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Heart | Nevada Senior Guide

Santa’s Handy Hints For everyone on your list

November 30, 2017 by · Comments Off on Santa’s Handy Hints For everyone on your list
Filed under: Articles 

(Family Features) Make holiday shopping a little easier this year with a few hints from the big man himself. Whether they love music, technology, fashion or fun, these gifts will put a smile on everyone’s face — and turn you into a holiday hero.

For the music lover

HTC One V — $269.99

www.mycricket.com

The HTC One V phone — available at Cricket Wireless —

combines the vibrant authenticity of Beats Audio with the no-contract carrier’s unlimited Muve Music service, for the best possible sound quality on songs downloaded directly to the phone. Cricket’s all-inclusive Android rate plans include unlimited talk, text and data plus unlimited music, starting at $50 per month.

 

For the young at heart

LEGO Bricks & More Basic Bricks Deluxe Set — $29.99

www.BuildTogether.com

A perfect gift for a family that loves to spend quality time being creative and building together. This open-ended LEGO construction set comes with 650 colorful LEGO bricks and photo inspiration to provide endless play possibilities at a great value. Take the fun beyond the box at the Build Together website, where you’ll find more building inspiration as well as monthly (seasonal and holiday) building instructions.

For the fashionista

Fashion: The Definitive History of Costume and Style — $50.00

www.dk.com

Containing everything you need to know about changing fashion and style, this beautiful book catalogs 3,000 years of fashion evolution. With stunning visual clarity, attention to detail, and information on icons from Marie Antoinette to Alexander McQueen, “Fashion: The Definitive History of Costume and Style” offers an invaluable overview of the history of fashion and costume.

For the audiophile

AUVIO Bluetooth Portable Speaker — $79.99

www.radioshack.com

Get rich, full and dynamic sound with no cord to tie you down. This sleek, compact speaker is compatible with most Bluetooth-enabled tablets, laptops, MP3 players, and smartphones running iOS or Android platforms. The built-in speakerphone makes picking up calls easy when paired with your mobile phone. Already a great value compared to similar products, save even more with $10 back for every $50 you spend at RadioShack starting November 4, 2012. Exclusively at RadioShack.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Life Extension: The Modern Anti-Aging Movement – Are We Standing at the Threshold of Immortality?

July 17, 2016 by · Comments Off on Life Extension: The Modern Anti-Aging Movement – Are We Standing at the Threshold of Immortality?
Filed under: General 

Why is skincare the focus of longevity research? I guess a cell is a cell, and if you can crack the code for one human cell, it is only a matter of time to solving the puzzle with different types of cell – and skin is without doubt the most visible cells each of us have. And it’s our faces in particular we often judge ourselves and others by, and we are in turn quickly scrutinized, and often opinions reached in a fraction of a second. Our faces often show the most visible signs of aging, and for many in modern society age is by nature “bad” and young or looking young is the ideal. That is why billions and billions of dollars each year are poured by consumers into all sorts of treatments to minimize wrinkles, to push back the effects of gravity, and to turn back the hands of time. And with that much money to be spent by consumers, there are many manufacturers eager to find the next step in arresting Father Time – and at least detaining him until the next stagecoach arrives, where hopefully he can be encouraged to move on before too much damage can be done.

The Entire Issue Explained – In A Pair of Shoelaces

Some time ago a friend gave me a simple analogy that puts this entire issue in perspective. The science may not win a Nobel Prize, but it gave me the necessary ah-ha moment.

The double helix of the DNA strand – our most basic foundation for life – is held together at each end by things that act in the same way as the hard plastic bits on the end of shoelaces do – preventing the DNA from unraveling, and the individual chromosomes scattering across the floor like dropping a string of pearls down a marble staircase. These things are called telomeres.

Somewhere programmed into these tiny telomeres is the entire basis to how long the DNA stays intact – and by inference these are the keys to the length of life of the organism. Somewhere written into the telomere is a great musical score but like all musical scores it has a double bar somewhere to signify the end; but is it to be a minuet or a Wagnerian epic? But sure enough, when the time comes, and the telomeres blow the full time whistle, the DNA strand will unravel and die – and the circle of life begins again. Telomeres govern how often our skin cells are replaced; why a puppy and a child born on the same date may age exactly the same chronologically, but the puppy has become a geriatric before the child reaches puberty.

Telomeres, my friend explained, occasionally go on the fritz (that must have a very specific scientific meaning). One of the ways this occurs is they may forget their programming to release and unravel, and they just hang on, allowing the cells thus affected to multiply again and again without dying. In fact, when this occurs often they become very difficult to kill and to all intents and purposes once the telomeres act in this way, the cell – and those it propagates – are effectively immortal.

This condition has a name which we all know. Cancer.

But, what if we were able in some way to persuade the telomeres within a cancer to behave normally – would that not be the “magic bullet” cure for cancer? And the other side to that equation – if the telomeres in healthy cells could be persuaded to act as they do in a cancer – then is this the recipe for a healthy cell that does not die? Does the cure for cancer and immortality hang on just this one thread?

Whatever your views may be, the reality is that some of the world’s finest research scientists are working on that exact question and some would say it is only a matter of a decade or two before this is neither conjecture nor science fiction, but a reality to face up to. The changes that would take place in society even if life expectancy were to take a leap forward by say 10 or 20 years are enormous, but we should all be thinking that this is a distinct possibility.

From the dab of lanoline a generation ago to what I know hold in my hand as an anti aging skincare treatment is more than just a revolution – and I have no doubt in a few years I will be saying this cream will not just slow the aging process and reduce the visible signs of aging, making your face appear younger – but it will actually be younger.

But before that, let’s look back at how this whole engagement with life extension and anti-aging started. Mankind has always striven for longevity and mused about immortality – but the past 50 years has seen some dramatic steps in reality toward this goal.

Genesis

The thought of extending life has been on the mind of mankind for millennia. References to the search for ways to prolong life can be found as far back as the Epic of Gilgamesh.

Gilgamesh was reputedly the fifth king of the kingdom of Uruk, the modern-day Iraq, around 2500 BC. According to the Sumerian list of kings, he reigned for 126 years. The Torah or Old Testament records Methuselah as living over 900 years, with life spans measured in centuries apparently commonplace before the time of Noah.

Throughout the development of scientific thought from the Reformation onwards, scholars have applied themselves to solving this riddle and these endeavors continue today at the very leading edge of scientific progress.

Unraveling Secrets

As the secrets of our existence are unraveled in ever more minute detail, we are beginning to understand what it is that makes us grow from tiny babies into adults. We now know, for example, that cell functions slow down as the body ages and that production of certain substances required by the body to regenerate decrease or cease completely.

Skin, for instance, needs two substances to retain strength and firmness.
The production of these substances namely collagen (strength, tightness) and elastin (flexibility) decreases with age. The decreases in production together with other factors that include the threat of free radicals make the skin age and become wrinkly. Free radicals are essentially incomplete oxygen molecules causing destructive chain reactions within cells.

The same kind of thing happens in every cell, every tissue and organ around the human body. For example, people develop frown lines, crow’s feet and wrinkles. Nutrients are no longer absorbed easily and vital cell functions, hormones and other substances are produced at decreased rates resulting in the body aging.

A Brief History of the Life Extension Movement

Science has been looking for ways to slow down this process for centuries. The forming of life extension movements, however, did not really begin until around 1970.

➢ In this year, Denham Harman, the originator of the so-called ‘free radical theory of aging’, decided that an organization dedicated to the research and information sharing between scientists working in biogerontology (the field of science concerned with the biological aspects involved in the aging process) was needed. As a result, the American Aging Association was formed.

➢ In 1976, two futurists, Philip Gordon and Joel Kurtzman wrote a book on the research into extending the human lifespan. This popular volume was titled ‘No More Dying. The Conquest Of Aging And The Extension Of Human Life’.

➢ Kurtzman was then invited to speak at Florida’s House Select Committee (HSC) of Aging, which was chaired by Claude Pepper, an American politician and spokesman for the elderly. The aim of this talk was to discuss the impact on Social Security by life extension.

➢ In 1980, Saul Kent, a prominent activist in the field of life extension, published the book ‘The Life Extension Revolution’ and founded the nutraceutical (from ‘nutrition’ and ‘pharmaceutical’, in other words, a nutrition supplement) firm known as ‘The Life Extension Foundation’.

This foundation is a non-profit making organization promoting dietary supplements and publishing the periodical ‘Life Extension Magazine’. Kent was later involved in work relating to cryogenics. He was jailed in the course of this work over a dispute at one point, although charges were dropped at a later stage.

➢ In 1982, American health writer and life extension advocate Sandy Shaw and her co-writer, Durk Pearson, popularized the term ‘life extension’ even further with the bestseller ‘Life Extension: A Practical Scientific Approach’.

➢ Roy Walford, a gerontologist and life-extensionist, published ‘Maximum Lifespan’, another popular book on the subject. He and Richard Weindruch, his student, followed this up in 1988 with their summary on the research they had conducted into the ability to prolong the life of rodents through calorie restriction. The title of this book is ‘The Retardation of Aging and Disease by Dietary Restriction’.

Although this ability to extend life with calorie restriction had been known since the 1930’s, when gerontologist, biochemist and nutritionist Clive McCay did some research into the subject, it was the work of Walford and Weinbruch that gave solid scientific grounding to the McCay’s findings.

Walford’s scientific work was driven by a personal interest in life extension. He practiced calorie restriction as part of his own life and eventually died at the age of 80. The cause of his death was amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a progressive motor neuron disease.

➢ A4M, the ‘American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine’ was founded in 1992 to create a medical specialty for anti aging that was distinctly separate from geriatrics. This allowed scientists and physicians interested in this particular field of science to hold conferences and discuss the latest developments.

➢ The sci.life-extension, a Usenet group, was created by California-born author, philosopher and translator Brian M. Delaney. This represented an important development within the movement of life extension. It made it possible, for example, for the CR (Calorie Restriction) Society to be created.

➢ A more recent development is the proposal of Dr A. de Grey, a biogerontologist at Cambridge University. This proposal suggested that damage to cells, macromolecules, organs and tissues can be repaired with the help of advanced biotechnology. This is evident in hair restoration products, for instance.

More than Books

Although it would appear that most of the work revolving around life extension has been done solely by writing books or founding societies or organizations of some kind or another, the reality is that these books were written in response to or based on very specific, detailed scientific research that have yielded positive results.

They are no longer the works of hopeful minds, but the works of dedicated scientists who have spent their lives working on discovering facts about aging and trying to find ways to slow down, or even reverse the process.

Many breakthroughs have been made, and in many ways, we are already able to extend lives to a certain extent. The average lifespan of a human being is already far greater than it used to be as a result of medical, pharmaceutical and nutritional advances brought about by research and development.

The work continues, and scientists around the world are continually conducting research, comparing results, discussing options and making advances on our behalf.

Driving Forces behind the Development of the Life Extension Movement

What factors are driving this movement into ever greater efforts to find solutions to the extension of Life? The answer to this question actually includes a whole range of factors.

Expectations Have Risen

As the ‘baby boomer’ generation (born between 1946-1964) enters retirement age, expectations of this group are dramatically different from those of the preceding generations. They have greater expectations and desires to enjoy their life as pensioners to the fullest and for as long as is possible. This expectation covers not only length of life, but quality of life as well and this is not a passive request but an active and strident demand in many cases.

Pharmacology

Progress in pharmacology has led to a wide selection of drugs that allow people to live longer and fuller lives being developed over the last two decades or so. The work is still very much in progress and many more drugs are being developed daily.

One of the classic examples of a drug raising the quality of life for older individuals are erectile dysfunction treatments – notably Viagra, Cialis and Levitra. These drugs have dramatically reduced the number of fatalities or serious injury resulting from elderly men rolling out of bed, as well as a number of more qualitative benefits.

Advances in Genetics

Some of the latest scientific research and subsequent advances made in biotechnology and genetics are providing some hope that it may be possible to hold back some of the fundamental causes of aging.

As we outlined previously, chromosomes containing DNA strings are essentially capped with a binding substance known as telomeres. In effect, the telomeres are consumed during cell division and over time, they become shorter and shorter.

This was first observed by a scientist called Leonard Hayflick, and the process of limited cell division was subsequently named the Hayflick Limit. Advocates of life extension work on the thought that lengthening the telomeres through drugs or gene therapy may ultimately extend the Hayflick Limit and thereby fool the cells, and as such the body, into ‘thinking’ it is younger than it actually is.

Developments in Precision Manufacture

Advances made in the fields of nanotechnology, miniaturization, computer chips and robotics also provide hope for potentially life extending solutions.

In the 1970’s, a popular TV series starred Lee Majors as the ‘Six Million Dollar Man’? Science fiction then. Today, it is science fact. Millions of people now walk through life with artificial ankle, knee and hip joints and healthy feet. A generation ago, mass production of this kind of technology was a distant dream.

The same applies to many individuals with artificial limbs. Artificial legs used to be crude wooden contraptions that were just able to keep a person balanced. Today’s artificial limbs are almost fully functional.

The Blessings of Medical Progress

Who would have thought even 50 years ago that it would become possible to bypass a coronary artery, or even replace a heart completely? Yet there are hundreds of thousands, if not millions of individuals enjoying their lives after having this kind of surgery – few of whom would be alive just half a century ago.

Millions of people no longer have to wear glasses, because of the availability of laser surgery. This, too, was science fiction just a few years ago. Today, it is advertised next to shampoo in magazines and on TV.

In other words, science is moving rapidly towards not only extending life, but making the quality of these extra years better as well.

Is it Science, Science Fiction or Lunacy?

What should the average person believe? This question is almost as difficult to answer as finding solutions to extended life. Even among scientists, opinions are divided. Some do believe that extending the quality of life is as possible as extending life in general.

Others brush off the thought as un-scientific nonsense. This is often simply based on the fear of anything ‘new’ disturbing the status quo of established limits. Fortunately, real scientists do keep on looking, because if every single scientist had decided that some of the advancements already in medical, pharmaceutical and technological fields could not be possible, we would all still be dying at 30.

So where does that leave us?

There is no doubt what-so-ever that there are many charlatans out there trying to make a quick buck out of people’s desire to retain their youth. Even today, many products being sold in their millions are essentially non-effective – often given fantastic names and have the most bewildering ingredients to make them look scientific to consumers and justify their cost.

But the facts are while many advancements are being made and research points to the possibility of eventually finding the key to maintaining youth for longer, the scientific community is still warning the public that many of the products being sold today are unreliable to say the least.

➢ Although food supplements may assist in keeping a body healthier – something that can often be achieved by simply adopting a healthier life style and diet – there is as yet no categorical and undeniable proof that they slow down aging as such.

➢ The same goes for many hormone treatments. Although they may have a short term effect of some kind, it is not yet scientifically proven that they will actually work in the long run. The fear that it may not work is based on the fact that taking hormones, a good example is the hormonal acne treatment, will ultimately actually slow down the body’s own production of these hormones.

In addition, many treatments may have potential (and yet unknown) side effects in the long run that could be harmful to the user’s health. This includes the fears that such hormone treatments could increase the risk of cancer, diabetes and other major illnesses.

➢ Other ideas, like the calorie restriction method, are working for rodents. In fact, studies conducted with rats on 30 to 50 per cent restricted diets have shown to almost double the life span of rats.

Similar studies conducted on primates have also shown tendency to extend life to a certain extent and prevent a list of age related illnesses. There are as yet no studies on humans, although some are actually living on calorie restricted diets. Whether this will prolong their lives, however, is a question of having to wait and see.

The theory is that by reducing calorie intake, the metabolism of the body is slowed down, thereby slowing the aging process as well. Nutritionists say there is a certain amount of calories a body of a certain size and weight needs to have to maintain health. Reducing this amount by up to 50 per cent is hardly a good idea in the long term.

Time will tell, as they say, but how will anyone be able to tell the difference? If a person lives to the age of 80, is this because they are on this diet or would they have lived to this age anyway?

Where Will This Lead?

Many believe there is realistic hope and expectation of making significant strides in the area of longevity within the next two decades. This group typically believes the answer will ultimately lie within genetics and biotechnology. It is too early to make definite predictions, but the research so far shows promise and, as mentioned earlier, some of the results of this research are already being used in certain treatments to improve patients’ lives.

At present, overall aging is difficult to slow down, to say the least. Some products indicate they will assist in maintaining overall health/longevity, but the area we are seeing the first commercial products being developed is in the area of skin care and given the size of this market, it is likely that this will continue to be the weather-vane of longevity treatments.

Science or Snake Oil?

It will be difficult to tell these two apart for many years. Charlatans are likely to about, because it is difficult to disprove many theories easily. Equally difficult will be positive proof from those with an ethical perspective on the trail of a real breakthrough, as products based on valid research and using technology or ingredients that will actually have an effect rarely promise overnight results. This is something that anyone looking to find improved youthful looks, etc, will have to bear in mind. None of these products can perform miracles. Even the best of them will take time and regular use in order to achieve the desired effect.

The bottom line is that where we stand now, we can be sure there are some things which are ineffective or even harmful; there are some that show some promise and there are some that are starting to cross the line of being able to demonstrate results – albeit modestly at this point.

In the meantime, it is wise to research products very carefully and to refuse to be baffled by weird and wonderful sounding ingredients or fantastic sounding promises of instant youth. Regeneration will take time – let’s face it, it has taken a lifetime to get to this point, turning back the clock can never be possible over night.

Skin Care and the Life Extension Movement

One may well ask just what all this, and in particular the life extension movement as such, could possibly have to do with skin care, health and beauty products. The fact is, much of the research into life extension is resulting in new approaches to skin care as a kind of by-product.

A greater understanding of how genetics and cellular processes affect the aging and condition of skin allows these research and development teams to investigate different compounds, their compatibility with human cells and genetic make up.

Many compounds found in nature are not just compatible to human skin but in fact the skin cells actually have natural receptors for these compounds. Because life extension research has discovered these receptors, skin care developers can now use this knowledge and create the formulae for their products to provide maximum effect.

Another skin care ‘by-product’ of life extension research is the use of nanotechnology. The use of nanotechnology, or, to be more precise, nanoparticles, has had a huge impact on the way nutrients and other components of skin care products are being delivered to the skin cells. In some ways, nanotechnology has already revolutionized skin care. It is now possible to use active ingredients previously difficult to effectively deliver to the skin, as well as making old, proven ingredients even more effective. Some ingredients used in cosmetics for hundreds, if not thousands of years by certain cultures can now be even more effectively used to improve skin condition and maintain a healthy, youthful look.

Even the moisturizing effect of skin care products can be improved with nantechnology. For this effect, so-called nanosomes are used. Nanosomes are small, pocket-like particles that melt or disintegrate on skin contact. By doing this, the moisturising effect is accelerated, assisting the skin faster and more efficiently.

Nanotechnology plays a key part not only in slowing the aging of skin, but is believed to actively assist in repairing and healing skin cells and tissue.

Another breakthrough in life extension research that is beginning to make itself felt in skin care products is the research into stem cells. Stem cells are elements of all life, plant, animal and human. Stem cells have two properties other cells do not have. These properties are the ability to develop into any kind of cell type and the ability to divide almost indefinitely. The use of plant stem cell extracts in skin care is likely to become one of the next ‘big things’ in the industry. And prepare for the debate when human stem cells are proposed as part of an anti-aging skincare regime, as will inevitably occur!

One thing we can be certain of, is that science will continue to search for answers to the question of life extension, and business will drive the commercialization of discoveries. But whether these lead us to a utopian future or potentially a minefield of strife as we debate who will use and who will benefit from these new godlike powers. In the meantime, at a practical level in the skincare, health and beauty industry we remain hopeful and expectant we will see the emergence of products that not only promise results, but produce them.

David Christensen is a veteran of Asia Pacific business, currently residing in Bangkok, Thailand and heading up the business he was a co-founder of, Royal Siam Natural Health & Beauty – who can be located at [http://www.royalsiam.asia], and the information supporting site at [http://www.royalsiam.info]. Royal Siam was established after careful planning in early 2011, spending 2011 concentrating on building the necessary business infrastructure and concentrating on the domestic Thai market. Early in 2012 Royal Siam launched its international website and online store, and in April 2012 publicly declared the ambition to be among the world’s top 20 premium health and beauty brands by the year 2020. Royal Siam is a unique business, operating in the premium skincare, anti aging, and related fields. At its core, one mission is to commercialize and bring to a global market the immense wealth of knowledge about the healing and beneficial properties of Thai and South East Asian plants – a knowledge base carefully built up over the last thousand years. At the same time, the mission is to bring to market the very latest in scientific advances in the area of anti aging… resulting in the unique position of having a Thai heritage and offering the best of nature, tradition, and science.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/David_D_Christensen/1317312

The Programmed Cellular Death Approach to Anti-Aging Treatment

May 8, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Programmed Cellular Death Approach to Anti-Aging Treatment
Filed under: General 

Modern anti-aging treatment is built on a common base of knowledge that I will quickly review. Biochemistry and molecular biology tell us there are many types of chemical reactions going on in the human body. We know that it is the genetic information programmed inside our cellular DNA that defines what reactions occur. Genetic information, expressed in regulated ways, builds the body’s proteins and enzymes, and controls how enzymes carry out the cell’s biochemical reactions.

This information, contained in the DNA of our genome, consists of many thousands of long, often repetitive, sequences of base pairs that are built up from four basic nucleotides. Human genome mapping has shown there are over 3 billion base pairs in our DNA. It is estimated they contain some 20,000 protein-coding genes. All body functions are controlled by the expression of the genes in our genome. The mechanisms controlling the aging process are believed to be programmed into our DNA but only a fraction of the biochemical reactions related to the aging process have been looked at in any detail. Cellular aging is a very complex process and many of its low level operating details have yet to be discovered.

Anti-aging theory has consolidated itself along two lines of thought: the programmed cellular death theory and the cellular damages theory. The programmed death theory focuses on the root causes of aging. The cellular damages theory looks at the visible aspects of aging; i.e. the symptoms of aging. Both theories are correct and often overlap. Both theories are developing rapidly as anti-aging research uncovers more details. As works in progress these theories may take years to complete. This broad characterization also applies to the currently available types of anti-aging treatments.

The programmed death theory of aging suggests that biological aging is a programmed process controlled by many life span regulatory mechanisms. They manifest themselves through gene expression. Gene expression also controls body processes such as our body maintenance (hormones, homeostatic signaling etc.) and repair mechanisms. With increasing age the efficiency of all such regulation declines. Programmed cellular death researchers want to understand which regulatory mechanisms are directly related to aging, and how to affect or improve them. Many ideas are being pursued but one key area of focus is on slowing or stopping telomere shortening. This is considered to be a major cause of aging.

With the exception of the germ cells that produce ova and spermatozoa, most dividing human cell types can only divide about 50 to 80 times (also called the Hayflick limit or biological death clock). This is a direct consequence of all cell types having fixed length telomere chains at the ends of their chromosomes. This is true for all animal (Eukaryotic) cells. Telomeres play a vital role in cell division. In very young adults telomere chains are about 8,000 base pairs long. Each time a cell divides its telomere chain loses about 50 to 100 base pairs. Eventually this shortening process distorts the telomere chain’s shape and it becomes dysfunctional. Cell division is then no longer possible.

Telomerase, the enzyme that builds the fixed length telomere chains, is normally only active in young undifferentiated embryonic cells. Through the process of differentiation these cells eventually form the specialized cells from which of all our organs and tissues are made of. After a cell is specialized telomerase activity stops. Normal adult human tissues have little or no detectable telomerase activity. Why? A limited length telomere chain maintains chromosomal integrity. This preserves the species more than the individual.

During the first months of development embryonic cells organize into about 100 distinct specialized cell lines. Each cell line (and the organs they make up) has a different Hayflick limit. Some cell lines are more vulnerable to the effects of aging than others. In the heart and parts of the brain cell loss is not replenished. With advancing age such tissues start to fail. In other tissues damaged cells die off and are replaced by new cells that have shorter telomere chains. Cell division itself only causes about 20 telomere base pairs to be lost. The rest of the telomere shortening is believed to be due to free radical damage.

This limit on cell division is the reason why efficient cell repair can’t go on indefinitely. When we are 20 to 35 years of age our cells can renew themselves almost perfectly. One study found that at the age 20 the average length of telomere chains in white blood cells is about 7,500 base pairs. In humans, skeletal muscle telomere chain lengths remain more or less constant from the early twenties to mid seventies. By the age of 80 the average telomere length decreases to about 6,000 base pairs. Different studies have different estimates of how telomere length varies with age but the consensus is that between the age of 20 and 80 the length of the telomere chain decreases by 1000 to 1500 base pairs. Afterwards, as telomere lengths shorten even more, signs of severe aging begin to appear.

There are genetic variations in human telomerase. Long lived Ashkenazi Jews are said to have a more active form of telomerase and longer than normal telomere chains. Many other genetic differences (ex.: efficiency of DNA repair, antioxidant enzymes, and rates of free radical production) affect how quickly one ages. Statistics suggest that having shorter telomeres increases your chance of dying. People whose telomeres are 10% shorter than average, and people whose telomeres are 10% longer than average die at different rates. Those with the shorter telomeres die at a rate that is 1.4 greater than those with the longer telomeres.

Many advances in telomerase based anti-aging treatments have been documented. I only have room to mention a few of them.

– Telomerase has been used successfully to lengthen the life of certain mice by up to 24%.

– In humans, gene therapy using telomerase has been used to treat myocardial infarction and several other conditions.

– Telomerase related, mTERT, treatment has successfully rejuvenated many different cell lines.

In one particularly important example researchers using synthetic telomerase that encoded to a telomere-extending protein, have extended the telomere chain lengths of cultured human skin and muscle cells by up to 1000 base pairs. This is a 10%+ extension of telomere chain length. The treated cells then showed signs of being much younger than the untreated cells. After the treatments these cells behaved normally, losing a part of their telomere chain after each division.

The implications of successfully applying such techniques in humans are staggering. If telomere length is a primary cause of normal aging, then, using the telomere length numbers previously mentioned, it might be possible to double the healthy time period during which telomere chain lengths are constant; i.e. from the range of 23 to 74 years to an extended range of 23 to 120 or more years. Of course this is too optimistic because it is known that in vitro cultured cells are able to divide a larger number of times than cells in the human body but it is reasonable to expect some improvement (not 50 years but say 25 years).

We know that telomerase based treatments are not the final answer to anti-aging but there is no doubt that they can, by increasing the Hayflick limit, extend or even immortalize the lifespan of many cell types. It remains to be seen if this can be done safely done in humans.

Telomerase based treatments are only a partial answer to anti-aging. Please carefully research any anti-aging supplements based on this line of treatment. Through my articles and website I want to help you maintain your good health for the next 10 to 25 years. My hope is that within time period the fruits of anti-aging research will become available to everyone.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9227048

Part Four: Current and Future Anti-Aging Treatments

May 1, 2016 by · Comments Off on Part Four: Current and Future Anti-Aging Treatments
Filed under: General 

As previously noted, many anti-oxidants are essential nutrients. Natural anti-oxidants, like vitamin C and E, work synergistically. Anti-oxidants may be more effective if obtained from a diet rich in fruits and vegetables. Nutritionists recommend eating 6 or more daily servings of anti-oxidant rich fruits and vegetables. Everyone agrees the use of antioxidant supplements for anti-aging may be helpful, but there is no agreement on what the most effective supplement dosages should be.

Anti-aging medicine acknowledges that stress of all kinds causes aging but has not yet developed individualized treatment for this. There are countless sources of internal and external stress and individual stress levels vary greatly. One overlooked cause of internal stress is improper hydration. Water is essential in for the correct operation of many internal functions. Too little or too much water causes age producing stress. When one is old (80+) thirst perception declines and dehydration can easily set in. Other overlooked sources of stress are antioxidants themselves. High doses (or doses above certain yet unspecified amounts) of supplemental anti-oxidants are a known cause of stress.

To be helpful, antioxidant supplements must prevent other types of stress more than the stress they themselves create. Knowing the correct supplement dosages that can do this is an essential part of anti-aging treatment. A healthy young person in his twenties, who is properly nourished, will have less internal stress that an older individual in his sixties. For a young individual, lower amounts of antioxidants may be safer than higher amounts. A older person, whose many internal homeostatic mechanisms are less able to deal with internal stress, may benefit more from higher amounts of antioxidants. Theoretically an anti-oxidant based course of anti-ageing treatment will slow the rate at which cellular damage occurs. Cells will become “sick” more slowly. Over time, as fewer sick cells are replaced at a slower rate, the number of cells retaining longer telomere chains will be higher. You can then reasonably expect this to result in an increase in life expectancy. For now the recommended but imprecise approach to decrease the rate at which cellular damage occurs is to increase your per day intake of anti-oxidant rich fruits and vegetables, to slightly increase your intake of antioxidants, and to take various vitamins and small amounts of anti-aging supplements on a daily basis. One study has shown taking a good multivitamin supplement is associated with longer telomere length.

Ideally anti-aging treatment should to be fine tuned for each individual. The key here would be to measure and minimize the cumulative effects of different kinds of stress on an individual basis. Easily measurable practical bio-markers for various types of stress do not yet exist or are not being used. When they are used it will be easy to customize individual antioxidant dosages so that everyone have “optimum” levels throughout their life. “Optimum” levels would maintain a safe reserve of protective antioxidants in the body.

Next I will briefly discuss the most popular nutrients associated with anti-aging. The most popular of the anti-oxidants, vitamins, and nutrients often associated with good health and anti-aging include: beta-carotene (vitamin A), vitamin C, vitamin E, various Flavonoids,Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, Co-enzyme Q10, Lycopene, Selenium.

There are dozens of supplements that are known to effectively treat specific symptoms of old age. A few of the better known supplements include: DMAE, Acetyl-l-carnitine, L-carnosine, Alpha Lipoic Acid, DHEA, L-arginine, and melatonin

Good food contains some of the anti-oxidants previously mentioned. A few other popular foods associated with anti-aging include: Green Tea, turmeric, and red wine.

All of the above have unique biological properties and, in my opinion, are “good” for you if taken in small or moderate amounts. Some (ex. vitamin C) may also be “good” for you in larger amounts. Various studies on each of these may conflict with each other. You need to carefully research each substance on your own but researchers have already found several nutrients to be associated with longer than average telomere lengths. These include: Green Tea, Omega-3, Vitamins A, C, D, and E.

Vitamin E has been associated with telomere lengthening anti-aging properties.

Green tea contains many antioxidants, including vitamin C, E and flavenoids.Flavenoids form a large antioxidant class (including catechins and quercetin) that has many anticarcinogenic, antihypercholesterolemic, antibacterial, (helps prevent dental caries), and anti-inflammatory properties. The leaves of the tea plant are rich in polyphenols. The consumption of 3 cups or more of green tea daily has been associated with longer than average telomere length.

The Omega-3s are essential long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids that are anti-inflammatory and help prevent heart disease, stroke, memory loss, depression, arthritis, cataract, cancer. Omega-3s slow down the shortening of telomeres; i.e. they may protect against aging on a cellular level.

Vitamin C is an abundant internal water soluble antioxidant that protects cellular components against free-radical formation caused by pollution and cigarette smoke. Many studies have associated high vitamin C intakes with lower rates of cancer of the mouth, larynx and esophagus. Vitamin C has shown promise in treating premature aging and possibly aging itself.

Due to limitations on the number of links I can incorporate into this article I could not provide more reference links supporting the preceding paragraphs. If interested please email me at the email address shown at the end of this article and I will forward them to you.

The sooner you start some sort of anti-aging treatment the better but it is never too late to start. All real treatments will help you maintain a longer than average average telomere chain length.

The goal of the programmed death theory of aging is to address the root causes of aging. This goal includes attempts to slow or reverse the telomere shortening process. Two such treatments are: TA 65 and human genetic engineering.

TA 65 is a telomerase activating product produced and marketed by Sierra Sciences. The key ingredient in TA 65 is Astragalus, a plant extract known to have telomerase activation properties. The product may work but I do not recommend it for several reasons. TA 65 is too expensive for the average person. A number of expensive health spas incorporate TA 65 in their programs. Again these are financially beyond the reach of the average person. The marketing tactics of Sierra Sciences have been questioned by many and there are law suits pending against TA 65.

The big issue I have with TA 65 is one of scientific honesty. The company genetically engineered mice that allowed telomerase to be switched off and on at an early age. TA 65 was able to switch telomerase back on in these mice and allowed them to live normal lives. http://www.nature.com/news/2010/101128/full/news.2010.635.html

Using this to show how effective TA65 treatment is, is dishonest. This is not how telomerase normally works and there was no real extension of the lifespan beyond what it would have been without the genetic modification. In normal mice the effects of TA65 were temporary and little or no life extension was seen. http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2011/04/11/anti-aging-pill-new-study-on-ta-65-sparks-controversy.html

Human genetic engineering is the real answer to fighting and defeating aging. It can directly address the root causes of aging. Advances in this area (ex. CRISPR) allow DNA base pairs to be inserted or deleted at specific place in our DNA. This means the human genome can now be precisely edited as needed. The lifespan of old mice has been modestly increased using telomerase gene therapy. In humans gene modification therapy has frequently been used for various medical problems. On September 15, 2015, Elizabeth Parrish was the first human to undergo anti-aging gene therapy. Anti-aging treatments will rapidly advance as our knowledge of the specifics of the human genome grows.

Current general social-political attitudes seem to be favoring the further development of anti-aging research. There are no international recognized political programs to stop aging or extend life but since 2012 a few pro-immortality political parties have sprung up. Their aim is to support anti-aging and life extension research, and to help provide access to advances in these areas to everyone. Among the numerous organizations supporting anti-aging research, the SENS (Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence) organization has come up with an anti-aging research plan. They want to develop anti-aging therapies to repair most forms of cellular damage. SENS, is a charitable organization. Any anti-aging advances resulting from funding it provides will become readily available public knowledge. In addition to the normal scientific research there is the $1,000,00 Palo Alto Longevity Prize that is being offered to anyone who can come up with an effective anti-aging treatment.

As of 2015, all known anti-aging treatments are only partially effective. Depending on when one starts a comprehensive anti-aging program, one can probably extend one’s life by 10 to 25 years. Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health estimated that an anti-aging lifestyle can add 24.6 more productive years to one’s lifespan. Anti-aging knowledge increases at a rate of about 10 times every 10 years. This probably means that for many of us there is more than enough time to reap the anticipated benefits in anti-aging research. One day soon, aging, like many other diseases, will be cured. While we wait for those anti-aging technological singularities to occur the name of the game is to ensure we stay healthy long enough repeat their benefits.

As a former engineer I have a strong affinity to all sciences including biology.

My interests include following advances in the fields of anti-aging, health and nutrition. Rapid advances in these areas will vanquish the disease we call aging.
Through my articles and website I want to help you maintain your good health for the next 10 to 25 years. I believe this can be done by a daily program that includes moderate exercise, a healthy diet that includes vitamins and related supplements, and taking advantage of any advances in related research. My hope is that within the next 25 years or less, the fruits of anti-aging research will become available to everyone.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9239681

The Development of Old Age and Related Issues

April 18, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Development of Old Age and Related Issues
Filed under: General 

In traditional Chinese and other Asian cultures the aged were highly respected and cared for. The Igabo tribesmen of Eastern Nigeria value dependency in their aged and involve them in care of children and the administration of tribal affairs (Shelton, A. in Kalish R. Uni Michigan 1969).

In Eskimo culture the grandmother was pushed out into the ice-flow to die as soon as she became useless.

Western societies today usually resemble to some degree the Eskimo culture, only the “ice-flows” have names such a “Sunset Vista” and the like. Younger generations no longer assign status to the aged and their abandonment is always in danger of becoming the social norm.

There has been a tendency to remove the aged from their homes and put them  in custodial care. To some degree the government provides domiciliary care services to prevent or delay this, but the motivation probably has more to do with expense than humanity.

In Canada and some parts of the USA old people are being utilised as foster-grandparents in child care agencies.

SOME BASIC DEFINITIONS

What is Aging?

Aging: Aging is a natural phenomenon that refers to changes occurring throughout the life span and result in differences in structure and function between the youthful and elder generation.

Gerontology: Gerontology is the study of aging and includes science, psychology and sociology.

Geriatrics: A relatively new field of medicine specialising in the health problems of advanced age.

Social aging: Refers to the social habits and roles of individuals with respect to their culture and society. As social aging increases individual usually experience a decrease in meaningful social interactions.

Biological aging: Refers to the physical changes in the body systems during the later decades of life. It may begin long before the individual  reaches chronological age 65.

Cognitive aging: Refers to decreasing ability to assimilate new information and learn new behaviours and skills.

GENERAL PROBLEMS OF AGING

Eric Erikson (Youth and the life cycle. Children. 7:43-49 Mch/April 1960) developed an “ages and stages” theory of human development that involved 8 stages after birth each of which involved a basic dichotomy representing best case and worst case outcomes. Below are the dichotomies and their developmental relevance:

Prenatal stage – conception to birth.

  1. Infancy. Birth to 2 years – basic trust vs. basic distrust. Hope.
  2. Early childhood, 3 to 4 years – autonomy vs. self doubt/shame. Will.
  3. Play age, 5 to 8 years – initiative vs. guilt. Purpose.
  4. School age, 9to 12 – industry vs. inferiority. Competence.
  5. Adolescence, 13 to 19 – identity vs. identity confusion. Fidelity.
  6. Young adulthood – intimacy vs. isolation. Love.
  7. Adulthood, generativity vs. self absorption. Care.
  8. Mature age- Ego Integrity vs. Despair. Wisdom.

This stage of older adulthood, i.e. stage 8, begins about the time of retirement and continues throughout one’s life. Achieving ego integrity  is a sign of maturity while failing to reach this stage is an indication of poor development in prior stages through the life course.

Ego integrity: This means coming to accept one’s whole life and reflecting on it in a positive manner. According to Erikson, achieving integrity means fully accepting one’ self and coming to terms with death. Accepting responsibility for one’s life and being able to review the past with satisfaction is essential. The inability to do this leads to despair and the individual will begin to fear death. If a favourable balance is achieved during this stage, then wisdom is developed.

Psychological and personality aspects:

Aging has psychological implications. Next to dying our recognition that we are aging may be one of the most profound shocks we ever receive. Once we pass the invisible line of 65 our years are bench marked for the remainder of the game of life. We are no longer “mature age” we are instead classified as “old”, or “senior citizens”. How we cope with the changes we face and stresses of altered status depends on our basic personality. Here are 3 basic personality types that have been identified. It may be a oversimplification but it makes the point about personality effectively:

a. The autonomous – people who seem to have the resources for self-renewal. They may be dedicated to a goal or idea and committed to continuing productivity. This appears to protect them somewhat even against physiological aging.

b.The adjusted – people who are rigid and lacking in adaptability but are supported by their power, prestige or well structured routine. But if their situation changes drastically they become psychiatric casualties.

c.The anomic. These are people who do not have clear inner values or a protective life vision. Such people have been described as prematurely resigned and they may deteriorate rapidly.

Summary of stresses of old age.

a. Retirement and reduced income. Most people rely on work for self worth, identity and social interaction. Forced retirement can be demoralising.

b. Fear of invalidism and death. The increased probability of falling prey to illness from which there is no recovery is a continual source of anxiety. When one has a heart attack or stroke the stress becomes much worse.

Some persons face death with equanimity, often psychologically supported by a religion or philosophy. Others may welcome death as an end to suffering or insoluble problems and with little concern for life or human existence. Still others face impending death with suffering of great stress against which they have no ego defenses.

c. Isolation and loneliness. Older people face inevitable loss of loved ones, friends and contemporaries. The loss of a spouse whom one has depended on for companionship and moral support is particularly distressing. Children grow up, marry and become preoccupied or move away. Failing memory, visual and aural impairment may all work to make social interaction difficult. And if this then leads to a souring of outlook and rigidity of attitude then social interaction becomes further lessened and the individual may not even utilise the avenues for social activity that are still available.

d. Reduction in sexual function and physical attractiveness. Kinsey et al, in their Sexual behaviour in the human male, (Phil., Saunders, 1948) found that there is a gradual decrease in sexual activity with advancing age and that reasonably gratifying patterns of sexual activity can continue into extreme old age. The aging person also has to adapt to loss of sexual attractiveness in a society which puts extreme emphasis on sexual attractiveness. The adjustment in self image and self concept that are required can be very hard to make.

e. Forces tending to self devaluation. Often the experience of the older generation has little perceived relevance to the problems of the young and the older person becomes deprived of participation in decision making both in occupational and family settings. Many parents are seen as unwanted burdens and their children may secretly wish they would die so they can be free of the burden and experience some financial relief or benefit. Senior citizens may be pushed into the role of being an old person with all this implies in terms of self devaluation.

4 Major Categories of Problems or Needs:

Health.

Housing.

Income maintenance.

Interpersonal relations.

BIOLOGICAL CHANGES

Physiological Changes: Catabolism (the breakdown of protoplasm) overtakes anabolism (the build-up of protoplasm). All body systems are affected and repair systems become slowed. The aging process occurs at different rates in different individuals.

Physical appearance and other changes:

Loss of subcutaneous fat and less elastic skin gives rise to wrinkled appearance, sagging and loss of smoothness of body contours. Joints stiffen and become painful and range of joint movement becomes restricted, general mobility lessened.

Respiratory changes:

Increase of fibrous tissue in chest walls and lungs leads restricts respiratory movement and less oxygen is consumed. Older people more likelyto have lower respiratory infections whereas young people have upper respiratory infections.

Nutritive changes:

Tooth decay and loss of teeth can detract from ease and enjoyment in eating. Atrophy of the taste buds means food is inclined to be tasteless and this should be taken into account by carers. Digestive changes occur from lack of exercise (stimulating intestines) and decrease in digestive juice production. Constipation and indigestion are likely to follow as a result. Financial problems can lead to the elderly eating an excess of cheap carbohydrates rather than the more expensive protein and vegetable foods and this exacerbates the problem, leading to reduced vitamin intake and such problems as anemia and increased susceptibility to infection.

Adaptation to stress:

All of us face stress at all ages. Adaptation to stress requires the consumption of energy. The 3 main phases of stress are:

1. Initial alarm reaction. 2. Resistance. 3. Exhaustion

and if stress continues tissue damage or aging occurs. Older persons have had a lifetime of dealing with stresses. Energy reserves are depleted and the older person succumbs to stress earlier than the younger person. Stress is cumulative over a lifetime. Research results, including experiments with animals suggests that each stress leaves us more vulnerable to the next and that although we might think we’ve “bounced back” 100% in fact each stress leaves it scar. Further, stress is psycho-biological meaning the kind of stress is irrelevant. A physical stress may leave one more vulnerable to psychological stress and vice versa. Rest does not completely restore one after a stressor. Care workers need to be mindful of this and cognizant of the kinds of things that can produce stress for aged persons.

COGNITIVE CHANGE Habitual Behaviour:

Sigmund Freud noted that after the age of 50, treatment of neuroses via psychoanalysis was difficult because the opinions and reactions of older people were relatively fixed and hard to shift.

Over-learned behaviour: This is behaviour that has been learned so well and repeated so often that it has become automatic, like for example typing or running down stairs. Over-learned behaviour is hard to change. If one has lived a long time one is likely to have fixed opinions and ritualised behaviour patterns or habits.

Compulsive behaviour: Habits and attitudes that have been learned in the course of finding ways to overcome frustration and difficulty are very hard to break. Tension reducing habits such as nail biting, incessant humming, smoking or drinking alcohol are especially hard to change at any age and particularly hard for persons who have been practising them over a life time.

The psychology of over-learned and compulsive behaviours has severe implications for older persons who find they have to live in what for them is a new and alien environment with new rules and power relations.

Information acquisition:

Older people have a continual background of neural noise making it more difficult for them to sort out and interpret complex sensory input. In talking to an older person one should turn off the TV, eliminate as many noises and distractions as possible, talk slowly and relate to one message or idea at a time.

Memories from the distant past are stronger than more recent memories. New memories are the first to fade and last to return.

Time patterns also can get mixed – old and new may get mixed.

Intelligence.

Intelligence reaches a peak and can stay high with little deterioration if there is no neurological damage. People who have unusually high intelligence to begin with seem to suffer the least decline. Education and stimulation also seem to play a role in maintaining intelligence.

Intellectual impairment. Two diseases of old age causing cognitive decline are Alzheimer’s syndrome and Pick’s syndrome. In Pick’s syndrome there is inability to concentrate and learn and also affective responses are impaired.

Degenerative Diseases: Slow progressive physical degeneration of cells in the nervous system. Genetics appear to be an important factor. Usually start after age 40 (but can occur as early as 20s).

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE Degeneration of all areas of cortex but particularly frontal and temporal lobes. The affected cells actually die. Early symptoms resemble neurotic disorders: Anxiety, depression, restlessness sleep difficulties.

Progressive deterioration of all intellectual faculties (memory deficiency being the most well known and obvious). Total mass of the brain decreases, ventricles become larger. No established treatment.

PICK’S DISEASE Rare degenerative disease. Similar to Alzheimer’s in terms of onset, symptomatology and possible genetic aetiology. However it affects circumscribed areas of the brain, particularly the frontal areas which leads to a loss of normal affect.

PARKINSON’S DISEASE Neuropathology: Loss of neurons in the basal ganglia.

Symptoms: Movement abnormalities: rhythmical alternating tremor of extremities, eyelids and tongue along with rigidity of the muscles and slowness of movement (akinesia).

It was once thought that Parkinson’s disease was not associated with intellectual deterioration, but it is now known that there is an association between global intellectual impairment and Parkinson’s where it occurs late in life.

The cells lost in Parkinson’s are associated with the neuro-chemical Dopamine and the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s are associated the dopamine deficiency. Treatment involves administration of dopamine precursor L-dopa which can alleviate symptoms including intellectual impairment. Research suggests it may possibly bring to the fore emotional effects in patients who have had psychiatric illness at some prior stage in their lives.

AFFECTIVE DOMAIN In old age our self concept gets its final revision. We make a final assessment of the value of our lives and our balance of success and failures.

How well a person adapts to old age may be predicated by how well the person adapted to earlier significant changes. If the person suffered an emotional crisis each time a significant change was needed then adaptation to the exigencies of old age may also be difficult. Factors such as economic security, geographic location and physical health are important to the adaptive process.

Need Fulfilment: For all of us, according to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs theory, we are not free to pursue the higher needs of self actualisation unless the basic needs are secured. When one considers that many, perhaps most, old people are living in poverty and continually concerned with basic survival needs, they are not likely to be happily satisfying needs related to prestige, achievement and beauty.

Maslow’s Hierarchy

Physiological

Safety

Belonging, love, identification

Esteem: Achievement, prestige, success, self respect

Self actualisation: Expressing one’s interests and talents to the full.

Note: Old people who have secured their basic needs may be motivated to work on tasks of the highest levels in the hierarchy – activities concerned with aesthetics, creativity and altruistic matters, as compensation for loss of sexual attractiveness and athleticism. Aged care workers fixated on getting old people to focus on social activities may only succeed in frustrating and irritating them if their basic survival concerns are not secured to their satisfaction.

DISENGAGEMENT

Social aging according to Cumming, E. and Henry, W. (Growing old: the aging process of disengagement, NY, Basic 1961) follows a well defined pattern:

  1. Change in role. Change in occupation and productivity. Possibly change in attitude to work.
  2. Loss of role, e.g. retirement or death of a husband.
  3. Reduced social interaction. With loss of role social interactions are diminished, eccentric adjustment can further reduce social interaction, damage to self concept, depression.
  4. Awareness of scarcity of remaining time. This produces further curtailment of activity in interest of saving time.

Havighurst, R. et al (in B. Neugarten (ed.) Middle age and aging, U. of Chicago, 1968) and others have suggested that disengagement is not an inevitable process. They believe the needs of the old are essentially the same as in middle age and the activities of middle age should be extended as long as possible. Havighurst points out the decrease in social interaction of the aged is often largely the result of society withdrawing from the individual as much as the reverse. To combat this he believes the individual must vigorously resist the limitations of his social world.

DEATH The fear of the dead amongst tribal societies is well established. Persons who had ministered to the dead were taboo and required observe various rituals including seclusion for varying periods of time. In some societies from South America to Australia it is taboo for certain persons to utter the name of the dead. Widows and widowers are expected to observe rituals in respect for the dead.

Widows in the Highlands of New Guinea around Goroka chop of one of their own fingers. The dead continue their existence as spirits and upsetting them can bring dire consequences.

Wahl, C in “The fear of death”, 1959 noted that the fear of death occurs as early as the 3rd year of life. When a child loses a pet or grandparent fears reside in the unspoken questions: Did I cause it? Will happen to you (parent) soon? Will this happen to me? The child in such situations needs to re-assure that the departure is not a censure, and that the parent is not likely to depart soon. Love, grief, guilt, anger are a mix of conflicting emotions that are experienced.

CONTEMPORARY ATTITUDES TO DEATH

Our culture places high value on youth, beauty, high status occupations, social class and anticipated future activities and achievement. Aging and dying are denied and avoided in this system. The death of each person reminds us of our own mortality.

The death of the elderly is less disturbing to members of Western society because the aged are not especially valued. Surveys have established that nurses for example attach more importance to saving a young life than an old life. In Western society there is a pattern of avoiding dealing with the aged and dying aged patient.

Stages of dying. Elisabeth Kubler Ross has specialised in working with dying patients and in her “On death and dying”, NY, Macmillan, 1969, summarised 5 stages in dying.

  1. Denial and isolation. “No, not me”.
  2. Anger. “I’ve lived a good life so why me?”
  3. Bargaining. Secret deals are struck with God. “If I can live until…I promise to…”
  4. Depression. (In general the greatest psychological problem of the aged is depression). Depression results from real and threatened loss.
  5. Acceptance of the inevitable.

Kubler Ross’s typology as set out above should, I believe be taken with a grain of salt and not slavishly accepted. Celebrated US Journalist David Rieff who was in June ’08 a guest of the Sydney writer’s festival in relation to his book, “Swimming in a sea of death: a son’s memoir” (Melbourne University Press) expressly denied the validity of the Kubler Ross typology in his Late Night Live interview (Australian ABC radio) with Philip Adams June 9th ’08. He said something to the effect that his mother had regarded her impending death as murder. My own experience with dying persons suggests that the human ego is extraordinarily resilient. I recall visiting a dying colleague in hospital just days before his death. He said, “I’m dying, I don’t like it but there’s nothing I can do about it”, and then went on to chortle about how senior academics at an Adelaide university had told him they were submitting his name for a the Order of Australia (the new “Knighthood” replacement in Australia). Falling in and out of lucid thought with an oxygen tube in his nostrils he was nevertheless still highly interested in the “vain glories of the world”. This observation to me seemed consistent with Rieff’s negative assessment of Kubler Ross’s theories.

THE AGED IN RELATION TO YOUNGER PEOPLE

The aged share with the young the same needs: However, the aged often have fewer or weaker resources to meet those needs. Their need for social interaction may be ignored by family and care workers.

Family should make time to visit their aged members and invite them to their homes. The aged like to visit children and relate to them through games and stories.

Meaningful relationships can be developed via foster-grandparent programs. Some aged are not aware of their income and health entitlements. Family and friends should take the time to explain these. Some aged are too proud to access their entitlements and this problem should be addressed in a kindly way where it occurs.

It is best that the aged be allowed as much choice as possible in matters related to living arrangements, social life and lifestyle.

Communities serving the aged need to provide for the aged via such things as lower curbing, and ramps.

Carers need to examine their own attitude to aging and dying. Denial in the carer is detected by the aged person and it can inhibit the aged person from expressing negative feelings – fear, anger. If the person can express these feelings to someone then that person is less likely to die with a sense of isolation and bitterness.

A METAPHYSICAL PERSPECTIVE

The following notes are my interpretation of a Dr. Depak Chopra lecture entitled, “The New Physics of Healing” which he presented to the 13th Scientific Conference of the American Holistic Medical Association. Dr. Depak Chopra is an endocrinologist and a former Chief of Staff of New England Hospital, Massachusetts. I am deliberately omitting the detail of his explanations of the more abstract, ephemeral and controversial ideas.

Original material from 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

In the lecture Dr. Chopra presents a model of the universe and of all organisms as structures of interacting centres of electromagnetic energy linked to each other in such a way that anything affecting one part of a system or structure has ramifications throughout the entire structure. This model becomes an analogue not only for what happens within the structure or organism itself, but between the organism and both its physical and social environments. In other words there is a correlation between psychological conditions, health and the aging process. Dr. Chopra in his lecture reconciles ancient Vedic (Hindu) philosophy with modern psychology and quantum physics.

Premature Precognitive Commitment: Dr. Chopra invokes experiments that have shown that flies kept for a long time in a jar do not quickly leave the jar when the top is taken off. Instead they accept the jar as the limit of their universe. He also points out that in India baby elephants are often kept tethered to a small twig or sapling. In adulthood when the elephant is capable of pulling over a medium sized tree it can still be successfully tethered to a twig! As another example he points to experiments in which fish are bred on

2 sides of a fish tank containing a divider between the 2 sides. When the divider is removed the fish are slow to learn that they can now swim throughout the whole tank but rather stay in the section that they accept as their universe. Other experiments have demonstrated that kittens brought up in an environment of vertical stripes and structures, when released in adulthood keep bumping into anything aligned horizontally as if they were unable to see anything that is horizontal. Conversely kittens brought up in an environment of horizontal stripes when released bump into vertical structures, apparently unable to see them.

The whole point of the above experiments is that they demonstrate Premature Precognitive Commitment. The lesson to be learned is that our sensory apparatus develops as a result of initial experience and how we’ve been taught to interpret it.

What is the real look of the world? It doesn’t exist. The way the world looks to us is determined by the sensory receptors we have and our interpretation of that look is determined by our premature precognitive commitments. Dr Chopra makes the point that less than a billionth of the available stimuli make it into our nervous systems. Most of it is screened, and what gets through to us is whatever we are expecting to find on the basis of our precognitive commitments.

Dr. Chopra also discusses the diseases that are actually caused by mainstream medical interventions, but this material gets too far away from my central intention. Dr. Chopra discusses in lay terms the physics of matter, energy and time by way of establishing the wider context of our existence. He makes the point that our bodies including the bodies of plants are mirrors of cosmic rhythms and exhibit changes correlating even with the tides.

Dr. Chopra cites the experiments of Dr. Herbert Spencer of the US National Institute of Health. He injected mice with Poly-IC, an immuno-stimulant while making the mice repeatedly smell camphor. After the effect of the Poly-IC had worn off he again exposed the mice to the camphor smell. The smell of camphor had the effect of causing the mice’s immune system to automatically strengthen as if they had been injected with the stimulant. He then took another batch of mice and injected them with cyclophosphamide which tends to destroy the immune system while exposing them to the smell of camphor. Later after being returned to normal just the smell of camphor was enough to cause destruction of their immune system. Dr. Chopra points out that whether or not camphor enhanced or destroyed the mice’s immune system was entirely determined by an interpretation of the meaning of the smell of camphor. The interpretation is not just in the brain but in each cell of the organism. We are bound to our imagination and our early experiences.

Chopra cites a study by the Massachusetts Dept of Health Education and Welfare into risk factors for heart disease – family history, cholesterol etc. The 2 most important risk factors were found to be psychological measures – Self  Happiness Rating and Job Satisfaction. They found most people died of heart disease on a Monday!

Chopra says that for every feeling there is a molecule. If you are experiencing tranquillity your body will be producing natural valium. Chemical changes in the brain are reflected by changes in other cells including blood cells. The brain produces neuropeptides and brain structures are chemically tuned to these neuropeptide receptors. Neuropeptides (neurotransmitters) are the chemical concommitants of thought. Chopra points out the white blood cells (a part of the immune system) have neuropeptide receptors and are “eavesdropping” on our thinking. Conversely the immune system produces its own neuropeptides which can influence the nervous system. He goes on to say that cells in all parts of the body including heart and kidneys for example also produce neuropeptides and neuropeptide sensitivity. Chopra assures us that most neurologists would agree that the nervous system and the immune system are parallel systems.

Other studies in physiology: The blood interlukin-2 levels of medical students decreased as exam time neared and their interlukin receptor capacities also lowered. Chopra says if we are having fun to the point of exhilaration our natural interlukin-2 levels become higher. Interlukin-2 is a powerful and very expensive anti-cancer drug. The body is a printout of consciousness. If we could change the way we look at our bodies at a genuine, profound level then our bodies would actually change.

On the subject of “time” Chopra cites Sir Thomas Gall and Steven Hawkins, stating that our description of the universe as having a past, present, and future are constructed entirely out of our interpretation of change. But in reality linear time doesn’t exist.

Chopra explains the work of Alexander Leaf a former Harvard Professor of Preventative Medicine who toured the world investigating societies where people  lived beyond 100 years (these included parts of Afghanistan, Soviet Georgia, Southern Andes). He looked at possible factors including climate, genetics, and diet. Leaf concluded the most important factor was the collective perception of aging in these societies.

Amongst the Tama Humara of the Southern Andes there was a collective belief that the older you got the more physically able you got. They had a tradition of running and the older one became then generally the better at running one got. The best runner was aged 60. Lung capacity and other measures actually improved with age. People were healthy until well into their 100s and died in their sleep. Chopra remarks that things have changed since the introduction of Budweiser (beer) and TV.

[DISCUSSION: How might TV be a factor in changing the former ideal state of things?]

Chopra refers to Dr. Ellen Langor a former Harvard Psychology professor’s work. Langor advertised for 100 volunteers aged over 70 years. She took them to a Monastery outside Boston to play “Let’s Pretend”. They were divided into 2 groups each of which resided in a different part of the building. One group, the control group spent several days talking about the 1950s. The other group, the experimental group had to live as if in the year 1959 and talk about it in the present tense. What appeared on their TV screens were the old newscasts and movies. They read old newspapers and magazines of the period. After 3 days everyone was photographed and the photographs judged by independent judges who knew nothing of the nature of the experiment. The experimental group seemed to have gotten younger in appearance. Langor then arranged for them to be tested for 100 physiological parameters of aging which included of course blood pressure, near point vision and DHEA levels. After 10 days of living as if in 1959 all parameters had reversed by the equivalent of at least 20 years.

Chopra concludes from Langor’s experiment: “We are the metabolic end product of our sensory experiences. How we interpret them depends on the collective mindset which influences individual biological entropy and aging.”

Can one escape the current collective mindset and reap the benefits in longevity and health? Langor says, society won’t let you escape. There are too many reminders of how most people think linear time is and how it expresses itself in entropy and aging – men are naughty at 40 and on social welfare at 55, women reach menopause at 40 etc. We get to see so many other people aging and dying that it sets the pattern that we follow.

Chopra concludes we are the metabolic product of our sensory experience and our interpretation gets structured in our biology itself. Real change comes from change in the collective consciousness – otherwise it cannot occur within the individual.

Readings

Chopra, D. The New Physics of Healing. 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

Coleman, J. C. Abnormal psychology and modern life. Scott Foresman & Co.

Lugo, J. and Hershey, L. Human development a multidisciplinary approach to the psychology of individual growth, NY, Macmillan.

Dennis. Psychology of human behaviour for nurses. Lond. W. B.Saunders.

[http://www.psychologynatural.com/DepressionBroch.html]

Dr. Victor Barnes is an Adelaide psychologist and hypnotherapist. He has also had three decades of experience in adult education including serving as Dean of a Sri Lankan college (ICBT) teaching several Australian degrees. His overseas experience includes studies and consulting experience in USA, PNG, Poland and Sri Lanka.

American Red Cross Advancing Health Options in Southern Nevada

January 22, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
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dr-john-lunettaDr. John Lunetta, D.O. arrived in Las Vegas more than a year ago to help with the American Red Cross Blood Services regional expansion. For decades, the Red Cross blood supply in Southern Nevada came from other areas of the country, mostly from Idaho, Montana and Utah. But over the course of the last year and a half, the team has grown the program of blood collection to that of supplying nine of the area’s 14 hospitals.

 

But Dr. Lunetta’s presence here makes this program so much more than a simple blood collection service. Licensed to practice in seven western states, and eight of our local hospitals, Dr. Lunetta assists local doctors when they have questions about using Red Cross blood products. Transfusion recommendations to find the most compatible blood or questions about reactions to transfusions are all topics on which Dr. Lunetta can speak.

 

Dr. Lunetta also brings with him the latest in patient blood management education. His contemporary approach allows local doctors to, when appropriate; use less product resulting in less risk to patients.

 

But there are additional American Red Cross Blood Services here in Las Vegas not available in some other regions known as clinical services. With the medical equipment and the skilled nurses that work with Dr. Lunetta, Clinical Services can offer one-on-one patient contact delivering care through an apheresis machine, which uses centrifugal force to separate blood into its constituent components. This is a method used in the treatment of leukemia patients, sickle cell patients, and a large number of neurologic and oncology patients. Dr. Lunetta also oversees treatments involving some new technology using extracorporeal photopheresis, or ECP. In layman’s terms, it’s like a tanning bed for your blood.  Due to Dr. Lunetta’s expertise, some area patients will soon be able to receive treatment here that they could only get in California previously.  It’s used to treat patients who suffer from Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma in which the skin is attacked by the patient’s own T-cells. The treatment calms those cells down and the skin begins to heal. An average patient needs to receive 150 – 300 procedures once every two weeks.  Another more common use of this treatment is for patients who have graft vs. host disease; usually as a result of a bone marrow transplant, or other organ transplant such as lung or heart.

 

Many more procedures and innovations are in the pipeline that Dr. Lunetta and his staff may be able to offer in the future and the Red Cross is pushing the development of new ways in which Blood Services can help in our community. From his involvement with donors at blood drives to his work with patients who get the blood transfused, Dr. Lunetta is involved every step of the way.

 

Dr. Lunetta is available for interviews for print, online, radio and television. Well-spoken and with a talent to break complex medical ideas down into language that we can all understand, Dr. Lunetta is a delightful guest and talented subject matter expert.

 

To book Dr. Lunetta, or to interview him on his range of expertise, please contact the office of Lloyd Ziel at the contact below.

 

Lloyd Ziel

Public Information Officer | Communications and Public Affairs

 

American Red Cross

Southern Nevada Chapter

1771 E. Flamingo Rd. Suite 206-B

Las Vegas, NV 89119

702-232-6604 cl

702-369-3351 of

702-791-3372 fx

Lloyd.Ziel@redcross.org

www.redcross.org/southernnevada

Drug interactions causing a significant impact on statin use

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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A new study has found that many people who stopped taking cholesterol-lowering statin drugs were also taking an average of three other drugs that interfered with the normal metabolism of the statins.

The other drugs can contribute to a common side effect of taking statins – muscle pain – and often led people to discontinue use of a medication that could otherwise help save their life, researchers learned.

The interactions of many drugs with statins have been known of for some time, researchers said, but are not being adequately managed by physicians and pharmacists, who could often choose different medications or adjust dosages to retain the value of statin drugs without causing this side effect.

The research, done as part of a survey of more than 10,000 current and former statin users, found that use of medications which interfere with statin metabolism almost doubles the chance that a person will discontinue statin use due to muscle pain.

The issue is of growing importance because statin drugs are some of the most widely used medications in the world, proven to lower LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, and decrease the risk of heart attacks, heart disease, strokes and death. About 20 million people in the U.S. now take statins, and new guidelines have just been issued to further expand the types of health conditions for which statins may be of benefit. Based on those guidelines, the number of statin users could increase to more than 30 million.

The findings were published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology by scientists from Oregon State University and four other universities or research institutes.

“We’ve known for some time of many medications that can interact with statins, but only now is it becoming clear that this is a significant contributor to the side effects, and often the reason some patients stop taking statins,” said Matt Ito, a professor in the OSU College of Pharmacy and president of the National Lipid Association, which funded this study.

“This issue is something physicians, pharmacists and patients all need to be more aware of,” Ito said. “There’s a lot we can do besides discontinue use of these valuable medications. You can change dosages, use drugs that don’t cause interactions, use different types of statins. Patients need to be proactive in understanding this issue and working with their health care providers to address it.”

Persons who have problems taking statins should discuss options with their physicians or pharmacists, Ito said, and not assume the drug has be to discontinued. A Medscape web site at http://reference.medscape.com/drug-interactionchecker also can help individuals learn more about possible interactions between statins and the full range of medications they may be taking.

Statins are usually well-tolerated, but in the recent survey, a muscle-related side effect was reported by 29 percent of participants. In former statin users, 62 percent of the people said that side effects, mostly muscle pain, were the reason they stopped taking the drugs.

There are many drugs that can interfere with statin metabolism, increase systemic exposure to the statin and raise the risk of this muscle pain, the researchers said in their report. This can include some common antibiotics, cardiovascular drugs, and others taken for treatment of cancer, mental health, HIV treatment and other conditions.

These interactions are not always adequately considered by physicians and pharmacists, however. One recent report found that as many as 20 percent of significant statin-drug interactions were missed in 64 pharmacies.

Besides drug interactions, statin side effects are also more common in women and associated with increasing age, history of cardiovascular disease, and some other conditions. Statin discontinuation has been associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and death.

About the OSU College of Pharmacy: The College of Pharmacy prepares students of today to be the pharmacy practitioners and pharmaceutical sciences researchers of tomorrow by contributing to improved health, advancing patient care and the discovery and understanding of medicines.

U.S. Veterans Honored by Encore.org’s 2013 Purpose Prize

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Seven Awards for People Over Age 60 Solving the World’s Toughest Social Problems

The Purpose Prize has become a “MacArthur genius award for people who develop a second career as social service entrepreneurs.” – The New York Times.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy organizes a network of volunteers across the country to teach disabled veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan how to combat stress — through fly-fishing.

A public relations executive helps wounded warriors find and renovate foreclosed homes – and transforms lives and neighborhoods in the process.

These are two of the seven winners of the 2013 Purpose Prize, awarded by Encore.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who translate decades of skill and experience into “second acts” that contribute to society’s greater good.

Now in its eighth year, The Purpose Prize is the nation’s only large-scale investment in people over 60 who are combining their passion and experience for the social good. Created in 2005 by Encore.org, the prize is aimed at those with the passion to make change and the wisdom to know how to do it, showcasing the value of experience and disproving the notion that innovation is solely the province of the young.

Two winners will receive $100,000 each and five winners will receive $25,000 each.

This year’s winners:

* Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. ($100,000 winner of The Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra)

* Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron taps into her own experience as a cancer survivor to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. ($100,000)

* Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing emotional wounds through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. ($25,000)

* Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
Fennelly runs a unique summer camp behind bars that is transforming federal prisoners into involved parents. ($25,000)

* Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
Huttinger’s project is on a path to eradicate human schistosomiasis, a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. ($25,000)

* Reverend Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. ($25,000)

* Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
Young’s rise from immigrant nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. ($25,000)

The Purpose Prize winners will be honored on December 5, 2013, at an awards ceremony in Sausalito, Ca. NBC’s Jane Pauley will emcee the event for hundreds of Encore leaders and the Purpose Prize winners.

Twenty-one judges – leaders in business, politics, journalism and the nonprofit sector – chose the seven winners from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees. Judges include Sherry Lansing, former CEO of Paramount; David Bornstein, author and New York Times columnist; Eric Liu, writer and founder of CitizenUniversity; and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, The Purpose Prize is a program of Encore.org, which aims to engage millions of boomers in encore careers combining personal meaning, continued income and social impact in the second half of life.

This year, Symetra is sponsoring the $100,000 Purpose Prize for Future Promise, which recognizes an individual whose approach for helping society has the potential to grow steadily over the next five years. The company plans to sponsor another Purpose Prize for Future Promise in 2014.

“While Purpose Prize winners are helping to solve a wide range of pressing social problems, they have one thing in common,” said Marc Freedman, CEO and founder of Encore.org and author of The Big Shift (PublicAffairs Books). “They – and millions of others in encore careers – are turning personal passions and decades of experience into invaluable contributions across sectors, continents and generations, often through entrepreneurship.”

Short summaries for all winners follow. Photos are attached. Longer bios and higher resolution photos are available.

Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas, winner of this year’s Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra, rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. Following a 35-year-career as a fundraising and marketing dynamo, she became the director of communications at Purple Heart Homes in 2008 in an effort to provide greater services for veterans who have service-connected disabilities. In just three years, Thomas helped take the fledgling nonprofit to new heights. She has raised millions for Purple Heart Homes in financial contributions and material donations. Revenue shot up 600% in her first year with the startup. She’s developed an innovative program that matches veterans with foreclosed homes donated by banks, then raises the funds to renovate a home for the individual veteran’s needs. It’s a win-win for all generations—and communities too. It helps veterans to grow assets, towns to recoup lost taxes and neighborhoods that have struggled with foreclosures to stabilize.

Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron is an award-winning journalist with more than 42 years in television broadcasting. She tapped into her own experience as a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. To focus on the plight of low-income Latinos fighting the disease, Duron founded Latinas Contra Cancer (Latinas Against Cancer), an organization committed to educating, supporting and providing essential services to low-income Spanish speakers often overlooked by the health care system. Latinas Contra Cancer has offered a range of programs that have taught more than 3,000 men, women and teens about the disease, resulting in more than 300 preventative cancer screenings. The group has provided psychological and social support to over 100 patients per year. However, the call to action Duron answered has had an impact far beyond the Bay Area. Her passionate commitment is helping Latino communities across the U.S. gain access to cancer support, information and treatment. Her great empathy for cancer patients has made her utterly clear on her bigger purpose in the second stage of life.

Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing the emotional wounds of battle through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. A cancer survivor and war veteran himself, Nicholson was impressed by the fortitude of disabled veterans at the Walter Reed military hospital, where he was treated for prostate cancer in 2005. It spurred him to found Project Healing Waters, a program dedicated to helping disabled soldiers and veterans recover from the trying aftermath of war through the sport of fly-fishing. One-on-one connections have been key to Project Healing Waters’ approach since the beginning. Nicholson knew there were fly-fishing groups and facilities all over the country. His innovation was to convince them to start, manage and lead fly-fishing instruction and outings with veterans through military and Veterans Administration facilities. The quiet bonds forged over fishing lines began to transform lives. Again and again Nicholson heard from family members who said their loved ones had returned from war withdrawn, angry, and difficult to be around. But after fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters, they’ve become happier, more open and engaged. Project Healing Waters works closely with VA Recreational and Occupational therapies to identify those who would most benefit from the program. Many are in wheelchairs or using prosthetics. A few are blind. Participants reflect of full spectrum of disabled veterans and include all ages, genders, ethnicities and disabilities. Nicholson says the impact “goes well beyond the mechanics of fly-fishing.”

Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
A lifelong social activist who ran homeless shelters in the District of Columbia for 17 years, Carol Fennelly abandoned her plans to retire in 1998 when she learned that D.C. inmates had been transferred to Youngstown, OH. One woman made 10-hour round-trip drives twice a week to visit her son. Moved to answer a social need, Fennelly thought about opening a hospitality house in Youngstown for family members visiting inmates. She soon learned that while 93% of the federal inmate population is male, in sheer numbers there are more programs for mothers in prison than there are for fathers. She decided she had what it took to change things. “I had spent years organizing, dealing with government, making change happen, and that emboldened me to think I could go into prisons and start all these radical programs,” Fennelly says. So she launched an encore career with Hope House, an innovative organization that helps prison inmates stay in regular contact with their children. In the past 14 years, Hope House has hosted 200 video teleconferences, 18,000 personalized book readings by fathers and 31 week-long summer camps, which allow kids to spend time with their fathers free of the usual restrictions that come with visitor hours and family chaperones. California recently decided to implement the Hope House model in its 33 state prisons. Prisons in Texas, Idaho and New Hampshire may follow. In 2013 Fennelly was honored at the White House as a Champion of Change.

Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
International public health expert Elizabeth Huttinger spotted a big idea in shrimp, and launched an encore career that could eradicate a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. Huttinger’s project – founded in 2006 – is targeting human schistosomiasis, an infectious parasite carried by river snails. Understanding that the population of prawns that eat those snails had precipitously declined, Huttinger, 63, has devoted her encore career to restoring the prawn population in the SenegalRiver Basin. Projet Crevette’s mission is multifaceted: the restoration of the prawn population diminishes the spread of schisto, provides new economic opportunities to afflicted communities and heals families infected by the disease. Today, Projet Crevette is a prawn-farming microenterprise, operated by locals at public watering holes. It has brought social innovation, new microbusinesses, environmental restoration and improved health to communities. Huttinger is confident Projet Crevette will meet its bold goal to fully restore the indigenous prawn population—and improve countless lives in the process.

Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Reverend Violet Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. After 14 years as parish pastor trained in psychotherapy, Little left behind her traditional congregation to create a religious refuge for the homeless on the streets of the city, which became the “WelcomeChurch.” The church relies mostly on word of mouth, and services can pop up in a city park or on a sidewalk. No questions are asked, and everyone is welcome. The WelcomeChurch coordinates medical services through local universities, helps people get into rehab or jobs, and offers educational services to the public on the causes of homelessness. Little estimates 40 percent of her congregants have moved off the streets into permanent housing and the WelcomeChurch celebrates each and every one of them, many of whom stay connected with Little through their transition. Little’s congregation has grown to include hundreds of homeless as well as non-homeless volunteers in the EvangelicalLutheranChurch in America.

Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
An immigrant from the West Indies who built a meaningful life on meager income, Young’s gritty rise from nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. She’s encouraged thousands to stand up for their right to earn a living wage, and counsels and trains others to become leaders themselves. In 2004, Young began building a movement to legislate a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in New YorkState, which would make overtime, paid time off and rest days mandatory. In 2009, when she heard then Governor David Patterson say on the radio that he’d sign the bill if it made it to his desk, she put on a full court press, becoming the engine behind passage of the law in 2010. The law is the first of its kind in the country, but Young is committed to making sure it isn’t the last. She’s now a key player in the NDWA’s expansion from 11 to 44 affiliated organizations with 15,000 members, up from 5,000 in 2007. Young’s passion for serving her community has only just begun.

Read More About Encore’s Purpose Prize at www.encore.org/prize.

About Encore.org

Encore.org is a national nonprofit that promotes the idea that people in their second acts have the talent and experience to solve some of society’s greatest problems.

About The Atlantic Philanthropies

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. In keeping with the Giving While Living philosophy of founder Charles “Chuck” Feeney, The Atlantic Philanthropies believes in making large investments to capitalize on significant opportunities to solve urgent problems now, so they are less likely to become larger, more entrenched and more expensive challenges later. The Atlantic Philanthropies also seeks to encourage others of significant wealth to engage in major philanthropic pursuits in their lifetime.

About The John Templeton Foundation

The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, supporting research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.

About Symetra

Symetra Financial Corporation (NYSE: SYA) is a diversified financial services company based in Bellevue, Wash. In business since 1957, Symetra provides employee benefits, annuities and life insurance through a national network of benefit consultants, financial institutions, and independent agents and advisors.

 

CONTACT: Sara Ying Rounsaville, srounsaville@encore.org, 415-952-5121, or Russ Mitchell, rmitchell@encore.org, 510-969-0801

Benefits of Cayenne For Senior Citizens’ Diets by Sharon Elrod

September 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Expert Author Sharon Elrod

Alternative and Complementary treatments are finally getting some long overdue recognition. Senior citizens have been among the groups of people lobbying for non-traditional medical treatment of disease. One of those non-traditional methodologies is the use of herbal medicine. Among the herbs getting appropriate accolades these days is Cayenne.

Most of us think of it as a hot pepper, added to soup and sauces for the tangy taste it offers. But Cayenne has healing power that is now being studied in a variety of medical centers. Aryuvedic medicine has known of its curative power for centuries. Folklore describes its healing effects on heart attacks, open wounds, pain, hemorrhaging and digestion. And now medical science is adding its official stamp on the benefits of the herb with studies focusing on the therapeutic benefit of this hot peppe.

The active component of Cayenne is capsaicin. Do an Internet search on that word alone, and you will be amazed at the results. Clinical studies on Cayenne/capsaicin have found many medicinal benefits including antioxidant activity, cytotoxic action, inhibit some cancer cell growth, alleviate oral mucositis pain, treating psoriasis and pruritus, and other benefits.

The great thing about Cayenne is its nutritional value as well as medicinal. This herb is used extensively in all kinds of culinary dishes. Seniors around the globe are beginning to add this herb to many dishes that do not call for it. The addition creates a delight for most palates! When used in combination with other herbs, it acts as a catalyst that increases the effectiveness of other herbs used in the same dishes.

The nutritional value of Cayenne comes from its very high source of Vitamins A and C, the complete B complexes, and its high levels of organic calcium and potassium, which is one of the reasons it is good for the heart.

Readers are encouraged to check further on the validity of information available on the Internet. Bibliographies offer a comprehensive resource on reports of studies. Readers are always encouraged to read the original source to avoid possible misrepresentation, even that offered in good faith. As always, this article is not intended to offer medical advice or to replace the need for all readers to consult their primary care physicians and specialists about their individual medical needs.

Article provided by Sharon Shaw Elrod. Senior Citizen Journal, Your Partner in Productive Aging, provides current and relevant information on topics of interest to seniors. Please visit my web site at http://www.seniorcitizenjournal.com/.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sharon_Elrod

Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

National Council on Aging Launches Second Year of Education Program for Older Adults and Those Who Care for Them Aimed at Helping to Protect More Older Adults from the Flu

Actor Lee Majors, best known for his iconic roles on The Big Valley, The Fall Guy, and The Six Million Dollar Man, is joining the National Council on Aging (NCOA) Flu + You program to help protect older adults from influenza (commonly known as “the flu”). Flu + You aims to inform adults 65 and older, their caregivers, and those who care about them, about the dangers of the flu, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options.

As a part of his involvement in the Flu + You campaign, Majors will appear in a public service announcement (PSA) that follows him as he embarks on an important and action-packed mission: learning about his vaccine options and getting vaccinated against the flu. The PSA will educate the public about the increased risk of flu in adults 65 years of age and older and the importance of knowing your vaccine options and getting a flu vaccine, even for tough guys like Majors.

Every year in the United States, roughly nine out of 10 flu-related deaths and more than six out of 10 flu-related hospitalizations occur in people 65 and older. Older adults are at a greater risk for flu due, in part, to the weakening of the immune system that typically occurs with age. This means that no matter how healthy or youthful we feel, as we age we become more vulnerable to the flu and its related complications.

“The CDC recommends an annual flu vaccine as the single best way to protect yourself from the flu, yet a third of people 65 and older still don’t get vaccinated,” said Richard Birkel, PhD, MPA, NCOA Senior Vice President for Healthy Aging and Director of NCOA’s Self-Management Alliance. “As NCOA continues to educate older adults about the flu and the potential severity of the illness, we hope to encourage more people to protect themselves and their loved ones by getting an annual flu shot.”

The flu vaccine offers the best defense to protect against the flu, and adults 65 years of age and older have several vaccine options. In addition to the traditional flu vaccine (which helps protect against three strains of the flu virus), there is also a quadrivalent vaccine (which helps protect against four strains), and a higher dose vaccine that was designed specifically for adults 65 and older. By improving the production of antibodies in older patients, the higher dose vaccine can provide a stronger immune response to the flu than traditional vaccines. All flu vaccines are covered as a Medicare Part B benefit, which means there is no copay for Medicare beneficiaries 65 years of age and older.

“I get the flu shot every year and encourage my peers to do the same – it’s a simple step you can take to protect yourself from the flu,” says actor Lee Majors.  “I urge everyone 65 years of age and older to talk to their health care provider about their vaccine options this flu season.”

The flu can make existing health conditions worse, and it is especially dangerous for people with lung disease, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer—conditions that commonly affect older adults. Nationwide, 86 percent of adults 65 years of age and older have at least one chronic health condition and approximately 66 percent of Medicare beneficiaries have two or more chronic conditions, putting them at increased risk of the flu and flu-related complications, which can be severe and include hospitalization and even death.

For more facts about flu, and to order free educational materials, including a brochure and fact sheet, visit www.ncoa.org/Flu.

About Flu + You
Flu + You is a national public education initiative, from the National Council on Aging with support from Sanofi Pasteur, to educate adults 65 years and older about the dangers of the influenza virus, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options. Older adults and their caregivers can learn more on the Flu + You website, www.ncoa.org/Flu, which features a public service announcement with Lee Majors and facts about the flu. Also available on the website is a calendar of Flu + You events that will be held in 12 cities throughout the United States in September and October. At the events, older adults will have the opportunity to learn more about their risks for flu and available vaccine options, as well as talk to a health care provider and receive a flu vaccination.

About NCOA
The National Council on Aging is a nonprofit service and advocacy organization headquartered in Washington, DC. NCOA is a national voice for millions of older adults—especially those who are vulnerable and disadvantaged—and the community organizations that serve them. It brings together nonprofit organizations, businesses, and government to develop creative solutions that improve the lives of all older adults. NCOA works with thousands of organizations across the country to help seniors find jobs and benefits, improve their health, live independently, and remain active in their communities. For more information, please visit:

www.NCOA.org | www.facebook.com/NCOAging | www.twitter.com/NCOAging

 

CONTACT: Dana Kinker, (212) 301-7181, dkinker@wcgworld.com

5 Tips for Healthy Aging of the Eyes

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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5 Tips for Healthy Aging of the Eyes

September is Healthy Aging Month, making it an ideal time to shed some light on an important issue that impacts millions as we age – our eyesight. With around 1.75 million people in the country having age-related macular degeneration, according to the National Institutes of Health, and another 2.2 million suffering from glaucoma, vision is a crucial issue as we age. The good news is that there are things you can do in order to help your eyes age healthily.

“Healthy eyesight is one of those things that people don’t pay much attention to until there is a problem,” explains Dr. Edward Kondrot, founder of the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center. “Ideally, it’s best to take measures to avoid those problems. Many of the problems people have with their vision as they age can be avoided, and even reversed.”

Regardless of one’s age, it is never too early or too late to do things to maintain healthy eyes. Here are 5 tips for doing just that:

  1. Be proactive. Those who do nothing to protect their vision may find they have problems as they age. Just like being proactive to have a healthy heart or mind, it is important to make healthy vision a priority. This means purposely including healthy vision measures in your lifestyle.
  2. Eat healthy foods. Diet plays an important role in maintaining one’s vision. It is important to eat plenty of antioxidant-loaded fruits and vegetables. They are nutritional powerhouses that will help to protect the eyes. Also, it is crucial to opt for organic foods, so that your body does not take in all the harmful chemicals. Those chemicals provide a toxic overload, which impacts the eyes, as well as the rest of the body.
  3. Stay hydrated. Many people who have eye problems are also dehydrated. Staying hydrated is essential to maintaining good eye health. Start each morning with a full glass of room-temperature water. Drinking things like tea and coffee do not count. Add a little lemon if you prefer, which will also help to flush toxins.
  4. Watch the shades. Millions of people have taken to wearing sunglasses, but may not be choosing ones that actually protect their eyes. Worse yet, they may choose some that actually weaken them. Dark sunglasses are not necessarily a good choice, as many may believe. When selecting sunglasses be sure to opt for those that block ultraviolet A and B light to really offer your eye protection.
  5. Reduce eye stress. People stress their eyes in ways that they are not even aware of, such as sleeping in a room that has a night light, or light coming from an alarm clock or another room. Another way people stress their eyes is to watch television in a dark room. Both of these things can provide unnecessary stress that can cause damage over time.

“Healthy aging of the eyes can be done and is being done by millions,” adds Dr. Kondrot. “It comes down to being aware of what will help and harm the eyes and then taking measures to do what will benefit them in the long run.”

Dr. Kondrot is the author of three best-selling books, including “10 Essentials to Save Your Sight” (Advantage Media Group, July 2012), and president of the Arizona Homeopathic and Integrative Medical Association. He has founded the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center, located just north of Tampa, Fla., which offers alternative and homeopathic routes to vision therapies known as the “Kondrot Program.” The program focuses on such conditions as macular degeneration, glaucoma, dry eye, cataracts, and others. His advanced programs have helped people from around the world restore their vision. The center sits on 50 acres of land and features a 14,000-square-foot state-of-the art complex, an organic ranch, jogging trails, swimming pool, hot tub, and more. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

About Health The Eye & Wellness Center

The Healing The Eye & Wellness Center is located 30 miles north of Tampa, in Dade City, Fla. Founded by Dr. Edward Kondrot, the Center offers world-class alternative therapies for vision conditions, including color and vision therapy, the treatment of glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration, dry eye, and more. The center also offers a variety of seminars, webinars, and training sessions for others in the medical community. Dr. Kondrot is the world’s only board-certified ophthalmologist and board-certified homeopathic physician. He is also author of three best-selling books in the field. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

How Senior Citizens Can Stay In Shape by Mark Warrington

August 21, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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As we grow older, our bodies undergo many changes. And not all of those changes are good ones. Our bones go weak, our muscles sag and our strength walks out on us. It’s something that we cannot avoid but there is a way to slow down the aging process and that is with exercise. Almost 85 percent of senior citizens fail to exercise regularly even though they know the importance of it. And the reason for that is almost the same as the one younger people have. That being exercise is too tiring, too hard or it takes too long for the results to show. It’s also a problem for older people being at the gym because of the younger people around them. And honestly, we all have our insecurities and when we’re older, being around a lot of younger people doesn’t help out. So, if you’re part of this age group and you want to stay fit, you can start working out at home instead.

The first thing older people need to consider is what exercises they should do. The number one exercise for seniors are cardio exercises. Cardio exercises can help keep the heart healthy. Walking, swimming and bike riding are the recommended exercises for seniors. If you don’t have a pool at home, 2 out of 3 isn’t bad. You can get a treadmill and a stationary bike to get the exercise you need. The next best exercise is strength training with the help of some dumbbells. As we grow older, our muscles grow weaker and they actually shrink. Doing strength exercises can help with preventing this because muscles that are frequently used decline slower. It is critical that before you do any of these exercises that consult your doctor so they could give you a recommendation.

If you’re ready to start working out at home, the next thing to do is to get the equipment you need. Before you get them though, you have to look out for some things. Since seniors are not as strong, the equipment needs to have soft steps or cushions for some equipments such as a treadmill. For dumbbells, you can get those that are made of rubber so it would be safer in case it’s dropped.

Before you start, make sure that you have someone to workout with, if necessary. This person not only ensures that you’re safe, they can also encourage you. It’s just like being in the gym with a trainer except you don’t have to deal with that many people and with that noise which irritates some older people easily making their exercises more uncomfortable. Don’t forget to do some stretching as well as this helps with your flexibility which is also important to keep your joints healthy.

Exercise is good for everyone, young or old. We just have to remember that old saying, no pain, no gain. Go ahead and make a fresh start tomorrow. Don’t be aged, be ageless.

Over at the FitnessArmory.com, you can let our expert advice on fitness and equipment reviews help you create the perfect home gym but without all the huge costs. We have the exclusive reviews on all your favorite brands and models to help you get in shape, get healthy and look great. Recent product reviews include: HealthRider H90THealthRider H95E. We invite you to stop by or drop us a line if you have any questions or need help with your fitness equipment selections.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mark_Warrington

Fullfilling Your Dreams, As a Senior Citizen by Eva Fry

August 12, 2013 by · Comments Off on Fullfilling Your Dreams, As a Senior Citizen by Eva Fry
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Today there are 30 million seniors. In 2030 there will be 70 million. The senior years can be an opportunity to fulfill dreams. Think of how happy those 70 million seniors will be if they believe they still have time to live their dreams. Think of how much happier and better our world will be when it is filled with people who are productive, doing good and living fulfilled lives, in their latter-years.

When we were young, we each had dreams of what we wanted to do with our life. Unfortunately many of us have never realized those dreams.

Why? We may have had parents who didn’t provide the opportunities we needed, when we were young. We may have married young, had children and the responsibilities of life took over. Before we knew, it we were seniors and believed we were too old to live our dreams.

I’m happy to report I am not one of those who live with regret or wish they had done more with their lives. Today, I am 67 years old and I am living my dreams.

I had three dreams when I was a young girl. My first, to be married, have children, and be a good mother with a happy family. My second, to be an entertainer and my third dream was to be a missionary.

Thankfully I have accomplished all three of my dreams and I’m starting on new ones.

My husband and I have been married for 48 years. We have three wonderful grown children and nine grandchildren. Why was this dream so important to me? My father was alcoholic and my mother emotionally ill. My childhood was sad and troubled. I desperately wanted a happy family like some of my friends. I was blessed to have that dream come true because I worked hard to make it come true.

Through the years, I never forgot my dreams to become an entertainer and a missionary. I just put them on hold. These dreams took a long time coming, but today my dreams have come true.

How have I accomplished my long-awaited dreams, in my senior years?

Change is the answer! Life doesn’t always stay the same. One door to our life may close but a new door always opens and we must be ready for it. When my children grew up and started their own lives, it left me in an empty nest. I was smart enough to use it as a launching pad to direct me toward my life-long dreams. I now had time to pursue them.

It began with me going back to college and taking a speech class. I took it to overcome my shyness and to learn to be more outgoing to I would have a chance at being an entertainer. You must know that I had no musical training and could not play an instrument so I had big dreams.

The class was a big step toward my dreams. I discovered I was a pretty good speaker and was asked to be on the college speech team. I traveled all over the USA competing with my speeches with intelligent teenagers. It was so much fun and I won a national speaking award. I joined Toastmasters and became president of my club. I took a stand-up comedy class. For many years I spoke for Mother’s Against Drunk Driving, because I had been a victim of a drunk driver when I was a teenager. These all helped me gain confidence in myself and encouraged me to see what I could do as an entertainer.

I began to learn words to old songs and entered a talent contest for the city of San Diego and won another award. For several years now, I have been the master of ceremonies for the same talent show and for their variety show at the San Diego Fair.

At the age of 60 I began entertaining at senior residences and to learn to play the piano and guitar. I began to write my own music. I have produced 60 songs and had my music played on 150 radio stations. For several years now I have entertained with my own show using my own music at many functions.

I feel I have actually accomplished my second dream to become an entertainer. I wrote a book to encourage others to do the same called “You Must Have a Dream.”

Accomplishing my third dream, to become a missionary, has been a wonderful blessing to me. Because I spoke for MADD, I was asked to speak at Juvenile Hall in San Diego. Because of my involvement with incarcerated kids, I began my own program called “Be a Winner in Life.’ which I presented for ten years to over 10,000 young people. From this I wrote two books to help the kids “Be a Winner in Life” and “Letters From Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids.”
This work has helped me be a missionary to these children teaching them true values and principals of life. My books help me share the message of The Gospel of Jesus Christ and the joy that it brings.

I am a senior citizen now and very thankful to God that I was able to fulfill the dreams of my heart.

We can all live to be 100 years old. How will your life turn out? I hope that when your life is over you will have no regrets and you will never have to say “I wish”, “if only”, but rather you will say, ” I fully lived my life and I have no regrets. I loved my life because I lived my dreams! This is how I feel about my life. I am so thankful. The Lord has truly blessed me. I pray He will bless you too.

My books can be purchased at http://www.evafry.com . I hope they will encourage you to live your dreams.

Eva Fry’s mission is to help others become better and happier. She is an inspirational author, singer/songwriter/ motivational speaker and seminar leader. Eva has published three books – “YOU MUST HAVE A DREAM” -for seniors, “BE A WINNER IN LIFE”-for good kids, troubled kids and their parents. “LETTERS FROM JUVENILE HALL, KIDS HELPING KIDS” (Actual letters from kids at Juvenile Hall, intended to save other kids from destroying their lives) She invites you to use the FREE ARTICLES she has written for: at- risk kids Also FREE ARTICLES of inspiration to help meet life’s challenges. http://www.evafry.com She has produced 7 Music CD’s

“Remember” (new music for seniors), “Oh What Joy Christmas” “The Little Things” (inspirational country), “I Love Living The Teachings of The Lord” (Gospel/Christian) “Savior of Mine” – (Christian) “God Gave You Intelligence” (for children)

“Classical Style” (instrumental)

Her music and books can be purchased at http://www.evafry.com Her books can also be ordered at any bookstore. Her articles have been published, all over the world.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eva_Fry

A Senior Citizen In Juvenile Hall by Eva Fry

August 9, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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It was my first time speaking at Juvenile Hall, I was terrified! I had seen enough movies to know I didn’t want to be there. As I hurried through the metal detectors, and pushed through the big metal doors, my heart was pounding and I was filled with fear. I wondered if I would get out of this place alive.

I passed the holding tanks, rooms with big windows containing kids who had just been arrested. In there were kids pacing, fighting addictions, fearfully waiting to be assigned to a unit. Some kids were right at home. They knew this place! They had been there before.

When I stepped into the inner sanctum I heard sounds that confirmed my fears. Angry kids were screaming, using profane language. I heard loud pounding on the doors, which dotted the narrow hallways. Juvenile inmates were communicating through the thick cement walls. As I scurried along, I saw empty eyes piercing out at me through the small, eye level windows of their rooms. I passed through more metal doors and hallways, until I came to the unit I was to speak in. Inside sat fifty young men, of all nationalities. I knew from their varying hair color. Their backs were toward me. They were juveniles from the age of 15 to 17.

As I slowly walked to the front of the room, I made sure there was a guard on either side, in case one of them grabbed me. I took a deep breath and turned toward them. My heart stopped! I was shocked! They were just kids! I expected them to look like criminals, but they looked like they could be one of my nine grandkids.

Although some did appear tough, and others rough, there was something about them that touched me. At that moment, my life changed! A still small voice inside me said, “you must try to help them!”

Thus began my continuing, nine-year mission, to help kids who are in trouble with the law. These are my kids. “The Forgotten Kid.” The children we think we can lock up, throw away the key, and forget. The ones who learned most of the bad things they have done, from us, the older generation. They are kids, paying the price for the sins of society. Our scapegoats

There are up to 600 kids locked up, in this facility, at any time. The Hall houses kids from the age of 10 to 18, although I saw a nine-year and ten-year-old carrying blankets and pillows. Were they going camping?
No! They were headed to their rooms, to be locked up, for armed robbery.

BE A WINNER IN LIFE IS MY PROGRAM. I help the kids believe they can still be WINNERS. I teach them they have potential to do amazing things with their life. In fact, I believe God sent them to this earth to do good with their lives. I tell them each one is a genius, in their own way, and can do something better than anyone else can do. They must find their genius. They must go to school, obey the law, obey their parents, be honest and work hard. My goal is to share with them the same truths I taught my kids: the basic truths of right and wrong.

I hope to support the parents who are good parents, but their kids got on the wrong track. I try to teach the ones with bad parents, or no parents, values they were never taught: basic principals of good and bad.

How did I start speaking at Juvenile Hall? It began a long time ago, when I was a little girl, the daughter of an alcoholic father who emotionally damaged my mother and us kids. I grew up in circumstances similar to some of these young wards.

I speak to them because I would have loved to have had someone, who cared, talk to me when I was young.

Some of these kids, like me, are the off spring of parents who didn’t care how their actions affected their kids. We were from homes full of contention caused by parents with addictions. Sick parents who were unable to control their own lives, let alone parent a child. So-called parents, who lived in their own hell and created havoc in the lives of their children. Parents who abandoned their kids.

When I talk to the kids, I relate to the ones who hope to fix their parents, and those who must care for their siblings. I relate because I remember pouring my Dad’s alcohol down the drain, thinking it would fix our problems but instead, I got myself into lots of trouble. I remember taking money from my Dad’s pocket, after he passed out, to give to my Mom. Money for food.

I remember the day I realized that whatever I did at home would change nothing. I would never have the loving family I longed for. Like many of these kids, I turned to friends for the family I needed. Like them, they were usually the wrong kids of friends, peers who were doing bad things. I remember drinking alcohol, even though I hated it, so I could fit in.

I hear my same story, over and over again, at Juvenile Hall.

To help them I share a profound truth, which I discovered in my young life. “Bad things happen for a reason!”

My bad thing: after a wasted life, at the age of 57, my Dad died an alcoholic. His drink of choice was 100% over proof rum. The good thing: My Dad’s death led to me realize I didn’t want to end up like him, or give my kids the life he gave me. I eventually made a commitment to stop drinking and change my life. Thankfully I was young and not an alcoholic, like my Father and Grandfather.

My commitment worked! I share with them how wonderfully my life has turned out, because of one small choice. I used my Dad’s mistakes to choose a better life for myself. I now have the life I dreamed about. My husband and I have been happily married for 45 years and with our children and grandchildren, are a close knit, happy, non-drinking family.

I tell them, “you can turn the bad things which have happened in your life into motivation for a better life too.” I help them believe they still have time to change.

Another reason I speak at Juvenile Hall is because I was a victim of a drunk driver. At the age of 17, the car I was riding in was hit head-on by a drunk driver. My head went through the windshield. My nose and part of my ear was torn off. Thankfully doctors put me back together, but I came to realize the terrible carnage alcohol could cause. I’ve had a mission all my life to teach the evils of alcohol use. I was a speaker for Mother’s Against Drunk Driving for several years. In fact, they were the ones who first sent me to speak at Juvenile Hall.

I teach the kids to abstain from alcohol and drugs. I have commitment cards, which I encourage them to sign and honor. I know if I can help them make a commitment not to drink alcohol, or use drugs; they will have a better chance at changing their lives and reaching their potential. They don’t need alcohol or drugs in their life. Most of the kids are locked up because of their first drink of alcohol, which lead to drug use and criminal behavior.

One of the questions people always ask me is “what is it like to talk to young criminals? Do they listen to you?”

My answer is, “at first it took a little time to know what to say and how to say it, so they would accept me. It took me time to overcome my fear of knowing how to communicate with them and have them accept me.”

One night, one of them asked, “why do you come to Juvenile Hall?” I answered, “why do you think?” His response, “for the money!” I replied, “no one pays me, in fact the first time I spoke, someone stole the hub caps from my car.” His mouth fell open and then he really listened to my program.

I’m happy to say I do very well with them! The kids are very attentive. They know I care. I don’t judge them. In most cases, I don’t know what their crime is. I don’t want to know. I tell them that what they have done is wrong and they must pay the price. On the other hand, I hope to stop them from getting deeper into crime. If I can stop them from hurting someone in the future, I feel my time is worthwhile.

I know I won’t get through to all of them, but I hope to plant seeds, which may take root someday when they have choices to make. My dream is to save as many as I can.

It is very gratifying when I feel I have gotten through to them and when they thank me. One boy said. “You told me bad things happen for a reason. Your right!” I never would have gotten an education if I hadn’t come to Juvenile Hall. I just got my GED. I applied to a college and was accepted. I will be going to school to be come an engineer when I get out.”

I am happy when I feel I have helped them look at life in a more positive way.

I try to help them turn their mistakes and bad experiences into something good. My greatest success is that I encourage the kids at Juvenile Hall to write letters to save other kids from the consequences they are experiencing. They have written incredible letters. Their letters have great impact on other kids because they come from their peers. My latest book “Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids contain the letters.

Here are inserts from some of the letters:

Addiction controlled my life. Don’t let it control you! I wish for all you guys to be safe, and I pray for you kids that don’t know what life is really about, because after that second when you make the bad decision, it goes down hill from there. Only you can change your future. I hope you all understand that there’s a number in prison with your name on it, if you don’t change. Now’s the time to change. Not later. Not when you get out, but now! If you don’t change now you never will.

Gang banging was my worst thing I ever gotten into. If I could take it back, I would. I repeated my Dad’s cycle.

Now I sit here in a one-room cell, facing 25 years to life. I want you to look around and see what kind of situation you’re in. Open you eyes and your minds and soak as much education as you can. I’m 17 years old in a couple of weeks. I will be graduating from high school (in Juvenile Hall). Education is the key to life.

I’m in the Hall, Unit 800. Why? Because I committed a sin while I was on drugs. At the age of 13, I started using drugs because my best friend was asking me to try some. At the age of 16, my charges are DUI, evading a peace officer, driving at an unsafe speed with no license, a firearm in the car and 187 murder.

All the violence that is going on in our community is not solving nothing. The only thing it’s doing is killing us off, one by one. Before you know it the human race will be extinct. Because we are the last of the dying breed. I’m only telling you this so you guys can make the right decision. Your homies probably say they are down for you, but they be faking, and that’s real. The only people that’s going to stick by you is your mama and your family. I seen too much in my life young homies and it’s not what you are thinking. I lost my little homie and that really hit me. All that was on my mind was retaliation but when I thought about it, I knew it wouldn’t bring him back so I thought of another game plan. I prayed!

Eva, I want to thank you for all the help that you have given me. All the little words you’ve spoken in your groups have helped me so much along the way. I have changed in ways that people wouldn’t believe. I have done a whole 360. Without the help of you, I see the change being 100% more difficult. I wish my family was around to see my new life.

As you can see, my experience with my kids, at Juvenile Hall, has been emotionally rewarding and very satisfying to me. These kids give my life meaning. I feel I am making a difference.

I continue to try to help kids. I have written a book called “BE A WINNER IN LIFE”, which I hope to get into the hands of every child in Juvenile Hall’s, all over the country. Also, I want to get it into the hands of parents. I hope to get to kids before they are locked up.

Yes I’m a grateful to be a senior citizen at Juvenile Hall! I’m grateful my senior years have value and that I am doing something with my time, which is worthwhile.

I now know that every senior citizen can use the wisdom they have gained throughout their life to make a difference. We can all do something. I encourage you to find a way to help a child. Our kids need you!

Eva Fry is an author, singer/songwriter and motivational speaker. She had a ten year volunteer program at Juvenile Hall called “Be a Winner in Life” She has three books “You Must Have a Dream” for seniors, “Be a Winner in Life” for kids, troubled kids and their parents, and Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids” – for all kinds, especially those who are locked up and to help kids from being locked up. She started writing and songwriting at the age of 60. Her goal is to encourage seniors to reach their potential and help kids do the same. She has many free articles on her web site to help young and old. She has six CD’s which are spiritually based and inspire young and old. She is avilable as a speaker or performer. Her work is available on her web site Eva Fry – eva@evafry.com http://www.evafry.com ( She has many free articles on her web site)

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eva_Fry

An Enjoyable Disney World Adventure For Senior Citizens by Herb Leibacher

August 6, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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You have finally decided to go to Disney World. The difference between you and many of the others who decide to go is that you have been waiting to travel here for most of your life. But, now that you are able to go, you wonder if it is too late. Disney World is a kids place so will there really be enough for you to do as a Senior Citizen? Do not worry and do not hesitate to pack your bags because not only will you have a blast while there, you will leave feeling like a kid again!

Attractions and Shows

Disney World is known for its magic and their shows and attractions are no exception. You could literally fill up each of your days at Disney World by just attending the shows. While they do have traditional dinner and short shows you can enjoy, Disney World goes above and beyond with several of their longer shows such as the Hall of Presidents and Walt Disney’s Carousel of Progress at the Magic Kingdom. Disney’s Hollywood Studios also has two great attractions that you will easily enjoy. Both The Great Movie and Walt Disney: One Man’s Dream offer wonderful historical perspectives of both Walt Disney and movies. Another great place to find attractions you will enjoy will be the Animal Kingdom where you can visit a petting zoo, travel nature trails, and observe animals while learning about their care.

Rides

Trying to decide the kind of ride you will be able to experience may be a little worrisome as well but rest assured there are plenty of rides that are fun for everyone. Many of Disney’s rides are developed so they are safe for people of all ages. In the Magic Kingdom, take the gentle It’s a Small World boat ride to learn about the various cultures, visit the jungle on the Jungle Cruise, fly through Neverland on the magical Peter Pan’s Flight, explore the unknown of outer space on the Astro Orbiter, or discover the sea with your mates on the Pirates of the Caribbean. After that, head over to Epcot to explore the world of energy on Ellen’s Energy Adventure before experiencing the evolution of communication on the slow riding Spaceship Earth. Finally, let your adventurer out to observe animals on the Kilimanjaro Safari at the Animal Kingdom.

Resorts

You have many options for places to stay during your visit to Disney World. All resorts offer rooms with showers wide enough to roll a wheelchair into and that have tub handrails. Additionally, all resorts have handicap accommodated rooms. Just make sure you do ask questions about any specific need you may have when you book the reservation.

Additional Activities

While you are at Disney World, make sure you take the time to see as many of the shows and street events as possible. Not only are these fantastic shows, but they will give you a great opportunity to rest during the day as well. Each park offers a variety of shows during the day and do not forget the night shows with fantastic light and firework displays.

Disney World may seem to be a place for young kids, but really it is a place for the young at heart. Do not let this misconception be a reason you do not go. There is plenty to do and experience as a senior citizen, so book your vacation, pack your bags, and let the adventure begin.

Herb likes to write about Disney World. Please check out his website that contains Disney World Vacation information as well as Disney Fantasmic information.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Herb_Leibacher

THE BOULEVARD MALL HOSTS HEALTH AND FITNESS FAIR

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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THE BOULEVARD MALL HOSTS HEALTH AND FITNESS FAIR

Nearly 25 local vendors to provide free services and information on Saturday, June 29

 

WHAT:            The Boulevard Mall, in partnership with Las Vegas Review Journal, El Tiempo, Mundo Fox TV, La Buena and ESPN Deportes hosts a Boulevard Mall Health and Fitness Fair on Saturday, June 29 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event is planned to occur annually to provide the public with convenient access to a variety of health and wellness resources in the community.

The Fair includes a variety of free services and information, such as health screenings and workshops.  Participating vendors include; American Heart & Stroke Association, American Lung Association in Nevada, Behavioral Bilingual Services, CareMore Medicare Advantage Program, First Person Care Clinics, Health and Wellness, Helping Kids Clinic, Kopolow & Girisgen, Doctors of Optometry, Nathan Adelson Hospice, Nevada Donor Network Inc., Nevada Health Centers, Nevada State Immunization Program – NVWeblz, Planned Parenthood of Southern Nevada, Vitamin World, State of Nevada Office for Consumer Health Assistance, Sunrise Children Foundation WIC, Three Square and US Senator Harry Reid.

For additional information and a complete list of all participating organizations, please contact The Boulevard Mall Management office at 702-735-7430 or visit boulevardmall.com.

WHEN:           Saturday, June 29, 2013

                        11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

                       

WHERE:        The Boulevard Mall

                        East Event Area

3680 S. Maryland Parkway

Las Vegas, NV 89169

 

About The Boulevard Mall:

The Boulevard Mall is a super-regional shopping center strategically located in the heart of Las Vegas just two miles from the Las Vegas Strip. The Boulevard is located on Maryland Parkway, a six-lane thoroughfare with easy mall accessibility from all directions. Some of its notable retailers include JCPenney, Macy’s, Sears, Charlotte Russe, Old Navy, Cotton On and Victoria’s Secret. For additional information, please visit www.boulevardmall.com.

Vegas Ranked 7th Most Generous City, According to Dating-Auction Survey

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Vegas Ranked 7th Most Generous City, According to Dating-Auction Survey

A survey conducted by WhatsYourPrice.com ranked the most generous cities in America according to average first-date offer. While the average accepted first-date price is $80 on the site, Las Vegas is home to some of this year’s most generous daters. The average cost for their shot at love? $174.
Las Vegas, NV – June 26, 2013
WhatsYourPrice.com released its annual list of “Most Generous Cities in America,” ranking the nation’s cities based on the generosity of their single men. Indianapolis is this year’s “Most Generous City,” with the average man valuing a first-date offer at $226.
The dating-auction site, which boasts over 650,000 members, calculated generosity according to the average price of all accepted first-date offers made by members since June 2012. Offers that were declined were not included in the calculations.

Here is a ranking of the year’s most generous cities in the US:

Top 15 Most Generous Cities in America (According to Average Accepted First-Date Price)

1.) Indianapolis, IN – $226
2.) Miami, FL – $207
3.) Philadelphia, PA – $199
4.) Charlotte, NC – $192
5.) Oklahoma City, OK – $183
6.) San Francisco, CA – $177
7.) Las Vegas, NV – $174
8.) San Antonio, TX – $163
9.) Raleigh, NC – $159
10.) Dallas, TX – $151
11.) Boston, MA – $148
12.) Baltimore, MD – $140
13.) New York, NY – $134
14.) Denver, CO – $132
15.) Seattle, WA – $127

“The most generous cities are home to the most sincere daters,” says Brandon Wade, Founder and CEO of WhatsYourPrice.com “The more a man invests in a first date, the more likely he will not take the opportunity for granted.”

When Wade first launched the website in 2011, his goal was to create a more active and open-minded dating community than can be found on a traditional dating site. According to Wade, by incentivizing the opportunities to date, members are encouraged to date more often, and to take more chances.

“When you put your money where your heart is, there is absolutely nothing to lose and everything to gain,” says Wade. “Men in these major cities realize that if there is chemistry, then the generosity paid off. If not, then at least she did not leave empty-handed.”

For information regarding this study, or to schedule an interview with WhatsYourPrice.com, please contact Leroy Velasquez at (702) 635-2440 or Press(at)WhatsYourPrice(dot)com.

About WhatsYourPrice.com

WhatsYourPrice.com is the only online dating website where first dates are bought and sold, and has been featured on such outlets as the New York Times, CNN, Anderson and the Huffington Post. WhatsYourPrice.com was founded by Brandon Wade, Founder & CEO of a number of successful niche online dating websites in April 2010. The website has over 650,000 members worldwide, 74% of which are located within the United States.

Thoughtful Gift Ideas for Senior Citizens by Natalie Aranda

May 31, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Kids are easily pleased by almost any gifts as the whole world is new to them. Senior citizens may have experienced and owned everything they wanted in their life. That’s what makes a challenge when it comes to choose gifts for your grandmothers or grandfathers.

No matter what time of year it is, personalized yet unique gifts will sure impress them if you listen to they say and look at what they do. Far too often people tend to buy senior citizens items that they’d never want. Consequently, you should first make a list of what type of hobbies they like. Do they enjoy golfing or spending time playing games with their friends? If this is the case, you could purchase a unique game for their Christmas gift. Researching vintage entertainment or new board games on EBay would be a different approach. This way you could give them something one of a kind. Christmas gift ideas may be tricky to come up with, but they should also incorporate how much you are thinking about them. Since you do want them to enjoy what you purchase, you could get them a gift certificate to a spa or a day at a romantic inn. These gifts are wonderful and inspiring items, regardless of what holiday it is. Chances are they will thank you for months, because the majority of gift givers do not think so deeply.

If you are having trouble coming up with birthday gift ideas, you should always remember to avoid joke presents! When we all get older, we cringe at the thought of age being mentioned. Although some senior citizens embrace who they are, some people would rather not make a big deal of their age. Therefore, you should avoid the birthday gift ideas that involve age jokes. You never know when you are going to offend someone. After all, the last thing you want to do is remind them of their life insurance settlements or the life settlement issues they may have to worry about.

If you are trying to find a better birthday idea, you should explore the idea of scrapbooks. By creating a book filled with photos, memories, and comments, it will bring your grandparents to tears. They embrace nostalgia and would love to have a keepsake that they can look through for years. As a result, these special birthday gift ideas are an extraordinary way to say you love them and are happy to be part of their lives.

Senior citizens may seem like they are impossible to buy for, but all they want are unique gifts like everyone else. No matter whom you are buying presents for, the gift ideas need to be out of the ordinary. Discouraged and don’t have a lot of money to spend? Even by taking time to create a memory book or photo album, it would bring a smile to their face. From birthday gift ideas to Christmas gift ideas, anything is possible as long as you put your heart into it. If you are looking for a quick fix and a simple present to buy, sadly you will be like everyone else.

Natalie Aranda writes on home and family [http://www.moonsome.net/Family-1/]. If you are having trouble coming up with birthday gift ideas, you should always remember to avoid joke presents! When we all get older, we cringe at the thought of age being mentioned. Although some senior citizens embrace who they are, some people would rather not make a big deal of their age. Therefore, you should avoid the birthday gift ideas that involve age jokes. You never know when you are going to offend someone. After all, the last thing you want to do is remind them of their life insurance settlements or the life settlement issues they may have to worry about.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Natalie_Aranda

Final Expense Life Insurance: Life Insurance Agent Lures Senior Citizen Inside A Decaying Casket by Donald Yerke

May 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

The sale of final expense life insurance opens up dormant prospects. Final expense life insurance representatives employ intense selling techniques  with a senior.

Looking confident but insecure, the sales agents feature dollar symbol  tattoos etched upon their chests. Typically enlarged eyes like low-cost red neon  glare as their looks show signs of being famished. In spite of this, these  indicated company agents resemble an assassin centering in on the newly  generated money target… a senior citizen.

Just about any older senior citizen has gained ample deep-rooted ability by  encounters with nonstop sellers. Stricken by a sales figure quota, the sales  agent keeps trying to hack continuously for sales closings. Stabilizing in for  improved position gets him shifting backward, bordering on dropping back just  like a gunshot hare.

The sales agent gives his best presentation. All the same, in all certainty  this is absolutely not a quick game, yet this still is an important matter of  life and death..By this time many newer career agents get raindrops of anxiety  arising swifter than the countless stars in the sky.

The retired weakened senior catches his breath and then takes an object out  of his new sweater zippered pocket. Out from an undersized vial of  prescriptions, he removes a singular one, more shrunken than an upsetting bug.  Without water to drink, the speck of the potent nitrate is centered then below  his tongue.

Wonder overwhelms the representative, now aware that this is absolutely  without doubt no chunk of sweet stuff. Making a response, the senior citizen  starts commenting in a gentle scratchy vocal tone. He replies it was a nitrate  pill as previously he had sustained a congestive heart stoppage. Flowing words & phrases bring figures of a full-length account of health circumstances.  Then a smile glows, as a gesture to the agent to dismiss the final expense life  insurance.

No doubt he had completely been outdone. How could this retiree still be  persuaded even if he rips the paperwork form from the agent’s possession?   His  plans of a high demanding canned sales recital turns to a grinding halt. The  newer agent is mum. And then finally he knows that letting a client feel being  in a burial place is absolutely cold.

On this occasion with the mild light wind, the conversation adjusts to one of  interactive mutual interest. The topic is fishing.. This improved topic  activates passion, even if at points the vastness of trophy fish landed most  certainly appeared to be expanded.

This newer agent notices how swiftly the chitchat among the two flows back & forth. Maybe securing the respect of the potential purchaser to approve of  you is much more gainful than fighting disputes? Perhaps confidence evolves into  being as potent as facts and results?

Closely after comes a move surprising the agent, similar to a creepy  cockroach unveiled to a spotlight. The older senior citizen pulls from inside  his wallet a picture of his individual grandchild. Next gently nudging the sales  agent he asks, “Will you tell me of the final expense life  insurance?”

The company agent holds to  his very greedy wants only,. Not at any time does  he inform the senior that the final expense life insurance coverage will  absolutely be turned down. Still, much like a crafty rat in an infested attic,  he scurries finding the insurance application. The good man even asks for being  insured for the greatest amount. Not even finishing the all-important paperwork  form, the trustworthy big-bellied new buyer goes into a far end passageway.  Reappearing, his fist is skintight encircling a roll of cash.

Close to drooling, the agent needs this newest purchaser to merely sign the  policy application. Arriving at the office later, the agent knows the final  expense life insurance application is not truly guaranteed issue. Quickly he  makes an unusual decision. The sales agent, very low on funds, decides to  swindle the $700.00 and destroy the application form.

Two years later to the day, the senior has his bright light turn to final  darkness. After the burial and coupled with grief, the grandchild finds he does  not receive one dime.

Case shut… but not completely. That precise identical time, a young chronic  drunk rams through the metal barrier aside a hill. Someone with identity  comparable to the former agent’s likeness is at once being engulfed in glowing  flames. After his instant cremation, no life insurance coverage is ever  located.

Final Expense Life Insurance was written by professional insurance business  writer, Donald Yerke. His writings will likely be launched right here, and  published in many locations. Find important material at Agents Insurance  Marketing, [http://www.agentsinsurancemarketing.com] right now. During the time  there steal your complimentary personal copy of “The Science of Getting Rich,”  as long as supplies last.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Donald_Yerke

Senior Citizen Moving Tips For the Elderly by Nancy Davies

May 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Most of the families have to move once or twice in their life and many people  experience their first move when they are senior citizen. Maybe they are living  alone in a huge house and need to move to a small condo or apartment that will  be easier to maintain and also easier on their health. Maybe they are moving in  with their grown up children after the partner has passed away, or due to an  unexpected illness. The reasons can be quite varied, but it is a fact that  people, even as senior citizen, are moving regularly across cities and  states.

So here are a few senior citizen moving tips that you should know in case you  come across such a situation – or you might have to move as well.

  • Take the time to adjust to the change. Living for many years in the same  house means that any move can be a big shock and news to digest. People get  attached to their homes where they’ve been living their entire lives, or  spending their life with their partners. Nobody moves to another place with an  easy heart and this is even more relevant for elderly. Take time off and learn  first to adjust to the idea before you take the big step ahead in your  life.
  • If your parents are moving, even if they are quite old, don’t forget to  involve them in the moving process. No person likes to be left outside of  things, particularly if it involves them directly. And elderly are a bit more  helpless than others, but that doesn’t mean they have to like it. They still  feel and think just like the rest of us, even if their bodies don’t cooperate  the way they would like to.
  • Plan and research ahead so you know how much the senior citizen will have to  pay for the move. It is known that they are usually on a fixed income which is  not all that big, so planning ahead and finding the best deal (without  sacrificing quality) is well worth it for them. Some companies have actually  discounts and offers when elderly are involved, so it might pay off to shop a  bit around before settling for the next moving company. People don’t like to be  out of control so they need to know at all times all the steps of the way, so  don’t forget to involve them even when you are searching for companies. And if  you have to go to rentals offices to discuss deals, the senior citizen will be  grateful if they can tag along and feel that they are fully involved in the  entire process.

Using truck  rentals for moving is a necessity when moving seniors to another location,  but finding good quality yet inexpensive pick up ruck rentals is well worth the initial search locally  or on the net.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Nancy_Davies

Advocacy for Senior Citizens: Getting Your Loved One the Best Care Available by Matthew G Young

May 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

A senior care consultant can play a very helpful role in your loved one’s  care. There is no set requirement for the professional background of a senior  care consultant; they can be nurses, doctors, or even experienced caregivers.  The main thing that this profession needs is a good idea of all the options  available to a senior citizen in need. Senior care consultants are advisers to  families with a loved one that needs help. They handle all sorts of issues that  might arise. In short, a senior care consultant is a catch-all position for  keeping senior citizens happy and healthy.

Consultants don’t help just senior citizens. They are there for the support  of families and caregivers as well. A senior care consultant, then, needs to be  very well versed in the issues that affect all of these folks. Families often  have many needs, some of which they might not even know about. A consultant can  help you address any problems that might occur, even the ones that you are not  anticipating.

Why should you go with a senior care consultant? There are many reasons, but  the most important of these is that they will act as an advocate for your loved  one and your family. These people have your best interests in heart, and they  will find the very best options for your family. Rather than settling for any  old service, you will have the very best options arranged easily for you and  your family’s needs. As an advocate, the senior care consultant will make sure  that the care they receive is top notch. For example, if you cannot decide which  in home care provider to go with, the senior care consultant will have had  experience dealing with the providers in your area and will have a good idea of  which provider is best for your family’s situation. There are many good in home  care providers; a consultant can help you find not only a good one, but the best  one.

There are also other types of things that a senior care consultant can take  care of. Nutrition is another big area of concern. Having a proper diet is  crucial for maintaining proper health and weight. People tend to lose weight  when they get older because they are not getting the proper nutrients in their  diet. A consultant can have connections or the know how to provide the proper  amounts of nutrients to your loved one’s diet. Age related weight loss can  result in illness or weakened bones; this makes everything that is put into our  bodies extremely important. A good consultant will know exactly which foods and  vitamins will help your loved one out in the most effective manner.

Matthew G. Young is a freelance writer who specializes in financial, sports,  and health-related topics. To learn more about in home health care visit Paradise In Home  Care

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Matthew_G_Young

Health Insurance – Boon For Senior Citizens by Mike James Soni

May 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Water, Water everywhere but not a drop to drink! That was how Senior Citizens  felt some years ago when the Health Insurance companies were selective to cater  to them. With better medical conditions, people are able to live longer and  healthier. However, age does bring some health related issues that needs to be  taken care of.

There was a time when people after 50 years of age were generally not  considered Insurable or were considered high risk. So, if anyone wanted to get  health Insurance, the policy was either denied or was issued with various  exclusions on Pre-existing diseases.

With the emergence of various Insurance companies, the Insurance segment for  Senior citizens has also opened up. It is a boon for them to be able to plan and  take their health in their own hands. The Insurance companies have started  considering senior citizens as a potential market and address their need for a  Health Insurance product. Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority (IRDA)  has also taken various steps to boost the inclusion of senior citizens in the  health insurance sector.

There are some health insurers which cover the senior citizens with no cap on  the entry age, though IRDA’s directive is to keep at least 65 years as the  maximum entry age.

The Health Insurance segment is at nascent stage and hence arbitrary at  present/dichotomous in nature. Every individual has to undergo medical tests so  as to be considered for health insurance. The reimbursement for the medical  tests varies from insurer to insurer. Now, all insurers would reimburse 50% of  the cost of the tests if they issue a health policy to the customer. However,  there still are some companies in the market that cover a senior citizen without  medical tests up to a certain age and covers pre-existing ailments from first  year itself.

The Insurance companies would have to include all these clauses in the offer  document and explain to the customer what it means to them. With IRDA bringing  more transparency, consistency and accountability in the sector, the customers  would have more options to choose from and a better product to meet their  needs.

To know more about Health, Healthy living, Insurance, Health Insurance  products of Max Bupa “Heartbeat” please click the link below.

http://www.maxbupa.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mike_James_Soni

 

Cell Phones For Senior Citizens Help the Baby Boomers Generation Caring For Elderly Parents by Kaye Swain

April 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Are you in the hate-to-admit-to-aging Baby Boomers Generation caring for  elderly parents? Me, too! And, like me, I’ll bet you are also always on the look  out for creative ways to multiply your time, easily multi-task, and find helpful  tips to be able to get more accomplished with less time.

One thing that has helped my senor mom and myself is when she finally agreed  to try out one of the Jitterbug cell phones for senior citizens. These large and  simple cell phones for seniors are truly easier for them to use and even include  the option to just dial O for the Operator who will then make the phone calls  for our senior parents. She is actually quite proud of herself that she hasn’t  had to resort to that, but it’s nice to know that option is available.

Cell phones for some seniors who have never done much in the “technology age”  is a harder hurdle to overcome than most might think. It took me four years to  talk her into one of these. My mother-in-law, on the other hand, dove into the  tech world with glee. She taught herself to use a computer and uses a regular  cell phone just fine. She may someday switch to the Jitterbug, but for right now  she is quite content. My senior mom, though, wouldn’t change her Jitterbug for  anything and considers them the best cell phones for senior citizens!

I totally agree with her BECAUSE of the peace of mind it gives this Baby  Boomer along with the handiness it provides when I can easily call her where  ever she is and where ever I am. We especially love it when we’re out shopping.  Since she no longer drives, I can take her to her favorite Walmart. She can go  off and do her shopping while I go get mine, saving us both time. Or, if I don’t  need to shop, I head for the McDonald’s that’s in the Walmart. I can then sit  there and write to my heart’s content. With my notepad and my iPhone, I’m able  to be quite productive, knowing that if she needs me for anything, she can just  give me a call on her Jitterbug cell phone. Before, we either had to stay  together, or spend considerable time looking for each other all over the  store.

I would not give up my smart phone for anything. I call it my brain and I’m  not joking since it has so much valuable information stored in it. But I am so  grateful for the simplicity of the Jitterbug cell phones for senior citizens and  how much easier they’ve made my life as well as hers!

And, if you pop over to http://www.SandwichINK.com and read Caring for the  Elderly Parents in the Family: Why Cell Phones for Senior Citizens or Medical  Alert Devices are a Wise Investment, you’ll discover another  vital reason I really appreciate my mom’s agreeing to get a  Jitterbug cell phone for seniors!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kaye_Swain

 

The Critical Importance of Recreation For Senior Citizens by Robert McCluskey

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As our population ages, there is increasing emphasis on teaching and learning  lifelong recreational skills. Research has shown that recreation is an important  part of an individual’s social behavior. Recreation plays a critical role in the  lives of older adults by contributing to an improved quality of life. People who  participate in recreational activities as senior citizens report significantly  more life satisfaction than those who do not.

Physical recreation is especially important. Engaging in physical activity  reduces almost every risk of disease, including heart disease, high blood  pressure, colon cancer and diabetes. Participation in recreational activities  improves mental health, as well. Again, research shows that older individuals  who participate in recreational activities have better coping behaviors in  response to stressful life events and daily frustrations. They learn that social  support is important, and available, through these activities.

Unfortunately, we have come to view our older years as a time of diminishing  activity and social interaction. As a result of these expectations, aging folks  often assume they are incapable of recreational activity or that it will not be  available to them. They often cite scarce financial resources, lack of  transportation or declining health as reasons for avoiding these important  activities. Although there is some validity to these concerns, we often overlook  the increasing resources that are being dedicated to wellness among senior  citizens. Some of these resources are:

  • Travel programs. Fees are usually required, but deep discounts for seniors  are often available.
  • Volunteering. Seniors bring valuable experience, wisdom and compassion to  others
  • Elderhostel. A world-wide travel program bringing affordable adventure and  learning to seniors
  • Theme parks. Senior days! Special entry fees!
  • Entertainment and arts. Museum and theatre tours often provide discounts and  transportation to seniors
  • Local parks and recreation programs. Great outdoor activities
  • Community Gardening. Check with your local parks and recreation office
  • Senior citizen centers. Free or reduced price meals and more!
  • Book clubs. Reading and socialization are a potent therapeutic combination  for the brain

 

It is important for senior citizens and those who care for them to seek out  recreational activities even at this time when they may be reluctant to do so.  Research indicates that seniors who participate in these kinds of activities  tend to remain active once they begin.

Western cultures sometimes view their aging populations as economic and  social liabilities. In fact, when they are nurtured, they become assets.  Recreational activities can provide help and motivation that seniors require to  enable them to contribute their valuable time and wisdom in return for that  nurturance.

Robert A. McCluskey Bob McCluskey is a semi retired teacher and school  administrator. He has recently been teaching college-level psychology classes  and has developed a course in the psychology of aging. Bob teaches courses  specifically designed for senior citizens and is especially interested in the  mental health of aging, With an emphasis on the preservation and enhancement of  memory.

If you would like to learn more about this topic visit our web site: Senior Technology News! Going Strong Seniors is your premier source for Internet  resources!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Robert_McCluskey

 

Senior Citizens Health Conditions by Ian Pennington

April 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As we reach our later years we are at risk of a great many health concerns.  The list of senior citizens health conditions is a long and complex one. It  includes both mental and physical issues and some people will be plagued with both.

It can only be expected that, as time takes it toll on our bodies, we will  experience some deterioration in our physical and mental wellbeing. That is not  to say that once we have retired we are on the scrap heap and just waiting until  our lives are over. Far from it. There has been a huge amount of medical  research taking place over the last century, and indeed much longer, and this  has paved the way for a greater understanding of the aging process. We are now  much more educated regarding nutrition and health matters and are able to  control and sometimes eliminate many of the senior citizens health  conditions.

One of the main fears that the elderly face is that of dementia of one form  or another. The most commonly known is Alzheimer’s Disease but there are others.  This affects the patients mind and can be the cause of heartache for a caring  partner who will feel unable to help. They will find that they spend much of  their time caring for the patient whilst at the same time having to accept the  fact that they are becoming more distant as the disease progresses. This can be  aggravated if the carer is also suffering from any one of the other senior  citizens health conditions, either physically or mentally.

Other serious conditions can often include strokes. Post stroke problems can  vary hugely depending on the severity of the attack and the level of recovery of  the patient. Sometimes a stroke can result in partial paralysis. This obviously  has a far reaching affect on the elderly and may jeopardise their ability to get  out and visit family and friends. Even the most simple tasks, which were taken  for granted previously, may now cause a problem; shopping, housework etc.  Strokes are high on the list of senior citizens health conditions, but, they are  also the subject of a lot of research and our understanding of the subject is  increasing all the time. Post stroke care has improved a great deal and in some  cases patients now recover fully.

Heart disease has been an increasing problem in all age groups, but continues  to be a main factor in contributing to senior citizens health conditions. Once  again, however, research is good on the subject and our knowledge increasing all  the time. Surgical options are becoming more common and our expertise in the  field has contributed to many lives being extended.

There are a number of senior citizens health conditions which can be helped  by a careful diet being followed during our earlier years. Osteoporosis,  rheumatism and arthritis have all been the subject of studies and tests. Some  foods have been found to be a great help in reducing the chances of becoming a  sufferer.

Don’t wait until it is too late. There has been so much research undertaken  on the subject of senior citizens health conditions that you would be wise to  take action early and follow the advice that is available so that you can  increase your chances of enjoying your later years in the best possible  health.

Ian Pennington is an accomplished niche website developer and author.

To learn more about senior health  [http://seniorhealthblog.info/senior-citizens-health-conditions], please visit  Senior Health Blog [http://seniorhealthblog.info] for current articles and  discussions.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ian_Pennington

 

Exercise for Senior Citizens At 50 And Beyond by Renie M Rutten

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Even a small amount of increased physical activity can benefit your  functional health. This means getting in and out of your home to attend church,  going for a walk, and getting your own mail without the assistance of someone  else.

Benefits Of Regular Exercise For Senior Citizens

—–Improved Overall Health

—–Smaller Waistline

—–Lowered Risk of Bone Fracture Including Hips

—–Lower Risk of Lung, Breast and Color Cancers

—–Stabilized Blood Sugar Reducing Type II Diabetes

—–Better Balance and Bone Strength

Levels of Senior Citizen Exercise Workouts

There are three basic levels of activity to discuss when thinking about  exercise for Senior Citizens, the first is sedentary. This is where many  senior citizens fall unfortunately. This means you are getting little or no  regular physical exercise. Sedentary individuals take less the 10,000 steps a  day and their risk of falls, illness and disease are much greater than seniors  in the next group.

The second group of seniors we want to discuss are those who get  moderate physical activity each day. Moderate activity should be the goal  of most seniors to keep them healthy and independent. Brisk walking, dancing,  bicycling, swimming, dance and exercise DVD’s are excellent examples of exercise  that will raise the heart rate, but allow you to breath and talk normally.

The final level of activity for the more active seniors is vigorous  activity. This level means you heart rate has increased to the level that  you are not able to talk and exercise at the same time. Some examples might  include running, tennis, Zumba dance or other high intensity exercise.

Senior Exercise the Answer to Anti Aging

Aging and lack of physical activity are often associated with health issues  like: loss of balance causing falls, forms of arthritis causing stiffness and  pain, breathing problems and sleep apnea, stroke, heart disease and even some  cancers. These conditions are attributed to the limited activity and excess  weight from a decrease in your muscle tone and RMR from not getting enough  movement as we age.

How To Increase Your Physical Activity Level

Increasing your activity especially if you fall into the sedentary level of  seniors may seem like a daunting task. The good news is that is not necessarily  true. Starting an exercise program can be fun and easier to start than you might  think.

The most important issue is to find some activity you enjoy. Remember you  don’t need to spend a fortune on a home gym to reach your peak fitness level.  Some ideas that cost little or nothing are walking, dancing or water aerobics.  Start slowly and increase your time and intensity each week or so. As always  it’s a good idea to visit with your doctor, especially if you have health issues  already.

Incorporate friends and make it fun. You can help others reach their peak  fitness and improve their health as well.

Learn more about exercise for senior citizens and how it can improve your  health and save your life. More fitness information is available on my website  at http://www.yourweightlossanswers.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Renie_M_Rutten

 

Riding to Death: How Healthy Eating Can Improve the Health of Senior Citizens by Stan Onodu

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Are you a senior citizen? Medical science told us that there are ailments  associated with age. You’ll agree with me that it is virtually unheard of for  youngsters to complain of illnesses like osteoporosis, high blood pressure,  diabetes, heart disease, arthritis and certain cancers. But these are mostly the  health challenges of older adults. As a senior citizen, you need to know that  you can effectively manage these diseases through healthy eating. Let me show  you how.

Fluids. Naturally, you’ll observe, in most cases, that the skin and the  entire body frame of older adults shrink as they get older and older. This is as  a result of the fact that they tend to dehydrate so easily, which may not be  unconnected with their inability to feel thirsty most of the time. As a senior  citizen therefore, you should form the habit of constantly ingesting water and  fruit juices into your system.

Proteins. Proteins are body-building foods. They are also in the business of  repair and or replenishment of worn-out body cells and tissues. The healthy  proteins for senior citizens include eggs, lean meats, turkey or poultry and  fish. From these, minerals such as calcium, zinc and iron, greatly needed by the  elderly can be sourced.

Carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are energy-giving foods. It is a known secret  that senior citizens need a lot of energy derivable from this kind of foods in  order to sustain their ability to perform basic daily activities like dressing,  bathing, etc. Whole grains, cereals and their derivatives form excellent diets  for them. And more so, with some fibre content in the foods, these older folks  will be less exposed to constipation.

Fats. Only unsaturated fat foods, as in lean meats, fish, low-fat diary  products, avocados, nuts and seeds, should be taken by senior citizens. The  reason being that other fats contain HDL kind of cholesterol that can aggravate  blood pressures, thereby putting their heart conditions at very high risk.

Moderate Exercise. Man shall not leave by bread alone. Our senior citizens  need some bit of exercises – taking a walk, light gardening, riding bicycles,  etc – which can help them burn off calories thereby reducing weight; improving  heart and lung functions, and ultimately engender overall feeling of well-being.  It is important to note, however, that before they embark on any form of  exercises, their doctors must be aware.

If our senior citizens can strive to adopt the above healthy lifestyles or  habits, I guarantee their good health even though, for sure, their health cannot  be as it used to be when they were younger. Healthy eating is a gateway to a  healthy, long life and the case of our senior citizens cannot be  different.

What is that health condition that constitutes a burden in your life? Do you  know that through healthy eating you can overcome it? You can learn a lot more  here: http://www.healthyeatingpalace.blogspot.com/.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Stan_Onodu

 

Not your ordinary joe – National Wellness Authority, Joe Piscatella, offers SIX-week Wellness and Heart Health Program

April 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

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Not your ordinary joe – National Wellness Authority, Joe Piscatella, offers SIX-week Wellness and Heart Health Program

 

RENO, Nev. (Feb. 15, 2013) –One of the country’s foremost authorities on lifestyle habits and heart health, Joe Piscatella, will offer 6 Weeks to a Healthier Heart – a six-week wellness program designed to improve heart health. The program will focus on lifestyle changes that can have a lasting impact on overall and heart health.

Piscatella underwent coronary bypass surgery at age 32 – and according to his doctors, his prognosis wasn’t good. He found a way to stay faithful to a healthy lifestyle, turned his life around and now is one of the longest-living survivors of bypass surgery – 35 years and counting.

This program is designed specifically for people who could benefit from practical tips that can be applied to daily life to achieve lasting results. Piscatella’s seminars – which TIME magazine calls a “force for positive change” – have inspired millions to achieve a healthier, better-balanced life.

Cost for the six-week program is only $50, which includes all six sessions, as well as pre- and post-fitness profiles to track results. The fitness profiles include a blood draw to calculate total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol), LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol), triglycerides and glucose, as well as weight and Body Mass Index (BMI) measurements.

Program participants across the country have reported proven results upon completion of the program. “On average, participants have lost 10.5 pounds, reduced their LDL cholesterol by 6.2 percent and increased their weekly exercise and activity by 28 minutes,” Piscatella said. “What’s even more impressive is that participants continued to report positive results even five months after the program ends. It is truly inspiring to see people adopt healthy lifestyle habits and improve their health.”

Each weekly 90-minute seminar focuses on a specific topic. All seminars will be held 6-7:30 p.m. at Hyatt Place , 1790 E Plumb Lane in Reno .

  • Monday, April 22: Make Your Health Last As Long As Your Life
  • Wednesday, May 1: Eating Healthy In A Doubleburger.com World
  • Wednesday, May 8: Move It Or Lose It
  • Wednesday, May 15: Take A Load Off Your Heart
  • Wednesday, May 22: Raising Fit Kids In A Fast World
  • Wednesday, May 29: Healthy Cooking At Home

More information about the program, including online registration is available at www.renown.org/HeartEvents. For general inquiries, call 775-982-4892.

Special media opportunity: Does a program like this sound appealing to you or a loved one? Media interested in participating in the program and sharing their story are able to do so at no cost. Interested media should contact Ayse (I-Shay) Caglar at 775-982-4609.

Media Interview / Photo Opportunity: Joe Piscatella is available for in-person media interviews Monday, April 22. He is available for other media interviews before that time via phone. Please contact Ayse (I-Shay) Caglar at 775-982-4609 

 Joe Piscatella - casual

About Joe Piscatella

Joe Piscatella, President of the Institute for Fitness and Health, lectures extensively to a variety of associations, including Fortune 100 companies, professional and medical organizations. He has authored 13 best-selling books including “Don’t Eat Your Heart Out,” “The Road to a Healthy Heart Runs Through the Kitchen,” and “Positive Mind, Healthy Heart!”. Piscatella is a frequent guest on television and radio programs that include CNN, the “Today” show, “Fox News” and “Good Morning America,” and is a guest expert on WebMD. He serves on the Legislative Task Force on Youth Health which focuses on improving nutrition and fitness in elementary schools in Washington state. He is also the only non-medical member of the National Institutes of Health Expert Panel on Cardiac Rehabilitation.

About Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health

Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health has more than 30 years of recognition as the region’s leader in heart and vascular care. The Institute for Heart & Vascular Health has championed innovative heart care with a history of firsts including the region’s first open heart surgery, first angioplasty and first stent replacement. Today, the Institute for Heart & Vascular Health continues to lead the way in state-of-the-art technology like the da Vinci Si HD Robotic Surgical System, 64-slice CT scanner, nuclear medicine, cardiac catheterization and the region’s only D-SPECT cameras that rule out heart attacks faster so patients can be diagnosed and treated quickly. With 17 board-certified heart physicians – more than any other hospital in the region – the heart physicians at the Institute for Heart & Vascular Health offer a variety of specialties and more than 345 years of combined cardiology experience. And with several care centers in Reno , Carson City , rural Nevada and Northern California , patients have convenient access to quality heart care throughout the region. For more information, visit renown.org/heart.

 

 

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Ayse E. Caglar, MBA | Marketing Business Partner II 1155 Mill St. H8  Reno , NV   89502 | P 775-982-4609 | F 775-982-4666

Senior Citizens Singles – Ways to Find a Date By Annielyn Summers

April 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many senior citizens singles today want to get back into dating. They love  the feeling of dating when they were younger. Perhaps now they feel that dating  is for the kids and not themselves anymore. As a senior citizen, one should have  more reason to date. At this time of someone’s life, the most important thing is  to enjoy life as it comes to you. This is the reason why it is better for single  senior citizens to date once again.

There are many ways to find a date. You can join local seniors clubs and meet  people there. The advantage here is you get to see and get to know that person.  Another advantage is you know they live your area, making dating that much  easier to coordinate. You can also try a senior singles cruise or vacation.  These are special trips created with the single senior in mind. You can travel  somewhere with a group of other senior singles. This way would perhaps be more  enjoyable since you get to enjoy the vacation as much as the company of the  people you meet. If you are internet savvy, the best and fastest way is to join  a social networking site like Facebook. All you have to do is join the site and  create your profile. This profile will be how everyone in the world will see  you. You may also search for other senior singles using these sites and have  contact with them. You can also join a dating service in your area. Every town  has one. By paying a small membership fee, the dating service will find  potential matches for you and set dates up for you. You date a few people and  you choose who you felt had the most connection with you. Despite the fee, it is  all worth it.

These are just a few ways to find other single senior citizens to date. When  you are meeting new people, always go with your instinct. You might find your  happiness in the process. You can find other websites about dating single senior  citizens on the internet.

Here’s A Secret Tip!

Love is just waiting for you. Go here –

http://www.senior-singles-dating.com
http://www.sweetesthearts.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Annielyn_Summers

 

Reasons for Hospitalizations of Senior Citizens by Warren Comer

April 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Experts are saying that senior citizens of today are a lot healthier than the  elderly a few decades ago. Not only are they getting sick less, but they are  also more active. They are living fuller lives, something that the old folks in  the past couldn’t have done.

What the Numbers Say

Statistics show than one third of all seniors need medical attention in a  hospital annually. The reasons for hospitalization are very varied, but most of  it is caused by the declining condition of their bodies. The fact remains  however, that life expectancy is on the rise.

What Increased Life Expectancy Means

The increase in life expectancy means that people people would need care for  a longer period. Though they are living longer years, it does not mean that they  are immune from the more common ailments. Even if they don’t get sick, their  body conditions really aren’t at their top forms anymore.

Common Reasons for Hospitalization

When a person becomes a senior citizen, the chances of being hospitalized are  increased. There are two major reasons why a person can be hospitalized, these  are due to injuries and heart problems.

Common Senior Citizen Injuries

Falls are the most common causes of injuries for the elderly. As people grow  older, the chances of falling are greatly increased. Half of all those who are  over 80 are likely to experience falling at some point.

The most common type of injury for seniors who have fallen is a hip injury.  It accounts for more than 40% of all the injuries that seniors suffer because of  falls

We all know that as people start to age, their bones become a lot weaker.  This would account for the brittleness of the bones. When a person who doesn’t  have a strong structure falls, the bones could easily break.

Other Types of Injuries

There are other types of injuries that seniors are prone to getting. These  include injuries from motor vehicle accidents, poisoning from medications and  fires. Their frail physical conditions can make them suffer more from these  injuries. It is important that they be given immediate medical attention should  they suffer from any of them.

Illness among Senior Citizens

When it comes to illnesses, heart problems are the most common reasons why  seniors get hospitalized. These problems include heart attacks and strokes. When  seniors exhibit signs and symptoms of any heart ailment, they should be brought  to the hospital right away so they can be treated.

Something as simple as flu can cause the hospitalization of a senior. In  their stage in life, a simple flu can cause a great deal of problems already. It  should be treated right away so that it won’t get any worse or cause other  conditions.

These are the most common reasons why seniors get taken to a hospital. If you  are living with a member of your family who is a senior citizen, then you should  know about these things so you can take better care of them. You can also share  what you’ve learned to make them aware of the health risks.

Family First  HomeCare is the perfect solution for seniors and others in need in New  Jersey who are not ready to leave their home for an institutional setting, but  because of illness or chronic conditions need support to remain at home. We  improve your life by providing compassionate, one-on-one care in the comfort of  your own home. Find out more about senior care services in New Jersey.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Warren_Comer

 

Depression in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Depression is a medical condition that is characterized by feeling down,  depressed, or hopeless; low self-esteem; and loss of interest in things one used  to enjoy. Senior citizens are prone to life-altering changes that can lead one  to feel depressed. Dealing with the trials life throws at us such as, loss,  change, loneliness, or a chronic medical condition can be quite overwhelming.  Still, depression is not a “normal” part of aging. Like heart disease or  diabetes, depression is a medical condition and it can be treated with  medication and therapy. Treatment is effective at alleviating symptoms within a  few weeks in at least 80 percent of people.

It is important that senior citizens and those providing their elder care  understand the symptoms of depression. If you think you or someone you know may  be suffering from depression, identify your symptoms by using the checklist  provided below. Then, if necessary, seek assistance. For senior citizens, the  most frequently used resource is a family doctor. Bringing a trusted friend or  relative may help ease any anxiety when going to an appointment. Understand that  your doctor may suggest a checkup and begin treatment or refer you to a mental  health specialist.

Before you say, “I’m okay”….

Do you feel:

  • Anxious or “empty”
  • Guilty or useless
  • Agitated or irritable
  • Less interested in things you used to enjoy
  • Like no one loves you
  • Life is not worth living

Or if you are:

  • A change in sleeping habits
  • A change in eating habits
  • Persistent headaches, stomach aches, or pain

Remember that these  may be real symptoms of a real medical condition that can be effectively  treated. Talk to your doctor today. Though many senior citizens suffer from  depression, feeling depressed is not a normal part of aging.

 

Health and Wellness tips

There are many measures senior citizens can take to help relieve the symptoms  of depression. Those involved in the elder care of senior citizens experiencing  depression should encourage the senior to follow these tips and improve their  wellbeing.

Check your medications. Senior citizens often take many  medications. Some medications, including those for sleep, blood pressure, and  nervousness, may affect mood. Talk with your doctor about each of the  medications you are taking. Be sure to include all over-the-counter medicines,  vitamins, and herbal supplements to minimize the chances of having side  effects.

Limit alcohol consumption. Alcohol use can bring about  depression. And, when alcohol and drugs are combined, interactions that lead to  depression can occur.

Stay connected. Sometimes, senior citizens find it more difficult  to get out and stay connected with others. Still, talking with friends and  family members, getting a pet, or even finding a new interest or hobby can help  one through this tough time.  Get involved in activities you take pleasure  in, such as reading a good book, going to a ballgame or a taking a class in a  subject that interests to you.

Be active. Physical activity can improve physical and mental  wellbeing. Though some senior citizens believe they cannot exercise, there are  activities like walking, gardening, or working out (even if one is in a  wheelchair) that can be helpful. Make a goal of 30 minutes of activity 5 days a  week. If you have not taken part in physical activity in a while, be sure to  check with your doctor and get his OK before you begin.

Eat healthy and drink plenty of fluids. Choose healthy snacks  like fruits, vegetables, yogurt, or nuts to increase your nutrition and energy.  Also, try to eat well-balanced meals.  Some senior citizens suffer from  loss of appetite and weight loss; if you have experienced either of these,  consult your doctor.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects  caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for  families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking  employment.

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Hearing Loss in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many senior citizens are affected by some hearing problems. If left  untreated, any extent of hearing loss may worsen over time. It is important that  senior citizens with difficulty hearing consult their doctor. Companions or  caregivers who notice a senior citizen is experiencing trouble hearing should  facilitate and encourage the senior to seek medical attention. Knowing the  symptoms and taking appropriate treatment measures can help stop and, in some  cases, even reverse hearing degradation.

Hearing is very important for daily functioning so problems with hearing are  quite serious and should be addressed as soon as possible. Senior citizens who  experience hearing problems may feel isolated or embarrassed as a result. Still,  if you find that you have trouble hearing, talk to your doctor about the many  treatment options available.

Symptoms

Senior citizens who have hearing loss often complain of:

  • Having trouble hearing on the phone
  • Difficulty with following conversations, especially when multiple people are  talking
  • Needing to have volume levels of electronics so high that others notice and  complain
  • Difficulty hearing things over background noise
  • Sensing that people always seem to mumble
  • Cannot understand when women or children speak to  you

Diagnosis

 

If a doctor finds that you have hearing loss, they may refer you to an  otolaryngologist who specializes in the ear, nose, and throat. After this doctor  conducts diagnostic tests, they may refer you to an audiologist who is trained  to measure hearing function. Audiologists can test your hearing for certain  pitches and loudness levels in order to find if a hearing aid is needed. These  tests are painless.

Hearing loss is caused by degeneration of nerves with age, one of the reasons  it is prevalent among senior citizens. Other common contributions to hearing  loss are earwax build-up, exposure to very loud noises over long periods of  time, viral and bacterial infections, heart conditions, head injuries, tumors,  medications, and heredity.

Types of Hearing Loss

Some different types of hearing loss include:

Presbycusis: This is age-related hearing loss. Senior citizens  affected by this condition can either have a hard time hearing or have low  tolerance for loud noises. It can be caused by damage to the inner ear known as  sensorineural hearing loss.

Tinnitus: This condition is characterized by hearing ringing, roaring,  or some other continuous noise in the ears. It can be caused by exposure to loud  noises, hearing loss, medications, other health problems, allergies, and  conditions of the heart and blood vessels. The source of noise caused by  tinnitus is unclear and varies in how long it affects the sufferer. Senior  citizens can treat the condition by either using a hearing aid to make other  sounds louder or using a masker that makes tinnitus noise less noticeable.  Others use music to drown out the extra noise. Avoiding smoking, alcohol, and  loud noises can decrease the effects of tinnitus.

Conductive hearing loss: This is caused by blockage between eardrum  and the inner ear. This can be caused by ear wax build-up, fluid in the middle  ear, abnormal bone growth, punctured ear drum, or ear infections. For ear wax  blockage specifically, it is suggested that sufferers use mild treatments like  mineral oil, baby oil, glycerin, or commercial ear drops to soften ear wax. If  you think the eardrum may be damaged, you should contact a doctor.

Treatment

Senior citizens who suffer from hearing loss have many options for treatment  and alleviating symptoms of decreased hearing functioning. These include:

Hearing aids: these are small devices placed on the ear that make  certain noises louder. Audiologists can help find the right hearing aid for you  and may allow you to test it in a trial period. Pick a hearing aid manufacturer  who will work with you while you adjust to wearing the product, and be sure that  you are aware of how to maintain a hearing aid, such as replacing batteries and  how to use it properly.

Assistive / Adaptive devices: There are a variety of products that fit  within this category like:

  • Telephone amplifying device: can be a receiver or entire phone that makes  phone conversations louder
  • TV and radio listening systems: avoids having to turn the volume up on  regular devices
  • Assistive listening systems: these are sometimes available in public venues  like theaters, churches, synagogues, and meeting places
  • Alerts: allow for signals that replace doorbells, smoke detectors, and alarm  clocks in order for the hearing impaired to hear them properly. These usually  employ vibrations or flashing lights to replace noise.

Cochlear  implants: If hearing loss is severe, a small electronic device can be placed  under the skin, behind the ear. It allows sound to bypass the malfunctioning  part of the ear and send signals directly to the brain. This process is not  helpful for all cases of hearing loss or deafness.

 

Tips for Senior Citizens

For senior citizens affected by hearing loss, here are some helpful hints for  communication:

  • Let people know you have trouble hearing them
  • Ask people to face you, talk slower, or ask them to speak without  shouting
  • Pay attention to facial expressions and gestures
  • Let people know when you don’t understand them
  • Ask people to reword things for you when you don’t  understand

Tips for Caregivers

 

Elder caregivers taking care of senior citizens who suffer from hearing loss  can use these helpful hints when speaking to their patients:

  • Face the person and talk clearly
  • Speak at a normal speed and do not cover the mouth
  • Stand in good lighting and avoid background noises
  • Use facial expressions and physical gestures
  • Repeat yourself if necessary
  • Keep a hearing impaired person involved in a conversation rather than  talking to others  about the individual while in their presence
  • Be patient,positive and relaxed during the interaction
  • Ask how you can help them understand you

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects  caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for  families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking  employment.

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Comparison of Health Insurance Schemes for Senior Citizens By Shankar P Nath

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

It is absolutely vital that as one approaches old age, one has a substantial  health insurance cover. The probability that one’s health care expenses would  increase substantially is almost a given. In this piece we look and compare the  different health insurance plans that are available in the market for senior  citizens. While every health insurance company wants to insure the young (and  almost by definition, more healthy), there are very few plans which provide  health insurance to people beyond 60. Another interesting thing to note here is  that most of the health insurance plans for senior citizens is offered by the  public sector general insurance companies.

The health insurance plans available for senior citizens are:

  1. Varistha Mediclaim by National Insurance
  2. Senior Citizen plan by Oriental Insurance
  3. Mediclaim for Senior Citizens by New India Assurance
  4. Senior Citizen Plan by United India Insurance
  5. Red Carpet Plan by Star Health Insurance

 

Varistha Mediclaim by National Insurance: This policy can be  bought by anyone between 60 and 80 years of age. Renewals can be done upto the  age of 90. Between the age bands of 76-80, premiums have an added factor of 10%  and between 80 to 90 years of age, premiums are grossed up by 20%. The sum  insured under this policy for hospitalization is Rs 1 lakh. For critical  illness, the sum insured is Rs 2 lakhs. Under the critical illness cover,  diseases such as cancer, renal failure, stroke, organ transplants etc are  covered. If the person has already been insured for 3 years through a health  insurance policy, then he or she does not have to undergo a medical test, else  there has to be a medical test under the prospective customer’s costs. For  domiciliary treatment, the maximum claim is fixed at 20% of the sum insured.  Ambulance charges upto Rs 1000 are covered under this policy. For a mediclaim  cover of Rs 1 lakh and a critical illness cover of Rs 2 lakhs, the premium  varies between Rs 6200 (for a 60-65 year old) to Rs 9200 (for a 75-80 year old).  One interesting feature of this policy is that pre existing hypertension and  diabetes are covered from the 1st year itself of the policy by paying 10%  additional premium for each of the two diseases. Pre existing is of course not  available for the critical illness policy. Other pre existing diseases are  covered after 1 policy year. Dialysis, chemotherapy and radiotherapy for  preexisting ailment is never covered. Claims are paid only for events that occur  within India. Claims which occur within the first 30 days of the commencement of  the policy will not be covered, unless in the case of the person being insured  with an Insurance Company without break for the past 12 months. For the purpose  of this policy, pre existing diseases such as cataract, piles, fistula, hernia,  benign lumps, joint replacement etc will not be covered in the first 12 months.  War related medical claims, vaccination, spectacles cost, plastic surgery,  corrective dental surgery, venereal disease, vitamins and tonics which are not  part of the treatment, nuclear disaster related health claims, alternative  treatment like homeopathy etc are excluded.

Opinion: We think it is one of the best policies for senior  citizens, except that the sum insured is low. They are quite generous as far as  the norms for entry age and pre existing diseases are concerned.

2. Senior Citizen Specified Disease Plan by Oriental  Insurance: In this plan, the policyholder has the option to choose sum  insured of Rs 1 lakh, 2 lakhs, 3 lakhs, 4 lakhs or 5 lakhs. One restrictive  feature of this policy is that 20% of any claim amount has to be co-paid by the  insured. Cashless payment through TPA is restricted to Rs 1 lakh. This plan  covers 10 specified diseases: cancer, renal failure, heart diseases, liver  related diseases, COPD (lung ailment), stroke, prostrate, orthopaedic disease,  ophthalmic disease, accidental injury and knee replacement. The amount that one  can claim for a particular disease is restricted as a percentage of the sum  insured (for e.g., 50% of the sum insured can be claimed for cancer, while 20%  of the sum insured can be claimed for stroke). A sum insured of Rs 1 lakh will  cost Rs 4500 for a 65 year old, while it will cost Rs 6400 if one is eighty  years old or beyond. While this may seem cheaper than National Insurance’s  Varistha medical scheme, it is less wide in scope. This policy has an  interesting refund of premium clause if one withdraws from the policy: if the  policyholder gets out of the policy within the first month, 75% of the premium  is returned and if he opts out between 3 to 6 months of the policy, 25% of the  premium is returned. In this policy, pre-existing diseases are not covered for a  period of 2 policy years. Other exclusions are very similar to those of  National’s Varistha medical scheme.

Opinion: a good scheme in terms of the level of sum insured  and price, but the scope of diseases covered is restrictive. Another issue is  that pre-existing is covered only after 2 policy years.

Mediclaim for Senior Citizens by New India Assurance: This  policy is available for senior citizens between 60 and 80 years, and the sum  insured can be Rs 1 lakh or Rs 1.5 lakhs. Pre existing diseases are covered  after 18 continuous months of coverage, while for diabetes and hypertension to  be covered, additional premium needs to be paid. Pre hospitalization is covered  for 30 days, while post hospitalization is covered for 60 days. An insurance of  Rs 1 lakh for a 65 year old will cost Rs 3850 while it will cost Rs 5150 for an  80 year old. Thus, premiums are very competitively priced. If one wants to  extend beyond 80 years, then loading of 10% or 20% has to be paid. For pre  existing diabetes or hypertension, an additional premium of 10% each has to be  paid. One interesting feature is that there is a 10% discount if one’s spouse is  also covered under this policy. This policy also has the same partial refund  norms on cancellation as Oriental’s Specified Disease Plan. Claims would be paid  only for medical treatment in India. The exclusion conditions are standard, and  are very similar to National’s Varistha Mediclaim.

Opinion: Attractively priced. Sum insured ceilings are low.  The product brochure is silent on co-pay, and thus there is no co-pay  requirement in all probability.

United India Insurance’s Specified Disease Plan: In this  policy, sum insured of Rs 50,000 to Rs 300,000 is available to people between 60  to 80 years of age. Sum insured of Rs 1 lakh will cost Rs 3715 for a 65 year  old, and Rs 8613 for an 80 year old. So while it is cheaper for the younger age  bands, it is a bit expensive for the older age groups. An interesting feature of  this policy is that there is a hospitalization cash payment from the 3rd day of  hospitalization on payment of a particular additional premium. While other  exclusion features of this policy are comparable to that of the previous 3  policies that we have discussed, the biggest problem of this policy is that this  has a pre-existing waiting period of 4 years.

Opinion: Pre -existing waiting period of 4 years is  restrictive

Star Health’s Red Carpet Plan: This plan has been a good  marketing success. While one barely gets to hear about the reasonably broad,  well priced schemes of the 4 nationalised companies, the market is quite excited  about Star Health’s Red Carpet scheme. The sum insured under this policy can be  for Rs 1 lakh, Rs 2 lakhs, Rs 3 lakhs, Rs 4 lakhs or Rs 5 lakhs. Age of entry is  restricted between 60 and 69 years. Pre existing diseases are covered from the  1st year itself, except for those preexisting diseases for which the insured  received payment in the preceding 12 months. Subsequently, these pre-existing  diseases are covered. There are sub limits under this policy wherein different  diseases have different limits as a percentage of the sum insured. Sum insured  of Rs 1 lakh will cost Rs 4900 at entry, while a sum insured of Rs 5 lakhs will  cost Rs 20000.. The biggest catch in this policy is that there is a 50%  co-payment for pre existing diseases and 30% co-payment for other diseases!!  Other exclusions are very similar to what is there for the nationalized  companies.

Opinion: Simple, well marketed claim. But the co-payment  terms are a huge negative! The ceiling for maximum age at entry is quite low (69  years), though the guaranteed renewal feature is a big positive. Also, the sum  insured levels of Rs 5 lakh is quite high and attractive in these days of  escalated medical costs.

In summary, we feel that National’s Varistha Plan is the widest in scope. The  only issue with the plans of the Nationalised Insurance companies is that the  sum insured levels offered might not be adequate for today’s high healthcare  costs. On the other hand, they are at least offering senior citizen health  plans. It is very difficult to locate any meaningful health insurance scheme for  senior citizens offered by any private health insurance company, except Star  Health. The only problem that we see with Star Health’s Red Carpet plan is that  of the Co-pay restriction.

Shankar Nath is the founder of http://www.PolicyTiger.com,  a leading online insurance comparison site in India. http://www.PolicyTiger.com helps user compare health  insurance, life insurance and car insurance policies in an unbiased manner so  that they can get the best price on their insurance, sometimes saving as much as  50% of the quoted price.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Shankar_P_Nath

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Senior Citizens Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, and Arthritis – Causes and Treatments By David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

“Arthritis” does not mean only that someone has stiff, aching joints. Many types of arthritis exist, each with its own symptoms and treatments. Most types are chronic, meaning that they can be a source of discomfort for an extended period of time. Arthritis can afflict joints almost anywhere in the body and may cause changes you can see and feel, including swelling, warmth, and redness in the joints. It can last for a short time but be very painful or continue for a long time with less pronounced results while still damaging the joints.

Arthritis is extremely common in the United States, especially among senior citizens. Still, there are many steps they and those providing care for the elderly can take to relieve the different types of arthritis. The most common types in this population are osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and gout.

Osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis in senior citizens and begins when cartilage, the type of tissue that pads joints, begins to wear away. This can eventually cause all the cartilage between bones to wear away, forming painful rubbing of bones against each other. This type of arthritis is most common in the hands, neck, lower back, knees, and hips.

Symptoms of OA can range from stiffness and mild pain that accompanies exercise or bending to severe pain in the joints even in times of physical rest. OA can also cause stiffness during times in which you haven’t used specific joints in a while, like when you’re on a long car ride, but this stiffness usually goes away when you move your joints again. OA can eventually lead to problems moving joints and sometimes to developing a disability if the areas affected are the back, knees, or hips.

Aging is often the greatest risk factor for developing OA. Other factors depend on the area of the body afflicted-for instance, OA in the hands or hips may be caused by genetic factors; OA in the knees may be caused by being overweight; and injuries or overuse of joints in the knees, hips, and hands may lead to OA.

Rheumatoid arthritis.

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) differs from OA in that it’s an autoimmune disease, meaning that your immune system attacks and damages the lining of a joint as if it were an injury or disease. RA leads to inflammation of the joints, which causes pain, stiffness and swelling, sometimes in multiple joints at once. It may be severe enough to prevent you from moving a certain joint. Senior citizens with RA may often experience fatigue or fever. You can develop RA at any age, and it’s more common in women.

RA can afflict almost any joint in the body and is often symmetrical, meaning that if you have RA in a specific joint on one side of your body, you probably experience RA in the same joint on the other side of your body. RA can damage not only joints, but also the heart, muscles, blood vessels, nervous system, and eyes.

Gout.

Senior citizens with gout experience the most severe pain relative to many other arthritis patients. An attack begins when uric acid crystals form in the connective tissue or joint spaces, leading to swelling, stiffness, redness, heat, and pain in the joint. Attacks often follow eating foods like shellfish, liver, dried beans, peas, anchovies, or gravy. Drinking alcohol, being overweight, and taking certain medications may worsen the symptoms. In senior citizens, using certain medications to lower blood pressure may also be a risk factor for a gout attack.

Gout is most common in the big toe, but it can occur in other joints such as the ankle, elbow, knee, wrist, hand, or other toes. Swelling may cause discoloration and tenderness due to skin stretching tightly around the joint. If you see a doctor during an attack, he or she may take a sample of fluid from the affected joint.

Other forms of arthritis.

Other forms include psoriatic arthritis  in patients who have psoriasis; ankylosing spondylitis, which mainly affects the spine; reactive arthritis, which occurs as a reaction to another illness in the body; and arthritis in the temporomandibular joint, the point at which the jaw attaches to the skull.

Arthritis Symptoms and Warning Signs.

Senior citizens and those providing their elder care should look out for the following symptoms as they may be indications of arthritis:

  • lasting joint pain
  • swelling in a joint
  • stiffness in a joint
  • tenderness or pain when touching a joint
  • difficulty in using or moving a joint normally
  • warmth and redness in a joint

 

Any of these symptoms lasting longer than two weeks should be addressed by a physician. If you experience a fever, feel physically ill, have a suddenly swollen joint, or have problems using a joint, a doctor should be contacted sooner. You will have to answer questions and go through a physical exam. Before suggesting treatment options, your doctor may want to run lab tests and take X-rays.

Arthritis Treatment.

Some common treatment options exist even though each type of arthritis is treatedsomewhat differently. Rest, exercise, eating a healthy diet, and becoming educated about the right way to use and protect the joints are key to minimizing the effects of arthritis. Proper shoes and a cane can minimize pain the feet, knees, and hips while walking, and some technology exists for helping open jars or bottles, turn doorknobs more easily, and otherwise improve quality of life in senior citizens with arthritis.

Additionally, some medications can lower the pain and swelling. Acetaminophen (in Tylenol) and some NSAIDs are sold over-the-counter and can ease pain. Other NSAIDs must be prescribed. It is important for senior citizens and those providing their in home care to pay attention to the warnings on both prescribed and over-the-counter drugs and to ask a doctor about how to properly and best use over-the-counter medicine to treat arthritis. The FDA also has information about many medications.

Some treatment options are specialized for individual types of arthritis.

Osteoarthritis Treatment.

There are medicines to help senior citizens with pain associated with OA, and rest and exercise may ease movement in the joints. Managing weight is also important. If one experiences OA in the knees, a doctor can provide shots in the knee joint, which can help to move it without as much pain. Surgery may also be an option to repair or replace damaged joints in senior citizens.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatments.

Treatment can diminish the pain and swelling associated with RA and cause joint damage to slow down or stop. One will feel better overall, and it will be easier to move around. On top of pain and anti-inflammatory medications, a doctor might prescribe DMARDs, which are anti-rheumatic drugs that can slow damage from RA. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, can minimize swelling while waiting for DMARDs to kick in. Additionally, biogenic response modifiers block the damage inflicted by the immune system and help people with mild to moderate RA when other treatments have failed to work properly.

Gout Treatment.

If you’ve gone through a gout attack, talk to a doctor to discuss possible causes and future prevention of attacks. Work together with your doctor and other elder care providers to plan and execute a plan for prevention. Commonly, NSAIDs or corticosteroids are recommended for an acute attack. This treatment diminishes swelling, allowing you to feel better fairly shortly after treatment. Usually, the attack fully stops within a few days. If one has experienced multiple attacks, a doctor may be able to prescribe medication to prevent further attacks.

Exercise can help Arthritis.

In addition to taking the proper medication and allowing your joints to rest, exercise can help senior citizens to stay in shape, maintain strong muscles, and control symptoms of arthritis. Daily exercise like walking or swimming keeps joints moving while lessening pain and strengthening the muscles around joints. Before starting any new exercise program, it is important to discuss options with your physician.

Three types of exercise are the best for senior citizens with arthritis:

  • Range-of-motion exercises reduce stiffness, improve flexibility, and keep joints moving. Activities like dancing fit into this category.
  • Strengthening exercises strengthen muscles, which improves support and protection to your joints. Weight training fits into this category.
  • Aerobic or endurance exercises improve health in the heart and arteries, prevent weight gain, improve how your body works overall, and may decrease swelling in some joints. Riding a bike fits into this category.

Other things to do to manage Arthritis.

 

On top of exercise and weight control, a number of other methods may help senior citizens ease the pain around joints. Applying heat or cold to joints, soaking in a warm tub, or swimming in a heated pool may help you feel better and move your joints more easily.

Surgery may be an option when damage has become disabling or when other treatment options have not adequately diminished pain. With surgery, joints can be repaired or replaced with artificial ones. Commonly, arthritic knees and hips are replaced.

Unproven remedies.

Many senior citizens with arthritis try treatments that have not been tested or proven to help. Some are harmful, like snake venom, while others are harmless yet unhelpful, like copper bracelets.

Here are a few ways to determine whether a treatment is unproven:

  • The remedy is said to work for all types of arthritis and other diseases
  • Scientific support is from only one research study
  • The label doesn’t include directions or warnings of use

Areas for further research.

 

Studies suggest that acupuncture could ease OA pain in some senior citizens. Dietary supplements such as glucosamine and chondroitin are also under investigation and may reduce OA pain. More research is needed to determine whether these types of treatments actually work to reduce symptoms and damage to joints.

Talk to your doctor and others involved in your elder care.

Try not to make light of your symptoms by telling yourself that joint pain or stiffness is simply caused by aging normally. Your doctor and other elder care providers can discuss possible treatment options with you to safely minimize your pain and stiffness and prevent more serious joint damage.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

Healthy Eating, Exercise and Lifestyle Guide For Senior Citizens By David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Healthy Eating and Lifestyle

While it is important for people of all ages to stay healthy, it is especially important for senior citizens to maintain healthy eating habits as well as to stay active which is important in the prevention of chronic illnesses like diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. By practicing healthier living practices, senior citizens can maintain a healthy weight, avoid depression, and stay mentally sharp. Those participating in caring for the elderly should be aware of these healthy living practices and work to both encourage and facilitate them.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a healthy diet includes many different types of food that are rich in nutrients. They have outlined specifically what this eating plan entails at the website.. Because this eating plan is designed specifically for senior citizens, it focuses on the types of foods that are important for preventing common ailments of older Americans like obesity and serious chronic illnesses.

Healthy Eating 101:

By following some of the tips listed, senior citizens can start a healthier lifestyle today:

  • Don’t skip meals. It is important to eat regularly in order to maintain normal metabolism and not become tempted to eat higher fat foods when food is consumed.
  • Eat a diet that is high in fiber. By eating foods like whole-grain breads, beans, vegetables, and fruits, you can lower your susceptibility to diabetes and heart disease.
  • Senior citizens especially should begin to adjust their diet to one that includes less calories and fat because the body will need less as it ages.
  • Calcium and Vitamin D are very important for nutrition and keeping bones strong. You can get this by either getting in at least three servings of dairy every day, or substituting these with soy-based beverages and proteins.
  • Senior citizens will have a harder time absorbing adequate amounts of the B12 vitamin. For this reason, it is important to eat cereals fortified with this nutrient or taking vitamin B12 supplements with meals.
  • Snack the smart way. Senior citizens will want to limit the amount of unhealthy snacking they do which involves foods high in calories and sugars. Instead, keep small portions of dried fruit, peanut butter, or crackers at hand to keep the appetite under control while remaining healthy.
  • Drink plenty of water. Although senior citizens often feel less thirsty then they used to, it is important to stay hydrated by either drinking water or water-based beverages like tea, coffee, soup, and skim milk.

Planning and Preparing Meals

 

Sometimes people find it hard to eat healthily because eating is often a social event which involves many people with different eating preferences and goals. While it is important to be able to enjoy a meal with family and friends, it is also important to maintain your own eating integrity by making sure everyone is on board with your personal healthy eating goals. Friends and family, as well as those providing elder care should facilitate healthy eating, not detour from it. The following tips address ways that senior citizens can maintain the healthy eating habits without sacrificing the social aspect of sharing a meal with others or learning to adjust to a lifestyle that involves eating with less people on a day-to-day basis.

  • Grocery shopping with others. This can be a fun and smart way to control the cost and quantity of food that you consume. If you don’t live with many people, this is a good way to split large-quantity items like potatoes and eggs which you may not be ableto use before expiration.
  • A time saving a smart way to eat healthy is cooking large quantities of food ahead of time and portioning for heating on later dates.
  • A quick way to prepare meals for yourself or for guests involves keeping frozen or canned fruits and vegetables on hand. Draining and/or rinsing canned foods is a good way to lower sodium or calories in foods that are kept in high sugar or high salt fluids.
  • Eating or preparing a meal shouldn’t always be a chore. Trying new recipes or eating outside can be a fun new twist on a meal with someone special.
  • Try to eat with people you enjoy to be around.
  • Some senior citizens have difficulty preparing meals, which is why it is important to become informed about home health care agencies or eldercare facilities that can aid in providing meals. The Eldercare Locator number is 1-800-677-1116.

Loss of Appetite or Desire to Eat

 

There are various reasons for why some senior citizens may not eat as well as they should or lose the desire to eat completely.

If you find that it is difficult to eat well, then it is best to speak with a healthcare provider or someone involved in your elder care about what can be done to help you eat better.

Some senior citizens are unable to eat well due to issues involving the condition of their teeth or issues with dentures. Checking with a dentist about physical pain that occurs when eating or other issues can help with these issues that lead to poorer eating habits.

When senior citizens lose family and friends or become depressed about events in their life, they may lose the desire to eat. In these instances, it is of the utmost importance that these individuals seek help from people they trust like their family, friends, church community, or those assisting with their elder care that will happily help them in finding ways to continue a healthy lifestyle and eating plan.

Some senior citizens complain that the flavor of foods change when they begin to take certain medications. While it is best to consult with a physician about issues surrounding medication, people can also take vitamin supplements with food that will help them stay healthy.

If you have someone who assists with your in home care, ask them to be vigilant about helping you eat healthy. Have them remind you to eat, and ask them to lend you a hand in preparing meals that are good for you.

Healthy Weight

Maintaining a healthy weight is important for being able to function in day-to-day life as well as stay mentally sharp. Senior citizens often lose or gain weigh as they age. If you are unsure about what weight you should maintain, consult your physician.

Health Risks Associated with Being Underweight

  • poor memory
  • compromised immunity
  • osteoporosis (weak bones)
  • decreases strength
  • hypothermia (lowered body temperature)
  • constipation

Health Risks Associated with Being Overweight

  • type 2 diabetes
  • high blood pressure
  • high cholesterol
  • heart disease
  • stroke (lack of oxygen transported to the brain)
  • some cancers
  • gallbladder disease

 

Because healthy weights will differ for everyone, it is important to verify with a physician whether it is healthy for you personally to lose or gain weight.

Staying Active

Participating in regular healthy amounts of physical activity can not only make you feel better, but it can make you less prone to diabetes, heart disease, and colon cancer. Staying active can be difficult for senior citizens, still it is an important part of a healthy lifestyle.

The following are some tips for maintaining a lifestyle that incorporates physical activity:

  • Know what amount of physical activity is appropriate for you. Everyone has different levels of activity that is safe for them, and while remaining active is important, always consult a health care provider about what is right for your lifestyle.
  • Take time to warm up, cool down, or take breaks when participating in a session of increased physical activity.
  • Take it slow. Always start slowly and build up to more intense levels of physical activities.
  • If you experience any pain, dizziness, or shortness of breath during exercise, stop the activity immediately.
  • Drink water.
  • Dress appropriately if you decide to exercise outdoors. Wear warmer clothes during the winter and wear lighter clothes during the summer while applying sunscreen or wearing sunglasses.
  • Wear the correct shoes for the activities that you participate in.

Types of Activity

 

Aerobic activities include activities that increase the heart rate and work the larger muscle groups. You may be able to speak a few words, but would not be able to carry on an entire conversation due to breathing patterns. Some examples of aerobics include:

  • brisk walking
  • water aerobics
  • tennis
  • house work
  • active play with children or pets
  • dancing

 

Begin incorporating small periods of this activity into your schedule during the week while slowly increasing the duration and frequency as time progresses. It is also important to incorporate different types of exercise that focus on balance and flexibility. Becoming used to a lifestyle with regular patterns of aerobic activity can reduce the effects of aging, control weight, lower risk of heart disease, improve flexibility, increase mood and energy, and expand social networks by meeting new people while doing various activities.

Strengthening activities involve the use of muscle groups against resistant forces like when lifting weights or doing yard work that involves lifting, digging, or pushing a lawn mower. This type of activity can keep muscles strong, reduce the need for a cane, reduce risk of bone injury, and help maintain a healthy weight.

Balance activities focus on muscles in specific areas of the body that encourage control as you move through space, reducing the likelihood of falls. This kind of activity could include walking heel to toe, standing on one foot, getting out of a sitting position without the use of the hands, and standing on the tip of your toes. Balance activities can help you stay steady on your feet and reduce the risk of fall and subsequent injury.

Flexibility activities increase the length of the muscles and can include stretching, yoga, and popular exercise programs like pilates. These activities can maintain the felxibility of joints, prevent stiffness, prevent injuries, and lower stress levels in general.

Weight-bearing activities require the muscles to work against gravity where the arms or legs bear the weight of the body. Activities like walking, tennis, and climbing stairs can build and maintain bone mass or reduce the risk of bone fractures.

Some activities incorporate multiple types of strengthening addressed above. What is important is that senior citizens find an enjoyable and do-able activity that will help them incorporate as many benefits as possible which will have far-reaching benefits to their health.

It’s Easy to Stay Healthy

A common misconception is that it takes an excessive amount of time and extra energy to maintain a healthy lifestyle. However, by just taking short walks for ten minutes a time or cleaning the house regularly can be practical ways to incorporate different physical activities into your daily schedule. And remember, staying healthy as a senior citizen will have increasing benefits as you continue to age.

Staying Motivated to Take Care of Yourself

Just because we age doesn’t mean that we are any less stressed by occurrences in life that may make us feel bad about ourselves or decrease our motivation to be good to ourselves. If anything, many of the challenges senior citizens face add stress.  Losing loved ones and friends or having trouble being independent with the added stressed of disease and functioning due to aging can cause depression or lifestyle changes that contribute to bad health. Here are some important tips for being good to yourself when you may not feel motivated due to circumstances out of your control:

  • Get plenty of sleep
  • Stay connected with family and friends
  • Join clubs or other social groups that you enjoy
  • Spend time with people that you enjoy
  • Volunteer at organizations in your community
  • Work a part-time job that isn’t too stressful or demanding
  • Watch a funny movie or find a way to laugh
  • Take up a hobby that you enjoy

 

Most importantly, senior citizens should remember that it is relatively easy and worth-while to maintain a healthy lifestyle as they age. Be sure to keep family, friends, and those involved in your elder care informed of your goals as they can help assist you. And remembering to eat healthy meals regularly, getting in physical activity, getting enough sleep, and being good to yourself are critical for maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

Legendary Band Heart Premieres on Fremont Street Experience’s Viva Vision

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 


Heart – Crazy on Vegas to premiere Feb. 14

 Fremont Street Experience is adding a new show to its already spectacular Viva Vision line-up. Heart – Crazy on Vegas — premiering on Valentine’s Day, Feb. 14 at 6 p.m. with a second showing at 11 p.m. – is a musical showcase with stunning graphics that is built around three of the band’s most iconic and popular songs: “Magic Man,” “Barracuda” and “Crazy on You.”


“Our Viva Vision shows are truly awe inspiring and never fail to stop everyone in their tracks.  We are sure Heart – Crazy on Vegas will continue to provide visitors with incredible visuals built around the band’s most well known songs,” said Jeff Victor, president of Fremont Street Experience.

The new Viva Vision show features live Heart performance footage from today as well as a newly restored rare and classic Heart concert film.

“The energy and style of the band guides the visuals, and the poetic lyrics guide the story. These ladies rock, and so does the show!” said George Johnsen, owner of Mammoth Sound & Vision, the company hired by Fremont Street Experience to create the show.

Heart – Crazy on Vegas takes us on a journey through the lyrical richness of three of the Wilson sisters’ most iconic songs. The show starts in the Pacific Northwest Forest, a moody and mystical environment told by the words of ‘Magic Man,’ then moves to the pristine beauty of the sea in ‘Barracuda’, and explodes into a highly charged world where viewers ride with Nancy and Ann as they go ‘Crazy on You.’

The new show will be featured throughout the weekend on Feb. 14-17 at 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. Beginning on Feb. 18, Heart – Crazy on Vegas will air nightly at 8 p.m. as part of the ongoing Viva Vision show schedule.

Sisters Ann and Nancy Wilson first showed the world that women can rock when their band, Heart, stormed the charts in the ’70s with hits like “Crazy on You,” “Magic Man,” “Barracuda,” “Straight On,” and so many more.  Not only did the Wilson sisters lead the band, they wrote the songs and played the instruments too, making them the first women in rock to do so.  Heart continued topping the charts through the ’80s and ’90s with huge hits like “These Dreams,” “Alone,” “What About Love,” “If Looks Could Kill,” “Never,” and a string of other hits that showcased the sisters’ enormous talents as musicians and singers.

Heart has sold more than 35 million albums, sold out arenas worldwide, found its way into the soundtrack of American life and in 2013, will be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Viva Vision Schedule (beginning Feb. 18)

John Van Hamersveld’s Signs of Life            7 p.m.
Heart – Crazy on Vegas                                   8 p.m.
Bon Jovi – Wanted in Vegas                            9 p.m.
A Tribute to Queen                                          10 p.m.
The Doors – Strange Days in Vegas               11 p.m.
Don McLean’s American Pie                          12 a.m.

Viva Vision®, the LED display canopy rising 90 feet in height and stretching 1,500 feet along the Fremont Street Experience promenade from Main Street to Fourth Street, forms a spectacular foyer for the existing resorts. Holding the canopy aloft are 16 columns, each weighing 26,000 pounds and capable of bearing 400,000 pounds and 43,000 struts.

Stretching the length of nearly five football fields, Viva Vision serves as the showcase for the world’s largest graphic display system. Originally, nearly 2.1 million incandescent lights were housed in the canopy. A $17 million investment in 2004 resulted in 12.5 million LED lamps to illuminate the overhead canopy, creating a never-before-seen color spectrum. Within the canopy itself are 181,000 LED Light Modules, 30 computers, 6,800 circuit cards, hundreds of miles data and electrical wiring, and 208 speakers producing 550,000 watts of concert-quality sound.

The Viva Vision technology is run by 10 high-speed, state-of-the-art computers, which operate the system from a dedicated control room. With 9,600 gigabytes of storage, reduced maintenance costs and increased storage capacity, the system is allowed to store and rotate a larger selection of shows than ever before.

About Fremont Street Experience
Fremont Street Experience is a five-block entertainment complex located in historic downtown Las Vegas.  Fremont Street Experience features Viva Vision, the world’s largest video screen which is 1,500 feet long, 90 feet wide and suspended 90 feet above the urban pedestrian mall. Viva Vision features nightly spectacular light and sounds shows with 12.5 million LED lights and a 550,000-watt sound system.  Fremont Street Experience is a one-of-a-kind venue which includes free nightly concerts and entertainment on three stages. With direct pedestrian access to 10 casinos, more than 60 restaurants and specialty retail kiosks, FSE attracts over 17 million annual visitors. Fremont Street Experience can be found online at www.vegasexperience.com.

Grimaldi’s Pizzeria To Host Special Dinner for Susan G. Komen for the Cure of Southern Nevada

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

“Grimaldi’s Pizzeria For the Cure” to serve three-course meal for $15 donation on Feb. 25

LAS VEGAS – Grimaldi’s Pizzeria, famous for its award-winning, hand-tossed, coal-fired brick oven pizzas, will host a special dinner for Susan G. Komen of Southern Nevada on Monday, Feb. 25 at the Rainbow restaurant (7155 S. Rainbow Rd.) A three-course meal, including salad, pizza and dessert, will be served for a cash-only donation of $15.

The event is open to the public and two seatings will be offered for guests. The first from 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. and the second from 6:30 – 8 p.m. To RSVP for this event call Komen Southern Nevada at 702-822-2524.

“Komen Southern Nevada is a non-profit that is close to many of our employees’ hearts,” said Mikaela Clough, manager of S. Rainbow Grimaldi’s Pizzeria. “Raising funds for an organization that is vital to our community is our way of giving back and we hope that many people will come out and show support.”

“With so many very worthy charitable organizations in our amazing city, we are tremendously grateful to be chosen by Grimaldi’s Pizzeria to be a beneficiary of their fundraising efforts,” said Stephanie Kirby, Executive Director of Komen Southern Nevada. “Las Vegas is a large city based on population, but we are made up of people who feel so strongly about caring for our community and, more importantly, caring for others in our community. Grimaldi’s is a prime example of a business that is determined to make a positive difference.”

About Grimaldi’s Pizzeria:
In the world of pizza, Grimaldi’s is an institution that has garnered more awards than any other pizzeria in the country with more celebrity sightings than most 5-star restaurants. Using only the freshest ingredients, a “secret recipe” pizza sauce, handmade mozzarella cheese and dough, Grimaldi’s serves traditional pizza (as it began in Naples, Italy) in an upscale yet casual, family oriented pizzeria. The intense heat of the oven evenly bakes the pies to create Grimaldi’s famous crispy and smoky thin crust that Zagat has voted best pizza year after year. Grimaldi’s Pizzeria has five locations in Las Vegas and one in Sparks, Nev. Las Vegas locations include The Shoppes at The Palazzo, Rainbow and 215, Boca Park Fashion Village The Fashion Show Mall and Richmar Plaza. The Sparks restaurant is located in The Legends at Sparks Marina.

For more information on Grimaldi’s Pizzeria visit www.grimaldispizzeria.com
“Like” Grimaldi’s Pizzeria on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/GrimaldisPizzeria
Follow Grimaldi’s Pizzeria on Twitter: www.twitter.com/grimaldispizza

About Susan G. Komen of Southern Nevada:

The Southern Nevada Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure® – along with those who generously support the organization with their talent, time and resources – is working to better the lives of those facing breast cancer in our community. Through events like the Komen Southern Nevada Race for the Cure®, we have invested more than $6 million in local breast health and breast cancer projects in Southern Nevada over the past 17 years. Up to 75 percent of net proceeds generated by the Affiliate provide grants for innovative community programs that reduce breast cancer mortality through screening, treatment, education and safety-net services, while the remaining 25 percent supports groundbreaking breast cancer research grants. This year, the Affiliate funded over $837,000 in local breast health programs for the uninsured and underserved in Las Vegas and surrounding areas, while providing $150,000 to breast cancer research.

For more information on Susan G. Komen for the Cure of Southern Nevada visit www.komensouthernnevada.org

Like Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Komen-Southern-Nevada-Race-for-the-Cure/255100881352

Northern Nevada Medical Group Announces Two Additional Cardiologists

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Northern Nevada Medical Center welcomes two additional local cardiologists to their team of physicians affiliated with the Northern Nevada Medical Group.

Chad Bidart, MD, FACC and Colin Fuller, MD, FACC, FACP, FSCAI, are providing heart and vascular care at Northern Nevada Medical Center’s Accredited Chest Pain Center. They join Northern Nevada Medical Group cardiologists Dr. Kosta Arger, Dr. Michael Newmark, Dr. Tom Nylk and Dr. Thomas Truong.

“We sincerely welcome these prestigious local cardiologists to our family,” said Tiffany Meert, Chief Operating Officer at Northern Nevada Medical Center. “The Accredited Chest Pain Center at NNMC has long been known for quality and expedient cardiovascular care. These cardiologists bring a breadth of experience and multidisciplinary skills, and they will continue to serve our community well.”

Dr. Bidart is board certified in internal medicine, cardiovascular disease and electrophysiology. He specializes in heart arrhythmia. A native of Winnemucca, NV, Dr. Bidart earned his medical degree at UNR and completed his residency and fellowship in cardiovascular disease at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona. He also completed a fellowship in cardiac electrophysiology at UCLA.

Dr. Fuller is board certified in internal medicine and cardiovascular disease. He specializes in peripheral arterial disease, cardiac sports medicine, and clinical and preventive cardiology. He is also a team physician for UNR Athletics. Dr. Fuller earned his medical degree at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston and completed his residency at UC, Davis. He completed his fellowship in cardiovascular disease at Baylor College of Medicine in Texas.
-more-

 

 

The cardiologists’ office is located on the Northern Nevada Medical Center campus at Sparks Medical Office Building, 2385 E. Prater Way, Suite 205, and they are also seeing patients in south Reno at 5575 Kietzke, just south of the Neil roundabout. To ensure continuity of care, Dr. Bidart and Dr. Fuller will continue to see their existing patients. They are also accepting new patients and are on most of the areas health plans including Medicare. To schedule an appointment please call (775) 352-5300.
The Chest Pain Center at Northern Nevada Medical Center is accredited by the Society of Chest Pain Centers for its ability to assess, diagnose, and treat patients who may be experiencing a heart attack. By becoming an Accredited Chest Pain Center, NNMC has enhanced the quality of care for the cardiac patients, and demonstrated a commitment to higher standards. When it comes to a heart attack, minutes matter.

Downtown 3rd hosts the International Vendor Village during the second annual Chinese New Year in the Desert

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Festival takes place in downtown Las Vegas February 8-10

LAS VEGAS – The Year of the Water Snake kicks off with the second annual Chinese New Year celebration in downtown Las Vegas, February 8 -10, as the area is transformed into a spring festival. Throughout the three-day event, guests can visit the International Vendor Village, located at Downtown 3rd – 3rd Street between Ogden Avenue and Stewart Avenue. As its name implies, the International Vendor Village features international flavors from multiple food vendors, including SATAY, Dragon Grille, Sauced, Wok Express, Gyoza-San, Triple George, Coast 2 Coast, Sin City Snoballs, Haulin’ Balls food truck, Ben’s BBQ and more.
Prizes and giveaways will be offered throughout the weekend.
Chinese New Year in the Desert starts Friday, Feb. 8 at 6 p.m. on the 3rd Street Stage at Fremont Street Experience. It includes three days of events such as the Miss Asian American Pacific Islander USA Pageant, a fashion show by Macy’s, the American Heart Association Heart Walk and the McDonald’s Las Vegas Spring Festival Parade. The International Vendor Village is open at Downtown3rd throughout the entire two and a half-day event.
About Fifth Street Gaming
Fifth Street Gaming (FSG) is a Las Vegas, Nevada-based casino management company led by CEO Seth Schorr and founded by Schorr and his partner, Jeffrey Fine. Fifth Street Gaming will own and operate seven Las Vegas gaming locations, including the Lucky Club Casino and Hotel, Opera House Saloon and Casino, Silver Nugget Casino, Little Macau Ultra Tavern, Gold Spike Casino & Hotel, Siegel Slots and Suites and MOB Bar. Combined, these properties operate over 1000 machines, two dozen table games and 400-plus employees. FSG is also overseeing redevelopment and eventual operations of Downtown Grand Hotel & Casino, formerly Lady Luck Hotel & Casino. Downtown Grand is scheduled to open in late 2013 and is planned to include 600 slot machines 35 table games and 650 employees. Through their successful management of these properties, Schorr and his highly experienced team have garnered a strong reputation for reinvigorating dated properties with new technology, systems and enhanced amenities. The principals of Fifth Street Gaming also control, through affiliates, the LEV Restaurant Group, a Food & Beverage operation that owns and operates more than 35 restaurants in the Las Vegas area with combined revenues exceeding $25 million. The LEV Restaurant Group is the local area developer for The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf and Jamba Juice, and has a number of internally developed concepts including i♥burgers, Lobster ME and The Daily Kitchen & Wellness Bar. For more information, visit www.fifthstreetgaming.com.

Nine simple ways you can improve your heart health

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Ten minutes a day is all you need to be heart healthy. Walking the dog, knowing your numbers, eating your greens – those are a few heart-healthy things that only Take 10.

Since 1963, to urge Americans to join the battle against heart and vascular diseases, Congress has advised the president to proclaim February “American Heart Month.” To celebrate American Heart Month this year, Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health is offering a variety of educational and screening events and opportunities for disease prevention and to support the fight against heart disease and stroke.

1. Beginning Feb. 1 though Feb. 28, Renown is helping people commit to improve their heart health in just 10 minutes a day. Every day in February, visit the Take 10 tab on the Renown Health Facebook page. From heart-savvy information and healthy recipes to useful apps, Renown will reveal a simple health tip that takes 10 minutes or less. Also enter to win an Ultimate Health Screening Package ($219 value).

2. Friday, Feb. 1, people are encouraged to promote awareness of heart disease by dressing in red on National Wear Red Day.

3. Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 5 and 6, Renown South Meadows Medical Center will host the life-saving services of Life Line Screening, the nation’s largest provider of preventive screenings. The screening event is designed to help local residents identify their risk of stroke, vascular disease and osteoporosis before the life-changing effects of these conditions can occur. The event is from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Northview Conference Room. Call 1-800-690-0295 to schedule an appointment.

4. Throughout February: Low-cost health screenings. These events include a variety of health screenings for cholesterol, diabetes, arthritis, heart disease and more. No appointment required. The schedule includes:

Feb 6, 8 – 10 a.m.: Renown Medical Group, 202 Los Altos Parkway.
Feb 13, 8 – 10 a.m.: 850 Mill St.
Feb 20, 8 – 10 a.m.: Renown Medical Group, 1343 W. Newlands Drive, Fernley
Feb 27, 8 – 10 a.m.: Renown South Meadows Medical Center, Northview Conference Room

5. Saturday, Feb. 9, Renown will participate in the Save a Heart – Simple 7 Health Expo featuring the American Heart Association’s Simple 7, steps to heart healthy living: Get Active, Control Cholesterol, Eat Better, Manage Blood Pressure, Lose Weight, Reduce Blood Sugar and Stop Smoking. The expo takes place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Scheels, Legends at Sparks Marina. The event is open to the public. No RSVP needed.

6. Friday, Feb. 15, at 12 noon, Renown will host a free Online Health Series webinar on the link between gout and heart disease. Renown Health Rheumatologist Malin Prupas, MD, FACP, will be the featured presenter. Register for this webinar at renown.org/onlinehealthseries.

7. Wednesday, Feb. 27, at 12 noon, Renown will host a free Online Health Series webinar on the early warning signs of heart attacks. Karen Meskimen, DNP, RN, will be the featured presenter. Register for this webinar at renown.org/onlinehealthseries.

8. Thursday, Feb. 28, Renown will host its annual Save Your Heart Luncheon featuring Letitia Anderson, MD, FACC. The educational luncheon will be from 12 noon to 1 p.m. at the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa, Paradise Ballrooms D & E. Doors open at 11:30 a.m. Cost is $10 and includes lunch. To RSVP, call 775-982-6483.

9. Friday, March 1, the American Heart Association will host its annual Go Red For Women Luncheon from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa:

Singing Valentines Will Keep Las Vegas Singing in February

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

They’ll be saying “I love you” in song — and they’ll be leaving hundreds of lucky romantics speechless.

On Wednesday and Thursday, February 13 and 14, a group of barbershop quartets will fan out across the Las Vegas Valley to deliver Singing Valentines to hundreds of special sweethearts. The sound of harmony will ring out in offices, restaurants, schools and homes throughout the city and surrounding communities. Wherever they appear, they’ll draw a crowd — and sometimes a few tears.

The quartets belong to the local Las Vegas Chapter of the 34,000-member Barbershop Harmony Society, which is headquartered in Nashville, TN.

A typical Singing Valentine costs $50 and includes two love songs sung in barbershop harmony, a personalized Valentines card and a beautiful red rose. Men and women alike are on the receiving end — with moving results.

“It’s especially fun to deliver a Singing Valentine from a woman to her husband or boyfriend,” says Dennis Johnson, of the Silver Statesmen Chorus. “Last year, my quartet went to an elementary school and caught a male teacher at lunchtime. He was stunned. His students and other teachers gathered around, and were ready to start razzing him — until they saw the tears welling up in his eyes.”

To order a Singing Valentine, contact the Silver Statesmen Chorus at 702-525-9484.

Orders can also be placed online at www.silverstatesmen.com.

No more “empty nest”: middle-aged adults face family pressure on both sides

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

The “empty nest” of past generations, in which the kids are grown up and middle-aged adults have more time to themselves, has been replaced in the United States by a nest that’s full – kids who can’t leave, can’t find a job and aging parents who need more help than ever before.

According to a new study by researchers at Oregon State University, what was once a life stage of new freedoms, options and opportunities has largely disappeared.

An economic recession and tough job market has made it hard on young adults to start their careers and families. At the same time, many older people are living longer, which adds new and unanticipated needs that their children often must step up to assist with.
The end result, researchers suggest, are “empty nest” plans that often have to be put on hold, and a mixed bag of emotions, ranging from joy and “happy-to-help” to uncertainty, frustration and exhaustion.

“We mostly found very positive feelings about adults helping their children in the emerging adulthood stage of life, from around ages 18 to 30,” said Karen Hooker, director of the OSU Center for Healthy Aging Research.

“Feelings about helping parents weren’t so much negative as just filled with more angst and uncertainty,” Hooker said. “As a society we still don’t socialize people to expect to be taking on a parent-caring role, even though most of us will at some point in our lives. The average middle-aged couple has more parents than children.”

The findings of this research were just published in the Journal of Aging Studies, and were based on data from six focus groups during 2009-10. It was one of the first studies of its type to look at how middle-aged adults actually feel about these changing trends.
Various social, economic, and cultural forces have combined to radically challenge the traditional concept of an empty nest, the scientists said. The recession that began in 2008 yielded record unemployment, substantial stock market losses, lower home values and increased demand for higher levels of education.

Around the same time, advances in health care and life expectancy have made it possible for many adults to live far longer than they used to – although not always in good health, and often needing extensive care or assistance.

This study concluded that most middle-aged parents with young adult children are fairly happy to help them out, and they understand that getting started in life is simply more difficult now. Some research has suggested that age 25 is the new 22; that substantially more parents now don’t even expect their kids to be financially independent in their early 20s, and don’t mind helping them through some difficult times.

But the response to helping adult parents who, at the same time, need increasing amounts of assistance is not as uniformly positive, the study found – it can be seen as both a joy and a burden, and in any case was not something most middle-aged adults anticipated.

“With the kids, it’s easy,” is a general purpose reaction. With aging parents, it isn’t.

“My grandparents died younger, so my parents didn’t cope with another generation,” one study participant said.

Many middle-aged people said it was difficult to make any plans, due to disruptions and uncertainty about a parent’s health at any point in time. And most said they we’re willing to help their aging parents, but a sense of being time-starved was a frequent theme.
“It brings my heart joy to be able to provide for my mom this way,” one study participant said. “There are times when it’s a burden and I feel resentful.”

The dual demands of children still transitioning to independence, and aging parents who need increasing amounts of care is causing many of the study participants to re-evaluate their own lives. Some say they want to make better plans for their future so they don’t pose such a burden to their children, and begin researching long-term care insurance. Soul-searching is apparent.

“I don’t care if I get old,” a participant said. “I just don’t want to become debilitated. So I would rather have a shorter life and a healthy life than a long life like my mom, where she doesn’t have a life. She doesn’t have memories. Our memories are what make us who we are.”

An increasing awareness of the challenges produced by these new life stages may cause more individuals to anticipate their own needs, make more concrete plans for the future, reduce ambivalent approaches and have more conversations with families about their own late-life care, the researchers said in their study.
About the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences: The College creates connections in teaching, research and community outreach while advancing knowledge, policies and practices that improve population health in communities across Oregon and beyond.

North Hill, Boston-Area Senior Living Community, Wins Innovation Award and Award for Best Repositioned 50+ Housing “On the Boards” Project in the U.S.

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

At an awards ceremony in Las Vegas last night, North Hill, the leading Boston-area senior living community, was honored with three Gold and two Silver awards in the National Association of Home Builders Best of 50+ Housing competition. This included being named the Best Repositioned 50+ Housing project “on the boards” in the nation. And then North Hill was s ingled out by judges for a special award — an Innovation Award for its industry-leading PurposeFULL Living wellness philosophy.

“Stunned and proud,” is how Kevin Burke, CEO of North Hill Communities Inc. [www.NorthHill.org] described his reaction. “Our entire community has been so committed and creative in its efforts to transform senior living. We felt honored to even be named a finalist in this, the industry’s most prestigious awards program. To be further recognized for Innovation — it’s very exciting.”

The awards reflect North Hill’s progress with the Project True North Initiative — the community’s largest and most comprehensive investment in its 28-year history. Project True North enhancements to the community include new residences, transformed indoor and outdoor spaces, and innovative services and amenities. At the heart of all the changes is PurposeFULL Living, North Hill’s multidimensional wellness philosophy [www.NorthHill.org/PurposeFULL-Living]. The judges felt the concept and execution of PurposeFULL Living was so notable it deserved a special Innovation Award.

The 50+ Housing Awards were winners were announced on January 23 at the International Builders Show in Las Vegas. North Hill received the following awards:
• GOLD — Best Repositioned/Remodeled Community on the Boards
o See renderings at http://www.northhill.org/senior-living-ma-photo-gallery
o Learn more about PurposeFULL Living at http://www.northhill.org/pursuing-your-passions
• GOLD — Best Online Marketing Strategy
o Visit the new main website, http://www.NorthHill.org, as well as a sister site focused on the initiative, http://www.TrueNorthEvolution.org
o See a recent email at http://bit.ly/UL3uU4
• GOLD — Best Sales/Marketing Event
o See photos from the event at http://bit.ly/RrqwRY
• SILVER — Best Brochure
o See a sample of the brochure at http://bit.ly/12aZCQc
• SILVER — Best Integrated Marketing Strategy
o “Discover True North,” the campaign launching the True North initiative, included direct mail, online and offline advertising, email, public relations and special events (the first of which attracted more than 400 attendees and caused a traffic jam on the Needham/Wellesley town line)
o See a sample TV ad at http://bit.ly/U4cfXo
ABOUT NORTH HILL: North Hill provides opportunities for vibrant living from its campus on the Needham/Wellesley line. Founded in 1984, a combination of location, the innovative Lifecare financial model and exceptional quality in healthcare and hospitality service have made North Hill one of the most sought-after retirement communities in Massachusetts. The North Hill vision is to be the leading provider of the most progressive, personalized healthcare and hospitality services to older adults in the Northeast. To learn more, visit www.NorthHill.org.

Locals Invited to Fall In Love Downtown

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

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For Southern Nevadans who may not have visited downtown Las Vegas recently, Valentine’s Day is a great time to explore the area. Downtown offers a variety of opportunities for the perfect date night.

The Smith Center for the Performing Arts hosts Itzhak Perlman on Feb 13. Dinner at Triple George Grill, drinks and games at Insert Coins, drinks at the mysterious Lady Silvia, a stay at the Cabana Suites and a well-made cocktail at Parlour Bar are just a few ideas for a great time. You can also take a tour of the Mob Museum, Neon Museum or walk around the Springs Preserve. There is something for everyone. To plan your Valentine’s Day right, check out the offers below

Clay Arts Vegas
http://www.clayartsvegas.com
“Four Weeks of Date Night:” class series for couples and singles on the potters’ wheel, firing and glazes. $150 for four-week series.
Thursdays, Feb. 14, 21, 28 and Mar. 7, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Electric Lemonade Shop
http://electriclemonadeshop.com/
15% off all items in store.
Thursday, Feb. 14

Forever Young Sculptures
http://www.foreveryoungsculptures.com/
Custom chocolate heart sculptures.
Now through Feb. 14

Fremont Street Experience
http://www.vegasexperience.com/
Viva Vision Show: “Heart: Crazy on Vegas”
Concert: Heart, featuring “Barracuda,” “Magic Man,” and “Crazy on You.”
Thursday, Feb. 14

Gaia Flowers, Gifts & Art
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Gaia-Flowers-Gifts-and-Art/108696899197958
“Flowers for Hope:” $10 from each “Candlelighters Arrangement” sold from now through Valentine’s Day is donated to Candlelighters Childhood Cancer Foundation.
Special Candlelighters benefit event with raffle prizes and refreshments:
Thursday, Feb. 14, 12-5 p.m.

Glamorous Doodads
www.glamorousdoodads.com
25% off in-store purchases.
Now through Feb. 14

Inside Style
http://www.insidestylehome.com/
Romantic cinnamon candle gift with purchase.
Now through Feb. 14

The Lady Silvia
http://www.theladysilvia.com/
Free champagne for ladies, 6-8 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 14

The Mob Museum
http://themobmuseum.org/
Anniversary celebrations include: commemorative collectible pin to first 1,000 guests; line-up photo opportunity with fun Valentine’s messages; oversize postcard signing in the lobby.
Thursday, Feb. 14, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
The Smith Center for the Performing Artshttp://www.thesmithcenter.com/
Performance by Itzhak Perlman, undeniably the reigning virtuoso of the violin.
Wednesday, Feb. 13, 7:30 p.m.
Skin City Body Painting Studio & Boutique
http://www.skincitybodypainting.com/
25% off boutique merchandise to anyone who says, “I love downtown!”
Thursday, Feb. 14, 12-6 p.m.
Vexed By Design
http://www.vexedlv.com/
10% off all spa gift baskets.
Now through Feb. 14

About DLVA:
The Downtown Las Vegas Alliance (DLVA) is a non-profit corporation comprised of downtown Las Vegas stakeholders – public, private and not-for-profit entities committed to enhancing business development and growth and quality of life in downtown Las Vegas. The DLVA provides a collective voice for established downtown-area businesses, provides information and assistance to new and potential downtown-area firms and works to enhance public awareness of downtown Las Vegas. Members enjoy affiliation with like-minded companies, access to important information relevant to the downtown area and inclusion in the DLVA’s public and community relations efforts. For more information, visit www.downtownlasvegasalliance.org; for membership information, please email info@downtownlasvegasalliance.com.

-30-
Eryn Sebelius
Faiss Foley Warren
Public Relations and Government Affairs
100 N. City Parkway Suite 750
Las Vegas, Nevada 89106
702-933-7777 ext 311 – office
702-933-1261 – fax
702-234-6684 – cell
eryn@ffwpr.com

Celebrate the Year of the Water Snake with Chinese New Year Festivities at Fremont Street Experience

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Celebrate the Year of the Water Snake with Chinese New Year Festivities at Fremont Street Experience

Second Annual Chinese New Year in the Desert to Take Place in Downtown Las Vegas Feb. 8-10

Celebrate the Year of the Water Snake as Fremont Street Experience, the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority (LVCVA) and Golden Catalyst present the second annual Chinese New Year in the Desert festival in Downtown Las Vegas from Feb. 8 – 10. Chinese New Year is the most important of the traditional Chinese holidays. It is known as “Spring Festival” in China, “Tet New Year” in Vietnamese and “Seol-lal” in Korean.

Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman will kick-off the three-day festival during the opening ceremonies which will feature a live authentic dragon dance by the Las Vegas Lohan School of Shaolin. Throughout the weekend guests will also experience live International Cultural Performances; taste authentic dishes from around the world in the International Vendor Village; watch contestants compete for the chance to be crowned Miss Asian American Pacific Islander USA which will include a Macy*s Fashion Show, Talent Show and interview segment; view stunning parade floats in the McDonald’s Las Vegas Spring Festival Parade; and create their own lantern to display on Fremont Street Experience to commemorate the Lunar Lantern Festival.

“Last year we hosted the first-ever Chinese New Year festival in Downtown Las Vegas which was a great success,” said Jeff Victor, president of Fremont Street Experience. “We are excited to once again host this important holiday and encourage everyone to come downtown for a fun-filled weekend to usher in the Year of the Snake and wish wealth, health and good fortune to all.”

“Chinese New Year in the Desert will be a three-day cultural party with several new marquee events, making Downtown Las Vegas truly one of the best places for everyone to come together and ring in the Year of the Water Snake,” said Jan-Ie Low, of Golden Catalyst.

“Las Vegas is excited to usher in Chinese New Year with a variety of cultural amenities, attractions and celebrations,” said Michael Goldsmith, vice president of international sales for the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority. “China is an important market for the destination as it is our number one source of international travel from Asia.”

Opening Ceremonies – Friday, Feb. 8 at 6 p.m. on the 3rd Street Stage
Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman will help usher in the new year by participating in the Opening Ceremonies and ribbon cutting on Friday, Feb. 8 at 6 p.m. on the 3rd Street Stage (next to the D, Four Queens and Fremont). The new year will be greeted with a live authentic dragon dance performed by the Las Vegas Lohan School of Shaolin complete with virtual firecrackers on Viva Vision (the largest video screen in the world measuring 1,500 feet long and suspended 90 feet above the street), an eye painting ceremony and performers dressed in elaborate costumes.

International Vendor Village and Cultural Performances
Throughout the three-day festival, guests will be taken on a journey around the world as they experience performances from several Asian entertainers on the 3rd Street Stage and visit the International Vendor Village, located on 3rd Street North between Fremont Street and Stewart Avenue, to taste the international flavors from renown food vendors. The International Vendor Village and Cultural Performances will take place on Friday, Feb. 8 from 5-10 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 9 and 10 from noon-9 p.m.

Lunar Lantern Festival
To commemorate the Lunar Lantern Festival, which officially ends the Chinese New Year celebrations, primary grade students of Clark County School District will be constructing paper lanterns marked with their “wish” for 2013. The lanterns will then be on display throughout Fremont Street Experience during the Chinese New Year in the Desert festival. Additionally, guests and passersby are invited to stop in at a booth located near the 3rd Street Stage to build their own lantern to display on Fremont Street Experience. The Lunar Lantern Festival is sponsored by St. Jude’s Women’s Auxiliary Group.

Miss Asian American Pacific Islander USA Pageant
Throughout the three-day event, several women will compete in the Miss Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) USA Pageant. Contestants will participate in the Macy*s Fashion Show, modeling the latest cutting edge Spring fashion lines from Macy*s, a Talent Show emceed by Ian Ziering from Beverly Hills 90210, and interview segment for the chance to be crowned Miss AAPI USA. The winner will receive a combination of cash and gift prizes with a retail value of $10,000. The First Runner-Up and Second Runner-Up will receive a combination of cash and gift prizes with a retail value of $5,000 and $2,500 respectively.

The schedule for the Miss Asian American Pacific Islander Pageant is as follows:
*** All events take place on the 3rd Street Stage.

Friday, Feb. 8
8 p.m. – Introduction of Miss AAPI USA Contestants
9 p.m. – Macy*s Fashion Show

Saturday, Feb. 9
8 p.m. – Talent Show: Miss AAPI USA Contestants

Sunday, Feb. 10
8 p.m. – Interview and Crowning of Miss AAPI USA Contestants

Heart Walk Benefitting the American Heart Association
On Saturday, Feb. 9 thousands of walkers from all over the valley will step out to support the American Heart Association during the Heart Walk. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. at the 3rd Street Stage with the walk taking place from 8:30-10:30 a.m.

McDonald’s Las Vegas Spring Festival Parade
On Sunday, Feb. 10 local businesses and organizations will come together to celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year during the McDonald’s Las Vegas Spring Festival Parade. Parade participants will showcase their talent and creativity with the most extravagant floats in vibrant colors to commemorate the rich history of the most important holiday of the Asian community. Starting at 10 a.m. at the intersection of Gass Avenue and 4th Street, the McDonald’s Las Vegas Spring Festival Parade will travel up 4th Street through Fremont Street Experience and end at the intersection of 4th Street and Ogden Avenue.

For a detailed entertainment schedule go to www.cnyinthedesert.com. All entertainment is free and open to the public.

About Fremont Street Experience
Fremont Street Experience is a five-block entertainment complex located in historic downtown Las Vegas. Fremont Street Experience features Viva Vision, the world’s largest video screen which is 1,500 feet long, 90 feet wide and suspended 90 feet above the pedestrian mall. Viva Vision features nightly spectacular light and sounds shows with 12.5 million LED lights and a 550,000-watt sound system. Fremont Street Experience is a one-of-a-kind venue which includes free nightly concerts and entertainment on three stages. With direct pedestrian access to 10 casinos, more than 60 restaurants and specialty retail kiosks, Fremont Street Experience attracts over 17 million annual visitors. Fremont Street Experience can be found online at www.vegasexperience.com.

Looking for Success in 2013?

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

MYVEGAS IS ALL ABOUT SUCCESS!
YOURS! PERSONAL, OR BUSINESS!

We’ll be providing tips from the pros over the next year,
And here’s just one to get you going…

A few days a go, my good friend and colleague,
Jeff Rogers, released a new ebook called

“How to Live an Aligned Life:
Find the Life, Purpose, and Passion You Were Made for.”

I had a chance to read it — and it’s fantastic. It’s a quick, enlightening read that will introduce you to the 7 core principles that will allow you to create a life completely congruent with your gifts and dreams. And no, this isn’t the same re-hashed stuff you hear from personal development seminar gurus or “law of attraction” DVDs. These are powerful, proven principles that dig deep and help you get to the heart of who you are and how to get what you really want in your life.

Best of all?

Because Jeff and his team have just launched their new website, they’re giving the ebook away.

This ebook is a game-changer.

I highly recommend you check it out.

To your success,

MYVEGAS MAGAZINE!

QUINCEAÑERAS MAGAZINE TO HOST COVER MODEL CASTING AT THE BOULEVARD MALL

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

WHAT: On Sunday, January 6, Quinceañeras Magazine will host an open casting in search of its next Miss Cover Girl. Young ladies of Hispanic descent, ages 14-15, are invited to attend. All contestants must be accompanied by an adult or guardian. Nevada residents only. A release form will be required in order to be considered.

The open casting at the mall will feature a runway presentation, DJ and a section for special guests attending to support those participating in the casting. A Wall of Fame will also be displayed throughout the center featuring past quinceañeras.

Contestants will be participating in the Quinceañera Expo on February 17. Finalists will compete for the crown on February 24 in Las Vegas.

For additional information on the casting, please visit www.quinceanerasmagazine.com.

WHEN: Sunday, January 6
2:00 p.m.

WHERE: The Boulevard Mall
East JCPenney Courtyard
3528 S. Maryland Parkway
Las Vegas, NV 89169
P: (702) 735-8268
www.boulevardmall.com

About The Boulevard Mall:
The Boulevard Mall is a super-regional shopping center strategically located in the heart of Las Vegas just two miles from the Las Vegas Strip. The Boulevard is located on Maryland Parkway, a six-lane thoroughfare with easy mall accessibility from all directions. Some of its notable retailers include jcpenney, Macy’s, Sears, Charlotte Russe, Gamestop, Layne Bryant, Old Navy, Cotton On and Victoria’s Secret. For additional information, please visit www.boulevardmall.com.

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts – February 2013 Calendar Of Events

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
Centers will be closed Feb. 18 for holiday observance.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $5 dollars per person per week at door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $4 dollars per person per week at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of international fun learning Armenian, Bulgarian, Israeli, Arabic, Macedonian, Russian, Greek, Turkish, Chinese, Serbian folk dances, and more. No need to bring a partner. Cosponsored by the Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing Club of Las Vegas, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 562-9889 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Spring Class Registration Opens Feb. 2 (all ages)
Registration for the six-week spring 2013 classes Feb. 20-March 30 is open Feb. 2-16.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Cultural arts classes include African Drum; African Dance for Children and African Dance for Teens/Adults; Keep it Moving…Ballet & Tap; Ballet–Beginner/Intermediate; Modern Dance; Hip Hop, Yoga–Health & Wellness; Tae Kwon Do; Video & Documentary Creation; Music Production; and Private Piano/Voice lessons. The West Las Vegas Arts Center also will offer two new exciting classes exploring the creativity and sheer fun of arts and crafts. They are: Kids Create and Craft It Up. To register, or for more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-4800.
Sweethearts Square Dance (ages 8+)
Saturday, Feb. 2; introductory lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7:30 to 10 p.m.
Admission: $12 per person at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Enjoy square dancing to callers such as Andy Finch, Joe Valvo, Vern Vernazarro and Ron Sowash of Las Vegas and with guest cuer Ron Hartzell. No need to bring a partner. Class-level dances, Plus and Round dances will be included, as well as a chance to win door prizes. Refreshments will be available. Cosponsored by the Stardusters, Las Vegas Square & Round Dance Club, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 348-4906 or (702) 229-6383, or visit www.lasvegassquarenrounddancers.org

Valentine Dance with Boyd Coulter & the Good Times Band
Saturday, Feb. 9, at 7 p.m.
Tickets: $10 advance purchase; $15 per person at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance the evening away with Big Band music. Step back to a sweeter time when Big Band swing was the thing and romance was the theme. Enjoy an evening of dancing to great tunes made famous by the bands of Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey and Benny Goodman; romantic standards from the ‘50s and ‘60s; cha-chas, tangos, and more. For more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call 229-6383.

Downtown Cultural Series – Emanuel Schmidt Quartet “The Music of Miles” (all ages)
Friday, Feb. 15, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
An excellent and experienced musician, Emanuel Schmidt has performed at schools, clubs, cafés and festivals – for intimate crowds as well as for thousands – in Australia, Switzerland and in the U.S.A. According to Schmidt’s peers and educators, he is “an outstanding and versatile guitarist of exceptional ability, and an extraordinarily thoughtful and hardworking musician.” Described by The Australian Music Centre’s Ian Shanahan as an “accomplished and imaginative composer,” Schmidt has written for a full orchestra and performs reflective, emotive and adventurous original compositions with his groups. This group will perform selections from albums such as “Kind Of Blue,” “My Funny Valentine,” “ESP,” and more. Call (702) 229-3515 for more details.

The Poets’ Corner
Hosted by Keith Brantley
Friday, Feb. 15, 7 p.m.
Admission is free.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
A monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants, featuring the best local poetry talent.

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Presents “Across The Truckee” (all ages)
Friday-Sunday, Feb. 15-17; 2 p.m. shows Saturday and Sunday; 7 p.m. shows Friday and Saturday.
Tickets: $7 for adults, $5 for teens/seniors/military; and $3 for children under age 12.
Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St., (702) 229-3515.
Who knew Nevada’s history could be so rich in entertainment? Don’t miss the chance to see the main stage version of “Across The Truckee,” the newly created and lively production about Nevada history, before it goes on tour. Meet colorful characters galore and tap your toes to music that sets you to humming—whatever your age! For tickets and information, call (702) 229-6383 or 229-6553, or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.
Guy Davis in Concert
Saturday, Feb. 16, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $10 advance purchase; $15 per person at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, Jeanne Roberts Theatre, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Guy Davis is a musician, composer, actor, director, and writer. But most importantly, Guy Davis is a bluesman. The blues permeates every corner of Davis’ creativity. Throughout his career, he has dedicated himself to reviving the traditions of acoustic blues and bringing them to as many ears as possible through the material of the great blues masters, along with African-American stories and his own original songs, stories and performance pieces. For more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call 229-6383.

An Evening with Peter Yarrow (all ages)
Friday, Feb. 22, 8 p.m.
Tickets: $10 in advance/$15 event day
Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St., (702) 229-3515.
Share an intimate evening with legendary singer/songwriter and activist Peter Yarrow (Peter, Paul & Mary, Puff the Magic Dragon, Operation Respect). Inspirational as well as humorous, Peter will look back over the career of Peter, Paul & Mary, telling stories and singing some of the many hits that won them acclaim worldwide. Call 229-3515 for more information.

The Jester Hairston Music Association, Inc. Presents “Why Do We Sing – The Evolution of African-American Music” (all ages)
Cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District.
Saturday, Feb. 23, 3 p.m.
Admission is free, but tickets are required and may be picked up in advance at the West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd.
West Las Vegas Library Theatre, 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 507-3989.
The Jester Hairston Music Association (JHMA) chorus, along with youth from the community, share reasons and circumstances of why we sing. The historical music genres of jazz, spirituals, and gospel will be explored and performed in this festive occasion. Please call (702) 229-4800 for more information.

USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, Feb. 23, 7 to 11 p.m.; dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Cost: $10 per person at the door; $5 for USA Dance members, military, and students ages 13-25.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Cosponsored by the USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national organization USA Dance. USA Dance Las Vegas is a volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. Call (702) 813-6694 or (702) 229-6383 for more information, or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org.
Exhibitions
“Second Wind” Exhibition
Artist Robin Stark
Nov. 26, 2012-Feb. 14, 2013; Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Grand Gallery, 495 S. Main St., First floor, (702) 229-1012.
Inspiration for this work was influenced by the work of American sculptor David Smith. The artist’s ceramic sculptural forms have a reference to the traditional ceramic vessel, yet deviate from functionality and focus on expressive formal elements (surface shapes defined by sharp edges and bold color) to suggest visual movement and momentum. The pieces treat the surface as a two-dimensional format to imply motion already established in the three-dimensional form through repetition and layering of various shapes and colors. The purity and intensity of the hues generate an emotional quality, which is critical to the overall nature of the pieces.

“Narratives of Progress” Exhibit
Artist Armin Mühsam
Jan. 18-March 16, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Snake Exhibit
Jan. 31-Feb. 23, by appointment only. Artists’ reception Jan. 31, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
Chinese Year of the Snake begins Feb. 10. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

African-American Heritage Exhibit
2013 Featured Artist: Lolita Develay
Feb. 7-April 18, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Nevada Watercolor Society’s 2013 Signature Members’ Exhibit
Feb. 28-March 23, during the reception and by appointment.
Artists’ reception Feb. 28, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

# # #
High-resolution photos are available for download at ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/Feb_2013_Events/ and ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/Exhibitions/.
No password is required.
Media Contact:
Margaret Kurtz
Public Information Officer
City of Las Vegas
495 S. Main St., 7th Floor
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702) 229-6993
Cell (702) 249-1828
E-mail: mkurtz@lasvegasnevada.gov

Two Health Screening Events Offered Through Renown

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Two Health Screening Events Offered Through Renown

RENO, Nev. (Oct. 23, 2012) – Renown Health Institute for Heart & Vascular Health is pleased to host the life-saving services of Life Line Screening, the nation’s largest provider of preventive screenings, to help local residents identify their risk of stroke, vascular disease and osteoporosis before the life-changing effects of these conditions can occur.

The event is open to local residents and will be held Thursday, Nov. 8, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., at Renown Regional Medical Center, 1155 Mill Street., in the Mack Auditorium, and Friday, Nov. 9, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at South Meadows Medical Center, 10101 Double R Blvd., in the Capri Conference Room. To pre-register for a screening contact Life Line Screening at www.lifelinescreening.com, or call 1-800-690-0295 to make an appointment. For directions, please dial 775-982-4100.

Offering these preventive services can help save lives and are painless and affordable. Symptoms are rarely present, and if they are, they are generally subtle, almost unnoticeable. In fact, half of all stroke victims don’t have any symptoms prior to their stroke. A simple screening may save you or your loved one’s life.

Screenings provided will include:
• Carotid Artery Screening – painless, non-invasive Doppler ultrasound used to visualize the carotid arteries, the arteries that bring blood to the brain. The majority of strokes are caused by plaque build up in these arteries.

• Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening – Ultrasound is used to visualize the abdominal aorta, the largest artery in the body, to measure the diameter of the aorta. This measurement can indicate if there is a weakening in the aortic wall which can cause a ballooning effect known as an aneurysm. Abdominal aortic aneurysms can burst. When they do, it is usually fatal.

• Peripheral Arterial Disease Screening – PAD is also known as “hardening of the arteries.” Individuals with PAD have a 4 to 6 fold increased risk of heart disease. Risk is evaluated through a measurement called the “Ankle-Brachial Index,” which is obtained by reading the systolic pressure in the ankle and arm.

• Osteoporosis Screening – Ultrasound is used to estimate the bone density of the heel. This can indicate if there is a reduction in bone density, which may indicate the presence of osteoporosis. The heel is used because it is similar in composition to the hip, where disabling fractures often occur.

• Atrial Fibrillation is an abnormal heart beat (arrhythmia) that affects the atria – the upper chambers of the heart – and is the most common form of sustained arrhythmia. 2.5 million Americans have been diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, and for those over age 40, there is a one in four chance of developing the condition.

Renown Provides Advanced Training for Healthcare Professionals

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Renown Provides Advanced Training for Healthcare Professionals

RENO, Nev. (Oct. 30, 2012) – Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health is teaming up with the Nevada Academy of Family Physicians (NAFP) to provide advanced training for healthcare professionals across northern Nevada this weekend in a three-day educational conference.

The 23rd Annual Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine Conference will be held at the Resort at Squaw Creek in Olympic Valley, Calif., Friday through Sunday, Nov. 2 – 4. This continuing medical education program is designed for internal medicine and family physicians, hospitalists, cardiovascular specialists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, pharmacists, nurses and all other physicians and healthcare personnel.

Topics include the most recent advances and current established guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, stroke and diseases or problems associated with heart disease.

The conference is sponsored by Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health. For more information and to register for the conference, visit renown.org/UpcomingEvents. Registration will also be available at the conference. To download a copy of the event program, click here.

About the Nevada Academy of Family Physicians:
The NAFP promotes the profession of family practice by preserving the scope of practice, promoting primary care research and encouraging family physicians to assume leadership roles. The NAFP works as an advocate for family physicians and their patients to various government and non-governmental organizations affecting healthcare access and delivery.

About Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health
Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health has more than 30 years of recognition as the region’s leader of heart and vascular care. More heart procedures are performed at Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health than anywhere else in northern Nevada. Renown’s heart physicians have access to sophisticated diagnostic and surgical equipment such as the D-SPECT camera that detects heart attacks faster, the da Vinci® S HD™ Robotic Surgical System, 64-slice CT scanner, nuclear medicine, MRI and cardiac catheterization so patients can be diagnosed and treated quickly. For more information, visit renown.org/heart.

Santa’s Handy Hints For everyone on your list

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Santa’s Handy Hints For everyone on your list

(Family Features) Make holiday shopping a little easier this year with a few hints from the big man himself. Whether they love music, technology, fashion or fun, these gifts will put a smile on everyone’s face — and turn you into a holiday hero.

For the music lover
HTC One V — $269.99
www.mycricket.com
The HTC One V phone — available at Cricket Wireless — combines the vibrant authenticity of Beats Audio with the no-contract carrier’s unlimited Muve Music service, for the best possible sound quality on songs downloaded directly to the phone. Cricket’s all-inclusive Android rate plans include unlimited talk, text and data plus unlimited music, starting at $50 per month.

For the young at heart
LEGO Bricks & More Basic Bricks Deluxe Set — $29.99
www.BuildTogether.com
A perfect gift for a family that loves to spend quality time being creative and building together. This open-ended LEGO construction set comes with 650 colorful LEGO bricks and photo inspiration to provide endless play possibilities at a great value. Take the fun beyond the box at the Build Together website, where you’ll find more building inspiration as well as monthly (seasonal and holiday) building instructions.

For the fashionista
Fashion: The Definitive History of Costume and Style — $50.00
www.dk.com
Containing everything you need to know about changing fashion and style, this beautiful book catalogs 3,000 years of fashion evolution. With stunning visual clarity, attention to detail, and information on icons from Marie Antoinette to Alexander McQueen, “Fashion: The Definitive History of Costume and Style” offers an invaluable overview of the history of fashion and costume.

For the audiophile
AUVIO Bluetooth Portable Speaker — $79.99
www.radioshack.com
Get rich, full and dynamic sound with no cord to tie you down. This sleek, compact speaker is compatible with most Bluetooth-enabled tablets, laptops, MP3 players, and smartphones running iOS or Android platforms. The built-in speakerphone makes picking up calls easy when paired with your mobile phone. Already a great value compared to similar products, save even more with $10 back for every $50 you spend at RadioShack starting November 4, 2012. Exclusively at RadioShack.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

 

Healthy Aging: Up2Me

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Healthy Aging: Up2Me
According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than 125 million people suffer from at least one chronic illness. If you are an adult with a chronic condition such as diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, heart disease, chronic pain or anxiety, this Healthy Aging : Up2Me workshop can help you.

It’s also important for family caregivers to avoid developing a chronic illness due to stress and neglect of their own health and well being.
• Join this FREE 2 1/2 hour workshop held each week for six weeks.
• Learn from trained volunteer leaders who have cared for those with chronic
health conditions.
• Set goals for yourself.
Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health
888 W. Bonneville Ave • Las Vegas, NV 89106
Fridays: September 28 – November 2, 2012
12:30 – 3 p.m.
Sign up with Susan Hirsch at hirschs2@ccf.org or 702-483-6023.

Renown Health News Update – October 2012

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Renown Health News Update – October 2012
Renown Health is committed to providing media with the latest news and events, national health trends and observances. Subject matter experts are available to discuss the following topics. Please contact Dan Davis at 775-982-6370 or ddavis2@renown.org to schedule an interview. Photos and video can also be made available.

INSIDE RENOWN HEALTH
• Pinterest – Renown Health has launched a Pinterest page featuring boards like Kidtastic Art, No Place Like Home and Passion for Purple. Renown’s Motivated Mommies board features pins from healthy and active moms who maintain a balance between work, parenting and self. If you know someone who fits this description, nominate them to participate by sending an email to support@renown.org.
• Flu Shots Available – As winter begins, so will an increase in cold and flu sicknesses. To keep from catching the flu virus, people should protect themselves with flu shots. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that everyone six months and older get a flu vaccine each year. A Renown representative is available to speak about ways to prevent the flu virus and other methods to keep from getting sick.
• Komen Race for the Cure – Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer and the fifth most common cause of death. To help spread awareness and raise funds, Renown Health’s team Renown Racers will raise money and participate in the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. Renown also offers preventative measures for women in the community. Screening and self breast exams are imperative to all women and should be discussed with a doctor. A medical expert is available to talk about the importance of early detection.

NATIONAL TRENDS LOCALIZED
• Halloween Tips and Tricks – As Halloween approaches, parents should prepare for a safe and healthy evening of trick or treating. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest offering nutritious snacks, limiting the number of treats children eat and ensuring that costumes and makeup are safe for children to wear. A Renown representative can discuss ways to make this Halloween night safe and fun for kids.
• Survival from Heart Attacks on the Rise – Death due to heart attacks is on the decline in the United States. Some doctors believe this trend is due to changes in healthcare and increases in medical technology. At Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health, leading edge physicians and technology help community members stay healthy and recover quickly if heart problems occur. A Renown representative is available to discuss ways to prevent heart attacks and to improve survival chances if one occurs.
• Paleo Diet – The Paleolithic Diet and other elimination diets like it have become increasingly popular as a way to lose weight quickly. Yet, once an individual stops dieting, he or she is likely to gain back most of the weight lost. A Renown representative is available to discuss more effective ways to lose weight and keep it off.

IMPORTANT HEALTH DATES/OBSERVANCES
• National Health Education Week – National Health Education Week is Oct. 15 to Oct. 19. This celebration focuses national attention on a major public health issue. This year’s health issue is “Adolescent Health: Planting Seeds for a Healthier Generation,” which aims to improve the health and future of America’s youth. A Renown representative is available to discuss ways to keep children healthy both physically and mentally.
• National Physical Therapy Month – October is dedicated to recognizing the important roles of those medical professionals who keep us moving. At the CARF accredited Renown Rehabilitation Hospital, physicians and physical therapists provide quality care to patients helping them to get back to their lives. A Renown Rehab representative can discuss how physical therapy helps people return to the quality of life they desire.
• Respiratory Care Week – Respiratory Care Week is Oct. 21 to Oct. 27. The week is dedicated to respiratory care professionals, and it is designed to bring awareness to the lung diseases like CDP and asthma. At Renown, the department of Respiratory Care Services dedicates itself to patients ensuring they receive the treatment necessary to manage their diseases. A Renown representative is available to discuss ways to manage respiratory diseases and treatment options available at Respiratory Care Services.

Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging Launches InvestigAge for Aging Services & Seniors Housing Industry

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Mather LifeWays announces the launch of a new online experts forum for the seniors housing/aging services industry, called InvestigAge.

Developed by Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging, InvestigAge is anticipated to be a key resource for senior living/aging services providers, professionals, developers, and investors, as well as for researchers and other stakeholders with interests in the field of aging. InvestigAge will highlight current findings and trends impacting housing and services for older adults.

The InvestigAge Editorial Board, consisting of 12 recognized industry leaders and researchers, will provide brief summaries of original research papers and reports.

Different than an abstract, which merely describes overall findings of a study, the annotated summaries will include a synopsis of the research, as well as a critical evaluation or analysis to help the reader interpret and apply the results.

“We see InvestigAge as a synergistic means to bridge scholarly research and industry practice,” said Linda Hollinger-Smith, PhD, RN, FAAN, vice president, Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging, who led the development and implementation of the launch.
“InvestigAge is just what the field needs around evidence-based research,” said Larry Minnix, president and CEO, LeadingAge. “We value this new tool for disseminating valuable research to senior living providers who are looking for a comprehensive resource to help inform their strategies and move our industry forward.”

Users will have access to InvestigAge online at any time with a login and password; in addition, they will receive a monthly e-newsletter highlighting new articles.

“InvestigAge will bring together key research, reports, and other original resources in a way that will be accessible in one place — rather than requiring extensive online or library searches,” said Mary Leary, CEO and president, Mather LifeWays.

Given Mather LifeWays’ strong reputation as a source of information about aging well through its successful 10-year history of the consumer-oriented Aging in Action online website and e-newsletter, with more than 13,000 subscribers, this highly-anticipated resource will benefit the aging services professional field as well. For more information, or to register for InvestigAge, visit online at www.investigage.com.

Based in Evanston, Illinois, Mather LifeWays www.matherlifeways.com is a unique, non-denominational not-for-profit organization founded 70 years ago to serve the needs of older adults. Dedicated to developing and implementing Ways to Age WellSM, Mather LifeWays creates programs, places, and residences for today’s young-at-heart older adults. Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging is the research and education arm of Mather LifeWays, and serves as a thought leader in the field of aging by designing and conducting national applied research, pilot demonstration projects, and education initiatives.

CONTACT: Lori Keenan, +1-847-902-2905, Lori@SmarthinkingPR.com

Renown Health Notices

Renown Health is committed to providing media with the latest news and events, national health trends and observances. Subject matter experts are available to discuss the following topics. Please contact Dan Davis at 775-982-6370 or ddavis2@renown.org to schedule an interview. Photos and video can also be made available.

INSIDE RENOWN HEALTH
• Hand Foot and Mouth Disease – During August, Washoe County School District and the Washoe County Health District issued warnings to parents of school children about hand, foot and mouth disease. A Renown Health pediatrician is available to answer questions about the disease and to suggest ways to prevent its spread.
• FastTrack ERs – The Emergency Rooms (ERs) at Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center now have the region’s first and only FastTrack ERs. Open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, the system is designed to treat patients who need immediate attention for small emergencies including minor cuts and burns, allergic reactions and other minor injuries. A Renown Health representative is available to discuss how FastTrack ER will help improve a patient’s ER experience.
• Pathway to Excellence® – Both Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center have been recognized as the first two Pathway to Excellence® hospitals in Nevada by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. This award honors a work environment designed to improve overall nursing satisfaction and retention of quality nursing staff. A Renown Health representative is available to discuss what this honor means for patient care.

NATIONAL TRENDS LOCALIZED
• Digital Accountability to Get Healthy – Getting exercise, eating right and losing weight always seems to be a challenge. Already connected to the digital world, people have turned to using social media tools and platforms to achieve their health goals. Renown Health has Healthy Tracks, an online program, to encourage employees to get screenings, exercise and eat nutritiously. A representative can speak on the benefits of digital accountability and how community members can become part of the Healthy Tracks challenge.
• Swallowing foreign objects – Each year, more than 100,000 cases of kids swallowing foreign objects are reported in the United States. Sometimes, the swallowed object may not harm a child at all. Other times, a doctor’s visit may be necessary. A Renown Health representative is available to talk about what to do if your child swallows something he or she should not.
• Dense breasts causing mammogram concerns – More women are learning from their physicians that they may have breasts too dense for mammograms to give a good picture. Women whose breast tissue is very dense have a greater risk of developing breast cancer than women whose breasts contain more fatty tissue. In addition, dense breast tissue makes spotting possible tumors on a mammogram more difficult. A Renown Health specialist can discuss other preventative measures and screenings women should take.

IMPORTANT HEALTH DATES/OBSERVANCES
• National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month – More than 23 million children and teenagers in the United States ages 2 to 19 are obese or overweight. Nearly one third of America’s children are at early risk for Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and even stroke. A pediatrician from Renown Health can discuss ways to prevent childhood obesity and keep children healthy.
• Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month – More than 20,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year, and approximately 15,000 women die annually from the disease. Ovarian Cancer is referred to as the silent killer because it usually is not discovered until its advanced stages. A gynecologist is available to talk about ways women can discover and effectively treat ovarian cancer early.
• Prostate Cancer Awareness Month – Prostate Cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in America affecting 1 in 6 men. Renown Institute for Cancer offers patients PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) screenings, da Vinci Robotic Surgery and leading radiation treatment options including TomoTherapy. Low-cost health screenings are offered every Wednesday. A local doctor is available to speak about this screening and cancer treatment options.

Free Screenings During Senior Fest

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General, Health and Home Care 

Hundreds of seniors will take advantage of free health screenings offered at Senior Fest 2012, Tuesday, Sept. 4 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Reno Town Mall. Last year, seniors lined up at the large tented area to participate in this once a year community outreach for tests offered by the health care team of professionals at Renown Health and Senior Care Plus.

Attendees, age 50 and older, can receive screenings regardless of their health insurance carrier. They include a Basic Metabolic Panel and Lipid Profile, Glycohemoglobin (Hemoglobin A1C) for known diabetics, blood pressure check and body mass index calculation. A pharmacist will also be available to review medications. Lab screenings will be offered from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

In addition to screenings, flu and pneumonia shots will be available at a low cost to general attendees. Medicare beneficiaries (Part B) and members of Senior Care Plus will receive the shots with no out-of-pocket cost.

Renown Health representatives will also be present to share important health information about specialized senior services, knee and hip joint replacement, cancer, heart services, Medical Group and Urgent Care and Cosmetic Laser & Skin Care.

For more information about the health screenings, contact Renown Wellness Resources at 775-982-5433.

About Hometown Health
Established in 1988, Hometown Health is the insurance division of Renown Health. Hometown Health is northern Nevada’s largest and most experienced health-insurance companies. Providing wide-ranging medical coverage and great service to members, Hometown Health represents a philosophy of health care that emphasizes active partnerships between members and physicians. Hometown Health values prevention as a key component of comprehensive care – reducing the risks of illness and helping to treat small problems before they can become more severe. Hometown Health offers a number of insurance products including HMO, PPO, HSA, Dental, Vision, and Senior Care Plus, northern Nevada’s first Medicare Advantage Plan. For more information, call 775-982-3000 or visit hometownhealth.com.

About Senior Fest
The 17th annual Senior Fest is the largest senior citizen outreach in northern Nevada. It offers informational booths featuring businesses and organizations that provide senior services in the Truckee Meadows community. Senior Fest is held at Reno Town Mall on the corner of Peckham Lane and South Virginia, across from the Reno Sparks Convention and Visitors Authority. Parking is free at both the mall and the Atlantis Casino parking lot. For more information, call 775-348-0717.

There’s No Place Like Home

September 1, 2012 by · Comments Off on There’s No Place Like Home
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Press-Media Releases 

There’s No Place Like Home
By Michael Clark

If you are on Medicare and have had a recent hospital stay, experts say there is about a 1-in-5 chance you will find yourself back in the hospital again within a month. Hospital readmissions are not only expensive they are hard on both patients and families. According to analysts, three-fourths of these readmissions are potentially avoidable.
Now, the Nevada Partnership for Value-driven Healthcare (NPV) has an initiative with an ultimate goal of reducing these hospital readmissions by at least 10%. The No Place Like Home Campaign is being implemented in Nevada by HealthInsight, the state’s Medicare Quality Improvement Organization.

Typically, problems begin when patients receive inadequate preparation for discharge from the hospital. The handover from the hospital to outpatient providers is poorly handled, and patients and their family caregivers are left to cope on their own with medical issues that they don’t understand. In fact, only about half of discharged patients follow up with their primary-care physicians after they leave the hospital, and those who don’t are much more likely to be readmitted than those who do see a doctor.
“Have we properly prepared the patient for a return home?” asks Deborah Huber, executive director of the non-profit organization HealthInsight, a prominent member of the NPV. “Poor communication is at the heart of the problem.”
Huber points out that too often people released from hospital care do not know when to go to their primary-care doctor, or which medications to take, or the costs involved. Making matters worse, there are no clear lines of authority. As a result, the system sets these individuals up to fail and creates a dangerous situation for patients, according to Brian Jack, an expert on hospital engineering.

In one study, for example, 78 percent of patients discharged from the ER did not understand their diagnosis, their ER treatment, home care instructions, or warnings signs of when to return to the hospital. Health care providers are partly responsible for this lack of comprehension.

IHI, a Boston-based nonprofit organization, advises hospitals and other institutions to use a patient-centered approach that looks at post-discharge care through a patient’s eyes. By doing “deep dives” into several patient histories, IHI says, and finding out why the patients were readmitted, it’s possible to understand where the entire process falls short and begin to fix it.

Another area that needs improvement has to do with what is called the transitions of care…do the health care providers receiving the patient know what the ones sending the patient home knows? “The patient gets stuck in the middle. They don’t know what to do,” Huber noted. And what about Advanced Planning…end of life care? Have patients and their families made these ultimate decisions? If not, these issues must be addressed. What if patients don’t want to go back to the hospital? Are they aware of what palliative care or hospice can do? “Medicare provides a good hospice benefit. The whole family can benefit from that.”

Here the goal is to make someone as comfortable as possible and give family members the support they need to help them through this difficult time. “These are the type of things I see every day with my home health patients, I see where patients would not have to return to acute if the goals set here could be obtained,” said Lucia Cleveland a home health occupational therapist.

HealthInsight’s goal is to reduce 30-day readmissions by 20% by October 2013. Finally, Huber observes “this is a community problem, not merely a hospital problem.” This community effort will produce sustainable and replicable strategies to achieve high-value health care for individuals in our communities and save potentially millions of dollars in healthcare costs.

“One way we support this statewide community effort is through a web-based campaign where providers, payers, and patients can pledge their support and become an active participant,” noted Jackie Buttaccio, HealthInsight’s Quality Improvement Manager. “The website is a one stop shop for all things readmissions with resources and tools that can be downloaded, and local success stories can be shared. “ The address is http://noplacelikehomenv.com

HealthInsight also supports this work through face to face workshops for providers to learn more about what they can change about their systems of care to keep patients safe from an avoidable hospital readmission.

Sunrise Health Events

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

Sunrise Hospital:

• Lunch and Learn: Effective Nutrition for Wellness
• Tuesday, September 11, 2012 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Located at the Sunrise Hospital H2U Office:
3131 LaCanada Street, suite 107
Las Vegas, NV 89109
Registration is required for this FREE, informational event. Please call 702-233-5300 to register.
• Physician Dinner Lecture on the Signs and Symptoms of a Stroke
• Tuesday, September 25, 2012 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Sunrise Hospital Auditorium
3186 S. Maryland Pkwy
Las Vegas, NV 89109
Registration is required for this FREE, informational event. Please call 702-233-5300 to register.

Mountain View Hospital:

• Lunch and Learn: Prostate Health and YOU – Robotics vs. Radiation
• Thursday, September 13, 2012 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
H2U MountainView Office, located at:
3150 N. Tenaya Way, suite 114
Las Vegas, NV 89128
Registration is required for this FREE, informational event. Please call 702-233-5474 to register.
• Total Joint Patient Education Seminar
• Wednesday, September 19, 2012 from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.
• MountainView Hospital First Floor Classroom
3100 N. Tenaya Way
Las Vegas, NV 89128
Registration is required for this FREE, informational event. Please call 702-233-5474 to register.
• Heart Murmur Clinic
• Saturday, September 22, 2012 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
MountainView Medical Office Building, located at:
3150 N. Tenaya Way, suite 140
Las Vegas, NV 89128
• Please wear comfortable, loose clothing for the screening portion of this event.
Registration is required for this FREE, informational event. Please call 702-233-5474 to register.

Southern Hills Hospital:

• Lunch and Learn: Six Keys to Helping Secure Your Financial Future
• Thursday, September 13, 2012 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Southern Hills Hospital First Floor Education Room, located at:
9300 W. Sunset Road
Las Vegas, NV 89148
This event is FREE – registration is required by calling 702-880-2700 at least two days before the event date.
• Dinner with Nathan Adelson Hospice: Understanding Hospice Care
• Tuesday, September 25, 2012 from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Southern Hills Hospital First Floor Education Room
9300 W. Sunset Road
Las Vegas, NV 89148
This event is FREE – registration is required by calling 702-880-2700 at least two days before the event date.

Senior Care Plus Offers Free Screenings During Senior Fest

Senior Care Plus, a Medicare Advantage Plan from Hometown Health, will offer free lab screenings during Senior Fest. Senior Fest is Tuesday, Sept. 4 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Reno Town Mall.

Lab screenings will be offered from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Attendees, age 50 and older, can receive screenings regardless of their health insurance carrier. They include a Basic Metabolic Panel and Lipid Profile, Glycohemoglobin (Hemoglobin A1C) for known diabetics, blood pressure check and body mass index calculation. A pharmacist will also be available to review medications.

Senior Care Plus members can receive a free FIT (fecal immunochemical test) at-home cancer screening and a heel bone scan (100 screenings will be offered for women only).

In addition to screenings, flu and pneumonia shots will be available at a low cost to general attendees. Medicare beneficiaries (Part B) and members of Senior Care Plus will receive the shots with no out-of-pocket cost.

Renown Health representatives will also be present to share important health information about specialized senior services, knee and hip joint replacement, cancer, heart services, Medical Group and Urgent Care and Cosmetic Laser & Skin Care.

For more information about the health screenings, contact Renown Wellness Resources at 775-982-5433.

About Hometown Health
Established in 1988, Hometown Health is the insurance division of Renown Health. Hometown Health is northern Nevada’s largest and most experienced health-insurance companies. Providing wide-ranging medical coverage and great service to members, Hometown Health represents a philosophy of health care that emphasizes active partnerships between members and physicians. Hometown Health values prevention as a key component of comprehensive care – reducing the risks of illness and helping to treat small problems before they can become more severe. Hometown Health offers a number of insurance products including HMO, PPO, HSA, Dental, Vision, and Senior Care Plus, northern Nevada’s first Medicare Advantage Plan. For more information, call 775-982-3000 or visit hometownhealth.com.

About Senior Fest
The 16th annual Senior Fest is the largest senior citizen outreach in northern Nevada. It offers informational booths featuring businesses and organizations that provide senior services in the Truckee Meadows community. Senior Fest is held at Reno Town Mall on the corner of Peckham Lane and South Virginia, across from the Reno Sparks Convention and Visitors Authority. Parking is free at both the mall and the Atlantis Casino parking lot. For more information, call 775-348-0717.

Million Hearts™ Social Media- Caregiver Video Contest

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Million Hearts™ Social Media- Caregiver Video Contest
Twitter @MillionHeartsUS

Week One (7/9)- We are launching our first video #contest next week in partnership with @CDCgov! Check back for details on #prizes and more!

Week Two (7/16)- Our first video #contest launches today! We invite #caregivers to join and share their stories. http://go.usa.gov/vEq @CDCgov

Week Three (7/23)- Please RT: Join the Million Hearts™ Caregiver Video Challenge. Submit your video by Aug. 31. http://go.usa.gov/vEq

Week Four (7/30)- Only 1 month left to show us how you control #bloodpressure! Submit your video and you could win a $500 #prize. http://go.usa.gov/vEq

Week Five (8/6)- #Caregivers, made your video yet? Share your story of how you keep your loved ones or clients heart-healthy! http://go.usa.gov/vEq

Week Six (8/13)- Show off your creativity. Make a video that shares how YOU help control the #bloodpressure of those you care for. http://go.usa.gov/vEq

Week Seven (8/20)- Just 2 weeks left until our Caregiver Video Challenge closes on 8/31. Enter your video for a chance to win $500! http://go.usa.gov/vEq

Week Eight (8/27)- Still want to join our video contest? You aren’t too late! Submit your video by FRIDAY at 5 PM. http://go.usa.gov/vEq

Facebook
Week of 7/16- We are excited to announce our caregiver video contest with @CDCgov launching this week! Share the story of how YOU help someone you care for control or maintain blood pressure. To join the contest, submit a video before August 31! http://go.usa.gov/vPF

Week of 7/30- One month left to submit a video to “Million Hearts™ Caregiver Video Challenge.” Share the story of how you help others control their blood pressure. The contest closes at 5 PM EST on August 31. http://go.usa.gov/vPF

Week of 8/13- Check out our Video Contest on http://go.usa.gov/vPF. Create a video for a chance to win up to $500 in prize money donated by our partners at the @CDCFoundation and share your tips for blood pressure control with thousands!

Week of 8/27- This is the last week to share your story of how you help your loved one control their blood pressure and maintain their heart health! Submit your video before 5 PM EST on Friday, August 31 at http://go.usa.gov/vPF.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Willow Creek

www.willowcreeklv.com

Who We Are

A Little Bit of History…

Founded  in 1992, Willow Creek Association (WCA) is a not-for-profit Christian organization that exists to maximize the transformative power of the local church. Our vision is to see every local church reach its full redemptive potential — becoming an unbridled conduit for the transforming power of Jesus Christ. In  short, we provide vision, inspiration, connection, tools, training, resources, and venues for church leaders like you to learn from and support one another.

Serving Leaders Worldwide…

For nearly 20 years, the WCA has developed a respected history of excellence and innovation in serving local churches and their leaders. We’re privileged to serve alongside 7,000 Member Churches representing more than 90 denominations and training leaders in 85 countries. Over the course of a year 15,000 churches engage with our vision, training, and resources.

Bill Hybels, Chairman of the Board @BillHybels

“When God transforms the life of just one leader, that leader can transform a church. When one church is transformed, you can transform a community. And… eventually the entire world is affected with the positive, life-changing power of Jesus Christ and the restoring work of His people.” – Bill Hybels

Jim Mellado, WCA President @JimMellado

“I am passionate about what can happen when God captures the heart of a faith community and it becomes a life-transforming agent to its community and the world as He intended.” – Jim Mellado

 

Church Partnership…

Connection with an under-resourced community can change your congregation’s perspective on faith and the challenges of the worldwide Church. These relationships provide a spiritual and emotional connection for your congregation and will open doors to great serving opportunities.

Effective discipleship is hard work.

You and your ministry team may spend countless hours creating opportunities, but are people growing? How can you be sure what you are doing is truly relevant to the spiritual growth of those in your church?

The REVEAL Spiritual Life Survey uncovers the hearts of your people so God can show you new ways to help them grow. REVEAL invites your congregation to honestly answer the question, “Where are you in a relationship to God”?

Over 1,500 pastors have asked this question of more than 450,000 church members have answered.

Churches of every size and shape are beginning to see their people move toward deep love of God and genuine love for others.

Learn new ways for your people to love Him and others more…

… those who are stuck will begin moving again…

… those who are dissatisfied with find hope for their journey of faith…

…those who are growing will build spiritual momentum…

 

Personalized  Practical Resources

  • Custom  report generated by your congregation’s responses, detailed explanations and charts
  • RevealWorks, a digital tool kit to help interpret your results – includes next steps with devotionals, self-guided planning sessions for your team, and  processing tools
  • Facilitator guides  to make planning sessions more productive

Quick Start GuideThe REVEALWORKS planning process is a self-facilitated, four-step process that guides a ministry team through understanding, prioritizing and acting in response to the REVEAL Spiritual Life Survey. Each step of the process is guided by a complete kit that provides your team with everything needed to lead an effective planning workshop.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Medicine Disposal Program

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

www.paininthedrain.com

PAIN IN THE DRAIN

IN THE COMMUNITY!

Did You Know… …You can dispose of your expired and unused medicine at any Police Department in Clark County?
Drop Boxes are now located in the lobby of the Boulder City Police Department, the City of Henderson Police Department Substations, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department substations, the North Las Vegas Police Department substations and the Mesquite Plice Department substations.

Don’t Rush to Flush!  Dispose of your expired medicines properly!

Only public employees may access public manholes for maintenance or monitoring activities. Other, illegal discharges might result in:

  • Clogged or overflowing sewer lines
  • Disruption of wastewater treatment plant processes
  • Damage to sewer lines and laterals
  • Buildup of toxic gases in the lines
  • Harmful discharges into the environment

An example of an illegal discharge is a commercial vacuum truck dumping its contents of grease interceptors, sand/oil interceptors and septic tanks into the sewer system. Illegal dumping into public manholes is most likely to occur at night and away from major streets. If you see a potentially unauthorized discharge, please contact the Water Reclamation District at 702-668-8354.

Introducing F.O.G.G.

The Clark County Water Reclamation District and the Cities of Las Vegas, Henderson and North Las Vegas have teamed up to ask our residents to Just Can It! and help keep cooking fat, oils, grease and grit (FOGG) out of our community’s sewer systems. These agencies maintain extensive collection systems of several thousand miles of pipeline underneath the streets to deliver wastewater from homes, businesses and schools to the treatment facilities.
We call it wastewater, but it is not wasted at all. We reclaim every drop of this valuable resource by treating it to very high levels until suitable for reuse- for golf courses, soccer fields, industrial cooling and, most importantly, for return to Lake Mead and the Colorado River system for Return Flow Credits. In order to clean the water to the very high standards necessary, these agencies must keep the wastewater flowing through the pipelines to reach the plants for treatment.

F.O.G.G. FAQs

Q:  What is FOGG, and is it a problem? A:  FOGG is made up of fat, oil, grease, and grit, and it is a very BIG problem! FOGG does not mix with water because its components are insoluble and have a tendency to separate from a liquid solution. When fat, oil and grease are poured down the drain, they stick to the sewer pipe walls creating layers of buildup that restrict the wastewater flow. This problem requires pipes to be cleaned more frequently, causes pipes to be replaced sooner than expected, and causes blockages that can result in sewer overflows.

Q:  How does fat, oil, grease, and grit (FOGG) create a sewer blockage? A:  Fat, oil, grease, and grit in a warm, liquid form may appear to be harmless since they flow easily down the drain. However, as the liquid cools, the FOGG solidifies and floats to the top of the other liquid in the sewer pipes. The layer of FOGG sticks to the sewer pipes and over time, the flow of wastewater becomes restricted and can cause a backup or overflow. The gritty particles, including coffee grinds, eggshells, aquarium gravel, grain, rice, seeds, etc. get trapped in the greasy buildup, accelerating the problem rapidly.
Over time, FOGG accumulates in the sewer system in much the same way that cholesterol accumulates in our arteries. As FOGG builds in the pipes, wastewater becomes increasingly restricted. Suddenly, sometimes without warning, a sewer pipe backs up and overflows, similar to a heart attack. The result is a home flooded with sewage, or sewage overflowing in the street, where it flows – untreated – into area waterways.

Q:  What products contain fat, oil, grease, and grit (FOGG) A:  Fat, oil, grease and grit are natural by-products of the cooking and food preparation process. Common sources include food scraps, meat fats, cooking oils, lard, baked goods, salad dressings, sauces, marinades, dairy products, shortening, butter and margarine, coffee grinds, eggshells, grain, rice, seeds, etc. Anything put through the garbage disposal adds to the buildup.

Q:  What can I do to keep fat, oil, grease, and grit (FOGG) out of the sewer and help prevent a grease related sewer overflow from occurring in my house or on my street? A:  Everyone plays a role in preventing FOGG from damaging our sewer system. The following easy tips can help prevent a sewer overflow in your home or neighborhood.

  1. Fat, oil, grease, and grit should NEVER be poured down the sink. Sink drains and garbage disposals are not designed to handle these materials properly.
  2. Before washing, scrape and dry wipe pots, pans and dishes with paper towels and dispose of materials in the trash.
  3. Pour fat, oil, grease and grit into a disposable container, such as an empty glass jar or coffee can. Once the liquid has cooled and solidified, secure the lid and place the container in the trash.
  4. Disconnect, or at least minimize use of the garbage disposal to get rid of food scraps. The garbage disposal chops up food into small pieces, but can still cause a blockage in the pipe. Use sink strainers to catch food items, and then empty the strainer into the trash.

Q:  Why is it important to dispose of FOGG properly? A:  Sewer system maintenance in neighborhoods that experience sewer blockages and backups due to fat, oil, grease, and grit is expensive and can contribute to the amount that customers pay for sewer service. A sewer blockage or backup can also result in expensive repairs to the home.

Q:  What should I do if I experience a sewer blockage or overflow? A:  Call your sewer service provider at one of the following numbers:

  • Clark County Water Reclamation District: 702-434-6600
  • City of Las Vegas: 702-229-6594
  • City of Henderson: 702-267-2500
  • City of North Las Vegas: 702-633-1275

Pain in the Drain | Why Flushing is Bad

Why Flushing is a Bad Idea When you flush medication down your drain, it ends up at one of our treatment facilities. These ingredients can remain in the treated water when it is released into the water cycle. Handful of PillsWhen prescription or over-the-counter drugs are flushed down the sink or toilet, their chemical components may be added to the water supply. The presence of these substances in the environment is emerging as an important national and international issue. Although the concentration levels of these products in the environment is very low, research and monitoring are continuing worldwide.
Putting medications down the drain is not just a local concern. Increasingly, prescription and non-prescription medications, many of which are not effectively destroyed by sewage treatment plants, are finding their way into streams and drinking water supplies. A study conducted by the United States Geological Survey found that 80 percent of the 139 streams sampled across 30 states detected very low concentrations of chemicals commonly found in prescription drugs. While the concentration levels of these products are very low, they may be enough to cause adverse effects in the environment and to human health.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

nevada-senior-guide Pacifica Henderson


Henderson Senior Living – Pacifica Green Valley

Pacifica  Senior Living understands that at any age, maintaining a sense of  freedom and independence is very important. At our Henderson senior living community you  will enjoy a lifestyle of choice. Our Heartland Assisted Living staff  is trained to provide the services you may need in a supportive  environment. Our goals are to promote an active and self-reliant  lifestyle; to recognize when assistance is necessary; to provide caring  attention; and to continue to educate our community.

Living Options

Pacifica Senior Living Green Valley provides the most innovative healthcare solutions for senior living in Henderson, NV to our residents and their families. By embracing the latest research available, we have developed the best care solutions available for assisted living and memory care for seniors in Henderson.

Services and Amenities

Grandmother and grandaughter hugging enjoying our Pacifica Senior Living Services in Henderson.

Pacifica  Senior Living Green Valley is a gracious single story full-service  retirement community nestled among beautifully manicured grounds,  gardens, and walking paths.

We  encourage our residents to allow us (the staff) to assist them in any  way we can. We believe it is our residents’ turn to relax and enjoy  retirement living at its fullest. Our mission is to help them feel at  home each and every day.

In addition to the apartment home maintenance, we offer generous amenities and services.

Pacifica Senior Living Amenities Include:

  • A charming, gated community with a single story, cottage-style design – no long corridors, stairs or elevators.
  • 24-hour on-site professional staffing
  • Family-style dining – three times a day
  • Weekly housekeeping, linens and personal laundry
  • All utilities (phone at an additional fee)
  • Cable television
  • Scheduled transportation
  • Social, educational, spiritual, and recreational programs
  • Full service beauty salon (additional fee)
  • Access to comfortable indoor and outdoor leisure areas
  • Manicured and maintained landscaped grounds with water fountain
  • Expansive rose garden and walking paths
  • Library
  • Vibrant activities program-rose hall community center
  • On-site apartment home maintenance
  • Pets welcome! (additional fee)

Our separate, secured memory care community offers:

  • Personalized memory care in a secure, comfortable setting
  • 24 hour safety supervision and assistance
  • Daily programs to enhance resident engagement
  • Secure exterior courtyards specifically designed for resident outdoor experiences

Cottages of Green Valley

(702) 992-0000 

2620 Robindale Road 

Henderson

West of Pecos

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Atria Sunlake – Las Vegas

www.atriasunlake.com

NSG_FebMarApr_2013_Web24

Atria Sunlake Terrace

Atria Seville Terrace,
Atria Sunlake Terrace
and Atria Sutton Terrace

Who Knew?

Who knew senior living could provide me with so much independence?

I moved into an Atria assisted living community. Now, I spend less time doing things I had to do more time doing the things I love. Hassle-free living in a fun and friendly environment – I couldn\’t ask for more. Experience the Atria lifestyle for yourself. Call today for a tour and be our guest for lunch.

Call today to dine with us and tour our community.

Atria Seville2000 N. Rampart
Las Vegas, NV 89128702-804-6800

Atria Sunlake3250 S. Fort Apache Rd.
Las Vegas, NV 89117702-256-6500

Atria Sutton3185 E. Flamingo Rd.
Las Vegas, NV 89121702-436-9000

 

Discover Superior Senior and Assisted Living in Las Vegas, NV, at Atria Sunlake

Atria Sunlake is a charming assisted living community nestled in the heart of one of the most desirable neighborhoods in Las Vegas, Nevada. With a full social calendar and a 24-hour staff of caregivers, residents will find the support they need to participate in active and independent living. Atria Sunlake is conveniently located near the distinctive Sahara West Library, and is close to shopping, restaurants and places of worship that enable a more fulfilling retirement living experience.

Beautiful landscaping along with luxurious interiors create an elegant assisted living community. Our attentive care staff supplies exceptional 24-hour senior care, making Atria Sunlake superior to surrounding Nevada retirement living communities.

Services

  • A choice of floor plans
  • A full-time events director
  • An emergency call system in every apartment
  • Assistance with activities of daily living
  • Concierge
  • Delicious meals served restaurant-style daily
  • Medication assistance
  • Retreat/temporary stays
    Atria offers a respite (retreat) program for seniors who need assisted living services on a short-term basis. Atria Retreat permits seniors to test the waters of senior living. By allowing guests to stay for a short time in an Atria community, potential residents can decide if senior living is right for them. The retreat program is also an alternative to high-cost inpatient rehabilitation following an illness or surgery. Should a patient be ready to leave the hospital but not ready to go home, Atria offers the comforts of home and 24-hour assistance until they get back on their feet. All of our Retreat guests enjoy the same great amenities as our full-time residents, including delicious meals served daily, a full calendar of social activities, scheduled transportation service and more.
  • Scheduled local transportation
    Local scheduled transportation is available to residents for medical appointments, shopping, religious services and other desired local destinations.
  • Trained staff available 24 hours a day

Amenities

  • Cafe with complimentary snacks and beverages
  • Engage Life programming
    Explore our events programming, tailored to nurture the mind, body and spirit of every resident.
  • Pets welcome

Nevada-Senior-Guide Sonoma Palms – Las Vegas

http://www.sonomapalms.com/

Sonoma Palms Apartments

Your home by the mountains…

Sonoma Palms Apartment Homes, located in Las Cruces, New Mexico, offers you that luxurious lifestyle you really wish you had. Now you can. Close to mountains, work and friends. Nestled in the heart of Mesilla Valley, Sonoma Palms offers you immediate access to I-25 and 70, as well as retail, restaurants and medical centers. Living at Sonoma Palms means reaping the benefits of extraordinary management services, resident programs, maintenance free living and a remarkable way of life. Come experience that exceptional, yet casual, lifestyle at Sonoma Palms. Your Home by the Mountains.

Sonoma Palms Apartments OPEN NOW!Close to pharmacies, restaurants, banking, hospital

  • Gated community
  • Side by side washer/dryer hook up
  • Alarm system
  • Separate storage facility
  • Planned activities
  • Great floor plans
  • 7600 sq. ft. Clubhouse
  • Satellite TV ready
  • Professional on site caring management team

 

3050 Jones Blvd.
Las Vegas, NV
702-309-8555

Section 8 vouchers accepted

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!