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heritage | Nevada Senior Guide

Heritage Springs – Nevada Senior Guide

April 3, 2017 by · Comments Off on Heritage Springs – Nevada Senior Guide
Filed under: Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing & Memory Care, Las Vegas 

http://www.heritagespringsseniorliving.com/

At Heritage Springs, our residents awake each morning knowing they have control over whatever lies ahead. Each day is as active, inspiring and as independent as they want it to be. After all, our philosophy is to encourage an active, Las Vegas senior lifestyle that supports privacy and dignity.

Heritage Springs is a resort-like senior living community located near the corner of West Flamingo Road and South El Capitan in beautiful, sunny Las Vegas. We’re near the 215 and just seven miles from the Las Vegas strip. You can see the glow of the casinos from many of our apartments. Plus, our residents can enjoy the beauty of the nearby Red Rock Mountains, take in a NASCAR event at the Las Vegas Speedway, or shop at the Downtown Summerlin Mall.

Our residents love to travel around the area, but travel isn’t always necessary because the opportunities for socializing, exercise, games, watching a movie, or simply relaxing are virtually endless right here.


Heritage Springs has been recognized as a 2016 recipient of the Bronze – Commitment to Quality Award for its dedication to improving the lives of residents through quality care. “It’s an honor to be recognized for the hard work and quality of care our team provides every day” said Julie Peterson, Executive Director of Heritage Springs. “We are committed to providing high-quality, person-centered care to our residents and their families. We will never stop improving.”


To discover more about Heritage Springs, call us at 702-360-6023

Heritage Springs, 8720 West Flamingo Road; Las Vegas, NV 89147

Life Extension: The Modern Anti-Aging Movement – Are We Standing at the Threshold of Immortality?

July 17, 2016 by · Comments Off on Life Extension: The Modern Anti-Aging Movement – Are We Standing at the Threshold of Immortality?
Filed under: General 

Why is skincare the focus of longevity research? I guess a cell is a cell, and if you can crack the code for one human cell, it is only a matter of time to solving the puzzle with different types of cell – and skin is without doubt the most visible cells each of us have. And it’s our faces in particular we often judge ourselves and others by, and we are in turn quickly scrutinized, and often opinions reached in a fraction of a second. Our faces often show the most visible signs of aging, and for many in modern society age is by nature “bad” and young or looking young is the ideal. That is why billions and billions of dollars each year are poured by consumers into all sorts of treatments to minimize wrinkles, to push back the effects of gravity, and to turn back the hands of time. And with that much money to be spent by consumers, there are many manufacturers eager to find the next step in arresting Father Time – and at least detaining him until the next stagecoach arrives, where hopefully he can be encouraged to move on before too much damage can be done.

The Entire Issue Explained – In A Pair of Shoelaces

Some time ago a friend gave me a simple analogy that puts this entire issue in perspective. The science may not win a Nobel Prize, but it gave me the necessary ah-ha moment.

The double helix of the DNA strand – our most basic foundation for life – is held together at each end by things that act in the same way as the hard plastic bits on the end of shoelaces do – preventing the DNA from unraveling, and the individual chromosomes scattering across the floor like dropping a string of pearls down a marble staircase. These things are called telomeres.

Somewhere programmed into these tiny telomeres is the entire basis to how long the DNA stays intact – and by inference these are the keys to the length of life of the organism. Somewhere written into the telomere is a great musical score but like all musical scores it has a double bar somewhere to signify the end; but is it to be a minuet or a Wagnerian epic? But sure enough, when the time comes, and the telomeres blow the full time whistle, the DNA strand will unravel and die – and the circle of life begins again. Telomeres govern how often our skin cells are replaced; why a puppy and a child born on the same date may age exactly the same chronologically, but the puppy has become a geriatric before the child reaches puberty.

Telomeres, my friend explained, occasionally go on the fritz (that must have a very specific scientific meaning). One of the ways this occurs is they may forget their programming to release and unravel, and they just hang on, allowing the cells thus affected to multiply again and again without dying. In fact, when this occurs often they become very difficult to kill and to all intents and purposes once the telomeres act in this way, the cell – and those it propagates – are effectively immortal.

This condition has a name which we all know. Cancer.

But, what if we were able in some way to persuade the telomeres within a cancer to behave normally – would that not be the “magic bullet” cure for cancer? And the other side to that equation – if the telomeres in healthy cells could be persuaded to act as they do in a cancer – then is this the recipe for a healthy cell that does not die? Does the cure for cancer and immortality hang on just this one thread?

Whatever your views may be, the reality is that some of the world’s finest research scientists are working on that exact question and some would say it is only a matter of a decade or two before this is neither conjecture nor science fiction, but a reality to face up to. The changes that would take place in society even if life expectancy were to take a leap forward by say 10 or 20 years are enormous, but we should all be thinking that this is a distinct possibility.

From the dab of lanoline a generation ago to what I know hold in my hand as an anti aging skincare treatment is more than just a revolution – and I have no doubt in a few years I will be saying this cream will not just slow the aging process and reduce the visible signs of aging, making your face appear younger – but it will actually be younger.

But before that, let’s look back at how this whole engagement with life extension and anti-aging started. Mankind has always striven for longevity and mused about immortality – but the past 50 years has seen some dramatic steps in reality toward this goal.

Genesis

The thought of extending life has been on the mind of mankind for millennia. References to the search for ways to prolong life can be found as far back as the Epic of Gilgamesh.

Gilgamesh was reputedly the fifth king of the kingdom of Uruk, the modern-day Iraq, around 2500 BC. According to the Sumerian list of kings, he reigned for 126 years. The Torah or Old Testament records Methuselah as living over 900 years, with life spans measured in centuries apparently commonplace before the time of Noah.

Throughout the development of scientific thought from the Reformation onwards, scholars have applied themselves to solving this riddle and these endeavors continue today at the very leading edge of scientific progress.

Unraveling Secrets

As the secrets of our existence are unraveled in ever more minute detail, we are beginning to understand what it is that makes us grow from tiny babies into adults. We now know, for example, that cell functions slow down as the body ages and that production of certain substances required by the body to regenerate decrease or cease completely.

Skin, for instance, needs two substances to retain strength and firmness.
The production of these substances namely collagen (strength, tightness) and elastin (flexibility) decreases with age. The decreases in production together with other factors that include the threat of free radicals make the skin age and become wrinkly. Free radicals are essentially incomplete oxygen molecules causing destructive chain reactions within cells.

The same kind of thing happens in every cell, every tissue and organ around the human body. For example, people develop frown lines, crow’s feet and wrinkles. Nutrients are no longer absorbed easily and vital cell functions, hormones and other substances are produced at decreased rates resulting in the body aging.

A Brief History of the Life Extension Movement

Science has been looking for ways to slow down this process for centuries. The forming of life extension movements, however, did not really begin until around 1970.

➢ In this year, Denham Harman, the originator of the so-called ‘free radical theory of aging’, decided that an organization dedicated to the research and information sharing between scientists working in biogerontology (the field of science concerned with the biological aspects involved in the aging process) was needed. As a result, the American Aging Association was formed.

➢ In 1976, two futurists, Philip Gordon and Joel Kurtzman wrote a book on the research into extending the human lifespan. This popular volume was titled ‘No More Dying. The Conquest Of Aging And The Extension Of Human Life’.

➢ Kurtzman was then invited to speak at Florida’s House Select Committee (HSC) of Aging, which was chaired by Claude Pepper, an American politician and spokesman for the elderly. The aim of this talk was to discuss the impact on Social Security by life extension.

➢ In 1980, Saul Kent, a prominent activist in the field of life extension, published the book ‘The Life Extension Revolution’ and founded the nutraceutical (from ‘nutrition’ and ‘pharmaceutical’, in other words, a nutrition supplement) firm known as ‘The Life Extension Foundation’.

This foundation is a non-profit making organization promoting dietary supplements and publishing the periodical ‘Life Extension Magazine’. Kent was later involved in work relating to cryogenics. He was jailed in the course of this work over a dispute at one point, although charges were dropped at a later stage.

➢ In 1982, American health writer and life extension advocate Sandy Shaw and her co-writer, Durk Pearson, popularized the term ‘life extension’ even further with the bestseller ‘Life Extension: A Practical Scientific Approach’.

➢ Roy Walford, a gerontologist and life-extensionist, published ‘Maximum Lifespan’, another popular book on the subject. He and Richard Weindruch, his student, followed this up in 1988 with their summary on the research they had conducted into the ability to prolong the life of rodents through calorie restriction. The title of this book is ‘The Retardation of Aging and Disease by Dietary Restriction’.

Although this ability to extend life with calorie restriction had been known since the 1930’s, when gerontologist, biochemist and nutritionist Clive McCay did some research into the subject, it was the work of Walford and Weinbruch that gave solid scientific grounding to the McCay’s findings.

Walford’s scientific work was driven by a personal interest in life extension. He practiced calorie restriction as part of his own life and eventually died at the age of 80. The cause of his death was amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a progressive motor neuron disease.

➢ A4M, the ‘American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine’ was founded in 1992 to create a medical specialty for anti aging that was distinctly separate from geriatrics. This allowed scientists and physicians interested in this particular field of science to hold conferences and discuss the latest developments.

➢ The sci.life-extension, a Usenet group, was created by California-born author, philosopher and translator Brian M. Delaney. This represented an important development within the movement of life extension. It made it possible, for example, for the CR (Calorie Restriction) Society to be created.

➢ A more recent development is the proposal of Dr A. de Grey, a biogerontologist at Cambridge University. This proposal suggested that damage to cells, macromolecules, organs and tissues can be repaired with the help of advanced biotechnology. This is evident in hair restoration products, for instance.

More than Books

Although it would appear that most of the work revolving around life extension has been done solely by writing books or founding societies or organizations of some kind or another, the reality is that these books were written in response to or based on very specific, detailed scientific research that have yielded positive results.

They are no longer the works of hopeful minds, but the works of dedicated scientists who have spent their lives working on discovering facts about aging and trying to find ways to slow down, or even reverse the process.

Many breakthroughs have been made, and in many ways, we are already able to extend lives to a certain extent. The average lifespan of a human being is already far greater than it used to be as a result of medical, pharmaceutical and nutritional advances brought about by research and development.

The work continues, and scientists around the world are continually conducting research, comparing results, discussing options and making advances on our behalf.

Driving Forces behind the Development of the Life Extension Movement

What factors are driving this movement into ever greater efforts to find solutions to the extension of Life? The answer to this question actually includes a whole range of factors.

Expectations Have Risen

As the ‘baby boomer’ generation (born between 1946-1964) enters retirement age, expectations of this group are dramatically different from those of the preceding generations. They have greater expectations and desires to enjoy their life as pensioners to the fullest and for as long as is possible. This expectation covers not only length of life, but quality of life as well and this is not a passive request but an active and strident demand in many cases.

Pharmacology

Progress in pharmacology has led to a wide selection of drugs that allow people to live longer and fuller lives being developed over the last two decades or so. The work is still very much in progress and many more drugs are being developed daily.

One of the classic examples of a drug raising the quality of life for older individuals are erectile dysfunction treatments – notably Viagra, Cialis and Levitra. These drugs have dramatically reduced the number of fatalities or serious injury resulting from elderly men rolling out of bed, as well as a number of more qualitative benefits.

Advances in Genetics

Some of the latest scientific research and subsequent advances made in biotechnology and genetics are providing some hope that it may be possible to hold back some of the fundamental causes of aging.

As we outlined previously, chromosomes containing DNA strings are essentially capped with a binding substance known as telomeres. In effect, the telomeres are consumed during cell division and over time, they become shorter and shorter.

This was first observed by a scientist called Leonard Hayflick, and the process of limited cell division was subsequently named the Hayflick Limit. Advocates of life extension work on the thought that lengthening the telomeres through drugs or gene therapy may ultimately extend the Hayflick Limit and thereby fool the cells, and as such the body, into ‘thinking’ it is younger than it actually is.

Developments in Precision Manufacture

Advances made in the fields of nanotechnology, miniaturization, computer chips and robotics also provide hope for potentially life extending solutions.

In the 1970’s, a popular TV series starred Lee Majors as the ‘Six Million Dollar Man’? Science fiction then. Today, it is science fact. Millions of people now walk through life with artificial ankle, knee and hip joints and healthy feet. A generation ago, mass production of this kind of technology was a distant dream.

The same applies to many individuals with artificial limbs. Artificial legs used to be crude wooden contraptions that were just able to keep a person balanced. Today’s artificial limbs are almost fully functional.

The Blessings of Medical Progress

Who would have thought even 50 years ago that it would become possible to bypass a coronary artery, or even replace a heart completely? Yet there are hundreds of thousands, if not millions of individuals enjoying their lives after having this kind of surgery – few of whom would be alive just half a century ago.

Millions of people no longer have to wear glasses, because of the availability of laser surgery. This, too, was science fiction just a few years ago. Today, it is advertised next to shampoo in magazines and on TV.

In other words, science is moving rapidly towards not only extending life, but making the quality of these extra years better as well.

Is it Science, Science Fiction or Lunacy?

What should the average person believe? This question is almost as difficult to answer as finding solutions to extended life. Even among scientists, opinions are divided. Some do believe that extending the quality of life is as possible as extending life in general.

Others brush off the thought as un-scientific nonsense. This is often simply based on the fear of anything ‘new’ disturbing the status quo of established limits. Fortunately, real scientists do keep on looking, because if every single scientist had decided that some of the advancements already in medical, pharmaceutical and technological fields could not be possible, we would all still be dying at 30.

So where does that leave us?

There is no doubt what-so-ever that there are many charlatans out there trying to make a quick buck out of people’s desire to retain their youth. Even today, many products being sold in their millions are essentially non-effective – often given fantastic names and have the most bewildering ingredients to make them look scientific to consumers and justify their cost.

But the facts are while many advancements are being made and research points to the possibility of eventually finding the key to maintaining youth for longer, the scientific community is still warning the public that many of the products being sold today are unreliable to say the least.

➢ Although food supplements may assist in keeping a body healthier – something that can often be achieved by simply adopting a healthier life style and diet – there is as yet no categorical and undeniable proof that they slow down aging as such.

➢ The same goes for many hormone treatments. Although they may have a short term effect of some kind, it is not yet scientifically proven that they will actually work in the long run. The fear that it may not work is based on the fact that taking hormones, a good example is the hormonal acne treatment, will ultimately actually slow down the body’s own production of these hormones.

In addition, many treatments may have potential (and yet unknown) side effects in the long run that could be harmful to the user’s health. This includes the fears that such hormone treatments could increase the risk of cancer, diabetes and other major illnesses.

➢ Other ideas, like the calorie restriction method, are working for rodents. In fact, studies conducted with rats on 30 to 50 per cent restricted diets have shown to almost double the life span of rats.

Similar studies conducted on primates have also shown tendency to extend life to a certain extent and prevent a list of age related illnesses. There are as yet no studies on humans, although some are actually living on calorie restricted diets. Whether this will prolong their lives, however, is a question of having to wait and see.

The theory is that by reducing calorie intake, the metabolism of the body is slowed down, thereby slowing the aging process as well. Nutritionists say there is a certain amount of calories a body of a certain size and weight needs to have to maintain health. Reducing this amount by up to 50 per cent is hardly a good idea in the long term.

Time will tell, as they say, but how will anyone be able to tell the difference? If a person lives to the age of 80, is this because they are on this diet or would they have lived to this age anyway?

Where Will This Lead?

Many believe there is realistic hope and expectation of making significant strides in the area of longevity within the next two decades. This group typically believes the answer will ultimately lie within genetics and biotechnology. It is too early to make definite predictions, but the research so far shows promise and, as mentioned earlier, some of the results of this research are already being used in certain treatments to improve patients’ lives.

At present, overall aging is difficult to slow down, to say the least. Some products indicate they will assist in maintaining overall health/longevity, but the area we are seeing the first commercial products being developed is in the area of skin care and given the size of this market, it is likely that this will continue to be the weather-vane of longevity treatments.

Science or Snake Oil?

It will be difficult to tell these two apart for many years. Charlatans are likely to about, because it is difficult to disprove many theories easily. Equally difficult will be positive proof from those with an ethical perspective on the trail of a real breakthrough, as products based on valid research and using technology or ingredients that will actually have an effect rarely promise overnight results. This is something that anyone looking to find improved youthful looks, etc, will have to bear in mind. None of these products can perform miracles. Even the best of them will take time and regular use in order to achieve the desired effect.

The bottom line is that where we stand now, we can be sure there are some things which are ineffective or even harmful; there are some that show some promise and there are some that are starting to cross the line of being able to demonstrate results – albeit modestly at this point.

In the meantime, it is wise to research products very carefully and to refuse to be baffled by weird and wonderful sounding ingredients or fantastic sounding promises of instant youth. Regeneration will take time – let’s face it, it has taken a lifetime to get to this point, turning back the clock can never be possible over night.

Skin Care and the Life Extension Movement

One may well ask just what all this, and in particular the life extension movement as such, could possibly have to do with skin care, health and beauty products. The fact is, much of the research into life extension is resulting in new approaches to skin care as a kind of by-product.

A greater understanding of how genetics and cellular processes affect the aging and condition of skin allows these research and development teams to investigate different compounds, their compatibility with human cells and genetic make up.

Many compounds found in nature are not just compatible to human skin but in fact the skin cells actually have natural receptors for these compounds. Because life extension research has discovered these receptors, skin care developers can now use this knowledge and create the formulae for their products to provide maximum effect.

Another skin care ‘by-product’ of life extension research is the use of nanotechnology. The use of nanotechnology, or, to be more precise, nanoparticles, has had a huge impact on the way nutrients and other components of skin care products are being delivered to the skin cells. In some ways, nanotechnology has already revolutionized skin care. It is now possible to use active ingredients previously difficult to effectively deliver to the skin, as well as making old, proven ingredients even more effective. Some ingredients used in cosmetics for hundreds, if not thousands of years by certain cultures can now be even more effectively used to improve skin condition and maintain a healthy, youthful look.

Even the moisturizing effect of skin care products can be improved with nantechnology. For this effect, so-called nanosomes are used. Nanosomes are small, pocket-like particles that melt or disintegrate on skin contact. By doing this, the moisturising effect is accelerated, assisting the skin faster and more efficiently.

Nanotechnology plays a key part not only in slowing the aging of skin, but is believed to actively assist in repairing and healing skin cells and tissue.

Another breakthrough in life extension research that is beginning to make itself felt in skin care products is the research into stem cells. Stem cells are elements of all life, plant, animal and human. Stem cells have two properties other cells do not have. These properties are the ability to develop into any kind of cell type and the ability to divide almost indefinitely. The use of plant stem cell extracts in skin care is likely to become one of the next ‘big things’ in the industry. And prepare for the debate when human stem cells are proposed as part of an anti-aging skincare regime, as will inevitably occur!

One thing we can be certain of, is that science will continue to search for answers to the question of life extension, and business will drive the commercialization of discoveries. But whether these lead us to a utopian future or potentially a minefield of strife as we debate who will use and who will benefit from these new godlike powers. In the meantime, at a practical level in the skincare, health and beauty industry we remain hopeful and expectant we will see the emergence of products that not only promise results, but produce them.

David Christensen is a veteran of Asia Pacific business, currently residing in Bangkok, Thailand and heading up the business he was a co-founder of, Royal Siam Natural Health & Beauty – who can be located at [http://www.royalsiam.asia], and the information supporting site at [http://www.royalsiam.info]. Royal Siam was established after careful planning in early 2011, spending 2011 concentrating on building the necessary business infrastructure and concentrating on the domestic Thai market. Early in 2012 Royal Siam launched its international website and online store, and in April 2012 publicly declared the ambition to be among the world’s top 20 premium health and beauty brands by the year 2020. Royal Siam is a unique business, operating in the premium skincare, anti aging, and related fields. At its core, one mission is to commercialize and bring to a global market the immense wealth of knowledge about the healing and beneficial properties of Thai and South East Asian plants – a knowledge base carefully built up over the last thousand years. At the same time, the mission is to bring to market the very latest in scientific advances in the area of anti aging… resulting in the unique position of having a Thai heritage and offering the best of nature, tradition, and science.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/David_D_Christensen/1317312

Inspirational Stamps Teach History of Civil Rights

January 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

11725_A(Family Features)  The influence of family can be a powerful thing. When asked who inspired her as a child, Rosa Parks, an extraordinary American activist, answered, “My family, I would say, my mother, and my maternal grandparents. I grew up with them.”

 

On December 1, 1955, Parks was arrested in Montgomery, Alabama, for refusing to give up her seat on a municipal bus to a white man. Her arrest sparked a boycott of the Montgomery bus system that lasted longer than a year, posing an ultimately successful challenge to racial segregation and inspiring others to similar action.

 

Rosa Parks’ lifelong dedication to civil rights has influenced generations of Americans. The U.S. Postal Service wants its 2013 Civil Rights set of stamps to continue to educate and inspire. It released the Rosa Parks Forever® Stamp this year, along with a stamp commemorating the day 50 years ago when nearly a quarter of a million people came together in Washington, DC, to participate in the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. A third stamp in the Civil Rights set celebrates the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation on Jan. 1, 1863, by President Abraham Lincoln.

 

Parents looking for ways to teach their children about historic American events like these can turn to stamps for fun, interactive ways to discuss national milestones and iconic figures with their children outside the classroom. Since 1893, the U.S. Postal Service has issued limited-edition stamps that honor prominent people, places, icons and events of contemporary American life. These miniature works of art serve as excellent resources for teaching about our country and our culture in a new and exciting way that reaches beyond a textbook.

 

In addition, the U.S. Postal Service has developed a worksheet to help guide exploration into civil rights and equality. The worksheet features a “how to” guide for making a family tree, as well as a coloring sheet and exercise that empowers children to think about what equality means to them. Download the worksheet and find other resources at http://blog-stampofapproval.com.

 

Educators will want to explore the U.S. Postal Service’s Community Connection website, found at www.uspsconnection.com, which brings the history and heritage of the Postal Service’s 238 years into elementary grade classrooms, using stamps as a catalyst to spark conversations and learning opportunities for students.

 

Twelve civil rights pioneers, including Mary Church Terrell and Mary White Ovington, have also been honored in the past with their own postage stamp. Every year the Postal Service commemorates notable leaders and cultural milestones through other stamp collections, such as the Black Heritage series and the American Treasures series.

 

Photos courtesy of Daniel Afzal/United States Postal Service

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

At a time when thousands of Baby Boomers are reaching the age of 65 every day, the issues of senior rights, elder laws, and anti-ageism have never been more important, more volatile, or more questioned. After all, this is the generation that was ready to take down the establishment fifty years ago, and they haven’t lost any of their desire to change the world for the better. And, they have the numbers to do it. Here are our 100 top blogs for seniors dealing with senior rights, law & policy, and anti-ageism.

Boomers Against The Law

  1. Elder Law Plus: lawyer Evan H. Farr blogs about topics concerning elder law, including probate strategies and parental care.
  2. Michigan Elder Law Blog: the attorneys at Barsch & Joswick provide seniors and their loved ones with sage advice on a variety of Elder law issues.
  3. Everything Elder Law: Evan Farr is back at it again, this time focusing on Elder Law news, concepts, and innovations from around the country.
  4. Massachusetts Estate and Elder Law Blog: lawyer and blogger Stephanie Konarski gives tips on estate planning and other elder law topics.
  5. New York Elder Law Attorney Blog: your source for elder law news and comment in New York, this blog analyzes nursing home legislation and elder care costs.
  6. Elder Law Prof. Blog: Elder Law professor Kim Dayton authors a really nice blog that covers a wide range of Elder law issues, from Supreme Court cases to seminars.
  7. The Pop Tort: can a consumer advocates blog dealing with civil justice be cute? This blog proves it can, complete with an adorable “Pop Tort” logo, even while exploring such issues as Medicare and Medicaid lawsuits, nursing home scams, and medical malpractice against the elderly, among other legal issues.
  8. Supportive Senior Solutions: this blog from a geriatric care management practice in New York covers issues related to geriatric care, caregiving, and healthcare laws for the elderly and infirm.
  9. Aging Beats the Alternative: elder care specialist Lorie Ebers uses her blog to talk about overcoming the challenges of aging, caring for aging parents, and the less talked about side of elder law: Boomer divorce.
  10. Elder Law Blog: lawyer Ronald C. Morton’s elder law blog is full of sage advice for seniors looking how to tap into Veteran’s benefits, how to plan for their golden years, and more.
  11. The Best Elder Law Blog: published by the attorneys at Lamson & Cutner, this blog discusses elder law cases, the Affordable Care Act, and same-sex marriage.
  12. Elder Law Tips and News: the lawyers at Cooper, Adel & Associates bring you posts on living trusts, aging issues, and general estate planning.
  13. The Connecticut Elder Law Blog: lawyer Michael Keenan provides his readers with estate planning tips, elder fraud, and Medicare rules.
  14. The Teddy Bear Lawyers: attorney Rick Law gives readers a great resource for Elder Law in the Chicagoland area. Find articles on protecting vulnerable seniors and financial planning.
  15. Oregon Elder Law: attorney Orrin Onken blogs on elder law, estate planning, and probate proceedings in plain, easy to understand language.
  16. Florida Elder Law and Estate Blog: this informative blog includes great articles on VA benefits, estate planning, and trusts.
  17. Golden Law Center: written by attorney Sasha Golden, the Golden Law Center blog discusses elder law, special needs planning, guardianship, wills and trusts, and estate administration.
  18. Kraft Elder Law: attorney Robert Kraft blogs about Medicaid, Medicare, wills, trusts, probate, veterans benefits, and other elder law topics.
  19. Pennsylvania Law Blog: this elder law blog by the attorneys at the law offices of Shober & Rock discusses Medicaid, taxes, Veterans, banks, and annuities.
  20. Long Beach Elder Law Blog: this blog focuses on elder abuse, estate protection, the Cal MediConnect program, and reform of health law.
  21. Houston Elder Law Blog: the folks at Wright Abshire Attorneys blog about care planning, estate planning, Medicaid Planning, Probate & Estate Administration, and and Veteran’s Benefits.
  22. Hauptman Law Blog: readers of this blog can learn more about elder, estate, and special needs law. Includes articles on the Medicare Settlement and VA Aid.
  23. Fulkerson Elder Law Blog: the function of this elder law blog is for the firm to respond to common questions clients have about elder law and review developments in the law impacting elder law and estate planning.
  24. CMLP Estate Planning and Elder Law Blog: readers can look forward to reviewing articles on simplifying their estate plan and elder law news items of note.
  25. Massachusetts Estate Planning and Probate Blog: attorney Matthew Karr keeps readers up to date on estate planning and probate news and information.
  26. Marshall Elder and Estate Planning Blog: the author of this elder law blog has over 30 years experience in estate planning, special needs planning, and estates.
  27. Hartford, CT Elder Law Blog: the attorney’s at Ruggiero Ziogas & Allaire discuss estate planning, care planning, Medicaid, Veteran’s Benefits, and Probate.
  28. El Paso Elder Law Blog: the law firm of Stephanie Townsend Allala and Associates blogs on estate planning, guardianships, Medicaid Planning, Nursing Home Abuse, and Trust & Probate.
  29. Miami Probate Law Blog: the folks at the Byrant law firm keep readers up-to-date on estate administration, probate court, estate litigation, and the nuisances of will and trust disputes.
  30. Elder Law News: attorney Brian A. Raphan is based in New York City and specializes in Wills, Estates, Trusts, and Elder Care issues. His blog is full of great resources.
  31. Aging & Law in West Virginia: this blog contains news in law and aging in West Virginia, written by the West Virginia Senior Legal Aid organization.
  32. Florida Elder Law and Estate Planning: this Florida Certified Elder Law attorney provides in depth insights and news to help Floridians protect themselves and preserve their assets.
  33. Family Law Blog Maryland: while this blog looks at all matters pertaining to Family Law, elder law sneaks in as a prevalent theme in many of the cases discussed. They look at legal matters like when divorce and retirement coincide, or when grandparents wish to take custody of their grandchildren.
  34. Phoenix AZ Family Law Blog: looking at issues older couples face in Arizona, this family law blog explores the specific challenges elders face in divorces and custody battles, complete with the latest policy changes and laws.
  35. Otherspoon: hospice volunteer and blogger Ann Neumann talks about care-giving and the realities, politics, and senior rights involved in death and dying.

Seniors Talk Policy And Politics

  1. Aging in Place: this blog is concerned with seniors who are dealing with shrinking benefits and increasing costs—seniors find answers on how to protect themselves.
  2. Estate in Denial: providing news, analysis, and commentary on abusive practices occurring in probate courts. Features original perspective and direct communication.
  3. Florida Estate Planning Lawyer Blog: this blog covers estate planning legal issues, cases of interest, and news with a focus on Florida elder law.
  4. McGuire Woods: the people at McGuire Woods author this great blog on long term care legal issues, including timely news, articles, and white papers.
  5. Illinois Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: published by the law office of Wilson & Wilson, this blog covers asset protection, banking, estate planning, and trusts.
  6. Illinois Nursing Home Abuse Blog: covers Illinois nursing home law, including Supreme Court cases and other information relating to residents and family members.
  7. Law Office of Donald D. Vanarelli Blog: provides readers in New Jersey with information on elder law, estate and special needs planning, and mediation services.
  8. Maryland Nursing Home Lawyer Blog: this blog offers insight on nursing home abuse reports, legislation, and legal opinions of elder law in Maryland.
  9. Massachusetts Estate Planning, Probate & Elder Law: elder law attorney Brian Barreira writes on legal issues involving death, taxes, special needs, and long-term elder care.
  10. New Jersey Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: blog posts explore life and death in New Jersey from a perspective of estate planning, elder law, taxation, probate, and estate administration.
  11. Medina Law Group: postings provide readers with advice on estate planning and management, estate taxes, elder law, and VA benefits.
  12. North Carolina Wills and Trusts: this blog provides readers with estate planning and elder law news with a North Carolina focus.
  13. California Nursing Home Abuse Law Blog: covers nursing home abuse, elder law abuse, and features many quality articles relating to California elder law.
  14. Nursing Home Law Blog: this well written blog discusses elder issues, legislation, legal news, protections of elder rights, and helpful health tips.
  15. PA Elder Estate and Fiduciary Law Blog: focuses on elder law, long-term care, end-of-life and health care surrogate decision-making, and estate planning.
  16. Patti’s Blog: find information about this lawyer’s practice, which concentrates on advocacy for seniors. She shares personal interests and her passions.
  17. Pennsylvania Nursing Home Abuse Lawyer Blog: this blog discusses nursing home abuse laws, cases, and news items from Pennsylvania.
  18. Barbara Cashman Blog: Barbara blogs about elder law and policy issues, and often hosts guest bloggers to share their insights on elder law and news.
  19. NJ Elder Law: lawyer Kenneth Vercammen blogs about topics related to estate planning and elder law. He was once awarded the NJ State Bar Municipal Court Practitioner of the Year.
  20. The Senior Sentinel: a blog compiling news and information for Baby Boomers, the Senior Sentinel concentrates on the intersection of ageism and public policy both nationally and world-wide.
  21. Elder Consult: this geriatric medicine blog not only covers Alzheimers, dementia, financial decision making, and medications, it also discusses related legal issues such as elder financial abuse.
  22. Grey Pride: a UK blog by the Anchor Digital Marketing team is dedicated to keeping older people at the top of the political agenda and petitioning the government to create a Minister for Older People to ensure their needs are met.
  23. Over 65 Blog: project organizers from Harvard, Yale, and The Hastings Center host this blog for “seniors seeking solutions for health care and security, mainly looking at health care system reforms, elder law policies and practices, and how seniors can achieve a stronger role in the future of health care.
  24. Reaping Hope Blog: a blog from an NGO in Nepal promoting dignified aging and elder rights, Reaping Hope explores elder abuse and elder oppression while actively helping elderly people claim their rights and challenge discrimination.

Age Against The Machine: Anti-Ageism

  1. Ageist Beauty: the musings, product reviews, and random thoughts of a woman who is fighting against her age.
  2. Everyday Ageism Project: this blog aims to capture people’s everyday experiences dealing with ageism. The author has discovered that ageism is the most commonly experienced form of prejudice.
  3. The Lonely Gerontologist: professor Kelly Yokum blogs about all things aging—including aging stereotypes and other aging topics that come to mind.
  4. My Elder Advocate: this blog provides comprehensive coverage of ageism, the dangers of nursing homes, elder abuse, and elder care.
  5. The Roaming Boomers: David and Carol are great examples of a couple who doesn’t let age get in the way of living life to the fullest.
  6. The Gypsy Nester: Veronica and David show readers how to rock the empty nest and get the most out of life as you age.
  7. Changing Aging: this multi-blog platform challenges conventional views on aging. The authors believe aging is a strength, rich in developmental potential and growth.
  8. The Elders: founded by Nelson Mandela in 2007, the Elders is a group of seniors committed to addressing global challenges, including child marriage and climate change.
  9. Beauty and Wisdom: the blog of photographer Robbie Kaye, who traveled to salons throughout the US to photograph and interview women in their 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s and discovered that beauty is ageless.
  10. Advanced Style: don’t tell these women they are too old to model hip and alluring fashions. This blog teaches women how to dress to impress and that age is only a number.
  11. RL TV: the only cable network and online destination for folks 50+, features a nice blog that provides tips on elder issues and promotes active living.
  12. The 70-Something Blog: blogger Judy informs readers how to live a full and engaging life as she chronicles her journey of aging.
  13. Retirement is Work: newly retired librarian and blogger resolves to post one good thing about retirement every day for a year, but along the way struggles with senior rights and anti-ageism.
  14. Yo Is This Ageist?: a humorous blog by Ashton Applewhite dedicated to determining whether age-related remarks are offensive, “challenging the stereotypes that segregate us by age.”
  15. This Chair Rocks: a smart and sassy blog by Ashton Applewhite that challenges the ideas of ageism with humor and snark. All stereotypes and insensitive remarks are grounds for brilliant blog posts.
  16. Senior Planet: “aging with attitude” is the tagline of this blog community of older adults using technology to connect with each other and take on the issues of ageism and senior rights.
  17. Changing Aging: a blog founded by Dr. Bill Thomas to promote “a radical reinterpretation of longevity” which focuses on anti-ageism and senior rights, as well as getting the most out of a long life.
  18. Time Goes By: Ronni Bennett takes on aging, ageism and related issues with humor, exploring the truth of “what it’s really like to get old.” She starts by rejecting the “cutesy” terms for old people – they’re called “elders” around here!
  19. The Magic of Middle-Aged Women: author Daniel Even Weiss – a man – blogs on the theme of his latest book, The Magic of Middle-Aged Women, where he challenges the prevailing ageist idea that women don’t get better as they age. They do.
  20. Advanced Style: Ari Seth Cohen, a young-ish photographer, roams the New York City streets photographing stylish and creative elders. Here, art challenges the paradigm that age and beauty can’t co-exist.
  21. The New Old Age: the New York Times blog on aging takes advantage of the newspaper’s top writers to explore the unprecedented intergenerational challenge of the Baby Boomers.
  22. The Little Old Lady Stays Put (or doesn’t): explores the “lives, lifestyles and issues of interesting older people,” touching on the issues surrounding ageism, elder rights, living with dementia, and overcoming the struggles of aging with strength and good humor.
  23. Naked at Our Age: advocate of ageless sexuality, Joan Price, talks about sex and aging, taking on Senior Rights subjects like safer sex for seniors while providing helpful tips.
  24. Aging & Work at Boston College: scholars, academics, and researchers share their findings on ageism in the workplace and the challenges aging workers face in this PhD-heavy blog by The Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College.
  25. Ethnic Elders: this newsy blog by New America Media examines the Senior Rights issues and Elder Law of minority groups such as age discrimination, lawsuits related to Social Security, and elder healthcare reform.
  26. The Everyday Ageism Project: blending blogging and research, this site’s goal is to capture the experience of age discrimination. The forum is full of people sharing their experiences in a supportive environment.
  27. Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens Blog: the Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens sub-blog offers wide ranging posts on issues including senior rights and ageism – with its signature left-wing perspective.
  28. Clinical Geriatrics: created as more of a peer-reviewed clinical journal by the American Geriatrics Society, some of the top scholars in geriatrics converge on this blog to discuss geriatric health and wellness issues, which often cross over into legal and anti-ageism issues.
  29. Age Action Alliance: this organization brings together a network of 300 organizations and individuals committed to helping older people. Its blog is dedicated to improving older people’s lives through advocating against ageism, particularly in Britain.
  30. Manitoba Senior Centres: this Canadian blog covers the rampant ageism in Canada and promotes world elder abuse awareness. It also has a list of resources for older adults.
  31. Fierce with Age: defying ageism goes mainstream at this blog, created by veteran journalist Dr. Carol Orsborn. Having written about the Boomer generation for major newspapers and blogged for the Huffington Post and NPR’s Next Avenue, Orsborn is well equipped to take on the spiritual and policy hurdles of aging.
  32. Live Better Boomer!: a Philadelphia-based blog, by social worker Tiffany Matthews, devoted to helping educate and empower Boomers advocate for their own improved healthcare.
  33. Third Age: billed as “health for Boomers and beyond,” Third Age offers relatively fluffy fare, like “Change your Mood with Color,” to the legal issues surrounding Boomer divorce and care-giving.
  34. The Old Gunhand: one facet of senior citizen rights you don’t see every day is elder gun advocates. This website not only tells you the best types of guns for elderly wielders, it also goes into gun policy and senior self-defense.
  35. Age Discrimination Info: a simple name for a one-stop source of statistics and information on age discrimination, including legislation, cases, news, publications, events and training. The perfect resource for the activist.
  36. Age UK: the largest organization in the United Kingdom for working with and for older people, this website has an entire section dedicated to age discrimination and ageism.
  37. National Youth Rights Association: not just for youngsters, the National Youth Rights Association combats ageism in all its forms. In fact, they probably wouldn’t appreciate being called “youngsters.”
  38. Disability and Representation: a blog by writer, photographer and activist Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg that discusses (and tries to change the discourse about) disability rights and ageism, along with autism.
  39. Over 50: Career coaching and workshops for the over-50 crowd, this blog doesn’t stop at finding a job. This site explores Baby Boomer activism in and out of the workplace.
  40. Activist Post: while this blog deals with many topics requiring advocacy, they often include issues that regard Senior Rights, Elder Law and anti-ageism.
  41. California Booming: an informational blog dedicated to California Baby Boomers, this blog covers everything from sex, to diet, to politics of the Boomer generation, including issues concerning senior rights and ageism in the workplace.

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts April 2013 Calendar Of Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts

April 2013 Calendar Of Events

495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101

Contact:  Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993                              Feb. 28, 2013

Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org

City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

 

 

 

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

 

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)

Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m.
Admission: $4 dollars per person per week at the door.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of fun learning international dance styles, including Arabic, Armenian, Bulgarian, Chinese, Greek, Israeli, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian and Turkish folk dances. No need to bring a partner. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.

 

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)

Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.

Admission: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

 

Contra Dance (ages 8+)
Saturday, April 13. Group lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7 to 10 p.m.
Admission: $10 adults; $5 members, students & military; $3 children under 16 & non-dancers; pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance to a live acoustic band playing joyful fiddle tunes, driving reels and a waltz or two. All dances are taught and called; newcomers and families welcome. No need to bring a partner. Wear comfortable flat-soled shoes and casual clothing. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

 

Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’Ole Concert (all ages)
Saturday, April 13, 7 p.m.
Cost: $10 in advance, $15 event day.
Historic Fifth Street School Auditorium, 401 S. 4th St., (702) 229-3515.
Five-time Na Hoku Hanohano Award-winner Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’ole was honored at the 2009 awards as Male Vocalist of the Year.  An accomplished hula dancer and singer in the Hawaiian language, he brings a love of the Hawaiian culture to his performance. For more information on the artist, go to www.kaumakaiwakanakaole.com/. For tickets and information, call (702) 229-3515 or (702) 229-6469, or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Downtown Cultural Series – Rocky and Ruthie Lombardo Songs from the “American Songbook” (all ages)
Friday, April 19, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.

Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
Bring your lunch to enjoy a concert by Rocky and Ruthie Lombardo. The jazz duo will offer selections from the American Songbook featuring American composers from 1920 to the present. For more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org, or call (702) 229-3515.

Poets’ Corner

Friday, April 19, 7:30 p.m.

Admission is free.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.

Hosted by Keith Brantley, this monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants features the best local poetry talent.

 

USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, April 20, 7 to 11 p.m. Dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Admission: $5 members, military and students ages 13-25; $10 for non-members. Pay at door.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St. (702) 229-6383.
Presented by USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. For more information, call (702) 813-6694 or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org.

 

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Presents “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale”

April 26 and 27, May 3 and 4 at 7 p.m.; April 28, May 4 and 5 at 2 p.m.

Cost: $7 adults; $5 teen/senior/military; $3 children age 12 and younger.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The classic fairy tale of Rapunzel comes to life in this lively musical appropriate for the whole family. Enjoy the new twist on the old tale, from the writing team that created “How I Became a Pirate.” This production is ideal for anyone of any age who loves to laugh! For tickets and information, call 229-6383 or 229-6553, or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

 

African-American Midwives Film Series — “Bringin’ In Da Spirit” (ages 14+)

Saturday, April 27, 3 p.m.

Admission is free.  Call (702) 229-4800 to reserve a space.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.

“Bringin’ In Da Spirit” is a film about the history of African-American midwives from slavery to current times. This film was able to capture the interviews of “grand” midwives that worked in the segregated South. Most African-Americans born in the segregated South prior to the mid-1960s were born into the hands of a midwife. The sparse number of black physicians and the poverty of many blacks meant that not only did midwives “catch” babies, but they did most of the “doctoring” in the community. With the development of Medicaid and other social and political changes, midwives were no longer relied upon for healthcare. Martha-Marie Drohobyczer will moderate a discussion after the film to examine some of the reasons African-American women have the highest infant mortality rate in the United States, three times the rate of white Americans, and what we can do to reduce this rate.

Exhibitions

 

“African-American Heritage”

Artist Lolita Develay

Through April 18, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.

Free admission and open to the public.

Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.

Lolita Develay is a 2014 Master of Fine Arts candidate at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She lived in Hollywood, Calif., prior to moving to Las Vegas in 2008. Her works are well painted surfaces which reflect her interest in traditions of realism, often focusing on the intrigue of light acting on an object. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Sculptures in Glass”
Artists Larry Domsky and Barbara Domsky

Through May 30, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.

Free admission and open to the public.

Las Vegas City Hall Grand Gallery, 495 S. Main St., First floor, (702) 229-1012.

Glassworks designed and created by this husband-and-wife team will be displayed. The work will include newer pieces that fit the format and space of City Hall as well as pieces from their collection of glassworks. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Spirit Journeys”

Artist Rainer Bertrams

March 21-May 4, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Artist’s reception March 21, 6 to 8 p.m.

Free admission and open to the public.

CharlestonHeightsArtCenter, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.

The images will focus on meditative subjects and themes that explore human kind’s existential struggles for a universal understanding of human nature. For questions about this exhibit or the gallery program, call 229-1012 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Equinox”

March 28-June 8, during reception and by appointment only.

Artists’ reception March 28, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

Admission is free.

HistoricFifthStreetSchool, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.

For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Celebrating Life! 2013” (ages 50+)

Tuesday-Wednesday, April 23-24 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. entry submission drop off.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.

This is the 13th annual juried exhibit for ClarkCounty resident artists age 50 and better. It is free to enter and each artist may submit only one entry. There are six media categories, each awarded first, second, third and honorable mention awards: Drawing/Pastel, Painting, Mixed Media, Photography, Sculpture and Ceramics, Watercolor and Gouache. There is also a best of show award. This program is sponsored by the city of Las Vegas Arts Commission. For more details, or to receive a prospectus, call (702) 229-1012.

# # #

Editor’s Note: Photos are available for download at

ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/Exhibitions/.

ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/April_2013/

No password is required.

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts March 2013 Calendar Of Events

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts March 2013 Calendar Of Events

495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101
Contact: Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993 Feb. 11, 2013
Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org
City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Spring Class Registration at Charleston Heights Arts Center (ages 2-adult)
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
March 1-April 3 registration for 7- to 8-week session of classes April 3-May 24.
Offered courses include ballet, jazz, hip hop, ballroom dancing, visual arts and private lessons in music and dance by appointment. For more information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org. Register for classes at www.artslasvegas.org/classes/register.htm beginning March 1.

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Spring Drama Class Registration (ages 4-17)
Registration Opens March 1 for 7-week class sessions that begin the week of April 3.
Cost: Fees range from $49 to $70.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
To register or for more information, call (702) 229-6553 or 229-6383, or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m.
Admission: $4 dollars per person per week at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of fun learning international dance styles, including Arabic, Armenian, Bulgarian, Chinese, Greek, Israeli, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian and Turkish folk dances. No need to bring a partner. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Contra Dances (ages 8+)
Saturdays, March 2 and 23. Group lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7 to 10 p.m.
Admission: $10 adults; $5 members, students & military; $3 children under 16 & non-dancers; pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance to a live acoustic band playing joyful fiddle tunes, driving reels and a waltz or two. All dances are taught and called; newcomers and families welcome. No need to bring a partner. Wear comfortable flat-soled shoes and casual clothing. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.
Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Auditions for “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale”
Saturday, March 2, 2013, 1 p.m.
No fee to audition.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Auditions for the Rainbow Company musical production of “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale” will start promptly at 1 p.m. Roles are available for ages 12 through adult. Comfortable clothes that allow for movement should be worn and a prepared song is strongly recommended. The show will be performed April 26-May 5. For more information, call 229-6553.

“The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle” presented by Target and ArtsPower (all ages)
Saturday, March 9, 10:30 a.m.
Cost: $3 general admission.
Historic Fifth Street School Auditorium, 401 S. 4th Street, 229-3515.
ArtsPower’s “The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle” tells the uplifting story of an ordinary train that performs an extraordinary feat of strength and courage. The story follows the adventures of The Little Blue Engine, who dreams of someday pulling the Piney Vale Ex¬press just like her best friend Rusty. For tickets and information, call 229-3515 or 229-6469 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, March 9, 7 to 11 p.m. Dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Admission: $5 members, military and students ages 13-25; $10 for non-members. Pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St. (702) 229-6383.
Presented by USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. For more information, call (702) 813-6694 or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org.

Downtown Cultural Series – Bill & Kate Isles Concert (all ages)
Friday, March 15, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
Bring your lunch to enjoy a concert by Bill and Kate Isles, an acoustic singer/songwriter duo based in Duluth, Minn. They tour nationally, entertaining audiences with a wide variety of musical styles, catchy melodies and memorable songs. For more information, visit www.billandkateisles.com or www.artslasvegas.org, or call (702) 229-3515.

Poets’ Corner
Friday, March 15, 7 p.m.
Admission is free.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Hosted by Keith Brantley, this monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants features the best local poetry talent.

St. Patrick’s Day Dance (adults)
Saturday, March 16, 7 p.m.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Admission: $10 in advance; $15 event day.
It’s easy to be green! Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day early by dancing to songs from the 1940s- 70s, from swing and foxtrots to Latin and jazz, performed by the Carl Grove Combo.
For tickets or information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.
Women and Young Women’s Conference 2013 (ages 14+)
“The Spirit Of A Woman…Body & Soul”
Saturday, March 23, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Admission is free, but advance registration is required. Call (702) 229-4800 to register.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
This dynamic event will promote personal empowerment and mentorship, with a focus on sisterhood. The purpose of the event is to strengthen communication between women and young women, creating and enhancing opportunities for understanding. A series of specialized workshops will be offered throughout the day to benefit and assist women as they share, teach, and learn from each other. Participants are asked to wear comfortable active wear for the workshops. Each adult participant is encouraged to bring a young lady or mentee of high school age, friend, mom, sister, or aunt to the event. The event is cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District.

Spring II Class Registration at the West Las Vegas Arts Center (all ages)
March 23-April 6 registration for 6-week session of classes April 10-May 18.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Cultural arts classes include African Drum; African Dance for Children and African Dance for Teens/Adults; Keep it Moving…Ballet & Tap; Ballet–Beginner/Intermediate; Modern Dance; Hip Hop; Zumba; Tae Kwon Do; Video & Documentary Creation; Music Production; Arts & Crafts – Kids Create and Craft It Up; and Private Piano/Voice lessons. To register, or for more information, call (702) 229-4800 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Folk Celebration and Stage Performance (all ages)
Saturday, March 23, 12:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Admission: $10.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Admission includes a 2 p.m. theatre concert performance in the Jeanne Roberts Theatre, featuring international dance artist “Zarnia,” who specializes in Middle Eastern dances with elaborate costuming, musician RJ Fox playing Flamenco-style guitar accompanied by flamenco dancers, and talented Las Vegas Kaminari Taiko Drummers, a performance group affiliated with the Japanese American Citizens League. View demonstrations and information 12:30-1:45 p.m., take dance lessons 3:30-6:30 p.m. A concert ticket stub will provide half off admission to the Contra Dance at 6:30 p.m. A food vendor will be on site from 12:30 to 6 p.m. This event coincides with the 2013 National Folk Organization’s Las Vegas conference. For tickets or information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Rainbow Company Spring Break Drama Workshop (grades 2-6)
Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Cost: $135. Advance registration is required.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Students will enjoy five full days of drama, with a performance on the main stage Saturday, March 30. For information and registration, call 229-6553 or 229-6383 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Spring Break Dance Camp (ages 12-18)
Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 3:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Cost: $75. Advance registration is required. Registration opened Feb. 1.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dedicated young dancers will flourish within this weeklong intensive and disciplined atmosphere available to intermediate- and advanced-level students (or students with a minimum of one year of dance instruction). Instruction led by Jackie Koenig and Jennifer Kidder. Dance attire required; please bring snacks. A student demonstration for family and friends at 6:30 p.m. Friday will conclude the camp. To register or more information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.
Spring Break Arts Workshop (ages 10-18)
Wednesday-Friday, March 27-29, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Admission is free, but advanced registration is required.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
This will be a heritage development workshop, exploring traditions and discovering individualities. Call (702) 229-4800 for information and registration.

Life Skills & Job Readiness Workshop (ages 14-19)
Saturday, March 30, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Admission is free, but registration is required.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Life Skills Training is a dynamic, skills-based program that promotes health and personal development. It is designed for those facing the new roles and responsibilities of becoming young adults transitioning into the workplace. The workshop focuses on goal setting, communication, decision making, risk, and maintaining relationships. The program is cosponsored by Nevada Partners. For more information and registration, call (702) 924-2134.
Exhibitions

“Narratives of Progress”
Artist Armin Mühsam
Through March 16, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
About his work, Mühsam says, “My work focuses on the relationship between the natural and the human-built. I imagine the land after technology has rendered it nearly uninhabitable, despite its promises to create a better world. I paint the absence of humans but not of humanity — man-made, sterile landscapes after the disappearance of the natural.” For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

“African-American Heritage”
Artist Lolita Develay
Through April 18, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
Lolita Develay is a 2014 Master of Fine Arts candidate at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She lived in Hollywood, Calif., prior to moving to Las Vegas in 2008. Her works are well painted surfaces which reflect her interest in traditions of realism, often focusing on the intrigue of light acting on an object. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

“Sculptures in Glass”
Artists Larry Domsky and Barbara Domsky
Feb. 26-May 30, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Grand Gallery, 495 S. Main St., First floor, (702) 229-1012.
Glassworks designed and created by this husband-and-wife team will be displayed. The work will include newer pieces that fit the format and space of City Hall as well as pieces from their collection of glassworks. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.
Nevada Watercolor Society’s 2013 Signature Members’ Exhibit
Feb. 28-March 23, during the reception and by appointment.
Artists’ reception Feb. 28, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information about the city gallery programs, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org. More information about the Nevada Watercolor Society can be found at www.nvws.org/.

“Spirit Journeys”
Artist Rainer Bertrams
March 21-May 4, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Artist’s reception March 21, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The images will focus on meditative subjects and themes that explore human kind’s existential struggles for a universal understanding of human nature. For questions about this exhibit or the gallery program, call 229-1012 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

“Equinox”
March 28-June 8, during reception and by appointment only.
Artists’ reception March 28, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

The Dr. Miriam & Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus Presents a Free Parenting Workshop from World-Renown Psychologist

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

The Dr. Miriam & Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus Presents a Free Parenting Workshop from World-Renown Psychologist New York Times Best Selling Author Michael G. Thompson, Ph.D. Provides a Practical Guide to Raising Healthy, Secure Children

Las Vegas – Jan. 8, 2012 –The Dr. Miriam & Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus is offering a free Parenting Workshop hosted by world-renowned psychologist specializing in children and families, Michael G. Thompson, Ph.D. On Sunday, Jan. 13 from1 – 3 p.m., 400 parents will have the opportunity to hear from this best selling author and sought after speaker who has appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show, The Today Show, CBS 60 Minutes, ABC 20/20, Good Morning America, and The Early Show. Thompson’s workshop is titled Pressured Children, Worried Parents: A Conversation about Parenting in 2013: managing you and your child’s expectations and emotions with regards to adolescence, friendship development, popularity and social cruelty.

“This is Michael Thompson’s fourth visit to our school and he is back by popular demand,” said Paul Schiffman, head of school of Adelson Educational Campus. “As a celebrated psychologist, he provides parents with wisdom, guidance and humor through all the tough decisions they make. We look forward to hearing his insight on Jan. 13.”

Michael Thompson, Ph.D. is a consultant, author and psychologist specializing in children and families. He is the supervising psychologist for the Belmont Hill School and has worked in more than five hundred schools across the United States, as well as in international schools in Central America, Europe, Africa and Asia.

He and his co-author, Dan Kindlon, wrote the New York Times best-selling book, Raising Cain: Protecting the Emotional Life of Boys (Ballantine Books, 1999). He is the author of Homesick and Happy: How Time Away from Parents Can Help a Child Grow, Speaking of Boys: Answers to the Most-Asked Questions about Raising Sons Ballantine, 2000), and co-author (with Catherine O’Neill Grace and Larry Cohen, Ph.D.) of Best Friends/Worst Enemies: Understanding the Social Worlds of Children (Ballantine, 2001) and Mom, They’re Teasing Me: Helping Your Child Solve Social Problems (Ballantine, 2002.) About Best Friends, Worst Enemies the Publishers Weekly review declared, “Not since Dr. Spock and Penelope Leach has there been such a sensitive and practical guide to raising healthy children.” The Pressured Child: Helping Your Child Achieve Success in School and in Life (with Teresa Barker, Ballantine, 2004) was written to help parents understand the complex journey of children through school, from Kindergarten through senior year. His third book on the psychology of boys, entitled, It’s a Boy!: Understanding Your Son’s Development from Birth to Eighteen, was published in 2008. It focuses on the importance of undirected, free play in the lives of boys. He is presently writing a new book about summer camps and schools trips entitled, Homesick and Happy: How Children Change and Grow When They Are Away from Their Parents.

A dedicated speaker and traveler, Michael Thompson has appeared on The Today Show, The Oprah Winfrey Show, ABC 20/20, CBS 60 Minutes, The Early Show and Good Morning America. He has been quoted in the New York Times, The Washington Post, Newsweek, Time and U.S. News and World Report and has been a guest on NPR’s “Morning Edition” with Susan Stamberg, “Talk of the Nation” with Ray Suarez and the Diane Rhem Show. He wrote, narrated and hosted a two-hour PBS documentary entitled “Raising Cain” that was broadcast nationally in 2006.

Dr. Thompson serves on the board of the American Camping Association and is on the Advisory Board of Parent Magazine. Dr. Thompson lives in Arlington, Massachusetts. He is married to Dr. Theresa McNally, a psychotherapist, and is the father of Joanna, 26, and Will, 20.

About The Dr. Miriam & Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus
The mission of The Dr. Miriam and Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus is to instruct and inspire new generations of students who will draw strength from a rich Jewish heritage, use their knowledge, values and vision to fulfill their own potential, and build a better world. Adelson Educational Campus was originally founded in 1980 and now educates children from 18 months through 12th grade. Adelson Educational Campus accepts students of all faiths and affiliations and offers a drug-free commitment to its students and faculty. Adelson Educational Campus is located at 9700 West Hillpointe Road in Summerlin. For more information please call (702) 255-4500 or visit www.adelsoncampus.org or Facebook/Adelson Campus

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts – February 2013 Calendar Of Events

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
Centers will be closed Feb. 18 for holiday observance.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $5 dollars per person per week at door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $4 dollars per person per week at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of international fun learning Armenian, Bulgarian, Israeli, Arabic, Macedonian, Russian, Greek, Turkish, Chinese, Serbian folk dances, and more. No need to bring a partner. Cosponsored by the Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing Club of Las Vegas, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 562-9889 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Spring Class Registration Opens Feb. 2 (all ages)
Registration for the six-week spring 2013 classes Feb. 20-March 30 is open Feb. 2-16.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Cultural arts classes include African Drum; African Dance for Children and African Dance for Teens/Adults; Keep it Moving…Ballet & Tap; Ballet–Beginner/Intermediate; Modern Dance; Hip Hop, Yoga–Health & Wellness; Tae Kwon Do; Video & Documentary Creation; Music Production; and Private Piano/Voice lessons. The West Las Vegas Arts Center also will offer two new exciting classes exploring the creativity and sheer fun of arts and crafts. They are: Kids Create and Craft It Up. To register, or for more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-4800.
Sweethearts Square Dance (ages 8+)
Saturday, Feb. 2; introductory lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7:30 to 10 p.m.
Admission: $12 per person at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Enjoy square dancing to callers such as Andy Finch, Joe Valvo, Vern Vernazarro and Ron Sowash of Las Vegas and with guest cuer Ron Hartzell. No need to bring a partner. Class-level dances, Plus and Round dances will be included, as well as a chance to win door prizes. Refreshments will be available. Cosponsored by the Stardusters, Las Vegas Square & Round Dance Club, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 348-4906 or (702) 229-6383, or visit www.lasvegassquarenrounddancers.org

Valentine Dance with Boyd Coulter & the Good Times Band
Saturday, Feb. 9, at 7 p.m.
Tickets: $10 advance purchase; $15 per person at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance the evening away with Big Band music. Step back to a sweeter time when Big Band swing was the thing and romance was the theme. Enjoy an evening of dancing to great tunes made famous by the bands of Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey and Benny Goodman; romantic standards from the ‘50s and ‘60s; cha-chas, tangos, and more. For more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call 229-6383.

Downtown Cultural Series – Emanuel Schmidt Quartet “The Music of Miles” (all ages)
Friday, Feb. 15, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
An excellent and experienced musician, Emanuel Schmidt has performed at schools, clubs, cafés and festivals – for intimate crowds as well as for thousands – in Australia, Switzerland and in the U.S.A. According to Schmidt’s peers and educators, he is “an outstanding and versatile guitarist of exceptional ability, and an extraordinarily thoughtful and hardworking musician.” Described by The Australian Music Centre’s Ian Shanahan as an “accomplished and imaginative composer,” Schmidt has written for a full orchestra and performs reflective, emotive and adventurous original compositions with his groups. This group will perform selections from albums such as “Kind Of Blue,” “My Funny Valentine,” “ESP,” and more. Call (702) 229-3515 for more details.

The Poets’ Corner
Hosted by Keith Brantley
Friday, Feb. 15, 7 p.m.
Admission is free.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
A monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants, featuring the best local poetry talent.

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Presents “Across The Truckee” (all ages)
Friday-Sunday, Feb. 15-17; 2 p.m. shows Saturday and Sunday; 7 p.m. shows Friday and Saturday.
Tickets: $7 for adults, $5 for teens/seniors/military; and $3 for children under age 12.
Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St., (702) 229-3515.
Who knew Nevada’s history could be so rich in entertainment? Don’t miss the chance to see the main stage version of “Across The Truckee,” the newly created and lively production about Nevada history, before it goes on tour. Meet colorful characters galore and tap your toes to music that sets you to humming—whatever your age! For tickets and information, call (702) 229-6383 or 229-6553, or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.
Guy Davis in Concert
Saturday, Feb. 16, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $10 advance purchase; $15 per person at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, Jeanne Roberts Theatre, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Guy Davis is a musician, composer, actor, director, and writer. But most importantly, Guy Davis is a bluesman. The blues permeates every corner of Davis’ creativity. Throughout his career, he has dedicated himself to reviving the traditions of acoustic blues and bringing them to as many ears as possible through the material of the great blues masters, along with African-American stories and his own original songs, stories and performance pieces. For more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call 229-6383.

An Evening with Peter Yarrow (all ages)
Friday, Feb. 22, 8 p.m.
Tickets: $10 in advance/$15 event day
Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St., (702) 229-3515.
Share an intimate evening with legendary singer/songwriter and activist Peter Yarrow (Peter, Paul & Mary, Puff the Magic Dragon, Operation Respect). Inspirational as well as humorous, Peter will look back over the career of Peter, Paul & Mary, telling stories and singing some of the many hits that won them acclaim worldwide. Call 229-3515 for more information.

The Jester Hairston Music Association, Inc. Presents “Why Do We Sing – The Evolution of African-American Music” (all ages)
Cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District.
Saturday, Feb. 23, 3 p.m.
Admission is free, but tickets are required and may be picked up in advance at the West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd.
West Las Vegas Library Theatre, 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 507-3989.
The Jester Hairston Music Association (JHMA) chorus, along with youth from the community, share reasons and circumstances of why we sing. The historical music genres of jazz, spirituals, and gospel will be explored and performed in this festive occasion. Please call (702) 229-4800 for more information.

USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, Feb. 23, 7 to 11 p.m.; dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Cost: $10 per person at the door; $5 for USA Dance members, military, and students ages 13-25.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Cosponsored by the USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national organization USA Dance. USA Dance Las Vegas is a volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. Call (702) 813-6694 or (702) 229-6383 for more information, or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org.
Exhibitions
“Second Wind” Exhibition
Artist Robin Stark
Nov. 26, 2012-Feb. 14, 2013; Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Grand Gallery, 495 S. Main St., First floor, (702) 229-1012.
Inspiration for this work was influenced by the work of American sculptor David Smith. The artist’s ceramic sculptural forms have a reference to the traditional ceramic vessel, yet deviate from functionality and focus on expressive formal elements (surface shapes defined by sharp edges and bold color) to suggest visual movement and momentum. The pieces treat the surface as a two-dimensional format to imply motion already established in the three-dimensional form through repetition and layering of various shapes and colors. The purity and intensity of the hues generate an emotional quality, which is critical to the overall nature of the pieces.

“Narratives of Progress” Exhibit
Artist Armin Mühsam
Jan. 18-March 16, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Snake Exhibit
Jan. 31-Feb. 23, by appointment only. Artists’ reception Jan. 31, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
Chinese Year of the Snake begins Feb. 10. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

African-American Heritage Exhibit
2013 Featured Artist: Lolita Develay
Feb. 7-April 18, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Nevada Watercolor Society’s 2013 Signature Members’ Exhibit
Feb. 28-March 23, during the reception and by appointment.
Artists’ reception Feb. 28, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

# # #
High-resolution photos are available for download at ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/Feb_2013_Events/ and ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/Exhibitions/.
No password is required.
Media Contact:
Margaret Kurtz
Public Information Officer
City of Las Vegas
495 S. Main St., 7th Floor
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702) 229-6993
Cell (702) 249-1828
E-mail: mkurtz@lasvegasnevada.gov

Innovative Senior Housing Community Takes Shape in Tucson include Horses! (equine therapy)

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Read about the role of horses and Dr. Andrew Weil along with other exciting news about Watermark’s latest innovation in senior living, The Hacienda at the River in Tucson, Arizona.

Innovative Senior Housing Community Takes Shape in Tucson
Partnerships and Affiliations Announced
Tucson, Ariz. – Before concrete is even poured for the Hacienda at the River, longtime Tucson senior housing developer David Freshwater and his operating partner, David Barnes, are carefully laying the foundation for Tucson’s newest and most innovative senior living community by solidifying partnerships and affiliations with some of Tucson’s biggest names in integrative medicine and therapy.
Most notably, Freshwater and Barnes are teaming with Andrew Weil, MD, to oversee onsite organic gardens and establish culinary principles that will promote optimum health. Co-directors of the Arizona Center on Aging, Mindy Fain, MD, and Janko Nikolich-Zugich, MD, Ph.D., have agreed to provide team-based interdisciplinary healthcare (Fain), incorporating the latest standards and advances of geriatric research (Nikolich) to Hacienda residents, complementing their primary care. Steven Wool, M.D. will serve as medical director and private practice doctor for the community. Evan Kligman, M.D. will coordinate and act as ongoing liaison for all University of Arizona partnerships and affiliations with the Hacienda at the River and other programs under development for Freshwater and Barnes’ organization, Watermark Retirement Communities.
According to Freshwater, the Hacienda team has also entered into an agreement with Barbara K. Rector, MA, CEIP co-founder of Therapeutic Riding of Tucson and Adventures in Awareness, to direct onsite equine therapy, believed to be the first program of its kind to be permanently integrated into an assisted living community.
“We’ve seen equine therapy work so well with residents in other Watermark locations that we’ve made it central to our vision for The Hacienda at the River,” said Freshwater. “Given that The Hacienda site is historically a horse property, we feel this use is especially fitting.”
Utilizing Mission Revival architecture, reflective of the Southwest’s iconic heritage, and set on the terrace at the edge of the Rillito River near River and Hacienda del Sol roads, the Hacienda at the River is envisioned to be a new style of community for mature individuals who need assisted living, memory care, nursing and short-term rehabilitation. The Hacienda is Watermark’s branded response to a new paradigm for de-institutionalized senior living environments: elders receive care almost invisibly through universal workers integrated into the core household, creating a family-centered setting that seamlessly provides expert personal and health support. Each of the four single-story homes at the Hacienda includes a living room and kitchen, library, family room and a front porch. The homes have courtyards with mesquite and other canopy trees. Resident suites in each home have private baths and roll in showers. Nursing and rehab services will also be provided at the new community in a two-story building with the look and feel of a boutique hotel rather than a traditional, institutional nursing home.
Other features of the development will include:
• Green building techniques including water harvesting and gray water systems, and other energy and water saving techniques leading to LEED certification;
• On-site orchard and gardens for providing a portion of fruits and vegetables used at the community;
• On-site restaurant and café featuring natural, organic foods (including those grown on-site) whenever possible serving residents, family members and visitors alike;
• Two rehab facilities for short-term and outpatient services including speech, hearing, occupational, and physical therapies. The Hacienda is also planning to integrate aquatic as well as equine therapies into its rehab programming.
The purchase of the 7.5-acre site closed October 3 and groundbreaking is expected in 2013. More affiliations are in the works, to be announced.
Freshwater and Barnes are nationally noted seniors’ housing experts who happen to live in Tucson. They opened their first senior living community, The Fountains at La Cholla, 25 years ago. Watermark now operates 31 communities coast to coast.
www.watermarkcommunities.com

City of Las Vegas Halloween & Harvest Happenings

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City Offers Many Special Events And Activities For Children And Adults

The city of Las Vegas offers special events and activities for children and adults for Halloween and harvest fun. These activities are just a sampling of the many programs available throughout the year. For a full list of classes and activities available, go online to download the Fall/Winter 2012-2013 Recreation Guide at www.lasvegasparksandrec.com or call any of the facilities below. All activities are subject to change. Please call to confirm before attending. Most centers are closed Oct. 26. Most activities require advance registration. Most programs at senior centers and active adult centers require a $2 annual membership in the city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all city of Las Vegas senior and active adult centers.

Oktoberfest Luncheon (ages 50+)
Thursday, Oct. 18, 11:30 p.m.
Cost: $5.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Celebrate the rich heritage of the German people with bratwurst, sauerkraut and a great party!

Halloween Luncheon (ages 50+)
Friday, Oct. 19, 11 a.m. seating; 11:30 a.m. luncheon. Advance reservations required.
Cost: $5.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.
Dress in costume for this annual luncheon that includes salad, dessert, beverages, and dinner served in a pumpkin!

Free Ward 6 Movie In The Park
Friday, Oct. 19, 7 p.m.
Centennial Hills Amphitheatre, 7101 N. Buffalo Drive, at Deer Springs Way.
Enjoy the PG-rated family film, “Scooby-Doo,” in the park, sponsored by Lexus of Las Vegas. Bring your picnic, blankets or folding chairs to be more comfortable. Food will be available for purchase from Curbside Café. For more information, call 229-6154 or visit www.lasvegasnevada.gov/ward6.

Cooking Club: What Can You Make from a Pumpkin? (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 23, 11 a.m.
Cost: $5.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Ghost & Ghouls Breakfast (ages 50+)
Thursday, Oct. 25, 8:30 to 10 a.m.
Cost: $3.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Enjoy a ghoulish serving of pancakes with bloody scrambled eggs and slices of bacon.

Howling Halloween Carnival (all ages)
Thursday, Oct. 25, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
Doolittle Community Center, 1950 N. J St., (702) 229-6374.
There will be a costume contest, games, drawings and candy for the kids. There will also be a Haunted Hallway designed to frighten all who enter.

Halloween Costume Dance with the Jerry Tiffe Band (adults)
Saturday Oct. 27, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $10 in advance, $15 event day.
Charleston Heights Arts Center Ballroom, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Get in the spirit of the season and “monster mash” at the annual Halloween-themed dance. Dress in your favorite costume and dance the night away to the music of Jerry Tiffe and his combo band. Band members are Jerry Tiffe (leader/singer/trumpet), Dale Sweetland (drums/vocals), Thomas San Filippo (keyboards/bass) and Brian Bissell (guitar). Call 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org for tickets and information. For more information on the band, go online to www.jerrytiffe.com.
-more-

Halloween Costume Luncheon & Celebration (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Oct. 31, 11:30 a.m. Advance registration required.
Cost: $5.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Dress in costume to enjoy a spooky meal and carnival-style games. Prizes will be awarded to the best costume, creepiest costume, funniest and more. Space is limited, so sign up early.

Halloween Fun! (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Oct. 31, 1 to 3 p.m. Advance registration required by Oct. 26.
Cost: $2.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.
Come dressed in costume to celebrate Halloween and two lesser-known holidays, Carve a Pumpkin Day and National Candy Corn Day! “Carve” a pumpkin and enjoy treats made with candy corn!

Scarecrow Making (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Nov. 7, 10:30 a.m. Registration begins Oct. 22.
Cost: $5 with a current annual $2 senior membership. Advanced registration is required.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
The PVC “skeleton” and base will be provided; the rest is up to you! Bring an old pair of jeans and shirt, or dress and shoes — it’s up to you to create a scarecrow that will be used to decorate the center. You’ll also enjoy a fall snack. Call 229-1702 for more information.

Harvest Festival Potluck (ages 50+)
Thursday, Nov. 8, 11:30 a.m.
Free with a dish to share.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.

Vi Marks 25 Years As a National Leader in Senior Living

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Vi Marks 25 Years As a National Leader in Senior Living

Vi – the developer, owner and operator of older adult living communities – is celebrating its 25th anniversary in August. Vi operates 10 continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) nationwide.

“We are extremely proud of the accomplishments we have achieved during the past 25 years,” said Randy Richardson, President of Vi. “In an era of uncertainty, our employees and residents can take pride in the fact we are a stable, national presence within the senior living industry, free from third-party debt in our CCRC communities and managed by a strong, long-tenured team.”

Vi was established in 1987 as Classic Residence by Hyatt. The company changed its name to Vi in 2010. The company was created by Penny Pritzker, whose family founded Hyatt Hotels, to leverage Hyatt’s hospitality expertise in the growing retirement living industry to better cater to the needs and lifestyle of discerning older adults.

Vi (pronounced vee) is the Latin root for the word “life.” It was chosen as the name for the company because it captures the positive opportunities to live a more engaging and fulfilling life as an older adult.

Vi’s ability to merge its hospitality heritage with quality senior living is what differentiates the brand from others. Visitors and residents can sense this commitment to quality and service from the moment they walk into one of Vi’s communities, according to Richardson. “Hospitality is in our DNA; and every detail is meant to convey quality service, from the decor to our lifestyle and fitness programs and to our employees who’ve been specially trained in the art of making residents feel at home.”

In addition, Vi communities feature stylish dining venues that enable residents to eat well and dine in style. Menus offer a wide variety of options to suit residents’ nutritional needs and taste preferences. Meals are prepared by chefs who receive specialized training at The Culinary Institute of America.

As testament to Vi’s approach, a recent survey of independent living residents at Vi’s 10 CCRC communities finds them happy with their decision to live at Vi. The survey finds that 94 percent of Vi’s independent living residents who completed the survey are very satisfied or satisfied with the community. Almost 95 percent say they would recommend their Vi community to family or friends.

Late last year, Vi commissioned a report by Ken Dychtwald Ph.D., renowned gerontologist, psychologist, best-selling author, and CEO of Age Wave that challenges the “prevailing myths and misperceptions” about CCRC living. The report, “The Five Myths and Realities of Continuing Care Retirement Communities,” is available here.

About Vi
Vi, formerly Classic Residence by Hyatt, is celebrating its 25th anniversary as a developer, owner and operator of older adult living communities. The company was founded in August 1987. The company is dedicated to enriching the lives of older adults by providing quality environments, services and care. Vi currently operates ten continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) nationwide. For more information about Vi communities, visit

http://www.ViLiving.com.

Contact: Tim Hermeling, 312-803-8480

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 Senior Special Events

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 Senior Special Events

Las Vegas Residents Invited To Celebrations, Luncheons & Activities At City Centers

The city of Las Vegas active adult and senior centers offer exercise, fitness, craft, arts, dance, music and computer classes; cards; games; discussion and social groups; luncheons; sports; and special events Monday through Friday to residents age 50 and better. Many of these activities contribute to wellness and a healthy lifestyle. A listing of classes and activities is published in the Beyond the Neon Leisure Guide, available in the centers and online at www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. All activities are subject to change. Most activities require $2 annual membership to city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all senior and active adult centers.

Golf Lessons (ages 50+)
Mondays at 9 a.m. or 10:15 a.m. Registration for October sessions begins Sept. 17.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Bring in a couple of clubs that you need to work on.

Oktoberfest Brunch (ages 50+)
Thursday, Oct. 4, 10 a.m. Registration open Sept. 3-28.
Cost: $3.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.
Celebrate Oktoberfest with some Bavarian brunch delicacies!

Breakfast Nook (ages 50+)
Friday, Oct. 5, 8:30 a.m.
Cost: $3, includes French toast casserole, sausage, fruit, coffee and juice.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Flu & Pneumonia Shots (all ages)
Tuesday, Oct. 9, 9 a.m. to noon.
Cost: Call for information. Various insurances accepted.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Southern Nevada Health District staff will administer flu and pneumonia vaccinations. Call 759-0850 for more information on pricing and which insurances will be accepted.

Chili Cook-off
Wednesday, Oct. 10, noon.
Cost: Free to enter; $2 to taste.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Make your best chili to enter in the annual chili cook-off. Prizes will be awarded to the winner. Salad and cornbread provided for those who taste and help judge the best chili!
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Helping You Understand Your Medicare Benefits and Options (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct., 16, 10 a.m. Registration opens Sept. 17.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Receive information to help you make your best Medicare choices.

Flu Shots (all ages)
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 10 a.m. to noon.
Cost: Call for information.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Southern Nevada Health District will provide annual flu shots. A list of accepted insurances will be available closer to the date of the clinic. Please call to be put on the reservation list.

Annual Texas Hold’em Poker Tournament (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 12:30 p.m.
Cost: $4.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Prepare for this fun tournament by joining the Thursday class at 1 p.m. or playing in the weekly games on Tuesdays and Fridays at 12:30 p.m. Enjoy hot and cold refreshments. Top three winners will receive a prize basket!

Getting Paid to Talk (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 1 to 3:30 p.m. Must be registered by Oct. 5.
Cost: $15.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.
This exciting workshop will teach you how to get paid to talk – by reading for audio books, animated shows and more. The field is wide open. Learn how to market yourself, where to go to find voice-over jobs, how to do voice-overs, etc.

World Food Day Luncheon (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Oct. 17, 11:30 a.m. Registration open Sept. 3-Oct. 12.
Cost: $5.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.
Give back to our community in honor of World Food Day. Bring a non-perishable food item with you and enjoy a delicious lunch. Feel good, doing good!

Oktoberfest Luncheon (ages 50+)
Thursday, Oct. 18, 11:30 p.m.
Cost: $5.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Celebrate the rich heritage of the German people with bratwurst, sauerkraut and a great party!

Flu and Pneumonia Shots (all ages)
Tuesday, Oct. 23, 9 to 11 a.m.
Call the beginning of October for pricing.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Southern Nevada Health District staff will administer flu and pneumonia vaccinations for a fee. Pneumonia vaccination is recommended for adults age 65 and older. For more information on flu vaccines, go online to www.southernnevadahealthdistrict.org/immunizations/flu-shots.php.
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Cooking Club: What Can You Make from a Pumpkin? (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 23, 11 a.m.
Cost: $5.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Lillian’s Fashion Divas (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Oct. 24, 11:00 a.m. for fashion show; brunch immediately following.
Fashion show is free and open to the public. Brunch cost: $3. R.S.V.P. by Oct. 17 for brunch.
West Las Vegas Library Theatre for fashion show, 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd.
Doolittle Senior Center for brunch, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Active adults from Doolittle Senior Center present fashions created in the master seamstress classes. They will showcase fall fashions, including casual wear, evening wear and Sunday’s best. The event is presented by the Doolittle Senior Center and hosted by the city of Las Vegas and Las Vegas-Clark County Library District. Call 229-6125 for more information.

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Cultural Arts – September 2012 Calendar Of Events

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Cultural Arts – September 2012 Calendar Of Events

495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101
Contact: Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993 July 26, 2012
Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org
City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Centers will be closed Monday, Sept. 3, for holiday observance.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m.
Cost: $4 dollars per person per week. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of international fun learning Armenian, Bulgarian, Israeli, Arabic, Macedonian, Russian, Greek, Turkish, Chinese and Serbian folk dances, and more. No need to bring a partner. For more information, call 229-6383.

Afternoon Delight Tea Dances (adults)
Thursdays, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Cost: $5 general admission per person. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Great music and a friendly atmosphere welcome dancers of all levels to the center’s beautiful ballroom dance floor. Loy Au will lead the dance instruction and demonstrations for new dances each week. A themed dance will be featured each month. Invite your friends and bring snacks to share. For more information, call 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Cost: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – Crystal Bookmark Award Nominations
Aug. 13-Sept. 21.
The Vegas Valley Book Festival launches its annual awards project to honor a local individual and an organization for advancing the cause of literature in the Las Vegas Valley. Nominations from the public are requested Aug. 13-Sept. 21. Nominations can be submitted online at www.vegasvalleybookfestival.org, or call (702) 229-5431 for a nomination form. The deadline for submittal is 5 p.m. Sept. 21. Nominees must reside in Southern Nevada. The two awards will be presented at the festival at 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, p.m. in the auditorium of the Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St.
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Contra Dances (ages 8+)
Saturday, Sept. 1, 15. Group lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7 to 10 p.m.
Cost: $10 adults; $5 members, students and military; $3 children under 16 and non-dancing adults. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance to the live music of an acoustic band playing joyful fiddle tunes, driving reels and a waltz or two. All dances are taught and called; newcomers and families are welcomed. No need to bring a partner. Wear comfortable flat-soled shoes and casual clothing. For more information, call 656-9513 or 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – “Create an Artist’s Sketchbook” (ages 3-12)
Sept. 1-2; Saturday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m.
Programs are free with paid admission. $10 for adults; $8 for seniors, military and children 12 and over; $5 for ages 3-11; free for children 2 and under.
Las Vegas Natural History Museum, 900 Las Vegas Blvd. N., 384-3466.
In this workshop inspired by the famed book series, “Dinotopia,” written and illustrated by James Gurney, kids ages 3-12 can create an imagined dinosaur utopia using watercolors and sketchbooks. Paleontology experts will answer questions on Saturday.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – “Smart Chicks Kick It Tour” (ages 13+)
Tuesday, Sept. 11, 7 to 9 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Shakespeare Las Vegas, Reed Whipple Cultural Center, 821 Las Vegas Blvd. North.
Seven best-selling young adult authors stop in Las Vegas as part of their six-city tour of North America. Authors Kelley Armstrong, Melissa Marr, Rachel Caine, Kim Derting, Kami Garcia, Richelle Mead and Veronica Roth will read excerpts from their own works, followed by a spirited question-and-answer session, book signings and reception. Call 229-5431 for more information.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – “The First Lady of Las Vegas” (all ages)
Saturday, Sept. 15, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Cost: $1 for ages 13+; free for ages 12 and younger.
Old Las Vegas Mormon Fort State Historic Park, 500 E. Washington Ave., (702) 486-3511.
Nevada author Carrie Townley Porter talks about the life of the pioneer heroine who helped found our city — and signs her book, “Helen J. Stewart: The First Lady of Las Vegas.”

Downtown Cultural Series – The Sweet Potatoes (all ages)
Friday, Sept. 21, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd South.
Bring your lunch to enjoy this noontime concert. The Sweet Potatoes play original, acoustic Americana- style music with a fresh twist. This trio will bring a smile to your face with their sweet harmonies and finely crafted songwriting. Call (702) 229-3515 or visit www.artslasvegas.org. For more information on the band, visit http://thesweetpotatoes.com/.

The Poets’ Corner
Hosted by Keith Brantley
Friday, Sept. 21, 7:30 p.m.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
A monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants, featuring the best local poetry talent.
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USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, Sept 22, 7 to 11 p.m.; dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Cost: $5 for USA Dance members, military, and students ages 13-25; $10 for non-members. Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Cosponsored by the USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national organization USA Dance. USA Dance Las Vegas is a volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. Call (702) 813-6694 or (702) 229-6383 for more information, or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org. Pay at the door.

Community Artist Series: Mohummed-Rafee Shakir “Shamanic Syntax”
Saturday, Sept. 29, 3 p.m.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Mohummed-Rafee Shakir provides an unusual opportunity for audience members to connect with the mysteries of the ancient world through a variety of artistic mediums within an environment of “sacred sound.” The concept of “sacred sound” is a reference to the concept that vibration is the underlying connective force of the universe.

Pride & Prejudice and Zombies English Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, Sept 29, 7 to 10 p.m.
Cost: $10 adults; $5 members, students and military; $3 children under 16 and non-dancing adults. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Featuring a combination of English and Scottish dances and more. Costumes are encouraged, but not required. Caller Marsden Macrae leads a program that is enlivened by her vast knowledge of the history, historical setting and social customs of each dance. Only a brief reminder of choreography will be available, prior to the start of each dance. Attendees can gain a familiarity of the dances by attending dance sessions that are available before Sept 29. For more information, call 656-9513 or 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization.

Exhibitions

“You are Here” Exhibition (all ages)
Artist David Lindsay
June 29-Sept. 1; Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Arts Center Gallery, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
David Lindsay grew up in the San Francisco bay area. After high school, he lived in northern Italy for two years. Although his purpose was not to study art, he could not help but be influenced by the art and architecture of that country. The influence of Italian painting and architecture can be seen in his work, but in a combination that is unique and creative. His work has been exhibited all over the United States, as well as in Italy and Romania. He currently is working on projects for venues in Las Vegas, Texas, Germany and Italy.

“Celebrating Life! 2012 Winners Circle” (all ages)
July 26-Sept. 6, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
Enjoy this collection of award-winning pieces from the annual juried exhibit for adults 50 and better that takes place each spring.
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“Νeothta” (Youth)
Aug. 23-Oct. 27, by appointment only and during artists’ reception.
Meet-the-Artists reception Aug. 23, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. 4th St.
A selection of artists explore idealistic images of children. Call (702) 229-1012 for more information.

“Object Illusion”
Artist Joanne Vuillemot.
Aug. 30-Nov. 15, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Terrace Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
This local artist and educator will exhibit her silver and mixed-media metalwork.

“Mountains and Valleys Without End”
Artist Daniel Gottsegen
Sept. 7-Nov. 21; Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The artist’s experience working in and studying the environment from both a scientific (naturalist) and personal orientation has shaped the way he considers (and constructs) his world and his work. He is interested in the tension and duality between our romantic conceptions of nature and the reality of the potential environmental calamities we are facing. He seeks to embody this tension in his work by the use of technology (video that he shoots) to derive image sources, or in recent work (the Wanderungen series) by juxtaposing images. For more information on the gallery program call (702) 229-1012.

Hispanic-American Heritage Exhibit
Sept. 13-Oct. 11, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Meet-the-Artists reception Sept. 13.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.

“Absolutly Abstract”* *Editor’s Note: Spelling of exhibit name is correct as listed.
Artist Thurman Hackett
Sept. 15-Nov. 17, Wednesday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Meet-the-Artist Reception: Saturday, Sept. 22, 3 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
After spending 25 years as an interior designer, Thurman Hackett came to realize his artistic talent. He began to find new freedoms of expression through painting. As years passed, Hackett developed his own style of abstract painting. Although his subjects relate to American and African history, American jazz artists and automobiles of the 1940s, this show focuses on Africa.

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Nevada-Senior-Guide College Villas

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NSG_FebMarApr_2016_Web-25

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    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
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    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
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