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home health care | Nevada Senior Guide

Using Home Health Care to Facilitate Independent Living

January 28, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
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When faced with the choice between living in an elderly care facility or aging as independently as possible at home, home health care is almost always the more desirable choice. Still, it’s not always easy to build a feasible support system for aging seniors who wish to retain as much independence and dignity as possible by continuing to live in their own homes.

Understanding the unique needs of an individual patient and the level of care required to help them stay in their own homes doesn’t have to be complicated. With the right assistance in place and a plan of action, it’s very possible to help your loved ones retain some semblance of an independent, healthy lifestyle well into their golden years.

Realistic Evaluation of Need

To create a plan for an extended aging-in-place arrangement, it’s imperative to objectively take stock of your loved one’s needs and requirements. Some seniors will require little more than… continue reading here:  http://www.insideeldercare.com/aging-in-place/using-home-health-care-to-facilitate-independent-living/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=using-home-health-care-to-facilitate-independent-living&utm_reader=feedly

Memory Loss in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

June 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Many senior citizens experience some form of memory loss. Still, there are differences between mild forgetfulness and more serious memory problems. And, it is important that senior citizens and those involved in their elder care address problems with memory, as it may be a sign of a more serious condition.

Mild Forgetfulness

As we age, we lose some of the sharpness of memory we had when we were younger. We may notice that it takes longer to recall facts or information, learn new things, or find or identify familiar objects. In general, these are all signs of mild forgetfulness rather than a more serious medical problem. If you are becoming worried about your memory, schedule an appointment with your doctor to rule out larger problems. Many activities can sharpen your mind and memory, such as picking up a new hobby, visiting friends, eating well, and exercising.

Some more tips for helping your memory are listed below:

 

  • Learn a new skill.
  • Volunteer in a local school, hospital, place of worship, or somewhere else in your community.
  • Spend a lot of time with loved ones.
  • Make use of memory tools such as large calendars, agendas, and notes to yourself.
  • Make an effort to put your wallet, purse, keys, or glasses in the same place each time you set them down.
  • Get ample rest.
  • Exercise and eat a healthy diet.
  • Avoid drinking a lot of alcohol.
  • Seek help if you feel depressed for an extended period of time (more than two weeks).

 

You can also make use of the following:

 

  • Large calendars
  • Agendas for each day
  • Notes about safety in the home
  • Directions for using common items around the house

Serious Memory Problems 

More serious memory problems disrupt your ability to carry on normal activities like driving, shopping, or handling money. Some signs of a serious memory problem include:

 

  • Repeating the same questions over and over.
  • Getting lost in a usually familiar place.
  • Being unable to follow directions.
  • Experiencing confusion about time, people, or places.
  • Taking poor care of yourself (eating poorly, forgetting to bathe, or engaging in unsafe actions or activities).

Causes of Serious Memory Problems 

Medical conditions. Certain medical conditions can lead to serious memory problems that should disappear after treatment. Some things that can cause memory problems are bad reactions to certain medications, depression, dehydration (insufficient amount of fluids in the body), poor diet (insufficient vitamins and minerals), minor head injuries, and thyroid problems. These are all serious medical conditions that should be handled by a physician.

Emotional problems. When senior citizens have certain emotional problems, serious memory problems may develop. Sadness, loneliness, worrying, or boredom can cause confusion and forgetfulness. An active lifestyle, visiting with loved ones, and learning new skills can be helpful, but it may be necessary to seek the help of a doctor or counselor for treatment. If this is the case, getting proper help should minimize memory problems.

Alzheimer’s disease. This disease also causes problems with memory. It begins slowly, but the symptoms get progressively worse as the brain changes. Although it may appear to be mild memory loss at first, people with Alzheimer’s get to a point at which it’s difficult to think clearly. Everyday activities like shopping, driving, cooking, and carrying on a conversation become complicatedTaking medication during the early or middle stages of Alzheimer’s disease can delay memory loss and can be of great help if you have trouble sleeping or are worried or depressed.

Multi-infarct dementia. This is another disease that causes memory problems, where symptoms often appear abruptly. Memory loss and confusion associated with this disease come about through small strokes or short periods of decreased blood flow to the brain. Preventing additional strokes can maintain or improve memory after a stroke, but having more strokes generally leads to more memory loss. To prevent strokes and multi-infarct dementia, maintaining a healthy blood pressure is key.

Diagnosing Serious Memory Problems

As with all health concerns, if you have cause to worry about your memory, you should see your doctor. Be prepared to have a complete checkup if your doctor thinks it is necessary. This checkup may include tests to check memory, problem solving, counting, and language skills, and your doctor may need to take a CAT scan of your brain. A CAT scan is helpful because it shows normal and problem areas in the brain and can help to identify a problem. When your doctor comes to a conclusion as to what is causing your memory problems and makes a diagnosis, ask which treatment options are best for you.

Support

Friends and family members can provide support to help you cope with memory loss. They can help you exercise, visit friends, and continue daily routines and activities. They can also remind you of the time, your location, and what is going on around you.

If memory problems progress to the point that you have difficulty taking care of yourself, in home care for senior citizens can be helpful. Home health care aides can assist with personal care, meal preparation, and health management. And they provide services according to your need, from a few hours a week to 24-hours a day.

The Caring Space
http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

 

Tips For Senior Citizens To Live Safer And Longer In Their Own Homes by Jamie McAdams

June 13, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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As people age, they are more prone to injuries occurring in their home. Common injuries that affect senior citizens are falls that occur in the home. In addition, medical emergencies often occur while a person is at home, and can be life threatening especially if immediate medical attention is not taken. Relying on other individuals being around to call for emergency services is a risky proposition, as for example if a fall happens in the shower it may take hours for someone to realize what has happened. Every minute is vital during injuries and medical emergencies.

While falls are a common cause of injury, there are several steps one can take to help prevent falling in the first place. These fall prevention tips include staying fit and active, wearing sensible shoes, removing tripping hazards from the walkways in the home, and ensuring walkways in the home have ample lighting. In addition, ensuring that stairways have hand rails, steps have non-slip treads, toilets are at the appropriate height, and grab bars are in the shower and tub helps to prevent falls.

In addition to the fall prevention tips listed above, it may be important to consider other ways of improving safety at home. To offset the dangers of living or being at home alone as one ages, a home medical alert system could be considered as an important component of living safely and independently at home.

A medical alert system is simply a system that enables a person to push a button, typically waterproof and worn somewhere on the body, which causes the medical alert company to respond typically within 20 seconds. The company is able to provide assistance over the phone, contact friends and relatives, and notify emergency services personnel if required.

Medical alert systems are appropriate for people who live alone, who are 65 years of age or older, have fallen in the past 3 years, who are worried about falling in the shower, and who have any health issues which could potentially require use of an ambulance. A medical alert system can provide peace of mind for seniors and their families, and can help keep seniors living in their own home independently.

Visit [http://www.MedAlertSystems.us] for more information on medical alert systems.

Jamie McAdams has worked in home health care and has worked with senior citizens in-home.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jamie_McAdams

Medicare and Medicaid For Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

June 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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There are two main programs administered by the government that offer benefits to senior citizens – Medicare and Medicaid.  Medicare is available for all senior citizens age 65 or older.  Those under age 65 with certain disabilities may also be eligible for Medicare.  If you are not a U.S. citizen, you must have entered the U.S. lawfully at least five years prior to receiving Medicare benefits. Medicaid is for people with limited income.

Medicare has two parts. Part A is the hospital insurance and Part B is the medical insurance.

Medicare Part A can pay for home health care if the patient meets certain requirements.  Part A is set up mainly to pay for care in a hospital or skilled nursing facility, or by hospice.  Depending on the amount of Medicare taxes paid by the patient and their spouse over their lifetimes, they may not have to pay a monthly fee for Medicare Part A.  Otherwise, the patient may have to enroll and pay a premium.

Medicare Part B is the medical portion which helps pay for medically-necessary doctors’ services and other patient care.  Part B can also pay for some preventative services (like flu shots) or some services to keep certain illnesses from getting worse.  The standard monthly premium for Medicare Part B was $96.40 in 2008.

You have two main options in how you get your Medicare coverage.  

You can choose traditional Medicare coverage, which is managed by the Federal government.  This plan provides Medicare Part A and Part B coverage.  The recipient can choose to have either Part A or Part B or both.  There is a mandatory deductible, and usually coinsurance charges for each time one gets service. A Medicare supplemental insurance policy known as “Medigap,” can also be purchased. This helps pay for some of the “gaps” such as co-payments, coinsurances, and deductibles.

Medicare Advantage Plans, offered by Medicare-approved private insurance companies (called Part C) is another option.  They generally provide services in addition to Part A and Part B services.  Co-payments, co-insurance, and deductibles are likely to be less, but you pay a monthly premium.

Medicare Part D is available for senior citizens with limited income to help pay for prescription costs.

Medicaid

Medicaid is a health insurance program designed for people with low-income.  It is funded by both the Federal and state government.  Each state administers the program for its residents. Rules for eligibility include the potential recipient’s income and assets.  Each state may have slightly different rules for determining financial need and other eligibility requirements.

If the senior citizen you are caring for has limited income, you should apply to find out if he or she is qualified.  Find a qualified caseworker in your state to help you with the application process.  You may have to pay a co-pay for certain medical services, depending on your state’s policies.

Medicare and Medicaid will pay for most of the medical expenses, including nursing home care, for those who qualify.

The Caring Space
http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space
We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

 

Health Insurance for Senior Citizens – How to Get the Best Rate by Brian Stevens

May 31, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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As a senior citizen, you may find yourself in a health insurance crisis – no longer covered by an employer’s health insurance policy but needing health insurance more than you ever did before. Of course, Medicare covers some of your medical expenses, but how can you get the best rate on health insurance to cover the gaps Medicare leaves?

What Medicare Covers

Once you are 65 years old, you’re eligible to enroll in Medicare. Medicare can include several programs:

* Medicare Part A, which helps cover inpatient hospital care, nursing home care, hospice care, and some home health care. Most people pay for this coverage through taxes, so they do not pay a deductible or monthly premium.

* Medicare Part B, which helps cover doctors’ services, outpatient hospital care, medical equipment, physical and occupational therapy and some home health care. Most people pay an annual deductible and a monthly premium for this health plan.

* Medicare Part C, Medicare Advantage Plan, which offers you more choices among health plans and extends your benefits.

* Medicare Part D, prescription drug coverage.

In addition, you may need MediGap coverage, which is health insurance that covers what Medicare does not.

Affordable Health Insurance for Senior Citizens

As you can see, health insurance for senior citizens can be confusing. Fortunately, insurance comparison websites can help you gain a clear picture of what health insurance you need, as well as help you find that insurance at a reasonable rate.

All you need to do is go to an insurance comparison website and complete a simple form with information about yourself and your insurance needs. Once you submit the form, you will soon receive quotes for affordable health insurance from multiple A-rated insurance companies. And at the best insurance comparison websites, insurance professionals are standing by to talk with you and answer any health insurance questions you have. (See link below.)

Visit http://www.LowerRateQuotes.com/health-insurance.html or click on the following link to get health insurance quotes for senior citizens from top-rated companies and see how much you can save. You can also get more insurance tips there.

The authors, Brian Stevens and Stacey Schifferdecker, have spent 30 years in the insurance and finance industries, and have written a number of articles on health insurance for senior citizens.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Brian_Stevens

Planning Fun Activities for Senior Citizens by Matthew G Young

May 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Many senior citizens do not want to or cannot leave the house. There are many reasons for this, some are physically impaired and have trouble getting around, and others simply don’t leave because they believe that they have nothing to do. Either way, getting out of the house is important sometimes, if only for the sake of the joys that social gatherings bring. Maintaining existing friendships and creating new ones can mean a lot to elderly folks, especially if they have not left the house for a while.

There are many senior citizen friendly activities out there, the trick is to match an activity with an interest that they hold, and therefore will be more accepting of going out of the comfort zone that is their home. Many people enjoy playing cards or board games. This is a much better solution than something like going to a movie will create; when playing games, it is hard not to be social. Movies are not the best choice because, although fun, there is little opportunity for social exchange. Games foster relationships, especially games like canasta or trivial pursuit where you can play on teams.

Another great activity for senior citizens is craft making. A group of people being instructed in how to put together a scrap book or design simple jewelry for the first time promises to be very fruitful. Not only will they learn a fun new skill, but they will inevitably interact with others at nearby at their table.

Going to a zoo or to a museum is another great choice. If there are any disabilities or hindrances to mobility, this can be a frustrating thing, but most public gatherings and places now allow people to rent wheelchairs. This will make getting around a much easier task, even if the people you are with have difficulty walking. Electric wheelchairs are perhaps the best choice since these require minimal effort in using.

Finally, you can always just go to a coffee shop. Social gatherings don’t need to be big group affair; sometimes people feel more comfortable in an intimate setting. Taking a friend out for coffee is a great way to interact on a one on one basis. It’s hard not to have a good time when you are with a close friend or relative. Coffee shops are great public places to go to with a couple friends because of this.

The most important thing about choosing an activity is to make sure that the person you are with has fun. If the senior citizen you are caring for does not have fun, they will not be likely to give social outings a second chance. As a caretaker, it’s your job to care for them physically as well as emotionally. Making activities fun isn’t hard, but you do need to choose the right activity that will match their desires and wishes.

Matthew G. Young is a freelance writer who specializes in financial, sports, and health-related topics. To learn more about in home health care visit Paradise In Home Care

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Matthew_G_Young

Senior Citizen Assisted Living Facilities by David Crumrine

May 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Assisted living is an alternative living arrangement for senior citizens requiring moderate elder care, including help with activities like eating, getting dressed, bathing, and using the bathroom as opposed to the more intensive care provided in nursing homes. This type of care serves as an intermediate between in home care for the elderly and the elder care provided by a nursing home. Facilities for this type of living may be in connection with retirement communities, nursing homes, home health care agencies, or complexes for senior citizens, or they may be separate facilities. This type of elder care is known by many names, such as residential care, board and care, congregate care, and personal care.

Assisted Living Facilities

When looking for an assisted living facility, you can usually expect to have your own room or apartment, provided meals, a staff of caregivers for support, and some or all of the following services:

  • housekeeping and laundry
  • security
  • recreational activities and exercise
  • transportation
  • guidance and monitoring of health care
  • reminders about or help taking medication
  • support with dressing, bathing, and eating

Choosing the Right Assisted Living Community

 

With these ideas in mind, it is important to choose the right facility for you. Each facility may have different ideologies of caring for the elderly, so not every facility may be a match for the kind of care and services you are looking for. When searching for elder care in an assisted living facility, there are a number of ways to determine whether a certain place will provide you with the comfort, security, and level of care you need:

  • Think about your future needs and determine whether the facility can provide the right kind of care for those needs.
  • Figure out whether the facility is near family, friends, and shopping centers or other businesses you’d like to walk to.
  • Are there admission and retention policies that do not allow people with severe cognitive impairments or physical disabilities to live there?
  • Is there a written statement of the philosophy of elder care of the facility, and do you agree with it?
  • Make more than one trip to each facility you are considering, sometimes unannounced.
  • Try to make some of those trips during mealtimes to check out the quality of food and service to the residents.
  • Take note of interactions between residents and those providing the elder care.
  • Ask whether each facility offers social, recreational, and spiritual activities based on your interests.
  • Talk to residents.
  • Find out what kind of training caregivers receive and how often they are trained.
  • Review state licensing reports.

Researching Assisted Living Centers

 

If you have concerns after performing some of the preceding suggestions-or if you would simply like to be thorough in your search-you may also wish to consider the following:

  • Call your state’s long-term care ombudsman as well as the local Better Business Bureau to ask about recently issued complaints against the facilities you are considering.
  • If a facility is connected to a nursing home or home health care agency, you may want to find out more its counterpart. You can find information about nursing homes on the Medicare website (www.medicare.gov/nhcompare/home.asp).

Assisted Living Financial Considerations for Seniors

 

Another aspect of assisted living facilities to consider is cost. Assisted living is generally less expensive than nursing home care, but more expensive the in home care for the elderly. The usual range is anywhere from $10,000 per year to over $50,000 per year, so it is important to know what you can afford and how much each facility costs. Another thing to know is that there may be fees not included in the basic rate. It will be helpful to figure out how much extra you will have to pay to live in a certain home.

Insurance may help cover some of these costs, but usually charges are covered primarily by the senior citizens who decide to live in these residences or family members responsible for their elder care. Some facilities also offer financial assistance programs, which you may want to inquire about.

Medicare does not cover the costs of these residences or the elder care provided there. Medicaid-the joint federal and state program that helps senior citizens and people with disabilities pay for health care when they are unable to afford it-may cover the service component of assisted living in certain states.

It is important to consider the different options in elder care. If cost is a concern, it may be helpful to consider in home care for senior citizens. This type of elder care may provide sufficient care for your needs in the comfort of your own home. If the degree of elder care provided by in home care or an assisted living facility does not meet your needs, consider a nursing home.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!