  Your elderly care program is flexible and you can change the program as different needs arise.  We will also work along with any home health agency or nursing agency that may be assisting your loved ones after a recent hospital stay.

 

Visiting Angels Reno

The Visiting Angels office located in Reno Nevada is locally owned and operated by Monica and Robert Pence.  For additional information on how we can help you or a loved one, please contact our office at 775-852-4663 or visit our website at www.visitingangels.com/reno.  We look forward to assisting you with your care needs.

Using Home Health Care to Facilitate Independent Living

January 28, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
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When faced with the choice between living in an elderly care facility or aging as independently as possible at home, home health care is almost always the more desirable choice. Still, it’s not always easy to build a feasible support system for aging seniors who wish to retain as much independence and dignity as possible by continuing to live in their own homes.

Understanding the unique needs of an individual patient and the level of care required to help them stay in their own homes doesn’t have to be complicated. With the right assistance in place and a plan of action, it’s very possible to help your loved ones retain some semblance of an independent, healthy lifestyle well into their golden years.

Realistic Evaluation of Need

To create a plan for an extended aging-in-place arrangement, it’s imperative to objectively take stock of your loved one’s needs and requirements. Some seniors will require little more than… continue reading here:  http://www.insideeldercare.com/aging-in-place/using-home-health-care-to-facilitate-independent-living/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=using-home-health-care-to-facilitate-independent-living&utm_reader=feedly

Drug interactions causing a significant impact on statin use

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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A new study has found that many people who stopped taking cholesterol-lowering statin drugs were also taking an average of three other drugs that interfered with the normal metabolism of the statins.

The other drugs can contribute to a common side effect of taking statins – muscle pain – and often led people to discontinue use of a medication that could otherwise help save their life, researchers learned.

The interactions of many drugs with statins have been known of for some time, researchers said, but are not being adequately managed by physicians and pharmacists, who could often choose different medications or adjust dosages to retain the value of statin drugs without causing this side effect.

The research, done as part of a survey of more than 10,000 current and former statin users, found that use of medications which interfere with statin metabolism almost doubles the chance that a person will discontinue statin use due to muscle pain.

The issue is of growing importance because statin drugs are some of the most widely used medications in the world, proven to lower LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, and decrease the risk of heart attacks, heart disease, strokes and death. About 20 million people in the U.S. now take statins, and new guidelines have just been issued to further expand the types of health conditions for which statins may be of benefit. Based on those guidelines, the number of statin users could increase to more than 30 million.

The findings were published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology by scientists from Oregon State University and four other universities or research institutes.

“We’ve known for some time of many medications that can interact with statins, but only now is it becoming clear that this is a significant contributor to the side effects, and often the reason some patients stop taking statins,” said Matt Ito, a professor in the OSU College of Pharmacy and president of the National Lipid Association, which funded this study.

“This issue is something physicians, pharmacists and patients all need to be more aware of,” Ito said. “There’s a lot we can do besides discontinue use of these valuable medications. You can change dosages, use drugs that don’t cause interactions, use different types of statins. Patients need to be proactive in understanding this issue and working with their health care providers to address it.”

Persons who have problems taking statins should discuss options with their physicians or pharmacists, Ito said, and not assume the drug has be to discontinued. A Medscape web site at http://reference.medscape.com/drug-interactionchecker also can help individuals learn more about possible interactions between statins and the full range of medications they may be taking.

Statins are usually well-tolerated, but in the recent survey, a muscle-related side effect was reported by 29 percent of participants. In former statin users, 62 percent of the people said that side effects, mostly muscle pain, were the reason they stopped taking the drugs.

There are many drugs that can interfere with statin metabolism, increase systemic exposure to the statin and raise the risk of this muscle pain, the researchers said in their report. This can include some common antibiotics, cardiovascular drugs, and others taken for treatment of cancer, mental health, HIV treatment and other conditions.

These interactions are not always adequately considered by physicians and pharmacists, however. One recent report found that as many as 20 percent of significant statin-drug interactions were missed in 64 pharmacies.

Besides drug interactions, statin side effects are also more common in women and associated with increasing age, history of cardiovascular disease, and some other conditions. Statin discontinuation has been associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and death.

About the OSU College of Pharmacy: The College of Pharmacy prepares students of today to be the pharmacy practitioners and pharmaceutical sciences researchers of tomorrow by contributing to improved health, advancing patient care and the discovery and understanding of medicines.

U.S. Veterans Honored by Encore.org’s 2013 Purpose Prize

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Seven Awards for People Over Age 60 Solving the World’s Toughest Social Problems

The Purpose Prize has become a “MacArthur genius award for people who develop a second career as social service entrepreneurs.” – The New York Times.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy organizes a network of volunteers across the country to teach disabled veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan how to combat stress — through fly-fishing.

A public relations executive helps wounded warriors find and renovate foreclosed homes – and transforms lives and neighborhoods in the process.

These are two of the seven winners of the 2013 Purpose Prize, awarded by Encore.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who translate decades of skill and experience into “second acts” that contribute to society’s greater good.

Now in its eighth year, The Purpose Prize is the nation’s only large-scale investment in people over 60 who are combining their passion and experience for the social good. Created in 2005 by Encore.org, the prize is aimed at those with the passion to make change and the wisdom to know how to do it, showcasing the value of experience and disproving the notion that innovation is solely the province of the young.

Two winners will receive $100,000 each and five winners will receive $25,000 each.

This year’s winners:

* Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. ($100,000 winner of The Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra)

* Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron taps into her own experience as a cancer survivor to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. ($100,000)

* Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing emotional wounds through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. ($25,000)

* Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
Fennelly runs a unique summer camp behind bars that is transforming federal prisoners into involved parents. ($25,000)

* Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
Huttinger’s project is on a path to eradicate human schistosomiasis, a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. ($25,000)

* Reverend Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. ($25,000)

* Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
Young’s rise from immigrant nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. ($25,000)

The Purpose Prize winners will be honored on December 5, 2013, at an awards ceremony in Sausalito, Ca. NBC’s Jane Pauley will emcee the event for hundreds of Encore leaders and the Purpose Prize winners.

Twenty-one judges – leaders in business, politics, journalism and the nonprofit sector – chose the seven winners from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees. Judges include Sherry Lansing, former CEO of Paramount; David Bornstein, author and New York Times columnist; Eric Liu, writer and founder of CitizenUniversity; and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, The Purpose Prize is a program of Encore.org, which aims to engage millions of boomers in encore careers combining personal meaning, continued income and social impact in the second half of life.

This year, Symetra is sponsoring the $100,000 Purpose Prize for Future Promise, which recognizes an individual whose approach for helping society has the potential to grow steadily over the next five years. The company plans to sponsor another Purpose Prize for Future Promise in 2014.

“While Purpose Prize winners are helping to solve a wide range of pressing social problems, they have one thing in common,” said Marc Freedman, CEO and founder of Encore.org and author of The Big Shift (PublicAffairs Books). “They – and millions of others in encore careers – are turning personal passions and decades of experience into invaluable contributions across sectors, continents and generations, often through entrepreneurship.”

Short summaries for all winners follow. Photos are attached. Longer bios and higher resolution photos are available.

Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas, winner of this year’s Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra, rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. Following a 35-year-career as a fundraising and marketing dynamo, she became the director of communications at Purple Heart Homes in 2008 in an effort to provide greater services for veterans who have service-connected disabilities. In just three years, Thomas helped take the fledgling nonprofit to new heights. She has raised millions for Purple Heart Homes in financial contributions and material donations. Revenue shot up 600% in her first year with the startup. She’s developed an innovative program that matches veterans with foreclosed homes donated by banks, then raises the funds to renovate a home for the individual veteran’s needs. It’s a win-win for all generations—and communities too. It helps veterans to grow assets, towns to recoup lost taxes and neighborhoods that have struggled with foreclosures to stabilize.

Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron is an award-winning journalist with more than 42 years in television broadcasting. She tapped into her own experience as a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. To focus on the plight of low-income Latinos fighting the disease, Duron founded Latinas Contra Cancer (Latinas Against Cancer), an organization committed to educating, supporting and providing essential services to low-income Spanish speakers often overlooked by the health care system. Latinas Contra Cancer has offered a range of programs that have taught more than 3,000 men, women and teens about the disease, resulting in more than 300 preventative cancer screenings. The group has provided psychological and social support to over 100 patients per year. However, the call to action Duron answered has had an impact far beyond the Bay Area. Her passionate commitment is helping Latino communities across the U.S. gain access to cancer support, information and treatment. Her great empathy for cancer patients has made her utterly clear on her bigger purpose in the second stage of life.

Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing the emotional wounds of battle through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. A cancer survivor and war veteran himself, Nicholson was impressed by the fortitude of disabled veterans at the Walter Reed military hospital, where he was treated for prostate cancer in 2005. It spurred him to found Project Healing Waters, a program dedicated to helping disabled soldiers and veterans recover from the trying aftermath of war through the sport of fly-fishing. One-on-one connections have been key to Project Healing Waters’ approach since the beginning. Nicholson knew there were fly-fishing groups and facilities all over the country. His innovation was to convince them to start, manage and lead fly-fishing instruction and outings with veterans through military and Veterans Administration facilities. The quiet bonds forged over fishing lines began to transform lives. Again and again Nicholson heard from family members who said their loved ones had returned from war withdrawn, angry, and difficult to be around. But after fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters, they’ve become happier, more open and engaged. Project Healing Waters works closely with VA Recreational and Occupational therapies to identify those who would most benefit from the program. Many are in wheelchairs or using prosthetics. A few are blind. Participants reflect of full spectrum of disabled veterans and include all ages, genders, ethnicities and disabilities. Nicholson says the impact “goes well beyond the mechanics of fly-fishing.”

Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
A lifelong social activist who ran homeless shelters in the District of Columbia for 17 years, Carol Fennelly abandoned her plans to retire in 1998 when she learned that D.C. inmates had been transferred to Youngstown, OH. One woman made 10-hour round-trip drives twice a week to visit her son. Moved to answer a social need, Fennelly thought about opening a hospitality house in Youngstown for family members visiting inmates. She soon learned that while 93% of the federal inmate population is male, in sheer numbers there are more programs for mothers in prison than there are for fathers. She decided she had what it took to change things. “I had spent years organizing, dealing with government, making change happen, and that emboldened me to think I could go into prisons and start all these radical programs,” Fennelly says. So she launched an encore career with Hope House, an innovative organization that helps prison inmates stay in regular contact with their children. In the past 14 years, Hope House has hosted 200 video teleconferences, 18,000 personalized book readings by fathers and 31 week-long summer camps, which allow kids to spend time with their fathers free of the usual restrictions that come with visitor hours and family chaperones. California recently decided to implement the Hope House model in its 33 state prisons. Prisons in Texas, Idaho and New Hampshire may follow. In 2013 Fennelly was honored at the White House as a Champion of Change.

Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
International public health expert Elizabeth Huttinger spotted a big idea in shrimp, and launched an encore career that could eradicate a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. Huttinger’s project – founded in 2006 – is targeting human schistosomiasis, an infectious parasite carried by river snails. Understanding that the population of prawns that eat those snails had precipitously declined, Huttinger, 63, has devoted her encore career to restoring the prawn population in the SenegalRiver Basin. Projet Crevette’s mission is multifaceted: the restoration of the prawn population diminishes the spread of schisto, provides new economic opportunities to afflicted communities and heals families infected by the disease. Today, Projet Crevette is a prawn-farming microenterprise, operated by locals at public watering holes. It has brought social innovation, new microbusinesses, environmental restoration and improved health to communities. Huttinger is confident Projet Crevette will meet its bold goal to fully restore the indigenous prawn population—and improve countless lives in the process.

Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Reverend Violet Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. After 14 years as parish pastor trained in psychotherapy, Little left behind her traditional congregation to create a religious refuge for the homeless on the streets of the city, which became the “WelcomeChurch.” The church relies mostly on word of mouth, and services can pop up in a city park or on a sidewalk. No questions are asked, and everyone is welcome. The WelcomeChurch coordinates medical services through local universities, helps people get into rehab or jobs, and offers educational services to the public on the causes of homelessness. Little estimates 40 percent of her congregants have moved off the streets into permanent housing and the WelcomeChurch celebrates each and every one of them, many of whom stay connected with Little through their transition. Little’s congregation has grown to include hundreds of homeless as well as non-homeless volunteers in the EvangelicalLutheranChurch in America.

Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
An immigrant from the West Indies who built a meaningful life on meager income, Young’s gritty rise from nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. She’s encouraged thousands to stand up for their right to earn a living wage, and counsels and trains others to become leaders themselves. In 2004, Young began building a movement to legislate a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in New YorkState, which would make overtime, paid time off and rest days mandatory. In 2009, when she heard then Governor David Patterson say on the radio that he’d sign the bill if it made it to his desk, she put on a full court press, becoming the engine behind passage of the law in 2010. The law is the first of its kind in the country, but Young is committed to making sure it isn’t the last. She’s now a key player in the NDWA’s expansion from 11 to 44 affiliated organizations with 15,000 members, up from 5,000 in 2007. Young’s passion for serving her community has only just begun.

Read More About Encore’s Purpose Prize at www.encore.org/prize.

About Encore.org

Encore.org is a national nonprofit that promotes the idea that people in their second acts have the talent and experience to solve some of society’s greatest problems.

About The Atlantic Philanthropies

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. In keeping with the Giving While Living philosophy of founder Charles “Chuck” Feeney, The Atlantic Philanthropies believes in making large investments to capitalize on significant opportunities to solve urgent problems now, so they are less likely to become larger, more entrenched and more expensive challenges later. The Atlantic Philanthropies also seeks to encourage others of significant wealth to engage in major philanthropic pursuits in their lifetime.

About The John Templeton Foundation

The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, supporting research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.

About Symetra

Symetra Financial Corporation (NYSE: SYA) is a diversified financial services company based in Bellevue, Wash. In business since 1957, Symetra provides employee benefits, annuities and life insurance through a national network of benefit consultants, financial institutions, and independent agents and advisors.

 

CONTACT: Sara Ying Rounsaville, srounsaville@encore.org, 415-952-5121, or Russ Mitchell, rmitchell@encore.org, 510-969-0801

National Report: Oral Health of Older Americans In A ‘State of Decay’

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Oral Health America Launches First-of-its-Kind Website to Connect Older Adults to Affordable Dental Care and Resources

The oral health of older Americans is in a state of decay, according to a new national report released today by Oral Health America (OHA).  A State of Decay, a state-by-state analysis of oral healthcare delivery and public health factors impacting the oral health of older adults, reveals more than half of the country received a “fair” or “poor” assessment when it comes to minimal standards affecting dental care access for older adults. Florida and Arizona, areas with large older adult populations, rank in the bottom five states due to a shortage of oral health coverage, a strained dental health work force, and deficiencies in prevention programs.

“While we are seeing improvements in certain areas of older adult dental care, there is still a lack of progress in advancing the oral health of such a vulnerable population,” said Dr. Ira Lamster, Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, ColumbiaUniversity, Mailman School of Public Health. “Older adults face significant health challenges if their oral health is poor, and there is no coordinated program to help fund necessary services.”

A State of Decay gave a rating of “fair,” “poor,” “good,” or “excellent” based on state level data analyzing five variables impacting older adult oral health: adult Medicaid dental benefits, inclusion of older adult strategies in state oral health plans, edentulism (loss of teeth), dental health professional shortage areas, and community water fluoridation.

The final evaluations in the report for each state are mixed, with several states performing well in some variables, but still in need of improvement in other important areas. The top findings of this report that require scrutiny and action are:

  • Persistent lack of oral health coverage across much of the nation. Forty-two percent of states (21 states) provide either no dental benefits or provide only emergency coverage  through adult Medicaid Dental Benefits.
  • Strained dental health work force. Thirty-one states (62 percent) have high rates of Dental Health Provider Shortage Areas (HPSAs), meeting only 40 percent or less of dental provider needs.
  • Tooth loss remains a signal of suboptimal oral health. Eight states had strikingly high rates of edentulism, with West Virginia notably having an adult population that is 33.8 percent edentate. Photo – PRN Photo Desk, photodesk@prnewswire.com
  • Deficiencies in preventive programs. Thirteen states (26 percent) have upwards of 60 percent of their residents living in communities without water fluoridation (CWF), despite recognition for 68 years that this public health measure markedly reduces dental caries. Hawaii (89.2 percent) and New Jersey (86.5 percent) represent the highest rates of citizens unprotected by fluoridation, an unnecessary public peril.

Daily, 10,000 Americans retire and only 2 percent do so with a dental benefit plan. The State of Decay analysis provides a tool for states to use in addressing shortfalls in oral health status, dental professional access sites, dental benefits for low-income adults, and population-based prevention, all of which affect the oral health of older adults, the fastest growing segment of the American population.

To help older adults and their caregivers address oral health needs and overcome many of the barriers to accessing affordable dental care, OHA launched toothwisdom.org. The website is a first-of-its-kind online tool that connects older adults to dental care and educates on the importance of maintaining oral health with age. The American Dental Hygienists’ Association (ADHA) and Special Care Dentistry Association (SCDA) supported OHA and the launch of the website by encouraging their members to provide meaningful articles for the toothwisdom.org.

“Dental Hygienists have the opportunity to assist older Americans with the oral health challenges they may face as they age,”” said Ann Battrell, Executive Director, American Dental Hygienists’ Association. “We’re all committed to sharing the message that oral health matters and changing the common misperception that with age comes a decline in oral health.”

Few websites focus on oral and systemic health topics, and even fewer provide resources for older adult oral health. Toothwisdom.org offers oral care resources by state – including direct links to dental care, caregiving support, financial tools, social services, and transportation. It also shares the latest news and reliable health information from dental experts across the country on relevant oral health issues, the importance of continuing prevention with age, and the impact of oral health on overall health.

“My dental procedures have been very costly and I had to contact a social worker to help me understand my bills. Dental care should be more available and affordable because we know poor dental care affects overall health, which is particularly important for seniors,” said senior Patricia Cosgrove, a client of The Carter Burden Center for the Aging, Inc.  “Toothwisdom.org can help me find a community health center so I can finally get an affordable check-up and stay up-to-date on oral health information.”

A State of Decay and toothwisdom.org are part of Oral Health America’s Wisdom Tooth Project™, an initiative designed to meet the oral health challenges of a burgeoning population of older adults with special needs, chronic disease complications, and a growing inability to access and pay for dental services.

Links to the 2003 and 2013 editions of A State of Decay can be viewed on toothwisdom.org.

About OHA’s Wisdom Tooth Project
For 55 years, Oral Health America has been the leading national non-profit dedicated to improving the oral health and well-being of Americans throughout the entire spectrum of life. Over the decades, the organization has evolved and adapted to the dynamic nature of our country’s demographics and specific health needs. The Wisdom Tooth Project was born in 2010 due to the current and future implications of an aging population and the need for oral health resources for them mean that we must take meaningful action now.

About Oral Health America
OHA is a national, non-profit association dedicated to changing lives by connecting communities with resources to increase access to oral health care, education, and advocacy for all Americans, especially those most vulnerable. For more information about Oral Health America, please visit www.oralhealthamerica.org.

Study by Harvard Medical School Researchers Examines Senior Living’s Role in Changing Health Care System

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Individuals in senior living communities require an array of health and supportive services to maintain an optimum quality of life. Often, these older adults receive fragmented care through multiple providers and payers, resulting in unnecessary health care expenditures and lower quality-of-care. To address these challenges, Brookdale is partnering with researchers at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and other senior living industry peers to establish the Assisted Living Sector Healthcare Policy Research Fund.

“This support allows us to examine what role senior living providers have in the new models of care that have emerged under health care reform,” says David Grabowski, PhD, professor of health care policy at HMS, who is leading this research study.

Grabowski and his team will examine whether providing more comprehensive, coordinated services in the senior living sector reduces the need for Medicare-paid services and Medicaid-financed nursing home services.

According to Will Clark, Brookdale’s senior vice president of strategy and brand and a member of the HMS Health Care Policy Advisory Council, society’s ability to meet the needs of an aging population is an important political, economic, clinical, and social imperative.

“Harvard’s reputation for tackling some of health care’s biggest challenges and generating meaningful insights that shape our nation’s policy is unparalleled. We are confident Dr. Grabowski and his colleagues’ research will be influential in determining the appropriate role senior living can and should play in our evolving health care system,” Clark said.

Brookdale’s goals for this effort are to create awareness for the potential senior living has to positively impact the health, well-being and overall cost of care for seniors; to identify barriers to creating more integration among senior living and the health care system; influence policy; and identify innovative models that integrate senior living with our health care system.

The initiative is funded through a cumulative contribution of $150,000 from Brookdale and eight other senior living providers — Atria Senior Living, Elmcroft Senior Living, Emeritus Senior Living, Erickson Living, HCP, Inc., Health Care REIT, Inc., Sunrise Senior Living, and Ventas, Inc. Together, these organizations hope to begin a dialogue among health care providers, policy makers, regulators, and consumers on the value of senior living and its role in creating an integrated, outcomes-driven health care system.

The study will occur in two phases. The first phase will consist of analyzing the role of assisted living in new payment-delivery models and presenting a conceptual model of how an integrated model might work, as well as the opportunities and challenges associated with such an approach. Building on the results of the first phase, the second phase of the project will consist of primary data work and potentially the development of a pilot program.

For additional information about the study, contact David Cameron, HarvardMedicalSchool’s director of science communications, at 617-432-0441 or david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu.

For more information about Brookdale, visit www.brookdale.com.

Brookdale Senior Living Inc. is a leading owner and operator of senior living communities throughout the United States.  The Company is committed to providing senior living solutions within properties that are designed, purpose-built and operated with the highest-quality service, care and living accommodations for residents.  Currently, Brookdale operates independent living, assisted living, and dementia-care communities and continuing care retirement centers, with more than 650 communities in 36 states and the ability to serve approximately 67,000 residents.  Through its Innovative Senior Care program, the Company also offers a range of outpatient therapy, home health, personalized living and hospice services. For more information, visit http://www.brookdale.com.

Contact: Andrea Turner, 615-564-6829, aturner2@brookdaleliving.com

Study Shows that People Who Undergo Cataract Surgery to Correct Visual Impairment Live Longer

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Australian researchers find a 40 percent lower mortality risk among patients who had their vision corrected through the procedure  

SAN FRANCISCO – Sept. 4, 2013 – People with cataract-related vision loss who have had cataract surgery to improve their sight are living longer than those with visual impairment who chose not to have the procedure, according to an Australian cohort study published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. After comparing the two groups, the researchers found a 40 percent lower long-term mortality risk in those who had the surgery.

The research is drawn from data gathered in the Blue Mountains Eye Study, a population-based cohort study of vision and common eye diseases in an older Australian population. A total of 354 persons aged 49 years and older and diagnosed with cataract-related vision impairment –  some of whom had undergone surgery and others who had not – were assessed between 1992 and 2007. Adjustments were made for age and gender as well as a number of mortality risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, smoking, cardiovascular disease, body mass index and measures of frailty and comorbid disease. Follow-up visits took place after five and ten years since the baseline exam.

Previous research had indicated that older persons with visual impairment were likely to have greater mortality risk than their age peers with normal vision, and that cataract surgery might reduce this risk. These studies – unlike the Blue Mountains Eye Study – compared people who had undergone cataract surgery with those in the general population or with those who had not had cataract surgery, and did not link vision status to the surgical status.

“Our finding complements the previously documented associations between visual impairment and increased mortality among older persons,” said Jie Jin Wang, Ph.D., of the Westmead Millennium Institute and one of lead researchers of the study. “It suggests to ophthalmologists that correcting cataract patients’ visual impairment in their daily practice results in improved outcomes beyond that of the eye and vision, and has important impacts on general health.”

The association between correction of cataract-related visual impairment and reduced mortality risk is not clearly understood, but plausible factors may include improvements in physical and emotional well-being, optimism, greater confidence associated with independent living after vision improvement, as well as greater ability to comply with prescription medications.

Dr. Wang noted one limitation of the study is that participants with cataract-related visual impairment who did not have cataract surgery could have had other health problems that prevented them from undergoing surgery, and that these other health problems could partly explain the poorer survival among non-surgical participants. This issue is addressed by the researchers in a subsequent study.

Caused by the clouding of the lens, cataract is a leading cause of treatable visual impairment that will affect more than half of all Americans by the time they are 80 years old.[1]  Surgical removal of the opaque lens with an artificial lens implanted is a successful procedure of cataract treatment. If completing everyday tasks is difficult, cataract surgery should be discussed with an ophthalmologist − a medical doctor specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

Seniors who are seeking eye care but are concerned about cost may qualify for EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, which offers eye exams and care at no out-of-pocket cost to qualifying seniors age 65 and older. Learn more at www.eyecareamerica.org. For more information on cataracts and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology 
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons — Eye M.D.s — with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who has the education and training to treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trusted and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

About Ophthalmology
Ophthalmology, the official journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, publishes original, peer-reviewed, clinically applicable research. Topics include the results of clinical trials, new diagnostic and surgical techniques, treatment methods technology assessments, translational science reviews and editorials.

Checklist Helps Seniors Through Medicare Open Enrollment

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Older adults can follow a few simple tips to avoid uncovered expenses in the upcoming year.

With Medicare open enrollment beginning Oct. 15, now is the time to start preparing for future health care needs.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130710/CG45364LOGO-b)

Frank Nelson, program manager at the Central Coast Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program, regularly educates Medicare beneficiaries about the importance of open enrollment. He urges seniors to use this period to reevaluate their Medicare Part D coverage and make the most of their policies.

In an interview with MySilverAge.com, Nelson said many beneficiaries feel overwhelmed or have questions about their plans: “It can be a complicated maze. There are a lot of ways you can get tangled up in the nuances.” To avoid the headaches that often come with health insurance, Nelson advises seniors to:

  • Check changes to Medicare Part D. Part D plans should be specific to an individual’s medication needs. Seniors will need to make sure their prescriptions are still covered each year during open enrollment.
  • Request local pharmacy pricing. Open enrollment is a good time to check pricing of prescriptions, as each pharmacy can differ.
  • Purchase a supplemental policy. Older adults might consider Medigap to cover health care costs that aren’t already covered by Medicare.

The steps outlined in this checklist help readers successfully navigate the complexities of Medicare open enrollment and stay on top of their health care plans. Read the full checklist here: http://www.mysilverage.com/medicarechecklist.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

AARP Report Highlights Need for Innovative Long-Term Care for the Aging Baby Boomer Population; Japan’s Technological Secrets May Hold the Answers

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

A newly published AARP report illustrates a profound demographic shift that will have consequences for decades to come, particularly in the senior living and long-term care industry. Baby boomers are entering their retirement years, while the ratio of potential family caregivers to those who require long-term services and support is beginning to drop. Fewer available caregivers will mean the senior living industry must rapidly adapt to a surging market. The AARP’s full report is available here: http://bit.ly/156phYi

Family caregiving is a low-cost but often burdensome approach to elder care. Becoming a primary caregiver often involves leaving behind a career, among other sacrifices. Plus, these well-intentioned caregivers may not have the expertise necessary to provide the level of care needed by an aged parent. Adults in these roles often feel enormous pressure and stress, sometimes even resentment. At any rate, the nation’s changing demographics will make today’s family caregiving situation far different in the near future.

Between 1990 and 2010, there were about 7 potential caregivers for every one person aged 80-plus. That ratio is at the start of a freefall that will force society to change the way it cares for its elderly members. By 2030, the ratio of caregivers to elderly will be 4 to 1. All remaining baby boomers will have reached their years of highest risk (80+) by 2050, when the caregiver ratio will have plummeted still further to 3 to 1.

Kevin Williams, president of SeniorMarketing.com, suggests innovative thinking will be required to bridge this care gap: “Naturally, with fewer family caregivers available, the responsibility will largely shift to senior living communities, care agencies and already overextended government programs. But it will take more than simply building more communities or training more staff—assuming an adequate number of candidates are even available. Technological innovation may be the silver bullet to raise the standard of living for aging boomers, improve efficiency, and reduce costs.”

The nation of Japan, which has the greatest life expectancy and one of the oldest average populations in the world, has recently experienced a demographic transition of its own. Recently, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare put out a call for 2 million new professional caregivers, but only received 1.3 million eligible candidates. With low birth rates being the norm, that shortfall will only increase. A tech-savvy society to begin with, the Japanese have embraced robotics and automation as a solution to the elder care issue. Motorized, assistive devices can help older individuals perform tasks themselves, while automated pill dispensers can prevent dangerous medication mistakes. A recent blog post on The Economist explained Japan’s inventive approach to the elder care dilemma: http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2013/05/automation-elderly

Williams concluded: “This demographic shift is a great challenge but also a great opportunity. Forward-thinking, entrepreneurs will be leading the way in this new environment. Technology to assist with daily tasks, provide medical care, monitor, and connect seniors to loved ones is advancing at a faster pace every year. It’s not unreasonable to predict that the future will witness even better care for our future seniors.”

About SeniorMarketing.com

Baltimore-based SeniorMarketing.com was created with twin goals in mind. First, the company helps connect caregivers and seniors with local, affordable care options. Second, the company increases income for senior living communities and health care agencies.

Contact:

Kevin M. Williams, President
SeniorMarketing.com
5024 Campbell Blvd., Suite D-3
Baltimore, MD 21236
Phone: 1-888-523-3311

The Benefits of Medicare Advantage

October 31, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Dr. Amir Bacchus

The annual election period during which seniors can enroll in Medicare Advantage plans began on Oct. 15 and ends Dec. 7.  During this open enrollment period, many of Nevada’s senior citizens will assess their health care needs and weigh their options carefully to determine whether a Medicare Advantage plan is right for them.

As a physician and the chief medical officer of HealthCare Partners Medical Group, I have a great deal of knowledge and experience related to Medicare Advantage plans, and I urge seniors to make informed decisions this fall.

Medicare Advantage plans can be an excellent choice for seniors without private supplemental insurance, as many offer improved access to coordinated care and protection against high out-of-pocket expenses. Medicare Advantage is an alternative to what is known as Medicare Fee-For-Service or “original Medicare.”  Medicare Advantage plans typically provide prescription drug coverage and eliminate the need to purchase a Medigap policy. The premiums tend to be lower than you would pay by purchasing original Medicare, Part D (prescription drug coverage) and Medigap separately.

When comparing Medicare Advantage plans, it is essential to consider the costs, benefits and health care provider choices within each available plan. You should take time to learn about the “in-network” providers associated with the health insurance plan.  It is important to know whether the providers have a reputation for offering high-quality, coordinate care and if they have a large enough network to meet your health care needs.  Finally, you should also consider access to the primary care physicians, specialists and other providers you use on a regular basis under each plan. Consistency of care has numerous benefits, especially for those who feel comfortable with their current health care providers.

When considering your coverage options this fall, pick the plan that works best for you. It’s a big decision, and I hope seniors explore their options during this year’s enrollment period.

Dr. Amir Bacchus is the chief medical officer and co-founder of HealthCare Partners Medical Group.  Bacchus received his M.D. from Wayne State University School of Medicine in 1993 and is a diplomat of the American Board of Internal Medicine.

 

 

Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

National Council on Aging Launches Second Year of Education Program for Older Adults and Those Who Care for Them Aimed at Helping to Protect More Older Adults from the Flu

Actor Lee Majors, best known for his iconic roles on The Big Valley, The Fall Guy, and The Six Million Dollar Man, is joining the National Council on Aging (NCOA) Flu + You program to help protect older adults from influenza (commonly known as “the flu”). Flu + You aims to inform adults 65 and older, their caregivers, and those who care about them, about the dangers of the flu, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options.

As a part of his involvement in the Flu + You campaign, Majors will appear in a public service announcement (PSA) that follows him as he embarks on an important and action-packed mission: learning about his vaccine options and getting vaccinated against the flu. The PSA will educate the public about the increased risk of flu in adults 65 years of age and older and the importance of knowing your vaccine options and getting a flu vaccine, even for tough guys like Majors.

Every year in the United States, roughly nine out of 10 flu-related deaths and more than six out of 10 flu-related hospitalizations occur in people 65 and older. Older adults are at a greater risk for flu due, in part, to the weakening of the immune system that typically occurs with age. This means that no matter how healthy or youthful we feel, as we age we become more vulnerable to the flu and its related complications.

“The CDC recommends an annual flu vaccine as the single best way to protect yourself from the flu, yet a third of people 65 and older still don’t get vaccinated,” said Richard Birkel, PhD, MPA, NCOA Senior Vice President for Healthy Aging and Director of NCOA’s Self-Management Alliance. “As NCOA continues to educate older adults about the flu and the potential severity of the illness, we hope to encourage more people to protect themselves and their loved ones by getting an annual flu shot.”

The flu vaccine offers the best defense to protect against the flu, and adults 65 years of age and older have several vaccine options. In addition to the traditional flu vaccine (which helps protect against three strains of the flu virus), there is also a quadrivalent vaccine (which helps protect against four strains), and a higher dose vaccine that was designed specifically for adults 65 and older. By improving the production of antibodies in older patients, the higher dose vaccine can provide a stronger immune response to the flu than traditional vaccines. All flu vaccines are covered as a Medicare Part B benefit, which means there is no copay for Medicare beneficiaries 65 years of age and older.

“I get the flu shot every year and encourage my peers to do the same – it’s a simple step you can take to protect yourself from the flu,” says actor Lee Majors.  “I urge everyone 65 years of age and older to talk to their health care provider about their vaccine options this flu season.”

The flu can make existing health conditions worse, and it is especially dangerous for people with lung disease, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer—conditions that commonly affect older adults. Nationwide, 86 percent of adults 65 years of age and older have at least one chronic health condition and approximately 66 percent of Medicare beneficiaries have two or more chronic conditions, putting them at increased risk of the flu and flu-related complications, which can be severe and include hospitalization and even death.

For more facts about flu, and to order free educational materials, including a brochure and fact sheet, visit www.ncoa.org/Flu.

About Flu + You
Flu + You is a national public education initiative, from the National Council on Aging with support from Sanofi Pasteur, to educate adults 65 years and older about the dangers of the influenza virus, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options. Older adults and their caregivers can learn more on the Flu + You website, www.ncoa.org/Flu, which features a public service announcement with Lee Majors and facts about the flu. Also available on the website is a calendar of Flu + You events that will be held in 12 cities throughout the United States in September and October. At the events, older adults will have the opportunity to learn more about their risks for flu and available vaccine options, as well as talk to a health care provider and receive a flu vaccination.

About NCOA
The National Council on Aging is a nonprofit service and advocacy organization headquartered in Washington, DC. NCOA is a national voice for millions of older adults—especially those who are vulnerable and disadvantaged—and the community organizations that serve them. It brings together nonprofit organizations, businesses, and government to develop creative solutions that improve the lives of all older adults. NCOA works with thousands of organizations across the country to help seniors find jobs and benefits, improve their health, live independently, and remain active in their communities. For more information, please visit:

www.NCOA.org | www.facebook.com/NCOAging | www.twitter.com/NCOAging

 

CONTACT: Dana Kinker, (212) 301-7181, dkinker@wcgworld.com

WestCare Foundation Announces Expanded Veterans Programs

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

WestCare Foundation Announces Expanded Veterans Programs

(Las Vegas) – WestCare, a community-based nonprofit providing responsive human services and behavioral health care programs for four decades, announced today that it has expanded its Veterans’ services.

WestCare, founded in Las Vegas 40 years ago, serves approximately 5,000 veterans throughout the United States annually.  America’s returning warriors often face health challenges including substance abuse and mental health disorders, identified as this generation’s “invisible wounds of war.”   Among them are post traumatic stress, brain injury, sexual trauma, anxiety and depression.  Episodes of homelessness, unemployment, and criminal justice involvement are not uncommon among our Veterans.

“These challenges present opportunities for community organizations, led by specially trained, qualified and informed staff, to assist with issues such as social isolation, domestic violence, reintegration and transition, and other problems a Veteran, as well as Veteran family members, may be experiencing,” said veteran and Director of Veteran Services, Dan Bernal. “WestCare is committed to helping Veterans and military family members live positive, productive and healthy lives.”

WestCare’s expanded programs are aimed at addressing a broad range of issues for Veterans and their families through services that  include: treatment for substance abuse and mental health disorders with gender or youth-specific services as appropriate, HIV/AIDS-specific programs, assistance to homelessness  including transitional shelters and permanent housing projects, family counseling, community reintegration, assistance to those who are justice involved, educational and vocational programs for both youth and adults, and case management.

From the top down, starting with WestCare’s President and Vietnam Veteran, Richard Steinberg, more than 10 percent of WestCare’s leadership and staff are Veterans and members of military families. The organization has a deep understanding of military culture at every level and in every program.  “Serving those who have served” is more than a slogan at WestCare.

Since the organization’s inception, Veterans have been welcomed into WestCare programs.  Today, the expanding reach of Veteran-specific programs is aimed at extending services to the men and women who deserve respect for their service, understanding of where they have been and opportunities for their future.

WestCare

WestCare, whose mission “uplifting of the human spirit,” was founded 40 years ago in Las Vegas.  Since its inception, it has grown to more than 100 locations in 16 U.S. States, the US Virgin Islands and the Pacific Islands headquartered in Guam.  The non-profit organization has a variety of programs available in each of the communities it serves.   For more information on the WestCare Foundation and its mission, visit www.WestCare.com.

Ophthalmologists Warn that Fireworks-Related Injuries Can Cause Permanent Vision Loss

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Ophthalmologists Warn that Fireworks-Related Injuries Can Cause Permanent Vision Loss
American Academy of Ophthalmology and Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology urge parents to closely supervise children when around fireworks

LAS VEGAS – June 26, 2013 – As the Fourth of July holiday approaches and Americans make plans to celebrate the stars and stripes with a little red glare from celebratory rockets, the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology urge the public to take important steps to prevent fireworks-related eye injuries. The academies ask parents and other adults to be especially cautious when children are in the presence of fireworks.

Of the more than 9,000 fireworks injuries that occur in the United States each year, [I]approximately 45 percent are sustained by children age 15 and under.[II] Eyes are among the most injured body parts,[III] and one in six fireworks-related eye injuries results in permanent vision loss or blindness.[IV]

All fireworks are dangerous if not properly handled; however, sparklers cause the most injury and are particularly dangerous since many children handle them on their own. Sparklers typically burn at 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit. That temperature is nearly 1,000 degrees hotter than the boiling point of water, double the heat required to burn wood, hot enough to melt glass and cause third-degree burns to the skin.[V] Out-of-control bottle rockets also cause some of the most serious eye injuries, including corneal abrasions, traumatic cataract, retinal detachment, optic nerve damage and rupture of the eyeball – all of which can lead to potential blindness.

Both Academies advise the public that the best way to avoid potentially blinding injuries is to attend a professional public fireworks display instead of using consumer fireworks. For those who still decide to use legal consumer fireworks, the Academy recommends they follow these safety tips to prevent eye injuries:

  • Never handle fireworks without protective eyewear and ensure that all bystanders are also wearing eye protection.
  • Never let young children play with fireworks of any type. If older children are permitted to handle fireworks, ensure they are closely supervised by an adult and wear protective eyewear.
  • Clear the area of flammable materials and view fireworks from at least 500 feet away.
  • Leave the lighting of professional-grade fireworks to trained pyrotechnicians.

For those who attend professional fireworks displays and/or live in communities surrounding the shows:

  • Respect safety barriers at fireworks shows.
  • Do not touch unexploded display (show) fireworks; instead, immediately contact local fire or police departments to help.

“It’s vital that the public take seriously the dangers of using consumer fireworks. If mishandled, devastating injuries can occur – particularly to the eyes,” said Adam J. Rovit, M.D., president of the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology. “We urge parents and adults to be on high alert about these risks, especially if children are in the presence of fireworks, and take these safety measures to reduce the risk of eye injury.”

The Academy and the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology believe these tips can help to ensure safe Independence Day observances for everyone. If, however, a fireworks-related eye injury occurs, call 911 and seek medical help immediately. These injuries typically need advanced care by an ophthalmologist, a medical doctor who specializes in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

For more fireworks safety tips and additional information on how to maintain healthy vision, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology
The mission of the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology is to promote and advance the science and art of medical eye care. The Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology’s members are dedicated to treating and preventing eye diseases for all patients.  Learn more at Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide.  Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org.

About EyeSmart
The American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.orgto learn more.

###


[I] Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2011 Fireworks Annual Report, accessed at http://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/113888/2011fwreport.pdf

[II] Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Fireworks-Related Injuries to Children, accessed at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/108/1/190.full

Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2011 Fireworks Annual Report, accessed at http://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/113888/2011fwreport.pdf

[IV]  British Journal of Ophthalmology, Ocular firework trauma: a systematic review on incidence, severity, outcome and prevention, accessed athttp://bjo.bmj.com.proxy1.library.jhu.edu/content/94/12/1586.full#ref-11

[V] National Fireworks Protection Agency fireworks tips, accessed at http://www.nfpa.org/assets/files/pdf/public%20education/fireworkssafetytips.pdf

Northern Nevada Medical Center Announces New CEO, Alan Olive

Northern Nevada Medical Center Announces New CEO, Alan Olive

OliveBldg

(Sparks, NV) Northern Nevada Medical Center welcomes Alan Olive, MPH, MHA, as new CEO for the 108-bed hospital in Sparks, NV.

Born and raised in Reno, Olive has 19 years of healthcare leadership experience. He has served as CEO at northern Nevada hospitals including Carson Tahoe’s Sierra Surgical Hospital in Carson City and Renown South Meadows Medical Center in south Reno. He was also previously an executive with Providence Health and Services, based in Portland, Ore, and MountainView Hospital in Las Vegas, NV.

“Alan is an experienced health care professional with expertise in integrated health systems, project management, health plan partnerships, hospital operations, and physician relations,” said Karla Perez, Regional Vice President for Acute Care at Universal Health Services. “His experience and history in the Reno/Sparks area will greatly benefit Northern Nevada Medical Center and healthcare in the community.”

OliveHeadshot

Alan earned a Bachelor of Science in Sociology from Brigham Young University and a Master of Public Health – Hospital Administration and Master of Healthcare Administration from Loma Linda University.

OliveLobby

Northern Nevada Medical Center is a 108-bed acute care hospital located in Sparks, Nevada. NNMC’s tradition of providing quality healthcare in a comfortable, accessible environment means peace of mind for the thousands of patients served by the hospital each year.

 

NNMC is the only hospital in Nevada certified by The Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center as well as knee replacement, hip replacement and spine surgery. NNMC is also the first program in the nation certified by The Joint Commission in low back pain and is also an Accredited Chest Pain Center by the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care. Northern Nevada Medical Center is owned and operated by a subsidiary of Universal Health Services, Inc.(UHS), a King of Prussia, PA-based company, that is one of the largest healthcare management companies in the nation.

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

At a time when thousands of Baby Boomers are reaching the age of 65 every day, the issues of senior rights, elder laws, and anti-ageism have never been more important, more volatile, or more questioned. After all, this is the generation that was ready to take down the establishment fifty years ago, and they haven’t lost any of their desire to change the world for the better. And, they have the numbers to do it. Here are our 100 top blogs for seniors dealing with senior rights, law & policy, and anti-ageism.

Boomers Against The Law

  1. Elder Law Plus: lawyer Evan H. Farr blogs about topics concerning elder law, including probate strategies and parental care.
  2. Michigan Elder Law Blog: the attorneys at Barsch & Joswick provide seniors and their loved ones with sage advice on a variety of Elder law issues.
  3. Everything Elder Law: Evan Farr is back at it again, this time focusing on Elder Law news, concepts, and innovations from around the country.
  4. Massachusetts Estate and Elder Law Blog: lawyer and blogger Stephanie Konarski gives tips on estate planning and other elder law topics.
  5. New York Elder Law Attorney Blog: your source for elder law news and comment in New York, this blog analyzes nursing home legislation and elder care costs.
  6. Elder Law Prof. Blog: Elder Law professor Kim Dayton authors a really nice blog that covers a wide range of Elder law issues, from Supreme Court cases to seminars.
  7. The Pop Tort: can a consumer advocates blog dealing with civil justice be cute? This blog proves it can, complete with an adorable “Pop Tort” logo, even while exploring such issues as Medicare and Medicaid lawsuits, nursing home scams, and medical malpractice against the elderly, among other legal issues.
  8. Supportive Senior Solutions: this blog from a geriatric care management practice in New York covers issues related to geriatric care, caregiving, and healthcare laws for the elderly and infirm.
  9. Aging Beats the Alternative: elder care specialist Lorie Ebers uses her blog to talk about overcoming the challenges of aging, caring for aging parents, and the less talked about side of elder law: Boomer divorce.
  10. Elder Law Blog: lawyer Ronald C. Morton’s elder law blog is full of sage advice for seniors looking how to tap into Veteran’s benefits, how to plan for their golden years, and more.
  11. The Best Elder Law Blog: published by the attorneys at Lamson & Cutner, this blog discusses elder law cases, the Affordable Care Act, and same-sex marriage.
  12. Elder Law Tips and News: the lawyers at Cooper, Adel & Associates bring you posts on living trusts, aging issues, and general estate planning.
  13. The Connecticut Elder Law Blog: lawyer Michael Keenan provides his readers with estate planning tips, elder fraud, and Medicare rules.
  14. The Teddy Bear Lawyers: attorney Rick Law gives readers a great resource for Elder Law in the Chicagoland area. Find articles on protecting vulnerable seniors and financial planning.
  15. Oregon Elder Law: attorney Orrin Onken blogs on elder law, estate planning, and probate proceedings in plain, easy to understand language.
  16. Florida Elder Law and Estate Blog: this informative blog includes great articles on VA benefits, estate planning, and trusts.
  17. Golden Law Center: written by attorney Sasha Golden, the Golden Law Center blog discusses elder law, special needs planning, guardianship, wills and trusts, and estate administration.
  18. Kraft Elder Law: attorney Robert Kraft blogs about Medicaid, Medicare, wills, trusts, probate, veterans benefits, and other elder law topics.
  19. Pennsylvania Law Blog: this elder law blog by the attorneys at the law offices of Shober & Rock discusses Medicaid, taxes, Veterans, banks, and annuities.
  20. Long Beach Elder Law Blog: this blog focuses on elder abuse, estate protection, the Cal MediConnect program, and reform of health law.
  21. Houston Elder Law Blog: the folks at Wright Abshire Attorneys blog about care planning, estate planning, Medicaid Planning, Probate & Estate Administration, and and Veteran’s Benefits.
  22. Hauptman Law Blog: readers of this blog can learn more about elder, estate, and special needs law. Includes articles on the Medicare Settlement and VA Aid.
  23. Fulkerson Elder Law Blog: the function of this elder law blog is for the firm to respond to common questions clients have about elder law and review developments in the law impacting elder law and estate planning.
  24. CMLP Estate Planning and Elder Law Blog: readers can look forward to reviewing articles on simplifying their estate plan and elder law news items of note.
  25. Massachusetts Estate Planning and Probate Blog: attorney Matthew Karr keeps readers up to date on estate planning and probate news and information.
  26. Marshall Elder and Estate Planning Blog: the author of this elder law blog has over 30 years experience in estate planning, special needs planning, and estates.
  27. Hartford, CT Elder Law Blog: the attorney’s at Ruggiero Ziogas & Allaire discuss estate planning, care planning, Medicaid, Veteran’s Benefits, and Probate.
  28. El Paso Elder Law Blog: the law firm of Stephanie Townsend Allala and Associates blogs on estate planning, guardianships, Medicaid Planning, Nursing Home Abuse, and Trust & Probate.
  29. Miami Probate Law Blog: the folks at the Byrant law firm keep readers up-to-date on estate administration, probate court, estate litigation, and the nuisances of will and trust disputes.
  30. Elder Law News: attorney Brian A. Raphan is based in New York City and specializes in Wills, Estates, Trusts, and Elder Care issues. His blog is full of great resources.
  31. Aging & Law in West Virginia: this blog contains news in law and aging in West Virginia, written by the West Virginia Senior Legal Aid organization.
  32. Florida Elder Law and Estate Planning: this Florida Certified Elder Law attorney provides in depth insights and news to help Floridians protect themselves and preserve their assets.
  33. Family Law Blog Maryland: while this blog looks at all matters pertaining to Family Law, elder law sneaks in as a prevalent theme in many of the cases discussed. They look at legal matters like when divorce and retirement coincide, or when grandparents wish to take custody of their grandchildren.
  34. Phoenix AZ Family Law Blog: looking at issues older couples face in Arizona, this family law blog explores the specific challenges elders face in divorces and custody battles, complete with the latest policy changes and laws.
  35. Otherspoon: hospice volunteer and blogger Ann Neumann talks about care-giving and the realities, politics, and senior rights involved in death and dying.

Seniors Talk Policy And Politics

  1. Aging in Place: this blog is concerned with seniors who are dealing with shrinking benefits and increasing costs—seniors find answers on how to protect themselves.
  2. Estate in Denial: providing news, analysis, and commentary on abusive practices occurring in probate courts. Features original perspective and direct communication.
  3. Florida Estate Planning Lawyer Blog: this blog covers estate planning legal issues, cases of interest, and news with a focus on Florida elder law.
  4. McGuire Woods: the people at McGuire Woods author this great blog on long term care legal issues, including timely news, articles, and white papers.
  5. Illinois Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: published by the law office of Wilson & Wilson, this blog covers asset protection, banking, estate planning, and trusts.
  6. Illinois Nursing Home Abuse Blog: covers Illinois nursing home law, including Supreme Court cases and other information relating to residents and family members.
  7. Law Office of Donald D. Vanarelli Blog: provides readers in New Jersey with information on elder law, estate and special needs planning, and mediation services.
  8. Maryland Nursing Home Lawyer Blog: this blog offers insight on nursing home abuse reports, legislation, and legal opinions of elder law in Maryland.
  9. Massachusetts Estate Planning, Probate & Elder Law: elder law attorney Brian Barreira writes on legal issues involving death, taxes, special needs, and long-term elder care.
  10. New Jersey Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: blog posts explore life and death in New Jersey from a perspective of estate planning, elder law, taxation, probate, and estate administration.
  11. Medina Law Group: postings provide readers with advice on estate planning and management, estate taxes, elder law, and VA benefits.
  12. North Carolina Wills and Trusts: this blog provides readers with estate planning and elder law news with a North Carolina focus.
  13. California Nursing Home Abuse Law Blog: covers nursing home abuse, elder law abuse, and features many quality articles relating to California elder law.
  14. Nursing Home Law Blog: this well written blog discusses elder issues, legislation, legal news, protections of elder rights, and helpful health tips.
  15. PA Elder Estate and Fiduciary Law Blog: focuses on elder law, long-term care, end-of-life and health care surrogate decision-making, and estate planning.
  16. Patti’s Blog: find information about this lawyer’s practice, which concentrates on advocacy for seniors. She shares personal interests and her passions.
  17. Pennsylvania Nursing Home Abuse Lawyer Blog: this blog discusses nursing home abuse laws, cases, and news items from Pennsylvania.
  18. Barbara Cashman Blog: Barbara blogs about elder law and policy issues, and often hosts guest bloggers to share their insights on elder law and news.
  19. NJ Elder Law: lawyer Kenneth Vercammen blogs about topics related to estate planning and elder law. He was once awarded the NJ State Bar Municipal Court Practitioner of the Year.
  20. The Senior Sentinel: a blog compiling news and information for Baby Boomers, the Senior Sentinel concentrates on the intersection of ageism and public policy both nationally and world-wide.
  21. Elder Consult: this geriatric medicine blog not only covers Alzheimers, dementia, financial decision making, and medications, it also discusses related legal issues such as elder financial abuse.
  22. Grey Pride: a UK blog by the Anchor Digital Marketing team is dedicated to keeping older people at the top of the political agenda and petitioning the government to create a Minister for Older People to ensure their needs are met.
  23. Over 65 Blog: project organizers from Harvard, Yale, and The Hastings Center host this blog for “seniors seeking solutions for health care and security, mainly looking at health care system reforms, elder law policies and practices, and how seniors can achieve a stronger role in the future of health care.
  24. Reaping Hope Blog: a blog from an NGO in Nepal promoting dignified aging and elder rights, Reaping Hope explores elder abuse and elder oppression while actively helping elderly people claim their rights and challenge discrimination.

Age Against The Machine: Anti-Ageism

  1. Ageist Beauty: the musings, product reviews, and random thoughts of a woman who is fighting against her age.
  2. Everyday Ageism Project: this blog aims to capture people’s everyday experiences dealing with ageism. The author has discovered that ageism is the most commonly experienced form of prejudice.
  3. The Lonely Gerontologist: professor Kelly Yokum blogs about all things aging—including aging stereotypes and other aging topics that come to mind.
  4. My Elder Advocate: this blog provides comprehensive coverage of ageism, the dangers of nursing homes, elder abuse, and elder care.
  5. The Roaming Boomers: David and Carol are great examples of a couple who doesn’t let age get in the way of living life to the fullest.
  6. The Gypsy Nester: Veronica and David show readers how to rock the empty nest and get the most out of life as you age.
  7. Changing Aging: this multi-blog platform challenges conventional views on aging. The authors believe aging is a strength, rich in developmental potential and growth.
  8. The Elders: founded by Nelson Mandela in 2007, the Elders is a group of seniors committed to addressing global challenges, including child marriage and climate change.
  9. Beauty and Wisdom: the blog of photographer Robbie Kaye, who traveled to salons throughout the US to photograph and interview women in their 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s and discovered that beauty is ageless.
  10. Advanced Style: don’t tell these women they are too old to model hip and alluring fashions. This blog teaches women how to dress to impress and that age is only a number.
  11. RL TV: the only cable network and online destination for folks 50+, features a nice blog that provides tips on elder issues and promotes active living.
  12. The 70-Something Blog: blogger Judy informs readers how to live a full and engaging life as she chronicles her journey of aging.
  13. Retirement is Work: newly retired librarian and blogger resolves to post one good thing about retirement every day for a year, but along the way struggles with senior rights and anti-ageism.
  14. Yo Is This Ageist?: a humorous blog by Ashton Applewhite dedicated to determining whether age-related remarks are offensive, “challenging the stereotypes that segregate us by age.”
  15. This Chair Rocks: a smart and sassy blog by Ashton Applewhite that challenges the ideas of ageism with humor and snark. All stereotypes and insensitive remarks are grounds for brilliant blog posts.
  16. Senior Planet: “aging with attitude” is the tagline of this blog community of older adults using technology to connect with each other and take on the issues of ageism and senior rights.
  17. Changing Aging: a blog founded by Dr. Bill Thomas to promote “a radical reinterpretation of longevity” which focuses on anti-ageism and senior rights, as well as getting the most out of a long life.
  18. Time Goes By: Ronni Bennett takes on aging, ageism and related issues with humor, exploring the truth of “what it’s really like to get old.” She starts by rejecting the “cutesy” terms for old people – they’re called “elders” around here!
  19. The Magic of Middle-Aged Women: author Daniel Even Weiss – a man – blogs on the theme of his latest book, The Magic of Middle-Aged Women, where he challenges the prevailing ageist idea that women don’t get better as they age. They do.
  20. Advanced Style: Ari Seth Cohen, a young-ish photographer, roams the New York City streets photographing stylish and creative elders. Here, art challenges the paradigm that age and beauty can’t co-exist.
  21. The New Old Age: the New York Times blog on aging takes advantage of the newspaper’s top writers to explore the unprecedented intergenerational challenge of the Baby Boomers.
  22. The Little Old Lady Stays Put (or doesn’t): explores the “lives, lifestyles and issues of interesting older people,” touching on the issues surrounding ageism, elder rights, living with dementia, and overcoming the struggles of aging with strength and good humor.
  23. Naked at Our Age: advocate of ageless sexuality, Joan Price, talks about sex and aging, taking on Senior Rights subjects like safer sex for seniors while providing helpful tips.
  24. Aging & Work at Boston College: scholars, academics, and researchers share their findings on ageism in the workplace and the challenges aging workers face in this PhD-heavy blog by The Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College.
  25. Ethnic Elders: this newsy blog by New America Media examines the Senior Rights issues and Elder Law of minority groups such as age discrimination, lawsuits related to Social Security, and elder healthcare reform.
  26. The Everyday Ageism Project: blending blogging and research, this site’s goal is to capture the experience of age discrimination. The forum is full of people sharing their experiences in a supportive environment.
  27. Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens Blog: the Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens sub-blog offers wide ranging posts on issues including senior rights and ageism – with its signature left-wing perspective.
  28. Clinical Geriatrics: created as more of a peer-reviewed clinical journal by the American Geriatrics Society, some of the top scholars in geriatrics converge on this blog to discuss geriatric health and wellness issues, which often cross over into legal and anti-ageism issues.
  29. Age Action Alliance: this organization brings together a network of 300 organizations and individuals committed to helping older people. Its blog is dedicated to improving older people’s lives through advocating against ageism, particularly in Britain.
  30. Manitoba Senior Centres: this Canadian blog covers the rampant ageism in Canada and promotes world elder abuse awareness. It also has a list of resources for older adults.
  31. Fierce with Age: defying ageism goes mainstream at this blog, created by veteran journalist Dr. Carol Orsborn. Having written about the Boomer generation for major newspapers and blogged for the Huffington Post and NPR’s Next Avenue, Orsborn is well equipped to take on the spiritual and policy hurdles of aging.
  32. Live Better Boomer!: a Philadelphia-based blog, by social worker Tiffany Matthews, devoted to helping educate and empower Boomers advocate for their own improved healthcare.
  33. Third Age: billed as “health for Boomers and beyond,” Third Age offers relatively fluffy fare, like “Change your Mood with Color,” to the legal issues surrounding Boomer divorce and care-giving.
  34. The Old Gunhand: one facet of senior citizen rights you don’t see every day is elder gun advocates. This website not only tells you the best types of guns for elderly wielders, it also goes into gun policy and senior self-defense.
  35. Age Discrimination Info: a simple name for a one-stop source of statistics and information on age discrimination, including legislation, cases, news, publications, events and training. The perfect resource for the activist.
  36. Age UK: the largest organization in the United Kingdom for working with and for older people, this website has an entire section dedicated to age discrimination and ageism.
  37. National Youth Rights Association: not just for youngsters, the National Youth Rights Association combats ageism in all its forms. In fact, they probably wouldn’t appreciate being called “youngsters.”
  38. Disability and Representation: a blog by writer, photographer and activist Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg that discusses (and tries to change the discourse about) disability rights and ageism, along with autism.
  39. Over 50: Career coaching and workshops for the over-50 crowd, this blog doesn’t stop at finding a job. This site explores Baby Boomer activism in and out of the workplace.
  40. Activist Post: while this blog deals with many topics requiring advocacy, they often include issues that regard Senior Rights, Elder Law and anti-ageism.
  41. California Booming: an informational blog dedicated to California Baby Boomers, this blog covers everything from sex, to diet, to politics of the Boomer generation, including issues concerning senior rights and ageism in the workplace.

Health Insurance for Senior Citizens – How to Get the Best Rate by Brian Stevens

May 31, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As a senior citizen, you may find yourself in a health insurance crisis – no longer covered by an employer’s health insurance policy but needing health insurance more than you ever did before. Of course, Medicare covers some of your medical expenses, but how can you get the best rate on health insurance to cover the gaps Medicare leaves?

What Medicare Covers

Once you are 65 years old, you’re eligible to enroll in Medicare. Medicare can include several programs:

* Medicare Part A, which helps cover inpatient hospital care, nursing home care, hospice care, and some home health care. Most people pay for this coverage through taxes, so they do not pay a deductible or monthly premium.

* Medicare Part B, which helps cover doctors’ services, outpatient hospital care, medical equipment, physical and occupational therapy and some home health care. Most people pay an annual deductible and a monthly premium for this health plan.

* Medicare Part C, Medicare Advantage Plan, which offers you more choices among health plans and extends your benefits.

* Medicare Part D, prescription drug coverage.

In addition, you may need MediGap coverage, which is health insurance that covers what Medicare does not.

Affordable Health Insurance for Senior Citizens

As you can see, health insurance for senior citizens can be confusing. Fortunately, insurance comparison websites can help you gain a clear picture of what health insurance you need, as well as help you find that insurance at a reasonable rate.

All you need to do is go to an insurance comparison website and complete a simple form with information about yourself and your insurance needs. Once you submit the form, you will soon receive quotes for affordable health insurance from multiple A-rated insurance companies. And at the best insurance comparison websites, insurance professionals are standing by to talk with you and answer any health insurance questions you have. (See link below.)

Visit http://www.LowerRateQuotes.com/health-insurance.html or click on the following link to get health insurance quotes for senior citizens from top-rated companies and see how much you can save. You can also get more insurance tips there.

The authors, Brian Stevens and Stacey Schifferdecker, have spent 30 years in the insurance and finance industries, and have written a number of articles on health insurance for senior citizens.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Brian_Stevens

Life Insurance Planning for Senior Citizens by Natalie Aranda

May 31, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Life Insurance has sometimes been described as a bet between you and the Insurance Company. The Insurance Company is betting that you are going to live and you are betting that you are going to die. If you do die, you win the bet. This approach has been the basis of life Insurance policies in the past. Despite the fact that it would seem this does not much benefit an individual, the truth was that the Life Insurance payout was designed to provide for those that you left behind.

Changes in health care and the increasing life span have brought some changes to this concept. The desire for senior citizens to spend their retirement in an active adult community where they can enjoy their golden years to the maximum has prompted many to take a fresh approach to the use of the cash value of life insurance. It has also influenced the type of policies that have become popular. When a payout upon death was the main purpose of an insurance policy, the only thing that mattered was the amount of the death benefit.

Today, people in increasing numbers are opting to not spend their last years in their homes. An Arizona active adult community that is located in an area without a harsh winter seems much more attractive. A Florida active adult community situated close to the ocean would be preferably to long cold winters. This is the new dream of senior citizens, but in many cases the funds needed to make this dream come true are not available at the time of retirement. It has become possible to redeem the cash value of an insurance policy prior to death through an annuity settlement. The basic idea is the seller of the annuity provides a cash settlement to you at retirement. In return, they basically become the new beneficiary of your policy.

The annuity settlement changes the conditions of the bet. Now, you are betting that you are going to live, and the new beneficiary of your policy is betting you will die. If you live, you win. Many senior citizens are seeing this as a better idea. It takes some careful planning, and each case must be considered individually. The debt situation and the situation of a spouse and of children must be taken into consideration. The increased popularity of Individual Retirement Accounts has lessened the need for a large death payout to some degree. The best time to plan for your life insurance needs as a senior citizen is long before you ever become one. Sadly, this is not always done until too late. In this case, the options can be considered. It is not a time to be rash and seeking the advice of a trusted Insurance agent or financial advisor is highly recommended. If you plan on spending your last years enjoying a California active adult community, start that planning as early as possible.

Natalie Aranda writes about finance. Today, people in increasing numbers are opting to not spend their last years in their homes. An Arizona active adult community that is located in an area without a harsh winter seems much more attractive. A Florida active adult community situated close to the ocean would be preferably to long cold winters. This is the new dream of senior citizens, but in many cases the funds needed to make this dream come true are not available at the time of retirement.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Natalie_Aranda

Why Are Reverse Mortgages Important to Senior Citizens? by Craig Castle

May 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

In Texas and many other parts of the country, senior citizens are being squeezed. They receive, on average, $965 per month in social security. And, while property taxes vary, a senior in many Texas cities with a home valued at $100,000 will pay more than $200 per month in property taxes alone. Add to that the high cost of necessities like health care, prescription medicine, utilities, and mortgage payments, and the financial picture can be very bleak. It’s no wonder that many seniors face foreclosure or tax liens on their homes.

“Reverse mortgages are important to Texas seniors because they allow them to obtain a loan against the equity in their home—often their single largest asset—without making monthly payments to repay that loan. That means that with a government-insured reverse mortgage, a senior will never lose his or her home to a bank simply because he or she could not make a payment,” said Craig Castle, a San Antonio reverse mortgage specialist for the past four years.

So why don’t more Texas seniors take advantage of this financial product?

Castle says that in his experience, seniors shy away from reverse mortgages for three reasons:
◾1. Fear
◾2. Bad advice
◾3. The availability of other, more well-advertised, loan products

“I have had many clients elect not to complete the reverse mortgage process because of fear,” Castle says. “Usually, the additional cash could have improved their lives significantly.”

Seniors’ fear is not unfounded. They are often the targets of scams and fraud. But, reverse mortgages have one important safe-guard built into them to protect even those who are uncomfortable making financial decisions. In order to obtain a government-insured reverse mortgage, a senior must have counseling by a HUD counselor with the local housing authority or the Consumer Credit Counseling Office. This unbiased person can help the senior determine whether a reverse mortgage makes sense for his or her individual situation.

And, sometimes well-meaning family and friends give bad advice.

“I have had ministers tell clients that they heard that you could lose your home with a reverse mortgage,” Castle said. “It isn’t true, but advice isn’t always based on facts.”

The availability of home equity loans also clouds the picture for many seniors. “Home equity loans can be appropriate for people who have an income, but they often spell disaster for seniors,” Castle said. “I talk to potential clients every week who tell me that they are having problems keeping up with their payments.”

“My experience has been that most home equity clients who are over 65 and have taken the maximum 80% of their home value will eventually lose their house—if they live at least 3-5 years beyond the date of loan origination,” Castle added.

With a reverse mortgage, the homeowner can access from 40-60% of the appraised value of their home, but the loan is not repaid until they die or leave the home permanently. Then the home is sold and the proceeds are used to repay the loan, with any remainder going to the owner’s estate.

To find out more about the benefits and requirements for a reverse mortgage, visit [http://www.SouthTexasReverseMortgage.com] and request the free Federal Trade Commission publication, Facts for Seniors about Reverse Mortgages. Or call Castle at 210-789-3685.

“Misinformation has prevented many seniors from getting a reverse mortgage when it would have provided them with greater financial stability—and peace of mind. That’s why I like to have the family involved and why I often spend several hours at my clients’ home explaining and re-explaining how a reverse mortgage works and how the various pay-out options can make their lives better,” Castle said.

Craig Castle is a Reverse Mortgage Specialist with Financial Freedom in San Antonio and the South Texas area. He holds a BA in Economics from the University of Missouri, is a former Licensed Stock Broker, and has worked with reverse mortgages for the past four years. He is also chairman of the Not Forgotten Coalition, a not-for-profit organization that provides services and advocacy for senior citizens in San Antonio. For more information, visit [http://www.SouthTexasReverseMortgage.com] or phone 210-789-3685.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Craig_Castle

Health Insurance For Senior Citizens – Why Are They So Hard To Insure? by Zandra Jones

May 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Private health insurance for senior citizens is very hard to come by. As you get older, it becomes more prevalent that commercial insurance companies don’t want to cover older Americans. Since the creation of Medicare, there is no incentive to cover senior citizens because most buy into the Medicare system any way. Even though this may be true, there are still some older Americans who need to buy private health insurance. So let’s take a look at some of the main reasons why getting insurance for them can be difficult.

Your Age Is a Dominant Factor.

There are a number of reasons why senior citizens can’t get health coverage. For starters, a lot of health insurance companies look at your age. When people start getting over the age of 50, they are prone to have more illnesses, they see the doctor more often, and they might have more hospital stays. So the risks of insuring an older person far outweigh the benefits. We all age so why is this such an important factor?

The Cost Of Insuring An Older Person Is High.

Due to the fact that the elderly are prone to so many conditions and will need so much care, there are many companies who consider them to be a big risk. The average hospital stay of a person over the age of 50 is longer than some one in their 20’s and 30’s. Younger people heal and recover a lot quicker then older adults so their cost per treatment is less. Insurance companies know approximately how much they have to pay out for each age group and take all these things into consideration when pricing policies.

Pre-Existing Conditions are Not Insurable.

If you have a pre-existing condition like diabetes or high blood pressure, it is most of the time not insurable. May be with the new health care reform this will change. However, what does a pre-existing condition tell an insurance company? It tells them that you may not do a good job in taking care of yourself or you have bad eating habits. So why insure someone who could have possibly prevented such conditions by not drinking, not smoking, and not overeating. This may not be fair but insurance companies are in the business of making money for their investors.

Affordability May Be A Problem.

The last thing that you will find is that many times, senior citizens can’t afford the insurance. Even if they find a company willing to insure them, many are retired and are on a limited income. The cost of premiums alone can eat up any retirement check or pension income. Many have to choose between insurance or keeping a roof over their heads.

Getting health insurance for senior citizens is still a big problem for many. Many have never paid into the social security system and are not eligible for medicare and private insurance is way too expensive. Hopefully, the new health care reform will address many of these issues otherwise what options do these seniors have.

Getting good Health Insurance Information to stay update with the ever changing laws can be difficult. Visit www.healthbenefitstoday.com to get all the fact before you make a decision to purchase health insurance.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Zandra_Jones

Senior Citizen Health Insurance – How to Make it Affordable? by Reina Raine

April 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Senior citizen health insurance becomes a necessity as Medicare alone might  be insufficient unless you have a good savings plan or 401K during working  years. Retirement is a time when you get away from the daily grind and do things  that you love to do. However, when you consider the cost of a senior citizen  health insurance plan and added medications versus the fixed income of the  retirees, the picture looks quite bleak. Why is senior citizen health insurance  so expensive to secure? Is there anything that can be done to help the situation?

Getting an insurance policy is paying against a calculated risk. People get  hurt or sick, and the insurance company takes this risk into consideration when  calculating the premium. The greater the risks, the higher the premium.

With increasing age, people are more susceptible to illness and injury.  Illnesses such as hypertension and diabetes require long term care and  medication, hence increasing the overall cost. Age is seen as a high risk factor  to the profitability of the insurance company. This results in the premiums for  senior citizen health insurance being higher.

However, there are some ways to help you prepare for this. When setting up  your 401K savings plan, make sure that you take into consideration both the cost  of living after retirement and the cost of health care. Include the projected  costs for the premium payments for the senior citizen health insurance.

Sign up for the plan prior to retirement as the plan will be less expensive  if you are younger at the beginning of the policy. Check the details to verify  that the plan covers everything that you want and is compatible with Medicare.  Your chosen plan should be supplemental to government provisions and is not  intended to replace them. Always read the policy carefully before signing the  acceptance of the policy.

While this may seem like an extreme expense, the additional coverage provided  by these policies is worth paying for considering the kind of expenses that  might be incurred.

When purchasing the senior citizen health insurance cover, shop around to get  the best possible rates and coverage for your needs.

To learn much more on other aspects of health insurance  [http://healthinsuranceconsiderations.com/] visit  healthinsuranceconsiderations.com where you will find information on how to find  affordable health insurance [http://healthinsuranceconsiderations.com/] and how  to ensure you get best value for your money.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Reina_Raine

 

A Brain Fitness Program to Determine If Senior Citizens Are Safe Drivers by Diane Carbo

April 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Are senior citizens safe drivers? A brain fitness program that is being  tested may determine just that. A brain exercise program has just been  determined to possibly be the next big breakthrough in automotive safety.

Research studies have shown that a brain fitness program may decrease risky  driving habits and improves the response time for braking and stopping the  vehicle. As the population ages, there will be more and more senior citizens  driving than ever before.

It is presently known that as driver’s age, especially as they move into  their 70s and beyond, a number of problems with response time, planning and  concentration can get in the way of safe driving. It is the goal of a brain  fitness program to determine, “Are senior citizens safe drivers?”

The goal of the brain exercise program is to see if there is an increase in  response time, better planning executed and more concentration by the senior  drivers.

More on a brain fitness program that may determine “Are senior citizens safe  drivers?”

Medications that aging individuals are prescribed are a major problem that  affect their thinking (cognitive) abilities. As we age, we are more likely to  take multiple medications. These multiple medications can lead to impaired  driving ability in the senior citizen driver.

How does a brain fitness program improve a senior citizen driver to make them  safe? Brain fitness exercises can help senior drivers avoid or delay cognitive  decline and assist those aging drivers to maintain an independent life style as  long as possible.

A brain fitness program that encouraged an increase response time, visual  attention, memory, the ability to measure the processing of speed and the  ability to react to unexpected situations was studied. Past brain fitness  program research shows that not only do brain fitness exercises improve all of  the above, but the studies have shown that the brain training has sustained  those improved results beyond a 5 year period.

Start a brain exercise program today. There is increasing amounts of evidence  that specific thinking skills that are used for driving can be trained. The  results are better driving skills. It is never too late to start a brain fitness  program.The benefits may have lasting results that will assure a better quality  of life.

Diane Carbo Registered Nurse has more than thirty five years in the nursing  field. Her experience as a geriatric care manager, makes her uniquely qualified  to help those who want to live out their lives in their own homes. That decision  may be made when you are 20, 30, 40 or in fact at any age, with sooner rather  than later being ideal. Diane has developed a web site to make people aware of  issues and options. You will find a mountain of helpful information that will be  continually updated. Please visit http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com/brain-fitness-program.html to learn more about brain fitness. Sign up for “The Caring Advocate” her free  newsletter and receive a complimentary copy of the Home Health Care Planning  Guide.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

 

Senior Citizen Homes by David Stillwagon

April 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As the birth rate continues to go down in most of the world the senior  citizens population as a percentage of the total population is increasing. One  of the main reasons is health care that is geared toward older folks and the  increasing awareness of making the most of your later years. Not only are senior  citizens staying active they are also involved in their community and where they  want to reside. Senior citizens homes and apartments have become an important  issue in this country and others.

What are the issues facing senior citizens regarding where they live?

If you are an older person or couple and your children have left the house  then you might feel as though your present home is a little too big and you want  to down size. Of course it would be a tough decision not only for you but also  for your children. They probably don’t want to see you sell the house where they  grew up in and had so many memories. But you find that it is just too big for  the two of you now and taking care of the house and a lawn might be more than  you can handle.

Finding a home that is affordable, comfortable and one that meets your needs  can be a job for anyone no matter what age group you are in. The major indicator  of which house you choose is probably the price of the house. This is especially  true if you are a retiree living on a fixed income, you know what you can afford  and what you can’t. Unfortunately some of the houses that you may have thought  ideal were probably out of your pricing range.

Selling a house can be a real hassle whether the economy is good or bad. And  if you are in the market for a home it makes it twice as bad. But you have to  take your time find the house that is just right for you. Are there enough  bedrooms and bathrooms, is there room if you have overnight guest? And what  about that yard, is the right size to take care of?

It’s not only the house that you have to think about it is also the  neighborhood. What is the crime rate? Are the other houses in the neighborhood  taken care of? How close are you to your doctors and a hospital?

Finding senior citizen homes and apartments is a worthy task that takes time  and effort to achieve.

David Stillwagon blogs about health and age issues such as senior citizen homes

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Stillwagon

 

Senior Citizen Insurance by Jerry Fatjo

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Senior citizen insurance is used by people who are 65 years old or above. The  reason why this is a separate category of insurance is because senior citizens  tend to have more health related troubles, compared to younger people.

Therefore it is important for a senior citizen to find the right type of  insurance. They need to find insurance that is both affordable and offers good  coverage for their specific needs. Seniors do need insurance for the simple  reason that Medicare only provides partial coverage. The thing to do here is to  find out exactly what medicare covers and then have secondary insurance to cover  other expenses.

An example would be, Medicare part A will cover some of their inpatient care,  nursing home care and some health care. Medicare part B covers some types of  their outpatient hospital care, medical equipment and occupational therapy.

However, medicare of any type will usually not cover annual physicals. In  order to get this the patient may have to get the senior health insurance. This  is why it is important to check with your broker and see what exactly is covered  by medicare before getting insurance.

With the use of the internet it is easy nowadays to find an insurance company  that gives affordable rates. Although before getting your senior citizen  insurance coverage, it is always better to talk to an agent before signing  anything. Senior citizens can also qualify for some life insurance plans. There  is a common misconception that seniors do not have anybody directly dependent on  them, therefore they do not need life insurance policies.

This is simply not true in all cases and should be discussed with your  insurance agent or broker. The idea behind life insurance is to give financial  protection for family members. This way they are not left to pay for the funeral  and any unsettled debt that is left behind.

When it comes to the unfortunate situation, such as a loved one’s demise, you  will want to be sure everything or everyone is taken care of. This is especially  true if the person leaves behind a spouse and, or children. The surviving wife  or husband will have many expenses such as rent and health insurance. In this  case a life insurance policy will be of great help for the surviving family  member or members to take care of the daily, weekly, or even monthly living  expenses.

For more information on insurance for seniors check out  [http://www.senior-citizen-insurance-online.com/]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jerry_Fatjo

 

Gift Ideas For Senior Citizens Perplexing You? 5 Tips to Finding the Perfect Gift For Baby Boomers by Diane Carbo

April 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Gift ideas for senior citizens can be perplexing. Not to worry, I have  5 tips to help you find the perfect gift for seniors citizens in your life. Many  gift givers have the perception that as we age, we have accumulated everything  we need in life. In some case that may be so, but, just because we are getting  older, does not mean we don’t enjoy or appreciate a meaningful and well thought  out gift.

Tip #1 As we age, our needs change. Our thoughts focus on our past, what we  accomplished, what we wanted to do, but postponed due to life’s responsibilities  that came our way. Many fondly recall the dreams, plans and hopes of their  youth. There are many that have things in their life that they miss or wish they  had a chance to do. Now, because of their age, they think that this is no longer  a possibility. Trust me, there is a gift giving idea in those postponed dreams  and plans. And all you have to do is discover what they are.

Tip # 2 Every aging senior has different personalities, lifestyles,  interests, financial and health situations. This should be considered when  exploring gift giving options.

Take time to consider the senior adult for whom you want to choose the  perfect gift.

Are they an active senior, with lots of ability to get around independently?  Are they involved in church, community or group activities? Do they live  alone? Do they have limited access to social functions or activities due to  illness or inability to drive? What keeps them from getting out an about?   Do they have hobbies or outside interests? Have they had a change in  their physical or mental abilities that has affected their lifestyle?  Are  they able to take care of their home environment, yard or pets?  Is their  financial situation a problem or is money never a concern?  Are they an  individual that is open to trying new things? Or are they an individual set in  their ways?

More Gift Ideas for Senior Citizens Perplexing You? 5 Tips to  Finding the Perfect Gift for Baby Boomers…

Tip #3 To accomplish the goal of finding the perfect gift for the aging  senior in your life will take a little thought and exploration on your part.  Take time in your everyday conversations to ask questions about the past and the  present interests. Make this a part of your regular conversation. Gift ideas  will present themselves. Don’t hesitate to ask “Is there any thing that you  wished you had done?”  “Is there any thing that you miss doing or would like  to do some day?”  “Have you ever considered ________(this may be dancing  lessons, painting, doing wood working, trying a computer etc) ?”

Tip # 4 If you have done your exploration, you should have come up with some  great gift ideas. Or maybe you still feel stuck on finding the perfect gift. Now  it is time to be creative. If you have assessed the aging senior’s situation,  you can determine what is important to them. Would they benefit from some  special one on one time with you? Spending uninterrupted and unrushed time,  to do something that your aging senior will enjoy, not only will be appreciated,  but will have the benefit of creating a memory for you and your aging senior.   If they are an active senior, they may be open to trying something new and  different. You may want to plan a trip or activity that would be fun. Don’t  forget that learning is a lifelong activity. Check out the local colleges,  YMCA’s and online courses that may be of interest to your aging senior. You may  be able to introduce a new hobby or activity that will improve or maintain mind  and physical fitness.

Tip #5 Do not discount home made gifts or projects. Plan a family project  where the entire family can get involved. You may want to create a family tree,  organize family pictures. Create a slide show with old family pictures and have  your senior incorporate family stories behind those pictures. Or create a video  of your aging senior talk about the family history. This could be an on going  project with a planned family debut. Plan a party and ‘red carpet’ event for the  entire family to view.

Finding gift ideas for seniors can give you an opportunity to learn  and create a stronger bond between you. Finding a gift for baby boomers is  giving something needed, something wanted or something they have longed for, but  never expressed. Given with lots of love, will make it the “perfect”  gift.

Diane Carbo Registered Nurse has more than thirty five years in the nursing  field. Her experience as a geriatric care manager, makes her uniquely qualified  to help those who want to live out their lives in their own homes. Diane has  developed a web site to make people aware of issues and options. You will find  the answers to many of your questions as well as helpful information that will  be continually updated. Please visit http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com/gift-ideas-for-senior-citizens.html for more information on gifting baby boomers and senior adults. Sign up for The  Caring Advocate Ezine her free newlsetter and receive a complimentary  copy of the Home Health Care Planning Guide.

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Activities For Senior Citizens – How Hobbies and the Mind Body Connection Work By Diane Carbo

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Hobbies have a mind body connection, they are important activities for  senior citizens and are an important part of healthy aging. Active seniors  are proof that you can enjoy better health and have fun doing it.

Research studies have shown that leisure time and physical activity promote a  healthier lifestyle. Our bodies are meant to be active and move. Many, as they  age, tend to become increasingly inactive, preferring to watch TV to help pass  the time away. Finding fun activities for senior citizens can change that.

Some good activities for senior citizens

Active seniors are involved and participate in what life has to offer.  Hobbies give an individual a reason to get out and share with others. Whether it  is painting, building model airplanes or playing cards the benefits of a hobby  can be an increase your chances for improved physical, social and emotional well  being.

It is important to have regular leisure time physical activity. Anything that  promotes moving and being active will benefit you as you age. The health  benefits of staying active are a delay or prevention of a chronic disease such  as: heart disease, diabetes, some cancers and arthritis. Physical activity also  promotes brain fitness. This can help delay or prevent dementia or  Alzheimer’s.

Participating in a variety of hobbies helps many cope with the stressors of  life. How you react and respond to different situations in life affects your  health. Stress and anxiety can lead to poor health. Active seniors are involved  and lead a more balanced life.

Hobbies allow active seniors to socialize, find companionship and  camaraderie. Making connections with others that have the same interests can  often open an individual to new found friendships.

Many individuals that participate in similar hobbies find themselves with  other individuals that have similar situations and experiences in life. As we  age, we experience losses that affect our emotional health. Active seniors that  are involved in hobbies have a pool of other individuals that they can draw  emotional support and comfort. There are times when they can also learn from  shared experiences. Sharing our feelings with others is a way to connect with  others as well as relieve the stress and anxiety we may be feeling.

More Hobbies and the Mind Body Connection: How Active Seniors are Having  Fun and Enjoying Better  Health …

Hobbies as activities for senior citizens are a way to calm their  minds and relax. It is a way to belong, have something to look forward to  doing.

For many, their hobbies are a tool that releases stress and helps bring their  emotions back into balance again. It is a time when we get an attitude  adjustment and feel right with the world again.

Leisure time physical activity is important to healthy aging. Moving our  bodies and using our minds affect how we age. The mind body connection benefits  of participating in hobbies are improved mental clarity, enhanced immune system,  improved self esteem and self confidence.

Hobbies are a way to have fun, enjoy and stay regularly involved in leisure  time physical activity. Consistency and regular involvement is the key to  maintaining healthy aging.

Having a variety of hobbies during the week can keep an individual busy,  interested and involved. Participating in a hobby with a group can be  motivating. Knowing that the expectations of others are anticipating your  participation in the day’s activity may give one the boost to go when they feel  down. Even to know that you have others that depend on you to be there, may give  you an extra boost to participate when you don’t feel like it. Feeling a sense  of commitment to others, a sense of belonging is important to healthy aging.

Hobbies give many a sense of connection to others, when there are no other  connections in an individual’s life. Connections to others, a sense of  belonging, a sense of community gives many active seniors the reason to  participate in life to their fullest ability.

Hobbies are a way for many to stay physically and mentally stimulated. Trying  new things, meeting new people and sharing your knowledge, experience and  sometimes your creative side with others can keep an active senior challenged  mentally, as well as, physically.

Hobbies are a safe way to get out and meet people with like minded interests.  It is a great ice breaker to meeting new people and a way to stay active, no  matter how old you get to be.

Any activity that gets an aging senior moving and involved with others is a  step towards healthy aging. It is important to get busy and stay active. Take up  dancing, gardening; join a walking club or travel.

Hobbies have a mind body connection. Active seniors are having fun and  enjoying better health as they regularly participate in things they enjoy. It is  never too late to start enjoying yourself now. Take time to find your own  activities for senior citizens to help your loved ones and  yourselves.

Diane Carbo Registered Nurse has more than thirty five years in the nursing  field. Her experience as a geriatric care manager, makes her uniquely qualified  to help those who want to live out their lives in their own homes. Diane has  developed a web site to make people aware of issues and options. You will find a  mountain of helpful information that will be continually updated. Please visit:  http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com/activities-for-senior-citizens.html for more information on hobbies and senior activities Sign up for The Caring  Advocate Ezine her free newlsetter and receive a complimentary copy of  the Home Health Care Planning Guide.

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Health Insurance For Senior Citizens by Ram Mohan Susarla

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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If you are a senior citizen and do not have health insurance, the thought of  having to go to an emergency room in case of illness may be troubling you. You  should have planned for your retirement but if you did not include the details  of having Health Insurance after you retire, you are at the mercy of the ER and  without coverage you may even have to forego treatment. For many people in the  US, health care costs often result in bankruptcy even when they have insurance  because not all illnesses are covered by the policy. When it can happen to the  people who have insurance, it can be a nightmare for those who do not have  it.

In recent months, the issue of health insurance for senior citizens has  received extraordinary coverage and attention in the US because of President  Obama’s plan to have universal health care available to all citizens. This  measure from the Obama administration has drawn critics and supporters alike and  the battle lines are drawn in an increasingly bitter battle. The issue at stake  is whether there should be a public option that would enable the senior citizens  access to health care provided for by the government. The public option does not  guarantee free coverage but includes an option for the employers and the  government to provide for an eventuality.

Senior citizens need healthcare and they need it more than the other age  groups as they need access to quality medical assistance because of their  advancing age that makes them vulnerable to disease and disability. It is for  this reason that medical care in many countries is free for senior citizens and  they have access to the best medical facilities. Likewise, the US should also  have a health care system that provides for its senior citizens and ensures that  they get proper treatment for their various ailments.

In the context of the baby boomers retiring in large numbers and without the  proper tools for some of them to plan adequately for their retirement and health  care, there should be a comprehensive plan for access to medical coverage by the  insurance companies as well as the government. There are several insurance  companies that have special plans for senior citizens as they allow for the  coverage with all facilities provided for them. However, there are other  companies that do not encourage coverage for senior citizens on the grounds that  they are a high risk category and hence the premiums do not justify coverage.  There are some commentators who call for an old age premium to be placed on the  coverage plan so that senior citizens can get coverage at the rates provided by  the insurers, albeit with a premium.

The point that is being made here is that senior citizens better plan for  their retirement when they are in their forties and fifties so that they do not  become a burden on their children and that they retain coverage beyond  retirement and after they are well into their sixties.

Freelance Writer with over two years of experience in content development,  academic writing and business writing. Specialist in Custom Writing and SEO  development with emphasis on plagiarism free and unique content.

I am an Engineer by training and was a Project Manager before switching to  Freelancing. I can take up assignments in the areas of Project Management, IT,  Economics, Management and Book reviews. I am well versed with academic  formatting styles like APA, MLA, and Harvard etc.

I am a deadline conscious writer who provides plagiarism free and quality  content. I believe in Customer delight and go the extra bit to fulfill the order  specifications. I maintain constant contact with the customer and notify  requests for deadline extensions in advance. I avoid plagiarism by citing  sources and offering original ideas and check my output with Copyscape and other  tools. I have access to online libraries like Questia in addition to a wide  collection of books and journals relevant to the fields in which I  work.

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Comparison of Health Insurance Schemes for Senior Citizens By Shankar P Nath

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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It is absolutely vital that as one approaches old age, one has a substantial  health insurance cover. The probability that one’s health care expenses would  increase substantially is almost a given. In this piece we look and compare the  different health insurance plans that are available in the market for senior  citizens. While every health insurance company wants to insure the young (and  almost by definition, more healthy), there are very few plans which provide  health insurance to people beyond 60. Another interesting thing to note here is  that most of the health insurance plans for senior citizens is offered by the  public sector general insurance companies.

The health insurance plans available for senior citizens are:

  1. Varistha Mediclaim by National Insurance
  2. Senior Citizen plan by Oriental Insurance
  3. Mediclaim for Senior Citizens by New India Assurance
  4. Senior Citizen Plan by United India Insurance
  5. Red Carpet Plan by Star Health Insurance

 

Varistha Mediclaim by National Insurance: This policy can be  bought by anyone between 60 and 80 years of age. Renewals can be done upto the  age of 90. Between the age bands of 76-80, premiums have an added factor of 10%  and between 80 to 90 years of age, premiums are grossed up by 20%. The sum  insured under this policy for hospitalization is Rs 1 lakh. For critical  illness, the sum insured is Rs 2 lakhs. Under the critical illness cover,  diseases such as cancer, renal failure, stroke, organ transplants etc are  covered. If the person has already been insured for 3 years through a health  insurance policy, then he or she does not have to undergo a medical test, else  there has to be a medical test under the prospective customer’s costs. For  domiciliary treatment, the maximum claim is fixed at 20% of the sum insured.  Ambulance charges upto Rs 1000 are covered under this policy. For a mediclaim  cover of Rs 1 lakh and a critical illness cover of Rs 2 lakhs, the premium  varies between Rs 6200 (for a 60-65 year old) to Rs 9200 (for a 75-80 year old).  One interesting feature of this policy is that pre existing hypertension and  diabetes are covered from the 1st year itself of the policy by paying 10%  additional premium for each of the two diseases. Pre existing is of course not  available for the critical illness policy. Other pre existing diseases are  covered after 1 policy year. Dialysis, chemotherapy and radiotherapy for  preexisting ailment is never covered. Claims are paid only for events that occur  within India. Claims which occur within the first 30 days of the commencement of  the policy will not be covered, unless in the case of the person being insured  with an Insurance Company without break for the past 12 months. For the purpose  of this policy, pre existing diseases such as cataract, piles, fistula, hernia,  benign lumps, joint replacement etc will not be covered in the first 12 months.  War related medical claims, vaccination, spectacles cost, plastic surgery,  corrective dental surgery, venereal disease, vitamins and tonics which are not  part of the treatment, nuclear disaster related health claims, alternative  treatment like homeopathy etc are excluded.

Opinion: We think it is one of the best policies for senior  citizens, except that the sum insured is low. They are quite generous as far as  the norms for entry age and pre existing diseases are concerned.

2. Senior Citizen Specified Disease Plan by Oriental  Insurance: In this plan, the policyholder has the option to choose sum  insured of Rs 1 lakh, 2 lakhs, 3 lakhs, 4 lakhs or 5 lakhs. One restrictive  feature of this policy is that 20% of any claim amount has to be co-paid by the  insured. Cashless payment through TPA is restricted to Rs 1 lakh. This plan  covers 10 specified diseases: cancer, renal failure, heart diseases, liver  related diseases, COPD (lung ailment), stroke, prostrate, orthopaedic disease,  ophthalmic disease, accidental injury and knee replacement. The amount that one  can claim for a particular disease is restricted as a percentage of the sum  insured (for e.g., 50% of the sum insured can be claimed for cancer, while 20%  of the sum insured can be claimed for stroke). A sum insured of Rs 1 lakh will  cost Rs 4500 for a 65 year old, while it will cost Rs 6400 if one is eighty  years old or beyond. While this may seem cheaper than National Insurance’s  Varistha medical scheme, it is less wide in scope. This policy has an  interesting refund of premium clause if one withdraws from the policy: if the  policyholder gets out of the policy within the first month, 75% of the premium  is returned and if he opts out between 3 to 6 months of the policy, 25% of the  premium is returned. In this policy, pre-existing diseases are not covered for a  period of 2 policy years. Other exclusions are very similar to those of  National’s Varistha medical scheme.

Opinion: a good scheme in terms of the level of sum insured  and price, but the scope of diseases covered is restrictive. Another issue is  that pre-existing is covered only after 2 policy years.

Mediclaim for Senior Citizens by New India Assurance: This  policy is available for senior citizens between 60 and 80 years, and the sum  insured can be Rs 1 lakh or Rs 1.5 lakhs. Pre existing diseases are covered  after 18 continuous months of coverage, while for diabetes and hypertension to  be covered, additional premium needs to be paid. Pre hospitalization is covered  for 30 days, while post hospitalization is covered for 60 days. An insurance of  Rs 1 lakh for a 65 year old will cost Rs 3850 while it will cost Rs 5150 for an  80 year old. Thus, premiums are very competitively priced. If one wants to  extend beyond 80 years, then loading of 10% or 20% has to be paid. For pre  existing diabetes or hypertension, an additional premium of 10% each has to be  paid. One interesting feature is that there is a 10% discount if one’s spouse is  also covered under this policy. This policy also has the same partial refund  norms on cancellation as Oriental’s Specified Disease Plan. Claims would be paid  only for medical treatment in India. The exclusion conditions are standard, and  are very similar to National’s Varistha Mediclaim.

Opinion: Attractively priced. Sum insured ceilings are low.  The product brochure is silent on co-pay, and thus there is no co-pay  requirement in all probability.

United India Insurance’s Specified Disease Plan: In this  policy, sum insured of Rs 50,000 to Rs 300,000 is available to people between 60  to 80 years of age. Sum insured of Rs 1 lakh will cost Rs 3715 for a 65 year  old, and Rs 8613 for an 80 year old. So while it is cheaper for the younger age  bands, it is a bit expensive for the older age groups. An interesting feature of  this policy is that there is a hospitalization cash payment from the 3rd day of  hospitalization on payment of a particular additional premium. While other  exclusion features of this policy are comparable to that of the previous 3  policies that we have discussed, the biggest problem of this policy is that this  has a pre-existing waiting period of 4 years.

Opinion: Pre -existing waiting period of 4 years is  restrictive

Star Health’s Red Carpet Plan: This plan has been a good  marketing success. While one barely gets to hear about the reasonably broad,  well priced schemes of the 4 nationalised companies, the market is quite excited  about Star Health’s Red Carpet scheme. The sum insured under this policy can be  for Rs 1 lakh, Rs 2 lakhs, Rs 3 lakhs, Rs 4 lakhs or Rs 5 lakhs. Age of entry is  restricted between 60 and 69 years. Pre existing diseases are covered from the  1st year itself, except for those preexisting diseases for which the insured  received payment in the preceding 12 months. Subsequently, these pre-existing  diseases are covered. There are sub limits under this policy wherein different  diseases have different limits as a percentage of the sum insured. Sum insured  of Rs 1 lakh will cost Rs 4900 at entry, while a sum insured of Rs 5 lakhs will  cost Rs 20000.. The biggest catch in this policy is that there is a 50%  co-payment for pre existing diseases and 30% co-payment for other diseases!!  Other exclusions are very similar to what is there for the nationalized  companies.

Opinion: Simple, well marketed claim. But the co-payment  terms are a huge negative! The ceiling for maximum age at entry is quite low (69  years), though the guaranteed renewal feature is a big positive. Also, the sum  insured levels of Rs 5 lakh is quite high and attractive in these days of  escalated medical costs.

In summary, we feel that National’s Varistha Plan is the widest in scope. The  only issue with the plans of the Nationalised Insurance companies is that the  sum insured levels offered might not be adequate for today’s high healthcare  costs. On the other hand, they are at least offering senior citizen health  plans. It is very difficult to locate any meaningful health insurance scheme for  senior citizens offered by any private health insurance company, except Star  Health. The only problem that we see with Star Health’s Red Carpet plan is that  of the Co-pay restriction.

Shankar Nath is the founder of http://www.PolicyTiger.com,  a leading online insurance comparison site in India. http://www.PolicyTiger.com helps user compare health  insurance, life insurance and car insurance policies in an unbiased manner so  that they can get the best price on their insurance, sometimes saving as much as  50% of the quoted price.

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CVS Caremark Emphasizes Commitment to Older Americans at Annual American Society on Aging Conference

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Company highlights the importance of medication adherence in helping seniors on their path to better health

CVS Caremark (NYSE:CVS) will highlight how medication adherence plays a vital role in helping older Americans on their path to better health at the 2013 Annual American Society on Aging Conference, which is being held in Chicago this week.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20090226/NE75914LOGO )

CVS Caremark, a Titanium Sponsor of the conference, will also be participating in a number of general sessions and panels and will highlight its efforts to ensure customers and patients receive quality care and guidance as they age. David Casey, the company’s Vice President of Workforce Strategies and Chief Diversity Officer, will open the March 12 General Session: Mysteries of Population Aging.

As a pharmacy innovation company, CVS Caremark is committed to developing new ways to lower costs and improve health. By advancing the understanding of medication adherence through research collaborations, the company is gathering important information about why some patients take their medications as prescribed and why others do not. CVS Caremark is also refining the ways it interacts with patients through proven programs, such as Pharmacy Advisor and Maintenance Choice, that help patients stay on their medications and improve health outcomes.

“People age 65 and older typically take two or three times as many medications as younger Americans,” said Casey. “As we reinvent pharmacy care, we will continue to be a trusted health care partner to all of our customers, but particularly to aging Americans who are more likely to have chronic conditions and require more guidance.”

CVS Caremark is not only committed to its older customers and patients, it is also committed to recruiting mature workers and supporting older colleagues who are already part of the company.

“At CVS Caremark, we believe talent is ageless. Our mature colleagues’ knowledge and experience are important assets to our company. They provide us with insight into the best ways to serve our mature customers and sometimes become mentors to their younger colleagues,” added Casey.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 4.7 percent of the nation’s workforce is age 60 and over. Currently, 6.9 percent of CVS Caremark’s workforce is age 60 and over, higher than the national rate. The number of CVS Caremark colleagues who are age 50 and over has grown from approximately 6 percent in 1990 to nearly 20 percent in 2013. To continue this upward trend, CVS Caremark is cultivating public and private partnerships at the local, state, and national level with the goal of recruiting more mature workers into all areas of its workforce.

About CVS Caremark

CVS Caremark is dedicated to helping people on their path to better health as the largest integrated pharmacy company in the United States. Through the company’s more than 7,400 CVS/pharmacy stores; its leading pharmacy benefit manager serving more than 60 million plan members; and its retail health clinic system, the largest in the nation with more than 600 MinuteClinic locations, it is a market leader in mail order, retail and specialty pharmacy, retail clinics, and Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans.  As a pharmacy innovation company with an unmatched breadth of capabilities, CVS Caremark continually strives to improve health and lower costs by developing new approaches such as its unique Pharmacy Advisor program that helps people with chronic diseases such as diabetes obtain and stay on their medications.  Find more information about how CVS Caremark is reinventing pharmacy for better health at info.cvscaremark.com.

Contacts:

Jeff Ventura
Corporate Communications
(401) 770-1990
Jeffrey.Ventura@cvscaremark.com

Ophthalmologists Consider Five Tests and Treatments that Would Benefit from Doctor-Patient Conversations

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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American Academy of Ophthalmology Joins Choosing Wisely® Campaign to Advance Quality Eye Care and Promote Health Care Savings

The American Academy of Ophthalmology today announced it is participating in the Choosing Wisely® campaign, a national initiative of the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation to encourage conversations between patients and their doctors about treatment options and efficient use of health care dollars. The Academy is one of 17 organizations joining Choosing Wisely today – representing more than 350,000 physicians, nurses, pathologists, radiologists and other health care professionals – to release lists of commonly performed tests, procedures and treatments that patients and physicians should discuss.

The United States spends more on health care than many other industrialized nations, yet often does not achieve better health outcomes. This may be explained in part by an overuse of unnecessary and duplicative medical tests. Choosing Wisely, which promotes best practices and better management of health care resources, complements physicians’ efforts to use evidence-based medicine to meet patients’ needs.

To ensure that the best care options are considered for ophthalmic patients, the Academy has identified five common tests and treatments that ophthalmologists and patients should discuss:

  1. Preoperative Medical Tests: Don’t perform preoperative medical tests – such as an electrocardiogram or blood glucose test – prior to eye surgery unless there are specific signs indicating a need for them.
  2. Imaging Tests: Don’t routinely order imaging tests when there are no symptoms or signs of significant eye disease.
  3. Antibiotics for Pink Eye: Don’t prescribe antibiotics for pink eye that is caused by an adenovirus.
  4. Antibiotics for Eye Injections: Don’t routinely provide antibiotics before or after injections into the vitreous cavity of the eye.
  5. Punctal Plugs for Dry Eye: Don’t treat dry eye by inserting punctual plugs before attempting other options, such as medical treatments with artificial tears, lubricants and compresses.

“Some experts estimate that up to 30 percent of health care delivered in the U.S. may be unnecessary or duplicative,” said David W. Parke II, M.D., CEO of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. “Not only does this represent significant waste, but it also underscores patients’ unnecessary exposure to risks associated with any test or procedure. The American Academy of Ophthalmology is participating in Choosing Wisely as a way to support evidence-based medicine and promote greater patient involvement in their eye care. By increasing conversations between ophthalmologists and those they treat, we can better guarantee that patients receive the right eye care at the right time.”

The Academy’s health policy committee led the development of the list of five tests and treatments with input from members and ophthalmic subspecialty societies. Numerous recommendations and supporting evidence were researched and reviewed under the leadership of William L. Rich III, M.D., the Academy’s medical director of health policy.

“In medicine, more isn’t necessarily better,” said Dr. Rich. “Conversations around the five tests and treatments identified by the American Academy of Ophthalmology can reduce the potential for over-treating our patients. We will continue our work to identify treatments that could benefit from better conversations between ophthalmologists and their patients.”

To date, twenty-five specialty societies have released lists through Choosing Wisely. The lists released today will be promoted nationwide through the Choosing Wisely campaign’s consumer partners, including Consumer Reports, AARP, Wikipedia and the National Business Coalition on Health.

The Academy’s participation in the Choosing Wisely campaign is one component of its ongoing efforts to promote responsible use of health care resources, without sacrificing quality of care. The Academy also provides a wide variety of educational programs, products and services to ophthalmologists — medical doctors specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye disease and conditions — and the patients they serve in order to improve patient care. The organization’s EyeSmart® program features the most trustworthy and medically accurate consumer information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries.

To learn more about Choosing Wisely and to view the complete lists and details about the recommendations, visit www.ChoosingWisely.org. To learn how patients can start conversations about the five ophthalmic tests and treatments above, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons — Eye M.D.s— with nearly 32,000 members worldwide.  Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org  The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trusted and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org  to learn more.

About the ABIM Foundation
The mission of the ABIM Foundation is to advance medical professionalism to improve the health care system. We achieve this by collaborating with physicians and physician leaders, medical trainees, health care delivery systems, payers, policy makers, consumer organizations and patients to foster a shared understanding of professionalism and how they can adopt the tenets of professionalism in practice. To learn more about the ABIM Foundation, visit www.abimfoundation.org, read our blog blog.abimfoundation.org, connect with us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.

About Choosing Wisely
First announced in December 2011, Choosing Wisely is part of a multi-year effort led by the ABIM Foundation to support and engage physicians in being better stewards of finite health care resources. Participating specialty societies are working with the ABIM Foundation and Consumer Reports to share the lists widely with their members and convene discussions about the physician’s role in helping patients make wise choices. Learn more at www.ChoosingWisely.org.

No more “empty nest”: middle-aged adults face family pressure on both sides

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The “empty nest” of past generations, in which the kids are grown up and middle-aged adults have more time to themselves, has been replaced in the United States by a nest that’s full – kids who can’t leave, can’t find a job and aging parents who need more help than ever before.

According to a new study by researchers at Oregon State University, what was once a life stage of new freedoms, options and opportunities has largely disappeared.

An economic recession and tough job market has made it hard on young adults to start their careers and families. At the same time, many older people are living longer, which adds new and unanticipated needs that their children often must step up to assist with.
The end result, researchers suggest, are “empty nest” plans that often have to be put on hold, and a mixed bag of emotions, ranging from joy and “happy-to-help” to uncertainty, frustration and exhaustion.

“We mostly found very positive feelings about adults helping their children in the emerging adulthood stage of life, from around ages 18 to 30,” said Karen Hooker, director of the OSU Center for Healthy Aging Research.

“Feelings about helping parents weren’t so much negative as just filled with more angst and uncertainty,” Hooker said. “As a society we still don’t socialize people to expect to be taking on a parent-caring role, even though most of us will at some point in our lives. The average middle-aged couple has more parents than children.”

The findings of this research were just published in the Journal of Aging Studies, and were based on data from six focus groups during 2009-10. It was one of the first studies of its type to look at how middle-aged adults actually feel about these changing trends.
Various social, economic, and cultural forces have combined to radically challenge the traditional concept of an empty nest, the scientists said. The recession that began in 2008 yielded record unemployment, substantial stock market losses, lower home values and increased demand for higher levels of education.

Around the same time, advances in health care and life expectancy have made it possible for many adults to live far longer than they used to – although not always in good health, and often needing extensive care or assistance.

This study concluded that most middle-aged parents with young adult children are fairly happy to help them out, and they understand that getting started in life is simply more difficult now. Some research has suggested that age 25 is the new 22; that substantially more parents now don’t even expect their kids to be financially independent in their early 20s, and don’t mind helping them through some difficult times.

But the response to helping adult parents who, at the same time, need increasing amounts of assistance is not as uniformly positive, the study found – it can be seen as both a joy and a burden, and in any case was not something most middle-aged adults anticipated.

“With the kids, it’s easy,” is a general purpose reaction. With aging parents, it isn’t.

“My grandparents died younger, so my parents didn’t cope with another generation,” one study participant said.

Many middle-aged people said it was difficult to make any plans, due to disruptions and uncertainty about a parent’s health at any point in time. And most said they we’re willing to help their aging parents, but a sense of being time-starved was a frequent theme.
“It brings my heart joy to be able to provide for my mom this way,” one study participant said. “There are times when it’s a burden and I feel resentful.”

The dual demands of children still transitioning to independence, and aging parents who need increasing amounts of care is causing many of the study participants to re-evaluate their own lives. Some say they want to make better plans for their future so they don’t pose such a burden to their children, and begin researching long-term care insurance. Soul-searching is apparent.

“I don’t care if I get old,” a participant said. “I just don’t want to become debilitated. So I would rather have a shorter life and a healthy life than a long life like my mom, where she doesn’t have a life. She doesn’t have memories. Our memories are what make us who we are.”

An increasing awareness of the challenges produced by these new life stages may cause more individuals to anticipate their own needs, make more concrete plans for the future, reduce ambivalent approaches and have more conversations with families about their own late-life care, the researchers said in their study.
About the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences: The College creates connections in teaching, research and community outreach while advancing knowledge, policies and practices that improve population health in communities across Oregon and beyond.

Take Better Care of Yourself in 2013-and do it sitting down!

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Most healthcare professionals would agree that taking better care of yourself in the New Year is one of the best resolutions one could make. Resolving to routinely exercise is one of the best ways to accomplish that—even for people living with limited mobility. And to help get that exercise, The SCOOTER Store, along with Mary Ann Wilson, RN, founder, executive director and host of the PBS TV show, Sit and Be Fit™, have put together a complimentary, 32-page booklet with a series of exercises. This booklet includes full-color illustrations for exercises covering most every area of the body—from neck to core muscles and down to your toes.

“Exercise is one of the greatest gifts you can give yourself,” according to Wilson. “No matter what your age or fitness level, exercise will enhance your life in many ways,” Wilson added. “Besides being good for your body, exercise has been found to improve your mood and brain fitness.”
“This booklet is yet another way we show our commitment to keeping Americans with limited mobility more active and independent,” said Michael Clark, Chief Administrative Officer for The SCOOTER Store. “We are very pleased to have worked with Mary Ann Wilson and the Sit and Be Fit™ team to make this instructional booklet available.”
For a complimentary copy and resolve to take better care of yourself in 2013, visit www.exercisebooklet.com
About The SCOOTER Store
Since 1991, The SCOOTER Store has helped provide freedom and independence to more people with limited mobility than any other company in the nation. The company primarily offers power mobility equipment, including power wheelchairs and scooters, lifts, ramps and accessories in 48 states. Using this equipment provides today’s seniors an alternative to living in nursing homes or other care facilities. The company’s goal is to create an opportunity for every American senior to live their entire life safely and confidently at home. The company is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Health Care.
About Sit and Be Fit
Sit and Be Fit with Mary Ann Wilson, RN is currently celebrating its 26th year on public television. The popular series airs on 369 PBS stations, and is broadcast to over 82 million households. The exercise program is recognized by the National Council on Aging (NCOA) as a “Best Practice” program in health promotion and aging.

CONTACT: Tim Zipp, The SCOOTER Store, +1-830-627-4444, tzipp@thescooterstore.com

Senior Care Plus Offers Daily Meetings During medicare Enrollment Period

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Senior Care Plus Offers Daily Meetings During medicare Enrollment Period

RENO, Nev. (Oct. 15, 2012) – Senior Care Plus, a Medicare Advantage Plan offered by Hometown Health, is hosting daily informational group meetings to assist current and new members during the Medicare Annual Enrollment Period, which is Oct. 15 through Dec. 7, 2012.

During those dates, Medicare eligible beneficiaries can sign up or make changes to their current coverage, including choosing a Medicare managed care plan (Medicare Advantage or Stand-Alone Prescription Drug plans).

With this opportunity to select private health insurance for next year, these informational meetings are designed to answer questions regarding the impact of Health Care Reform on Medicare Advantage. Additionally Medicare eligible beneficiaries will be able to select the right insurance plan, with an effective date of Jan. 1, 2013, and complete their Annual Election Form.

“After Dec. 7, members will be locked into their plans until next year’s Annual Enrollment Period,” said Matt Ladich, director of government programs for Hometown Health. “Medicare Advantage plans can offer greater medical, prescription drug, and supplemental benefits in one plan with one insurance carrier versus other arrangements – this allows for lower costs and convenience to the beneficiary.”

Those interested can call 775-982-3191 or toll-free 888-775-7003 to choose from daily sessions held at the 850 Harvard Way offices. Walk-ins are welcome and home appointments may also be available. Additionally, specific meetings will be scheduled in communities outside of the Reno Sparks area at various libraries and senior centers. Reservations are strongly recommended. Visit seniorcareplus.com for more information.

Many Medicare eligible beneficiaries may wait until it is too late to enroll in managed care plans. These plans offer more cost savings and benefits than traditional (fee-for-service) Medicare. Senior Care Plus wants to educate the public about the change and cut down on possible beneficiary confusion and frustration.

Senior Care Plus, a product of Hometown Health Plan, Inc. is contracted with the Federal Government to offer a Medicare Advantage Plan with prescription drug coverage, available to anyone with both Medicare Parts A and B. Hometown Health is pleased to have been awarded another contract with Medicare for 2013 and will continue to offer its plans for a 17th year. Members must be residents of Carson City, Churchill, Douglas, Lyon, Storey and Washoe counties and continue to pay his or her Medicare Part B premium.

Post from a Survivor

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

My name is Heather Von St. James and I am a 6-year survivor of mesothelioma cancer – a rare disease caused by asbestos exposure that kills 90-95% of those who have it. Not many people know about this terrible disease and that’s why I have reached out to you for help. Because the health care community has such an impact spreading valuable health information, I am hoping you can assist me with my awareness mission. I partner with a great online resource called the Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance (www.mesothelioma.com), and I am hoping you will consider adding a link to their site from yours.

Thank you for joining me in my fight to educate people about such a deadly, yet preventable disease.

Best,
Heather

Heather Von St. James
Mother, Wife, Mesothelioma Survivor & Advocate
http://www.mesothelioma.com/blog/authors/heather/

Generous donations keep no-cost legal program going strong

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Generous donations keep no-cost legal program going strong

By Michael Clark

Did you know that Clark County has a trusted resource for senior citizens’ legal services? The Southern Nevada Senior Law Program provides free, quality legal services to county residents who are age 60+. They are the only free legal service provider in Clark County that exclusively assists senior citizens.

You may know them as the former City of Las Vegas Senior Citizens Law Project. The Law Project was sponsored by The City of Las Vegas since 1978 and unfortunately, in July of this year, the City had to withdraw its financial support due to the economic decline. Determined to continue this valuable program and with the support of the senior and legal community, The Law Project transitioned from a government program to a free standing non profit entity on July 1, 2012.

Legal advocacy/assistance services are available in civil areas of law including simple wills, long-term health care planning issues, consumer disputes and small claims instructions, intervention in elder abuse, landlord/tenant and mobile home problems, homesteads, social security problems and other government benefits problems. The Southern Nevada Senior Law Program also helps with preparation of documents for handling medical/legal issues in the event that the client is unable to do so.

The dynamic force behind the law program is Executive Director Sugar Vogel. Ms. Vogel began as a part time attorney in 1984. Over the years Vogel’s responsibilities grew as the senior law program expanded its scope of service. There are now 7 full-time attorneys, a number that includes both Ms. Vogel and her Deputy Director, Elana Graham.

“We work with our senior clients patiently and sensitively to ease their fears and resolve their legal problems,” Ms. Vogel explains. As an example of the personal, rewarding experience involving older people, Vogel remembered, “Mary and Tom had been married for 53 years and led a happy, relatively quiet life. They were devastated when Tom was diagnosed with stage 3 cancer. This was the biggest challenge they had faced in all their years together.

“They felt lost and alone but knew they needed to prepare for the future.” A Senior Law Program attorney patiently answered their questions and explained options. She guided them through completing their Powers of Attorney for Healthcare, Directives to Physician and wills giving them peace in knowing their wishes were documented.
“Seven months later, Mary returned to us as a widow,” she recalled. “She tearfully told us how we had made a traumatic time more manageable and how grateful she was for our help. Since the assistance we had given the couple had been so valuable, she hoped we could help her move forward on her own.” After that, the attorney helped Mary update her will and re-title her home. “Mary was assured that we will always be here to help her in times of need.”

Although legal services are provided at no cost, the program gratefully accepts donations. “we have several grants and other sources of income,” Ms. Vogel announced, “but very often it’s the individual donor who keeps us going. Our goal is to continue to provide these important free legal services to the senior community and grow this program to meet the increasing needs of seniors and they meet the challenges of aging.

Because the Southern Nevada Senior Law Program is a 501 c 3 non-profit, all contributions are tax deductible. Even a very small donation is welcome. Interest parties can mail a check to SNSLP 310 S. 9th St. 2nd floor Las Vegas, NV 89101.

For more information please call (702) 229-6596

Ophthalmologists Offer Sight-Saving Eye Care to Prevent Blindness

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

EyeCare America promotes vision loss prevention in U.S. through no out of pocket-cost eye exams and care

According to the World Health Organization, nearly 180 million people suffer from blindness or visual impairment globally, yet 75 percent of blindness could be prevented or treated with sight-saving eye care. In observance of World Blindness Awareness Month, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, urges the public to make eye exams and care a top priority to maintain their healthy vision.

A variety of problems are responsible for blindness around the world, and the leading causes of blindness and vision loss in the United States are age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataracts, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. More than two-thirds of visually impaired adults in the U.S. are age 65 or older. The number of Americans with age-related eye disease is expected to double within the next three decades unless something is done to reverse the trend.

To better prevent blindness in the U.S., EyeCare America encourages seniors to visit www.eyecareamerica.org to find out if they qualify for an eye exam and up to one year of care at no out-of-pocket cost. EyeCare America matches eligible patients age 65 and older with an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor – who will provide a comprehensive medical eye examination.

“Regular eye exams are imperative to detect and treat eye diseases and prevent serious vision loss,” said Richard P. Mills, M.D., chairman of EyeCare America. “This is especially true for people age 65 and older who are at increased risk for eye diseases. That’s why EyeCare America is so focused on providing access to eye care, and we hope that fewer people will suffer from preventable causes of blindness as a result.”

EyeCare America is made possible through the generous support of the Knights Templar Foundation, Genentech and Alcon. To see if you or a loved one is eligible, visit the online referral center at www.eyecareamerica.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

Baby, It’s Cold Outside and Getting Colder: 6 Ways to Save on Heating Costs

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Baby, It’s Cold Outside and Getting Colder: 6 Ways to Save on Heating Costs

Temperatures are already dipping in colder climates, and weather experts are warning consumers everywhere to brace for a colder winter than last year.

That means you’ll be paying more to heat your house this winter – and even more if you haven’t sealed it up and/or taken other energy efficiency measures.

If you think energy efficiency steps aren’t that big a deal, the founder of Angie’s List says you should think again.

“The average heating and cooling system accounts for about 54 percent of the average home’s total energy costs,” says Angie Hicks. “Even small things can add up to big heating bill savings – and many of them are jobs you can do yourself.”

Angie’s List, a national resource for consumer reviews on local service experts, including HVAC companies, went to highly rated heating experts to compile 6 ways to save on your heating bill:
1. All systems go? Check your furnace filters each month and replace if necessary. A clean filter distributes heat better and cuts your energy costs. Plus, it’s an inexpensive and easy task you can do yourself. An annual furnace checkup from a reputable heating system expert will help detect and fix small problems before they result in a system failure.
2. Block and tackle: Is your couch or a bookcase blocking a baseboard radiator? Take a look to be sure you have good airflow around registers and radiators to increase energy efficiency.
3. Drafting good for auto racing; not so much for homes: As much as 20 percent of the air moving through the average home’s duct system is lost to leaks and poor connections. Sealing up leaks with caulk, spray foam and/or weather stripping will stop that. Check doors and windows, too and caulk, seal and weather-strip any drafts.
4. Solar power: The sun offers free energy that you can tap even without solar panels. Keep your blinds up and the curtains open on a sunny winter day to absorb heat. Close them up at night to keep the heat inside.
5. Through the roof: Heat rises, which means if you don’t have enough insulation on the ceiling and in the attic, your heat is literally going through the roof. If you can see the floor joists in your attic, you probably don’t have enough insulation. Be sure to get the right R-value for your area.
6. Programmed to save: Use a programmable thermostat to easily adjust the temperature while you’re away or sleeping and save up to 30 percent on your bill, according to Energy Star.

###

Angie’s List helps consumers have happy transactions with local service professionals in more than 550 categories of service, ranging from home improvement to health care. More than 1.5 million paid households use Angie’s List to gain unlimited access to local ratings, exclusive discounts, the Angie’s List magazine, and the Angie’s List complaint resolution service.

Blindness and Vision Loss Spike by 23 Percent in the U.S.

September 24, 2012 by · Comments Off on Blindness and Vision Loss Spike by 23 Percent in the U.S.
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

American Academy of Ophthalmology Urges Seniors to Save their Sight through Prevention and Early Detection

Blindness and vision impairment are on the rise in the United States. A recent report by Prevent Blindness America indicates that, since the year 2000, incidence of blindness and vision impairment has increased by 23 percent among Americans age 40 and older.[i] However, most blindness in this country is preventable with proper eye care. The American Academy of Ophthalmology and EyeCare America urge Americans to get regular eye exams to better prevent and detect sight-stealing eye diseases.

Rising rates of age-related eye diseases and conditions are largely to blame for the increase in vision loss. Four of the most common causes of vision loss are diabetic retinopathy, where blood vessels in the retina swell or become blocked due to diabetes; age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a breakdown of the eye’s macula; glaucoma, an eye disease that damages the optic nerve; and cataracts, in which the eye’s lens becomes clouded. These conditions have shown a marked increase over the past 12 years:
• The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy increased by 89 percent.
• The frequency of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) increased by 25 percent.
• The incidence of glaucoma increased by 22 percent.
• The number of people affected by cataracts increased by 19 percent.[ii]
As baby-boomers continue to age, the incidence of age-related eye disease is also expected to continue to increase. Currently, people age 80 and older constitute only 8 percent of the population, but account for 69 percent of all cases of blindness.[iii] Early detection and treatment by an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor – may help prevent and in some cases, such as cataracts, even reverse vision loss.

Many seniors age 65 and older may qualify for an eye exam and up to 1 year of care at no out-of-pocket-cost through EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. EyeCare America matches qualifying patients age 65 and older with an ophthalmologist who provides a comprehensive medical eye examination. EyeCare America is co-sponsored by the Knights Templar Eye Foundation, Inc, with additional support from Alcon. To see if you or a loved one is eligible, visit the online referral center at www.eyecareamerica.org.

“Regular eye exams are imperative to detect and treat eye diseases and prevent serious vision loss,” said Richard P. Mills, M.D., chairman of EyeCare America. “This is especially true for people age 65 and older who are at increased risk for eye diseases. That’s why EyeCare America is so focused on providing access to eye care, and we hope that fewer people will suffer from preventable causes of blindness as a result.”

To learn more about EyeCare America or to find out if you or a loved one qualifies for the program, visit www.eyecareamerica.org. Learn more about eye diseases and conditions, and keeping your eyes healthy at www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® public education program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision, by providing the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. Visit www.geteyesmart.org to learn more.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. Since its inception, EyeCare America has helped more than 1.7 million people. More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

Renown Health Board Member and Volunteer Recognized with NHA Awards

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Lawson Fox, Renown Health board member, and Dinah O’Brien, Renown Health volunteer, were presented with awards at the Nevada Hospital Association (NHA) annual Membership Meeting Awards Luncheon late last week at the Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe. Fox received the Award for Trustee Excellence and O’Brien receive the Excellence in Volunteerism Award.

The two awards recognize one urban hospital and one rural hospital trustee and volunteer who have made an exemplary commitment to his/her hospital and contributions to improve his/her hospital’s service to its patients and community. Since their establishment, these awards have recognized a number of distinguished health care leaders throughout Nevada.

Fox has served on Renown Health boards for more than 8 years. During his tenure, he has overseen the implementation of quality tracking mechanisms for delivering quality care in the emergency departments of Renown Regional, Renown South Meadows Medical Center and the health network in general. In addition, his efforts of monitoring employee survey data have helped to provide consistent exceptional patient experiences.

O’Brien has been the volunteer coordinator of the Pet Therapy Program at Renown Health since the Healing Arts Program began more than 16 years ago. She is also a Volunteer Patient Visitor, a program that began in September of 2011 designed to empower volunteers to help with the patient experience.
In addition, she considers her years at the main reception desk at Renown Regional among her most significant contributions.

“Lawson and Dinah’s support throughout the community is truly a gift to northern Nevada. They are tremendous assets here at Renown,” said Jim Miller, president and CEO of Renown Health. “These honors are well deserved and both Lawson and Dinah should be commended for the genuine difference they have made and the many lives they have touched.”

In addition to individual awards, both Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center received NHA awards for quality. These awards mean medical professionals working at Renown South Meadows and Renown Regional provided treatment known to get the best results for patients.

Formally established in 1960 and incorporated in 1971, the Nevada Hospital Association (NHA) is a not-for-profit, statewide trade association representing 100 percent of Nevada’s acute care hospitals along with psychiatric, rehabilitation and other specialty hospitals as well as health-related agencies and organizations throughout the state. Allied with the American Hospital Association, NHA is an independent organization headquartered in Reno, Nevada. As a membership organization, NHA serves as a statewide resource and leader in promoting public understanding of, and support for, the health care system serving Nevada’s communities. In addition, NHA serves its members by providing education, information and representation and by serving as a catalyst in collaborative efforts to produce quality, adequately financed health care in Nevada.

Active Aging Week

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events 

Montara Meadows, an independent senior living community in Las Vegas, welcomes area seniors to participate in free national Active Aging Week seminar on Sept. 25.

Montara Meadows, www.montarameadows.com, is located at 3150 E. Tropicana Avenue in Las Vegas.

Active Aging Week, founded by the International Council on Active Aging (www.icaa.cc), promotes healthy lifestyles for seniors through a variety of enriching, educational, and inspiring events. The 2012 theme is “Many journeys, many destinations” and will be held throughout the country in late September.

• Tuesday, Sept. 25 at 10 a.m.: Let’s Talk Seniors® seminar on healthy aging

To RSVP, or to learn more, please call Montara Meadows at 702-435-3150.

*Active Aging Week is a registered trademark of International Council on Active Aging. Holiday Retirement is not affiliated with any health care provider and does not provide or coordinate any care services. Residents are welcome to obtain services from any provider of their choice.

Advance Directives for Health Care Professionals – 1.0 CEU

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

Advance Directives for Health Care Professionals – 1.0 CEU

September 12, 2012, 3 pm
Refreshments will be served

Presenter: Kim Boyer, Certified Elder Law
& Accredited VA Attorney

Hosted by: Acacia Springs – Luxury Independent & Assisted Living

Please join us for this informative and engaging workshop.
The workshop will cover:
 The types and purposes of advance directives

 The requirements for executing a living will and a durable power of attorney for health care
 Gain an understanding as to when each type of advance directive goes into effect

 Capacity and Informed Consent
o Legal capacity – what it means and how it is established

o Nevada laws on informed consent – case and the obligation of the professional
o Competency evaluations for legal planning at end of life

Boyer Law Group – (702) 255-2000 – 10785 W. Twain Ave., Ste. 200 – Las Vegas, NV 89135
Please RSVP or direct your questions to Tina Bettsteller: tina@elderlawnv.com
We look forward to seeing you there!

Free Screenings During Senior Fest

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General, Health and Home Care 

Hundreds of seniors will take advantage of free health screenings offered at Senior Fest 2012, Tuesday, Sept. 4 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Reno Town Mall. Last year, seniors lined up at the large tented area to participate in this once a year community outreach for tests offered by the health care team of professionals at Renown Health and Senior Care Plus.

Attendees, age 50 and older, can receive screenings regardless of their health insurance carrier. They include a Basic Metabolic Panel and Lipid Profile, Glycohemoglobin (Hemoglobin A1C) for known diabetics, blood pressure check and body mass index calculation. A pharmacist will also be available to review medications. Lab screenings will be offered from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

In addition to screenings, flu and pneumonia shots will be available at a low cost to general attendees. Medicare beneficiaries (Part B) and members of Senior Care Plus will receive the shots with no out-of-pocket cost.

Renown Health representatives will also be present to share important health information about specialized senior services, knee and hip joint replacement, cancer, heart services, Medical Group and Urgent Care and Cosmetic Laser & Skin Care.

For more information about the health screenings, contact Renown Wellness Resources at 775-982-5433.

About Hometown Health
Established in 1988, Hometown Health is the insurance division of Renown Health. Hometown Health is northern Nevada’s largest and most experienced health-insurance companies. Providing wide-ranging medical coverage and great service to members, Hometown Health represents a philosophy of health care that emphasizes active partnerships between members and physicians. Hometown Health values prevention as a key component of comprehensive care – reducing the risks of illness and helping to treat small problems before they can become more severe. Hometown Health offers a number of insurance products including HMO, PPO, HSA, Dental, Vision, and Senior Care Plus, northern Nevada’s first Medicare Advantage Plan. For more information, call 775-982-3000 or visit hometownhealth.com.

About Senior Fest
The 17th annual Senior Fest is the largest senior citizen outreach in northern Nevada. It offers informational booths featuring businesses and organizations that provide senior services in the Truckee Meadows community. Senior Fest is held at Reno Town Mall on the corner of Peckham Lane and South Virginia, across from the Reno Sparks Convention and Visitors Authority. Parking is free at both the mall and the Atlantis Casino parking lot. For more information, call 775-348-0717.

There’s No Place Like Home

September 1, 2012 by · Comments Off on There’s No Place Like Home
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Press-Media Releases 

There’s No Place Like Home
By Michael Clark

If you are on Medicare and have had a recent hospital stay, experts say there is about a 1-in-5 chance you will find yourself back in the hospital again within a month. Hospital readmissions are not only expensive they are hard on both patients and families. According to analysts, three-fourths of these readmissions are potentially avoidable.
Now, the Nevada Partnership for Value-driven Healthcare (NPV) has an initiative with an ultimate goal of reducing these hospital readmissions by at least 10%. The No Place Like Home Campaign is being implemented in Nevada by HealthInsight, the state’s Medicare Quality Improvement Organization.

Typically, problems begin when patients receive inadequate preparation for discharge from the hospital. The handover from the hospital to outpatient providers is poorly handled, and patients and their family caregivers are left to cope on their own with medical issues that they don’t understand. In fact, only about half of discharged patients follow up with their primary-care physicians after they leave the hospital, and those who don’t are much more likely to be readmitted than those who do see a doctor.
“Have we properly prepared the patient for a return home?” asks Deborah Huber, executive director of the non-profit organization HealthInsight, a prominent member of the NPV. “Poor communication is at the heart of the problem.”
Huber points out that too often people released from hospital care do not know when to go to their primary-care doctor, or which medications to take, or the costs involved. Making matters worse, there are no clear lines of authority. As a result, the system sets these individuals up to fail and creates a dangerous situation for patients, according to Brian Jack, an expert on hospital engineering.

In one study, for example, 78 percent of patients discharged from the ER did not understand their diagnosis, their ER treatment, home care instructions, or warnings signs of when to return to the hospital. Health care providers are partly responsible for this lack of comprehension.

IHI, a Boston-based nonprofit organization, advises hospitals and other institutions to use a patient-centered approach that looks at post-discharge care through a patient’s eyes. By doing “deep dives” into several patient histories, IHI says, and finding out why the patients were readmitted, it’s possible to understand where the entire process falls short and begin to fix it.

Another area that needs improvement has to do with what is called the transitions of care…do the health care providers receiving the patient know what the ones sending the patient home knows? “The patient gets stuck in the middle. They don’t know what to do,” Huber noted. And what about Advanced Planning…end of life care? Have patients and their families made these ultimate decisions? If not, these issues must be addressed. What if patients don’t want to go back to the hospital? Are they aware of what palliative care or hospice can do? “Medicare provides a good hospice benefit. The whole family can benefit from that.”

Here the goal is to make someone as comfortable as possible and give family members the support they need to help them through this difficult time. “These are the type of things I see every day with my home health patients, I see where patients would not have to return to acute if the goals set here could be obtained,” said Lucia Cleveland a home health occupational therapist.

HealthInsight’s goal is to reduce 30-day readmissions by 20% by October 2013. Finally, Huber observes “this is a community problem, not merely a hospital problem.” This community effort will produce sustainable and replicable strategies to achieve high-value health care for individuals in our communities and save potentially millions of dollars in healthcare costs.

“One way we support this statewide community effort is through a web-based campaign where providers, payers, and patients can pledge their support and become an active participant,” noted Jackie Buttaccio, HealthInsight’s Quality Improvement Manager. “The website is a one stop shop for all things readmissions with resources and tools that can be downloaded, and local success stories can be shared. “ The address is http://noplacelikehomenv.com

HealthInsight also supports this work through face to face workshops for providers to learn more about what they can change about their systems of care to keep patients safe from an avoidable hospital readmission.

Free Senior Help Fair

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

Free Senior Help Fair Provides Vital Information & Services

The Senior Help Fair is a collaborative event hosted by community-based organizations comprised of health care, senior service providers and government. The HELP Fair attendees will be treated to a variety of vendors, offering health and wellness screenings, health-related tips and information about local services from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thursday Sept. 6, 2012, on the campus of Christ Lutheran Church, located at 111 N. Torrey Pines Drive.

The Senior Help Fair is a one-stop destination for information about local services and organizations and is open to all ages. More than 50 agencies and companies will be on hand to provide information on community services for seniors. Community agencies will be on hand to help seniors connect with resources. Assistance programs that will be available include nutrition support, energy assistance, medication costs, affordable housing, legal services and transportation including the TAP taxicab assistance program. There will also be free health screenings for blood pressure, diabetes risk, vision, falls risk and dementia.

“This fair will help all seniors and those who care for them navigate the programs and services available to help people and to give voice to their concerns regarding services and resources,” said Senior Help Fair Organizing Committee Chair Jeff Klein. Individuals, who are 65 or over, should bring their identification and Medicare cards.
Along with the more than 50 agencies and companies offering information and services, free lunch will be served to the first 200 attendees, local singer Mark Miller will be providing entertainment and many door prizes will be offered on the hour.
The best time to think about aging is before the need arises. If an emergency happens, family members have to scramble to seek out options for care within a short time period, often not being able to take the time to make the best decision. “There are still a large number of people in the state who do not know what senior services are offered, or that these services even exist, so we will continue outreach efforts to the community,” said Commission on Aging member Lucy Peres “The goal is to raise awareness of health and safety related services in the state.”

The fair will also provide an opportunity for seniors to speak with their legislators and voice their opinions and concerns on issues that affect their daily lives.

When: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Thursday Sept. 6, 2012
Where: Campus of Christ Lutheran Church 111 N. Torrey Pines Drive
Information: Call Nevada Senior Services (702) 648-3425 www.nevadaseniorservices.org

Community Partners for Better Health 8th Annual Choose and Move Festival

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

Community Partners for Better Health (CPBH) is hosting the 8th Annual Choose and Move Festival on Saturday, September 8, 2012, from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., at the Doolittle Community Center, 1950 North J Street, Las Vegas, Nevada. We invite you to join us as an exhibitor at this educational, interactive, and fun event. The festival has proven to be a very popular event for health care providers, health care agencies and Southern Nevada residents. With more than 200 participants last year, we anticipate new additions will draw over 300 people to the event.

The festival encourages our community to adopt healthier lifestyles especially when it comes to regular physical activity and selecting more nutritious foods. Festival planners include the Southern Nevada Health District, City of North Las Vegas, Governor’s Office for Consumer Health Assistance, Clark County Fire Department, 100 Black Men-Las Vegas Chapter, Las Vegas Metro Police Department, American Lung Association, HealthInsight, Nathan Adelson Hospice and numerous other community stakeholders. The festival will feature a variety of free and low-cost health screenings, healthy food demonstrations and information, and free physical activity classes including African dance, belly dance, Latin dance, hula, and Zumba. Additionally, we are working with Jump for Joy Foundation to offer physical activities for our younger attendees.

Attached you will find an exhibitor registration form. We truly appreciate your consideration to participate in the event. We believe that you will find involvement beneficial to your organization’s mission and to the community you serve. You are a valuable resource in helping our community citizens live healthy lives and make positive health choices. The planning committee is developing a strategy to engage attendees more fully with vendors. Look for more on this in July.

If you have questions, please call Community Partners for Better Health, at 702- 256-2724 or Jackie Knudsen, Choose & Move Co-Chairman at 702-755-9035 or email: jacqueline.knudsen@emeritus.com

Senior Care Plus Offers Free Screenings During Senior Fest

Senior Care Plus, a Medicare Advantage Plan from Hometown Health, will offer free lab screenings during Senior Fest. Senior Fest is Tuesday, Sept. 4 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Reno Town Mall.

Lab screenings will be offered from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Attendees, age 50 and older, can receive screenings regardless of their health insurance carrier. They include a Basic Metabolic Panel and Lipid Profile, Glycohemoglobin (Hemoglobin A1C) for known diabetics, blood pressure check and body mass index calculation. A pharmacist will also be available to review medications.

Senior Care Plus members can receive a free FIT (fecal immunochemical test) at-home cancer screening and a heel bone scan (100 screenings will be offered for women only).

In addition to screenings, flu and pneumonia shots will be available at a low cost to general attendees. Medicare beneficiaries (Part B) and members of Senior Care Plus will receive the shots with no out-of-pocket cost.

Renown Health representatives will also be present to share important health information about specialized senior services, knee and hip joint replacement, cancer, heart services, Medical Group and Urgent Care and Cosmetic Laser & Skin Care.

For more information about the health screenings, contact Renown Wellness Resources at 775-982-5433.

About Hometown Health
Established in 1988, Hometown Health is the insurance division of Renown Health. Hometown Health is northern Nevada’s largest and most experienced health-insurance companies. Providing wide-ranging medical coverage and great service to members, Hometown Health represents a philosophy of health care that emphasizes active partnerships between members and physicians. Hometown Health values prevention as a key component of comprehensive care – reducing the risks of illness and helping to treat small problems before they can become more severe. Hometown Health offers a number of insurance products including HMO, PPO, HSA, Dental, Vision, and Senior Care Plus, northern Nevada’s first Medicare Advantage Plan. For more information, call 775-982-3000 or visit hometownhealth.com.

About Senior Fest
The 16th annual Senior Fest is the largest senior citizen outreach in northern Nevada. It offers informational booths featuring businesses and organizations that provide senior services in the Truckee Meadows community. Senior Fest is held at Reno Town Mall on the corner of Peckham Lane and South Virginia, across from the Reno Sparks Convention and Visitors Authority. Parking is free at both the mall and the Atlantis Casino parking lot. For more information, call 775-348-0717.

Cataract Rates are on the Rise in Americans Age 40 and Older

August 21, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Cataract Rates are on the Rise in Americans Age 40 and Older

American Academy of Ophthalmology Offers Tips for Cataract Detection and Treatment

SAN FRANCISCO – August 16, 2012 – The incidence of cataracts in the U.S. has risen 19 percent since 2000, impacting nearly 25 million Americans age 40 and older.[i] In fact, more than half of all Americans will develop cataracts by age 80, according to Prevent Blindness America’s Vision Problems in the U.S. report. In response, the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart program is educating the public about cataract risk factors, detection and treatment options during Cataract Awareness Month.

Cataract is a clouding of the eye’s lens, which can make it more difficult to focus light onto the eye’s retina – the light-sensitive tissue that sends images to the brain. Cataracts, a natural part of aging, are the most common cause of vision loss in the U.S. They typically develop slowly, so symptoms may not be immediately apparent. Over time, cataracts can cause vision to become blurry, cloudy, dull, or dim, and can interfere with daily activities.

The good news is that cataracts are almost always treatable with cataract surgery. During cataract surgery, an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor with the training and certification to provide the full range of eye care and surgery – removes the eye’s cloudy natural lens and replaces it with a clear artificial lens implant called an intraocular lens (IOL). Cataract surgery is often performed as an outpatient procedure and does not require an overnight hospital stay. Cataract surgery is one of the safest types of surgery, and 90 percent of patients who have cataract surgery enjoy better vision afterward.[ii]

“If you notice vision changes, cataracts could be to blame and you might need more than a new pair of glasses,” said David F. Chang, M.D., a clinical correspondent for the American Academy of Ophthalmology and a clinical professor at the University of California, San Francisco. “If you do have a cataract, you should be reassured that it is a normal aging change and not an eye disease. Cataract surgery usually carries an excellent prognosis, and you should talk to your ophthalmologist about whether surgery should be done to restore your eyesight.”

As the aging population grows, it is increasingly important for seniors and their caregivers to understand cataract risks, symptoms, prevention, and treatment options. The American Academy of ophthalmology recommends the following tips to maintain healthy vision:
• Get a baseline exam by age 40. All adults should get a baseline eye exam by age 40 when early signs of eye disease and vision changes may start to occur. During this visit, your ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.) will advise you on how often to have follow-up exams.
• After age 65, schedule regular eye exams. Anyone age 65 and older should visit an ophthalmologist regularly to detect eye diseases and conditions like cataract early, and to monitor any vision loss. Seniors age 65 and older may qualify for an eye exam and up to 1 year of care at no out of pocket cost through EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of American Academy of Ophthalmology. See if you qualify at www.eyecareamerica.org.
• Know your risk factors for cataract. Diabetes, smoking, extensive UV exposure, serious eye injuries, steroid use, and a family history of cataract can increase your risk for developing a cataract.
• Reduce your risks to prevent or delay the onset of cataracts. Use sunglasses and hats to protect your eyes from UV damage. Don’t smoke. If you have diabetes, control your blood sugar carefully through diet, exercise and medications if needed.
• Talk to your ophthalmologist about your treatment options. Vision loss from cataracts can interfere with daily activities. Talk to your ophthalmologist about whether cataract surgery is right for you. When preparing for surgery, give your doctor your complete medical and eye health history, including a list of medications that you have taken. Some medications can cause the iris to move out of its normal position and may require your ophthalmologist to adjust his or her surgical technique.

For more information on cataract symptoms, risk factors, surgery, and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org.

About EyeSmart
The American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

Seniors Citizens are a high priority in Washoe County

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Seniors Citizens are a high priority in Washoe County

Washoe County is experiencing a rapid demographic shift because of the aging of the “baby boom” generation. Like every community in America, we are evaluating how to provide services to the most vulnerable seniors.
 After an April 2, 2012 presentation by Washoe County Senior Services WCSS), the Joint Meeting of the Board of County Commissioners, Reno City Council, Sparks City Council and Washoe County School District Board of Trustees requested that the Department prepare a report on the cost and benefit of increased funding.
 The Department offers both a $1.2 million and $2.4 million option.
 Please ask your elected officials, in-person, by letter or e-mail, and in testimony at public hearings to support the proposal. The following is a summary:

Washoe County, like all of the United States, is seeing the “Baby Boomers” turn 60 in unprecedented numbers. This demographic shift is having a dramatic impact on seniors, families and our community.
 The senior population is growing faster than any other segment of the Washoe County community; 25% are now over 55, with the age group 55-64 years absorbing 27.3% of all County population growth over the last decade.
Washoe County Senior Services (WCSS) is not able to meet the needs of the rapidly growing number of vulnerable seniors.
 Today, Washoe County Senior Services assists only 8% of the more than 71,000 County residents over the age of 60. We are forecast to have as many as 93,000 over 60 by 2016.
 The Washoe County Senior Center, 9th and Sutro, is 34 years old, and over half of its Meals on Wheels delivery vehicles are over 10 years old.
 In 1985, when voters approved the $.01 Senior Citizens ad valorem Fund in perpetuity, it was believed to be adequate for all future facility, program and service needs. Because of increasing costs, the addition of essential programs and above all, population growth, this is no longer true.
 Almost all Washoe County Senior Services programs have a waiting list.
Washoe County Senior Services helps “Bend the Curve” of health and long term care costs by keeping seniors active, involved and independent.
 Planning to prepare the community for an aging society; leverage new resources.
 Senior Centers operated in partnership with cities and GID that provide classes, activities and events; volunteer opportunities.
 Congregate Meals at 8 locations in senior centers and public housing.
 Outreach and early intervention programs to connect seniors to services as early as possible.
 “Help Line” – Aging and Disability Resource Center – provides information, advice and counseling about health and long term care.
 Social Services, including case management, nursing, Home Delivered Meals and in-home care for the most vulnerable.
 Senior Law for legal matters including advance directives, public benefits appeals, elder law, and housing counseling.
 DayBreak Adult Day is an alternate to nursing home care.
Seniors and their families need help managing the maze of services and choices; many seniors are not able to pay for the services they need
 Almost every Washoe County family will be faced with providing care for aging parents and relatives. Most are not prepared.
 In a 2006 Washoe County needs assessment, only 34% of all seniors said that they could afford to pay for their own care.
WCSS low cost supportive services reduce public expenses by keeping people healthier, longer, supporting independent living in their homes and by delaying or preventing institutionalization. The additional funding would provide services and reduce other costs:
 Congregate Meal sites and Senior Centers
• 20% of the 2,100 seniors report that it is their only meal of the day.
• Site managers, which were eliminated in previous budget cuts, would be restored for all meal sites.
• Provide clerical and social work support for senior centers.
 WCSS “Help Line” provides counseling on long term care and health care options, empowering seniors to make an informed choice on decisions that affect their entire family.
• Expert information, advice and counseling would be available to an additional 5,500 seniors and family members per year.
 Case management and visiting nurse
• An additional 350 seniors would receive medication management, help with medical professionals and an in-home nursing assessment.
• An additional 600 seniors would be assisted by a case manager to coordinate care and arrange for services.
• An additional 400 low-income seniors would get in-home services, such as home care, personal care and escorted transportation that are not available elsewhere.
 Home Delivered Meals provides 1/3 of the USDA Recommended Daily Allowance to homebound seniors, who cannot prepare their own meals.
• Today, 175 (37%) of WCSS current HDM case load need assistance in 2 or more Activities of Daily Living (ADLs – bathing, dressing, eating, toileting, etc.) and receive additional case management, nursing and in-home care. They have received services for at least one year.
• New funding would serve an additional 300 homebound seniors per year; provide an additional 70,000 meals per year, for a total of 180,000.
• Additional funding would help an additional 400 high risk clients
 Senior Law: Provide legal services to an additional 400 people.
 DayBreak Adult Day Health: An additional 10 low-income seniors will get services.
• The annual cost for a DayBreak client is $11,000. Nevada Medicaid Nursing Home cost for the same senior is about $59,000 per year; an annual savings of $48,000 per year, and total potential annual savings of $3.48 million.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Health Care Partners Medical Group

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Las Vegas 

facebook.com/healthcarepartnersnevada

About Us

HealthCare Partners Nevada is a network of more than 200 primary care physicians and more than 1,300 specialists. With medical clinics and specialty care affiliates throughout Las Vegas, North Las Vegas, Henderson, Boulder City and Pahrump, HealthCare Partners Nevada (HCPNV) is committed to delivering the highest quality of care to all our patients.
Through our total care model, HealthCare Partners provides patient centered comprehensive primary care, specialty, and urgent care services. Founded in 1996, HealthCare Partners Nevada is an affiliate of HealthCare Partners LLC with offices in California, Florida and Nevada.

For Patients

At HealthCare Partners we approach your health with Total Care. Our mission is to deliver the highest quality care to all our patients. We do this by offering you complete access to our services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We also accommodate same-day appointments.
Our health care providers are ready and able to offer expert care when you need it most. While our mission is to deliver the best possible care for our patients, our promise is to provide the personal attention you deserve. It is our pleasure to ensure your individual healthcare needs are met.

Specialty Services

When you choose HealthCare Partners, you are choosing to manage your health through what we call our Total Care Model.  Total care means that you are actively involved with a team of healthcare professionals lead by your primary care physician who is responsible for coordinating your care and ensuring the best outcome possible for your medical needs.
HealthCare Partners is continually adding medical specialties to our team of healthcare professionals, including cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, internal medicine, pediatrics, and podiatry.

Cardiology

Cardiologists are doctors with special training and skill in finding, treating and preventing diseases of the heart and blood vessels.
Click here to find a HealthCare Partners Medical Group cardiologists.

  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Repair
  • Angioplasty
  • Atrial Fibrillation Management
  • Cardiac Catheterization /Angiography
  • Cardiovascular Disease Management
  • Carotid Ultrasonography
  • Catheter Ablation (CA)
  • Cholesterol Management And Testing
  • Coagulation Monitoring
  • Coronary Angioplasty/Stenting
  • Doppler Ultrasound
  • Echocardiography (Echo)
  • Electrophysiological Studies (EPS)
  • Gated Blood Pooling Imaging
  • Heart Rhythm Management
  • Holter/Event Monitoring
  • Implantable Cardioverter /Defribrillator (ICD)
  • Laser Lead Extractions
  • Nuclear Cardiac Imaging
  • Patent Foramen Ovale Repair (PFO)
  • Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Rotational Atherectomy (PCTRA)
  • Peripheral Vascular Disease Management And Testing
  • Peripheral Vascular Interventions
  • Permanent Pacemaker Implantation
  • Stress Testing
  • Structural Heart Disease
  • T-Wave Alternans
  • Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)
  • Transesophageal Echocardiography
  • Ventricular Septal Defect Repair (VSD)
  • Women And Heart Disease
Endocrinology

Endocrinologists are doctors that focus on the medical aspects of hormones and their associated diseases and conditions.  Endocrine disorders may include: cholesterol disorders, coronary artery disease, diabetes, hormone replacement therapy, hypertension, hypoglycemia, obesity, osteoporosis, reproductive medicine and thyroid disorders.

Dermatology

Dermatologists are doctors that specialize in the diagnosis, treatment and management of disorders of the skin, hair and nails.

Internal Medicine

Internal medicine specialists are doctors that focus on adult medicine and have had special study and training focusing on the prevention and treatment of adult diseases. Internists are sometimes referred to as the “doctor’s doctor”, because they are often called upon to act as consultants to other physicians to help solve puzzling diagnostic problems.

Pediatrics

Pediatricians are doctors that focus on babies, children, adolescents, and young adults from birth to age 21.  Pediatricians manage the physical, mental, and emotional well-being of their patients in every stage of development.

Podiatry

Podiatrists are doctors that diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and related structures of the leg.

Nevada Senior Guide Announces Arbors Memory Care Community Top Rating

August 10, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Nevada Senior Guide Announces Arbors Memory Care Community Top Rating

Nevada Senior Guide Announces Arbors Memory Care Community Receives State’s Top Rating in Annual Survey. Family owned memory care community in Nevada receives another “A” grade.
Sparks, NV, August 09, 2012 –(PR.com)– Family owned memory care community in Nevada receives another “A” grade

Arbors Memory Care Community has received another “A” grade from the State of Nevada Department of Health and Human Services.

This is the 9th year in a row the community in Sparks, which specializes in the care of people with Alzheimer’s and related dementias, has received the highest rating from the Health Division’s Bureau of Health Care Quality and Compliance.

Owned and operated by the Stutchman family, the Arbors has never been resurveyed to achieve the A grade. They have consistently received the highest rating on the first survey or inspection.

Some assisted living and memory care communities receive a lower grade on the first inspection and then must be resurveyed once any deficiencies have been corrected.

During the annual survey state inspectors show up unannounced and check on resident care, medication management, employee fingerprints and background checks, resident medical records, cleanliness of the building and fire safety.

Survey results may be viewed at http://www.health.nv.gov/Deficiencies_Qry.asp#agc_ and click on the AGC/AGZ link.

Each licensed community in the state is surveyed on an annual basis. Facilities then receive a grade between A and D. An A grade means the community is well run with minor administrative issues and no harm is likely to occur. A grade of D means serious harm has occurred or a condition or incident has resulted in death or serious harm and/or multiple administrative issues were cited.

“We are so incredibly proud of our continuous A grade,” said owner Gina Stutchman. “One of the many benefits to being family-owned is that all of the decisions regarding the quality of care are made right here in our building, not at corporate headquarters in another state.”

Stutchman also said the Arbors provides ongoing staff training that far surpasses the state requirements.

“Our training focuses on the fact that each person with memory loss is unique and is affected in a different way. Understanding the disease process and learning a variety of ways to communicate allows our caregivers to reduce anxiety and create a comfort zone for our residents and their families.”

Arbors Memory Care Community is a family-owned and operated residential community providing care for persons living with Alzheimer’s or other dementias.

The Arbors, located at 2121 E. Prater Way in Sparks, offers long term stays, as well as respite stays for caregivers needing a short-term care solution.

For more information, please contact Stephanie Hanna, Arbors Memory Care Community (775) 331-2229 or visit www.arborsmemorycare.com.

For more information about Nevada Senior Guide, please go to http://www.nvseniorguide.com

What Types of Senior Jobs Exist? (Nevada Senior Guide)

September 27, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many seniors aren’t content to take the company watch and spend the rest of their lives in complete retirement. Part time and full time senior jobs exist, but the problem is finding them.

Wanting to stay busy isn’t the only reason seniors are looking for full and part-time jobs. Retirement and social securing incomes just aren’t enough to live on anymore, and seniors find themselves needing to work to pay the bills and buy food.

Some want to continue working simply because they love the feeling. They may be highly creative or well-educated and talented in a certain field. A job will provide these seniors with the sense of satisfaction they need.

The world has changed, and retirees don’t need to hold down a 9 to 5 job anymore, but they may be confused about what they’re qualified to do. Knowing just a little about the Internet lets seniors find suitable jobs or build a business and work from home.

If you’re searching for senior jobs, first decide what type of job appeals to you. If you’re an outgoing, people-person, you may want to seek jobs that take advantage of this talent. A job in retail might be just the thing that makes you happy and will supplement your income enough.

You may have enjoyed working for your old company or being in a certain line of work so much that you’ll want to speak to your employer about staying on with the company – perhaps on a part time basis. Most companies will love the fact that you’re bringing experience to the table.

Freelance jobs are extremely popular now. Many companies are outsourcing work to freelancers so that they won’t have to pay health care and other benefits to full time employees. You may be able to market yourself as a consultant and work as much or as little as you want.

A recent ‘Dear Abby column entitled, “Boomers finding new opportunities as they hit 65” brought to light that between 7,000 to 10,000 people will have a 65th birthday every day for the next 19 years. That’s right – approximately 76 million people will soon be hitting the big 65.

These seniors don’t want to be counted out of the work force. They want to be contributors and participators in life and in society. The impact on our world will be enormous. As these intelligent, hard-working people reach ‘retirement’ age, they won’t retire, but instead find ways to keep working – and that means more senior jobs.

Today, seniors have so many more opportunities than their parents – computers and the Internet has made it possible to begin a whole other career, build your own business and create a way to make a great income far into retirement years.

Don’t give up if you’re looking for senior jobs that fit your criteria. Search the Internet for business opportunities that might be just the chance you’re looking for.

Marjorie Chaddock

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Marjorie_Chaddock

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5771360

Finding an Assisted Living Facility Alternative for Your Loved One – Home Care Solutions (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

The following information is available for individuals who are in the process of making a decision about home care or an alternative to assisted living facility living. If your loved one has decided he or she would prefer to remain in the comfort of their own home rather than an elderly living facility, take the time to decide the best in senior care option for your loved one; it’s important to thoroughly research any professional in senior home care provider who will be visiting your home on a regular schedule.

If you’ve decided on home care as an alternative to assisted living facilities, the following information is important to consider before starting your search. First determine which type of services you or your loved one will need. It may be best to consult a physician or hospital discharge planner for assistance in evaluating your loved one’s special needs and care requirements. After acquiring the names of several service providers, take the time to consider their offered services and reputations. Here are a variety of questions to ask senior care providers and other individuals concerning the track record and history of an elderly living facility alternative care provider:

 

  • How long have you been in business as a provider of home care services?
  • How do you select and train your employees?
  • Do you provide nurses and/or therapists who evaluate patient home care needs?
  • Who supervises the provision of care?
  • How do you involve or include the patient and his or her family in care plan development?
  • How do you bill for services?
  • What procedures are in place in case of emergency?
  • How is patient confidentiality handled?
  • Can the home care provider supply a list of references?

 

Before choosing your senior living facility alternative and settling into a home care plan that works for you, remember that a little initial research can go a long way towards making the patient/senior care provider relationship beneficial to all.

An Alternative to Assisted Living Facilities: Assisted Living Care

You want your parent, friend, or loved one to enjoy their freedom and independence for as long as possible, and remain comfortable in their own household. As an alternative to elderly living facilities, home care is becoming a popular choice for seniors, as it enables them to remain in the safety and comfort of their own home, and relieves care giving duties from relatives and family members. Often times, your loved one may need help with activities or tasks that go overlooked-such as opening jars, driving, maintaining a clean household, and bathing. An alternative to assisted living facilities, home care provides support for those in need with personal care and daily activities and can provide part-time, full time, and as-needed support.

However, it’s important to understand that senior living caregivers do not always provide health-related services. Home health providers offer medical care, such as trained nurses or physical therapy services for seniors. Assisted living caregivers assist with non-medical senior care.

As your parents age they may require assistance, but assisted living care enables your parent or loved one to continue living independently for as long as possible.

Consider assisted living care as an alternative to assisted living facilities. Your loved one may only need care for a few hours a day, but their quality of life can improve significantly with in-home assistance. Although this decision may be emotional and challenging, it’s sometimes necessary to keep your loved ones safe, cared for, and comfortable.

Erica Ronchetti is a freelance writer for Visiting Angels, the nation’s leading, network of non-medical, private duty home care agencies providing senior care, elder care, personal care, Home health care, respite care and companion care to help the elderly and adults continue to live in their homes across America. Visit the Visiting Angels website to find out more information on alternatives to assisted living facilities.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=E._Ronchetti

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5036113

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August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
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The Nevada Senior Guide is your comprehensive resource directory for seniors and those who support them.

Are you looking for something in particular?  

An assisting living facility in a certain area, perhaps?  

Whatever it is, just let us know by filling in the form you see below and we will do our very best to help!

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How can we help you?
* Important Note: If you wish us to send you a physical copy of the Nevada Senior Guide, please provide your postal address, including zip *

 

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COMPLETE SENIOR GUIDE LISTING

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The Nevada Senior guide provides information about homes, health, services and leisure activities.

Featuring wonderful health care providers such as Circle of Life:

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The print version of Nevada Senior Guide is free and is available throughout Las Vegas, Henderson, Green Valley, Boulder City, North Las Vegas, Pahrump and Summerlin.

 






The Nevada Senior Guide contains the Senior Services Directory including government and non-profit agencies that offer services to seniors in Nevada. These services include food and housing assistance, transportation for medical appointments and other life enhancing services.

A Level of Care Directory is included to assist in the selection of appropriate services in assisted living faculties.

Previously known as the Las Vegas Senior Guide, Mathis began the publication in 2001 because she recognized the need to inform seniors about services that were available to them. It is distributed in Von’s Grocery Stores, Whole Foods Grocery Stores, all libraries and hospitals through-out southern Nevada.

 


 

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Our Mission Statement:  To Publish the most popular, user friendly, visible, results-based, free publication & website

The publication is filled with informative articles that relate to Senior issues including health care, home health and leisure activities.

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“Seniors are a unique group because they have so many needs that aren’t met as easily as those of the younger generations,” Mathis stated. “They are the largest percentage of our country’s population and are always looking for resources and good deals, no matter what their income level. The directory is also useful to baby boomers who can use it to find resources for their aging parents.”

“I do not know of any other advertisement that gives you so much for the price and not only produces results, but also has a staff that goes out of its way to help their advertisers through education and networking. Megan and her staff WANT you to be successful. To not advertise in Nevada Senior Guide is like giving your competition referrals.”  – Mark A. Simmons, QDCS, Exploring Life Transitions, Memory Care Consultant

 

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Nevada-Senior-Guide Medical and Health Services Directory – Northern Nevada Rural

City of Pioche – County Social Services
Information

(775) 728-4477 Lincoln County

www.co.lincoln.nv.us

Provides various essential programs, services,  benefits to assist qualified, needy families,  individuals achieve their highest level of
self-sufficiency, Transportation

Elder Protective Services (EPS)

State of Nevada – Aging & Disability
Services Agency – Northern Nevada

(775) 688-2964 Washoe County

Elder Protective Services for persons 60 years

old and older who may experience abuse,

neglect, exploitation, or isolation. Elder

Protective Services serves all of Nevada

 

Eureka Senior Center

20 W. Gold Street, Eureka NV 89316

(775) 237-5597
www.co.eureka.nv.us/county/senior.htm

Referral Services for Low Income Energy

Assistance, USDA, and Medicare

Fallon Paiute Shoshone Tribe Senior Center

1885 Agency Rd., Fallon, NV 89406

(775) 423-7569 Churchill County

www.fpst.org/programs/seniorcenter.htm

Offers meals, trips, traditional crafts, and

other cultural events, caregivers, food bank,

national relief charities program

Kids to Seniors Korner – Saint Mary’s

Community Wellness, Community

Based Outreach

(775) 770-6177 Washoe County

www.saintmarysreno.com

Kids to Seniors Korner assists vulnerable                           individuals and families, with special
emphasis on homeless children and seniors,                          by linking and providing them with community               resources through a collaborative community                    partnership to increase quality of life 8am-5pm

Lyon County Human Services

1075 Pyramid St., Silver Springs, NV 89429

(775) 577-5009 Lyon County

www.lyon-county.org

All emergency services, Senior Services,

Low Income, Employment. 8am-5pm

 

Nevada Rural Counties Retired & Senior                              Volunteer Program (RSVP)

Pahrump, Amargosa, Beatty, Crystal

2621 Northgate Lane, #6

Carson City, NV 89701

775-687-4680, treebanks@pahrump.com

RSVP Program provides free local transportation                           to doctors, shopping, bank, Respite Care,     Caregiver Program (4 hours at a time), Pro                           Bono Legal Services, Resistance Exercise

Training, Coupons for Farmers Market
(Call program director for information)

 

NYE/Esmerelda County Community

Health Nursing

1 Frankee St., Tonopah, NV 89049

(775) 482-6659. Referral Service, Immunization
flu shots, counseling for women’s/men’s
health, cancer screening

 

RSVP Program – NV Rural Counties

Homemaker Companions, Donations Welcome

Senior Daybreak Program

Washoe County Senior Services

(775) 328-2575 Washoe County

www.co.washoe.nv.us/seniorsrv

Daycare for adults age 18 years or older as
alternative to institutionalization, Provides                        respite care, nursing, day care and social
opportunities for the disabled adult,

Offers group care during the day

 

Senior ID Card – Douglas Cty Nevada TRIAD

(775) 782-9858 Douglas County

This card is wallet size and should be carried                     at all times. It contains information that could
save your life in case of an emergency.
CARE TRAK Program.

 

The Continuum Outreach Program

Nevada Care Connection Partner

3700 Grant Dr., Ste A, Reno, NV 89509

(775) 829-4700 Washoe County

www.thecontinuum-reno.com

Adult day care, therapy and rehab

 

Douglas County Nevada TRIAD

Dementia/Senior and Elderly Services

The Evacuation Disaster Program

(775) 782-9858 Douglas County

For those who live alone or are disabled:
in the event of a disaster and would not be                           able to evacuate without assistance. This                  program signs you up for immediate
assistance to come to your aid in the event                            an evacuation request is issued.

Contact for Magnet that holds health info.

 

Washoe County Senior Services Law Project

1155 E. 9th St., Reno, NV 89512

(775) 334-3050 Washoe County

Assists seniors of Washoe County with
Social security, supplemental security income,                   Medicare, food stamps, county assistance,                                 public housing and Foreclosure Info.

Call for hours. 60+

WEARC Program (Waiver for the Elderly in

Adult Residential Care)

State of Nevada – Aging & Disability
Services Agency – Northern Nevada

(775) 688-2964 Carson City County
www.nvaging.net

A home and community based waiver for                  the elderly in group care that offers individuals                   a less expensive alternative to supervised                              care in a residential setting

Nevada-Senior-Guide Advocacy Directory – Northern Nevada Rural

Advocates for Elders Program

State of Nevada – Aging & Disability Services   Agency  Northern Nevada

445 Apple St., S104, Reno, NV 89502

(775) 688-2964 – Carson City County

www.nvaging.net

Advocacy and assistance to frail seniors, RX & Drug Program, Rent & Tax Rebates, Elder Abuse, CHIP, Suicide Prevention, WEARC Program

 

Human Services Department of Lyon County

(775) 577-5009 x 15. Provides advocacy &
assistance to Lyon County seniors age 60+ in
Yerington, Dayton, Silver Springs & Fernley
Senior Centers, call for information.

 

Long-Term Care (LTC)

State of Nevada – Division of Aging Services

Northern Nevada – Washoe County

(775) 688-2964, www.nvaging.net

Addresses issues and problems faced by

residents in LTC facilities, also residents

facilities for groups. Protects the confidentiality

of a resident’s records, and ensures that the                      identity of any complainant or resident will                             not be discussed.

 

Crisis Call Center – Washoe County

(775) 784-8090, crisiscallcenter.org

Substance Abuse 800-450-9530 or

(775) 825-4357, Suicide Hotline 800-273-8255,                    option 1. Provides information and referral
services. Offers advocacy and support to
families of seniors 50 and older. Elder abuse
and neglect reporting, community outreach,
education on self-sufficiency, and community
resources.

 

Northern Nevada – NV Secretary of State

101 N. Carson St., Ste. 3, Carson City, NV 89701

(775) 684-5708, (702) 486-2887

www.LivingWillLockBox.com, sosmail@sos.nv.gov

NO COST SECURE way to file living wills and

advanced health care directives for immediate
access to health care providers, Mergers,                            Business License, Election Div, Notary.

 

NV Division for Aging & Disability Service

3416 Goni Rd., Bldg. D132, Carson City, NV 89706

(775) 687-4210. Elder Abuse, Senior Rx

Program, Disability Information, Medicaid,                            Suicide Prevention, Advocacy.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Respite Care Directory – Southern Nevada

Alzheimer’s Association – Desert SW Chapter

5190 S. Valley View Blvd. #S104, LV, NV 89118

(702) 248-2770, www.ALZ.org

Support Groups, Respite Care, Education,

Care Consultation. 800-272-3900 24/7 Hotline

 

East Valley Family Services

1830 E. Sahara Ave., Ste. 102

702-920-6581. Respite care by appointment,                          support group available – 702-920-6515

 

Easter Seals of S. Nevada

6200 W. Oakey Blvd., LV, NV 89146, 702-870-7050

Respite care, therapy services

 

Give Me A Break, Inc.

2550 Chandler Ave. #43, Las Vegas, NV 89120

(702) 898-2216, www.givemeabreak.com

Respite Care, Telephone Reassurance,

Referral Service, Community Service Court                        Assistance (call first)

 

Helping Hands of Vegas Valley, Inc.

2320 Paseo Del Prado Bldg. B #204

LV, NV 89102. (702) 633-7264, www.hhovv.org

Referral Service, Respite Care, Education,                          Food Pantry, Transportation

 

Nevada Senior Services – 2 Locations

Henderson 702-368-2273, LV 702-648-3425

Respite care and support programs.

Contributions welcome. Call for additional info.

 

The ALS Association/NV Chapter

4220 S. Maryland Pkwy., Bldg. B, Ste 404

Las Vegas, NV 89119

(702) 777-0500, www.ALSofNevada.org

Referral, Durable Medical for ALS patients.

Call for hours. Support groups

 

Veterans Affairs of So. Nevada

7235 W. Buffalo Dr., N. Las Vegas, NV 89113

702-791-9040

702-791-9000 OR 1-888-633-7554 – Health Care

1-800-827-1000 Reno, NV – Benefits

1-800-273-8255 Opt 1 – Suicide Prevention

www.VA.Gov. Respite Care, Assisted Care, also
connects to clinic locations, 8am-5pm, M-F.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Multiple Services Directory – Southern Nevada

AARP – Nevada State Office / Contact Center

5820 S. Eastern Ave. #190, LV, NV 89119

Toll Free 1-866-389-5652

www.aarp.org/nv

Advocacy, Employment Assistance, Safe

Driving Instruction, Tax Services, Legal Services

Catholic Charities of So. Nevada

531 N. 30th St., Las Vegas, NV 89101

(702) 382-0721

Foster Grandparent Program, Senior                                     Companion Program, Retired Senior Volunteers.                    Mon-Fri 7:30am-4pm. Telephone reassurance,                     Legal services

City Mission of Las Vegas

2214 N. Pecos Rd., Las Vegas, NV 89115

(702) 384-1930. Referral Service, Counseling                     Services, Donations; Geriatric, Friendly
Visitation, Food Boxes, clothing, Breakfast
8:30-9:30, Need application on file.

 

Clark County – Public Guardian

515 Shadow Lane, Las Vegas, NV 89106

(702) 455-4332, www.accessclarkcounty.com

Guardianship, Provide financial management

Clark County Social Services

1600 Pinto Lane, LV, NV 89106

(702) 455-7051, www.clarkcounty.com

Referral Service, Alternative Healthcare,

Long-Term Care, Homemaker Program,                   Financial Help, U.S. Citizens and Legal

Residents, Short Term Info, 7am-4:30pm

 

Friends in the Desert, Inc.

43 West Pacific Avenue, Henderson, NV 89015

(702) 565-8742

Meals served 6 days a week, Call for times,                          Clothing needed, Legal Assistance

 

Grace Care Center

2020 W. Bonanza Rd., LV, NV 89106

702-749-6332

Wellness, Mentoring Center, Basic Skills,                           Psycho-Social Rehab. Call for additional info

 

Hope Link of Southern Nevada

178 Westminster Way, Henderson, NV 89015

(702) 566-0576. Rental/Utilities assistance,                         Food Pantry, Henderson Residents, Mon –                  Thur, 8am – 6pm, Closed 12pm – 1pm for                             Lunch, closed Friday. Need proof of income                              and residency, NV ID, SS Card

 

Help of Southern Nevada

1640 E. Flamingo Rd., LV, NV 89119

(702) 369-4357, www.helpsonv.org

Travelers Assistance, Home Repairs, Shelter,

Food, Clothing, Family Resources, Lifeline,

Respite Services, Bus tokens, weatherization.

Renters utility services, HOPWA Program,

7am-5pm, Work Center, Homeless Services.                           Closed Fri.

Helping Hands of Henderson

102 E. Lake Mead Pkwy., Henderson, NV 89015

(702) 616-6554

Community Research, Referrals, Transportation,

60+ Older Henderson Residents, 8am-4:30pm

Helping Hands of NLV

3640 North 5th St., Suite 130, N. LV, NV 89032

(702) 649-7853. Referral, Paper Goods/Pantry
Distribution, Transportation to Doctor, Repair
– small jobs – inside only & miscellaneous.

Helping Hands of Vegas Valley

2320 Paseo Del Prado Bldg. B #204, LV, NV 89102

(702) 633-7264, www.hhovv.org

Referral Service, Respite Care, Volunteer

Transportation, The Pantry, Wheelchair van                        available. 60+ Over

Jewish Family Service Agency

4794 S. Eastern Ave., Ste. C, LV, NV 89119

(702) 732-0304, www.jfsalv.org. Call for hours.

Counseling, Holocaust Survivor Assistance,                       Adoption, Career Development, Pantry.

Las Vegas Rescue Mission

480 West Bonanza Road, Las Vegas, NV 89106

(702) 382-1766, www.vegasrescue.org

8am-6:30pm, Phone assistance for info

Shelter, Referral, Counseling, Nutrition, Eye                    Glasses, Thrift Store

 

Las Vegas Senior Citizens Ctr.

451 East Bonanza Road, Las Vegas, NV 89101

(702) 229-6454. Tripsters, Socialization,
monthly luncheons,  arts & crafts, exercise,
computers, music,  singing, billiards.

 

Lend A Hand, Inc.

400 Utah St., Boulder City, NV 89005

(702) 294-2363. Transportation, Referral,                           Friendly Visitation, Respite Care (3 hrs), Health         equipment M – F 9:00am – 2:00pm, In-Home                                Services, Lend a Hand Program

 

Lutheran Social Services of NV

73 Spectrum Blvd., LV, NV 89101

(702) 639-1730, www.lssnv.org

Food Pantry (over 62), Housing/Rental

Assistance, Utility assistance, Help getting                          State ID & Birth Certificates, Call for Info.                7:30am-4pm. Special programs.

Nevada Senior Services

901 N. Jones Blvd., LV, NV 89108, 702-648-3425

Creative aging, caregiver support groups,                             outreach programs, home modification. Call                             for additional assistance. Senior Assessment

 

Nevada SMP Senior Medicare Patrol

1860 E. Sahara Ave., LV, NV 89104

702-486-3403 or 1-888-838-7305

Prevention of fraud & medicare abuse, File claims

 

Nevada State Contractors Board

2310 Corporate Cir., Ste 200

Henderson, NV 89074

(702) 486-1100, www.nscb.nv.gov

Regulatory agency promoting quality

construction by Nevada licensed contractors.                   Provides contractor license verifications,

assistance with contractor workmanship

issues and homeowner education

regarding unlicensed contractors.

 

Nevada Talking Book Services (Library)

100 N. Stewart St., Carson City, NV 89701

1-800-922-9334, www.nevadaculture.org

Provide books, magazines, auto books

for blind and physically handicapped

Nevada Talking Book Services

6655 W. Sahara Ave., Ste B200, LV, NV 89146

(702) 486-3737, www.nevadaculture.org

Outreach and public awareness

 

RAGE Program – Aging & Disability

Resource Center           (702) 333-1038

2901 El Camino Ave., S-102, LV, NV 89102

Referral Service, Home Modification:

Minor, Build Handicap Ramps, Durable

Medical, Home & Vehicle Modification,                   Prescription Assistance

 

 

Senior Life Line/Goldberg Senior Center

2309 Renaissance Dr. #B, LV, NV 89119

(702) 933-1191. Transportation for Groceries
+ DRs, Homemaker Service, Nutritional
Program, Kosher Meals On Wheels, Home                             Safety Program, Limited Space, Henderson                    Transportation, Lunch on Fridays, Taxi
Vouchers

So. NV Center for Independent Living

4100 N. Martin Luther King, Ste. E100,

N. Las Vegas, NV 89030. www.sncil.org

(702) 649-3822, (800) 398-0760 toll free

People with disabilities, Counseling, Housing

Assistance, Advocacy, Technical Assistance,                        Public Awareness, Education, Referral info for                     food and transportation

 

State of NV Aging & Disability Services Division

Community Home-Based Initiatives Programs

1860 E. Sahara Ave., LV, NV 89104, 702-486-3545

Referral Service, Homemaker Program, Meal                      Delivery, Advocacy, Community Ombudsman,
Medicare counseling, taxi coupons, RX
Assistance, Elder Abuse and Neglect, Grant                        Programs, CHIP, Complaints.

 

Sun City Summerlin Charities, Inc.

10362 Sun City Blvd., Las Vegas, NV 89134

(702) 254-5831. Hours: 8:30am-11am

Residents Only. Transportation, Small

handyman jobs

 

The Salvation Army-Family Services

1581 N. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101

(702) 649-8240. Food Assistance, Case
Management, Referral,  gas & electric out
reach program, Age 62 (need to call for
qualification)

 

The Salvation Army

2900 Palomino Lane, Las Vegas, NV 89107

(702) 870-4430. Administrative Offices, Church

Donations welcome.

Veterans So. NV, Health Care System

N. Las Vegas, NV 89036

(702) 791-9000 for clinic connections

1-800-273-8255 Suicide, Opt 1 Lifeline

Pharmaceutical & Medical Assistance,

Psychiatric, Counseling, Support Groups,                            Respite Care, Assisted Care, Transportation                            to and from various clinics, VA benefits and                          services, Flu shots, Care Giver Program

Women’s Dev. Ctr. for Independent Living

4020 Pecos-McLeod, Las Vegas, NV 89104

(702) 796-7770. Affordable Rental Program,                      Clothing donations welcome. Call for Food                             Bank Info

Nevada-Senior-Guide Advocacy Directory – Southern Nevada

AARP – Nevada State Office / Contact Center

5820 S. Eastern Ave. #190, LV, NV 89119

Toll Free 1-866-389-5652

www.aarp.org/nv

Advocacy, Employment Assistance, Safe

Driving Instruction, Tax Services

 

Clark County Senior Advocate Pgm.

1600 Pinto Lane, LV, NV 89106

(702) 455-7051, www.accessclarkcounty.com

Referral Service, C/C Social Services,

SR Programs, Long Term Placement. Home                            Maker Services. Call for appointment

 

Health Insight

6830 W. Oquendo Rd., #102, LV, NV 89118

(702) 385-9933, www.healthinsight.org

Quality improvements, Health care and

Health issues

 

Health Insightof Livanta

6830 W. Oquendo Rd., Area 5, LV, NV 89118

1-877-588-1123

Supports medical records from healthcare                         providers. Complaints, appeals regarding

hospital discharges, Medicare assistance.

Nevada Disability Advocacy & Law Center

2820 W. Charleston Blvd., Ste. 11, LV, NV 89102

1-(888) 349-3843, (702) 257-8150,

www.ndalc.org. Legal Services, Referral,                            Advocacy for people with disabilities

 

Nevada Health Care Association

35 E. Horizon Ridge Pkwy, Suite 110-137

Henderson, NV 89002, (702) 434-2273

Advocacy, Home living assistance

Nevada Secretary of State

555 E. Washington Ave., #5200, LV, NV 89101

(702) 486-2887, www.livingwilllockbox.com

New website – no cost secure way to file

living wills and advanced healthcare

directives for immediate access to healthcare                     providers. For all ages. Education, fraud info.

 

Office of the Governor Consumer Health

Assistance

555 E. Washington Ave.,#4800, LV, NV 89101

(702) 486-3587, www.govcha.state.nv.us,                               www.rx.help4nv.org. Advocacy, Referral,                     Medical Issues, Workman’s Comp

Rape Crisis Center

801 S. Rancho Dr., Suite B2

Las Vegas, NV 89106, 8am-5pm

(702) 385-2153, www.therapecrisiscenter.org

Hotline (702) 366-1640

Advocacy and Support, Outreach, Education

Counselor on Site

 

Safe House

921 American Pacific Drive #300

Henderson, NV 89014

702-451-4203, Hotline (702) 564-3227

Domestic violence

 

Senior Assistance Services-Senator

Harry Reid

333 Las Vegas Blvd. So.,#8016, LV, NV 89101

(702) 388-5020. Referral Service, Advocacy

Nevada-Senior-Guide Nevada Aging and Disability Services Division

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

http://www.nvaging.net/

The Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD) in the State of Nevada, Department of Health and Human Services, represents Nevadans aged 60 years and older and those with disabilities.

Mission Statement The Aging and Disability Services Division provides leadership and advocacy in the planning, development and delivery of a high quality, comprehensive support service system across the lifespan. This allows all of Nevada’s elders, adults and children with disabilities or special health care needs to live independent, meaningful, and dignified lives in the most integrated setting appropriate to their needs. Developmental Services

State of Nevada Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD)

Programs/Services

 

Advocate for Elders

Advocacy, assistance, information and referral to frail seniors, who are 60 years of age or older, primarily homebound and living in the community, and their caregivers.

Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs)

Provides citizen-centered “one-stop” entry points into the long-term support system. Serves individuals in need of long-term support, caregivers, and those planning for future long-term support needs.

Assisted Living (AL) Waiver

Assisted living supportive services to eligible individuals in a residential facility as an alternative to nursing home placement.

 

Community Options Program for the Elderly (COPE)

Non-medical services to older persons to help them maintain independence in their own homes as an alternative to nursing home placement. Similar to the HCBW Program.

 

Disability Rx (External link) Assistance with the cost of prescription medicines to qualified individuals with disabilities.

 

Disability Services (External link)The Office of Disability Services provides resources at the community level which promote equal opportunity and life choices for people with disabilities through which they may positively contribute to Nevada.

Elder Protective Services (EPS)

For persons 60 years old and older who may experience abuse, neglect, exploitation, or isolation.

 

Grants

Information for current and/or prospective grantees.

 

Home and Community Based Waiver (HCBW formerly CHIP)

Non-medical services to older persons to help them maintain independence in their own homes as an alternative to nursing home placement.

 

Homemaker Program

General housekeeping, limited meal preparation, shopping, laundering, errands, standby assistance with bathing, and home management services.

 

IDEA Part C Office

Provides oversight of Part C (early intervention services) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Addresses issues and problems faced by residents in long term care facilities, which includes residential facilities for groups.

 

Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)

The goal of the SMP program is to empower seniors to prevent Medicare/health care fraud through outreach and education.

 

Senior Rx

Nevada’s plan to provide Nevada seniors relief from the high cost of prescription medicine.

 

Senior Tax Assistance/Rent Rebate Program

This program is no longer available.

 

State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP)

Medicare Counseling Information

Counseling and assistance to Medicare Beneficiaries in Nevada, utilizing a statewide network of volunteers.

 

Taxi Assistance Program (TAP)

Discounted taxicab fares to seniors and persons with disabilities in Clark County. (Washoe County also has a program of this type.

 

 

Waiver for the Elderly in Adult Residential Care (WEARC)

Non-medical services in a group care setting to offer individuals a less expensive alternative of supervised care in a residential setting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Visiting Angels – Summerlin and Henderson

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care 

www.visitingangels.com/vegas

Las Vegas Home Care, Las Vegas Senior Care and Elder Care

Visiting Angels is the nation’s leading nationally respected network of non-medical, private duty home care agencies providing senior care, elder care, personal care, respite care and companion care to help the elderly and adults continue to live in their homes. We are family owned by Michael and Jackie DiAsio.

With offices in Las Vegas and Henderson, we provide senior home care to these areas and the surrounding communities.

We are one of Las Vegas’ largest and most established home care agencies. In 2012, we completed our 12th year serving Las Vegas and Henderson. During 2012, we again performed over 200,000 care giving hours to our clients and their families. We currently have over 225 screened and trained employees (caregivers.) who have been with us an average of 4 years. We assist of about 450 people each day with our flexible program. In our 12 years, we have provided over 1,750,000 care giving hours of service to our clients and their families.

We are licensed thru the State of Nevada and during our 2012 unannounced Focused State Re-licensure Survey conducted by the State of Nevada’s Bureau of Health Care Quality and Compliance, we had no deficiencies. In addition to our private pay service, we are also a State of Nevada Medicaid Provider and during our 2012 unannounced Program Compliance Review by the State of Nevada’s Division of Health Care Financing and Policy, we obtained an overall score of 98%.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Dr Peter Randall – Randall Chiropractic Rehabilitation – Las Vegas

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care 

http://drpeterrandalllasvegas.com/

Bio

My journey started studying mathematics and sciences in college. I was a college athlete and I always made fitness and eating well a high priority in my life. In the late 1970’s my interest in health care was very strong, but I decided to pursue a career in mathematics or engineering simply because I could not find what I was looking for in the healthcare field of traditional medicine. I wanted to pursue a direction that emphasized more health than sickness. This all changed for me when I met a chiropractor at a health club that I was working in. He explained to me what chiropractic care was about, and after doing my own research, it sounded great! So my next assignment for myself was to contact local chiropractors in my area to observe their working with patients. I have to say that after practicing as a doctor of chiropractic for over twenty six years, having performed over one million chiropractic adjustments in my career, I still absolutely love what I do! In fact, I would not choose to do anything else for a career except chiropractic.

My chiropractic education and training was at Palmer College of Chiropractic. I enrolled there in 1982 and I graduated from Palmer College in 1985 having earned the degree of Doctor of Chiropractic. I also hold an additional board certification as a chiropractic sports physician and have worked with many high school athletes, professional athletes, and high school and professional teams throughout my career. Beyond my formal education at Palmer College of Chiropractic, I have completed several additional studies in the diagnosis and treatment of many conditions which affect our human bodies. These include, but are not limited to, disc, injuries, arthritis, aging, knee and shoulder injuries, nutritional deficiencies, gentile techniques and treatment for more difficult to manage patients, osteoporosis, MRI interpretation, CAT scan interpretation, and X-ray interpretation. I have also consulted with the New York State Attorney General’s office rendering expert opinions in civil litigation cases. I am a member of the Nevada Chiropractic Association, The Elks Club, and I am past President of Business Networking International in Las Vegas, NV.

I am licensed to practice chiropractic in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts since 1985, the State of New York since 1987, and the State of Nevada since 2007.

My practice uses a holistic, whole body, approach when treating each patient’s condition and necessary spinal and extremity joint adjustments, physiotherapy modalities including gentile electrical therapies, cold packs, hot packs, rehabilitation stretching and strengthening exercises, nutrition and weight loss for optimal health and healing. My office offers very caring and gentle approaches when treating each individual patient.

I live in North Las Vegas with my family consisting of my wife, our three daughters, our son, our two dogs and two cats. When I am not seeing patients I love to exercise, play golf, read both fiction and nonfiction novels. My wife and I enjoy going to Ballroom dancing lessons together. We have actually competed in several ballroom dance competitions in the past. I have fallen in love with the Las Vegas Valley and consider it my home (we have extended family that has lived here since 1986). Lastly, it is my mission to help all people in Las Vegas, and the surrounding communities, to feel better, suffer less pain, and lead healthier happier lives.

 

My patients say:

Bryan says:

Dr Randall is wonderful.  He not only fixed my back, he helped me even when my insurance initially declined my claim.

He’s very open and has such an easy-going manner, you feel like you can talk to him about anything.

He knows how to use pressure in a gentle manner, if that makes sense.

I would recommend Dr Randall.  He helped me and I know he can help you, too.

Te says:

 I’d never had chiropractic treatment in my life and Dr Randall explained everything to me.

He understood why my body just didn’t feel like ‘me’ – and his suggestions of things to do at home really helped much more than I expected.

I would recommend Dr Randall to anyone who is not sure what’s going on with their body and their bones – if you don’t feel like ‘you’, see Dr Randall.

It was a great experience.  Thank you.

Meg Mathis, Publisher/CEO, NV Senior Guide say:

Being 50+ has never slowed me down. My weekly visits to Dr. Randall have kept me in the gym at optimum performance. I’m strong, agile, and most of all I feel great all over!

Leigh S. says:

Orthopedic Doctors, Chiropractors, and other similar medical professionals have been part of my life since I was a child – and as such, I have around 40 years of experience in being able to know a quality health care professional when I find one.

Dr Randall is one of the best I have ever encountered.  He is an exceptionally experienced and knowledgeable doctor, and also one who trusts his instincts – and I trust him.

Without exception, I recommend Dr Peter Randall.  He is quality, through and through.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Siena Hills – Henderson

www.sienahills.com

NSG_AugSeptOct2016_Web-21

Assisted Living Las Vegas

Siena Hills Assisted Living in Las Vegas offers Independent Living, Assisted Living, Memory Care and Alzheimer’s Care.  Our staff is available 24 hours a day. Life at Siena Hills is comparable to living in a fine resort, with many of the same lifestyle enhancing amenities.

Independent Living & Assisted Living.

At Siena Hills, we strive to meet the needs of each Resident by providing an individualized care program that maintains each Resident’s privacy and dignity. Our health care services    are provided 24 hours a day and change according to your personal needs.

Reputation, Experience & Leadership.

Siena Hills’ unparalleled reputation in the community is fostered by our Executive Director, Mary Pophal. Mary has nearly twenty years of leadership experience in assisted living and memory care. Our residents and families benefit from Mary’s vision and knowledge.

Siena Hills

Active Assisted Living & Memory Care Community

Located in Henderson at
2910 Horizon Ridge Pkwy
702-614-8733

 

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!