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hospitalization | Nevada Senior Guide

Task Force evidence reviews suggests that one-time screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms could benefit older men

January 28, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
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A one-time screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in men 65 years or older is associated with decreased AAA rupture and AAA-related mortality rates, according to a new review being published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

AAA is a weakening in the wall of the infrarenal aorta resulting in localized dilation, or ballooning, of the abdominal aorta. A large proportion of AAAs are asymptomatic until a rupture develops, which is generally acute and often fatal (up to 83 percent of patients die before hospitalization). Risk factors for AAA include advanced age, male sex, smoking, and a family history, with smoking being the most important modifiable risk factor.

The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) reviewed published evidence to update its previous recommendation on screening for AAA. The reviewers found convincing evidence that screening men aged 65 and older decreased AAA-related mortality rates by approximately 50 percent over 13 to 15 years. Determining the most effective and efficient approaches to population-based AAA screening was an important goal of the review.

Continue reading here:  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/271716.php

Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

National Council on Aging Launches Second Year of Education Program for Older Adults and Those Who Care for Them Aimed at Helping to Protect More Older Adults from the Flu

Actor Lee Majors, best known for his iconic roles on The Big Valley, The Fall Guy, and The Six Million Dollar Man, is joining the National Council on Aging (NCOA) Flu + You program to help protect older adults from influenza (commonly known as “the flu”). Flu + You aims to inform adults 65 and older, their caregivers, and those who care about them, about the dangers of the flu, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options.

As a part of his involvement in the Flu + You campaign, Majors will appear in a public service announcement (PSA) that follows him as he embarks on an important and action-packed mission: learning about his vaccine options and getting vaccinated against the flu. The PSA will educate the public about the increased risk of flu in adults 65 years of age and older and the importance of knowing your vaccine options and getting a flu vaccine, even for tough guys like Majors.

Every year in the United States, roughly nine out of 10 flu-related deaths and more than six out of 10 flu-related hospitalizations occur in people 65 and older. Older adults are at a greater risk for flu due, in part, to the weakening of the immune system that typically occurs with age. This means that no matter how healthy or youthful we feel, as we age we become more vulnerable to the flu and its related complications.

“The CDC recommends an annual flu vaccine as the single best way to protect yourself from the flu, yet a third of people 65 and older still don’t get vaccinated,” said Richard Birkel, PhD, MPA, NCOA Senior Vice President for Healthy Aging and Director of NCOA’s Self-Management Alliance. “As NCOA continues to educate older adults about the flu and the potential severity of the illness, we hope to encourage more people to protect themselves and their loved ones by getting an annual flu shot.”

The flu vaccine offers the best defense to protect against the flu, and adults 65 years of age and older have several vaccine options. In addition to the traditional flu vaccine (which helps protect against three strains of the flu virus), there is also a quadrivalent vaccine (which helps protect against four strains), and a higher dose vaccine that was designed specifically for adults 65 and older. By improving the production of antibodies in older patients, the higher dose vaccine can provide a stronger immune response to the flu than traditional vaccines. All flu vaccines are covered as a Medicare Part B benefit, which means there is no copay for Medicare beneficiaries 65 years of age and older.

“I get the flu shot every year and encourage my peers to do the same – it’s a simple step you can take to protect yourself from the flu,” says actor Lee Majors.  “I urge everyone 65 years of age and older to talk to their health care provider about their vaccine options this flu season.”

The flu can make existing health conditions worse, and it is especially dangerous for people with lung disease, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer—conditions that commonly affect older adults. Nationwide, 86 percent of adults 65 years of age and older have at least one chronic health condition and approximately 66 percent of Medicare beneficiaries have two or more chronic conditions, putting them at increased risk of the flu and flu-related complications, which can be severe and include hospitalization and even death.

For more facts about flu, and to order free educational materials, including a brochure and fact sheet, visit www.ncoa.org/Flu.

About Flu + You
Flu + You is a national public education initiative, from the National Council on Aging with support from Sanofi Pasteur, to educate adults 65 years and older about the dangers of the influenza virus, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options. Older adults and their caregivers can learn more on the Flu + You website, www.ncoa.org/Flu, which features a public service announcement with Lee Majors and facts about the flu. Also available on the website is a calendar of Flu + You events that will be held in 12 cities throughout the United States in September and October. At the events, older adults will have the opportunity to learn more about their risks for flu and available vaccine options, as well as talk to a health care provider and receive a flu vaccination.

About NCOA
The National Council on Aging is a nonprofit service and advocacy organization headquartered in Washington, DC. NCOA is a national voice for millions of older adults—especially those who are vulnerable and disadvantaged—and the community organizations that serve them. It brings together nonprofit organizations, businesses, and government to develop creative solutions that improve the lives of all older adults. NCOA works with thousands of organizations across the country to help seniors find jobs and benefits, improve their health, live independently, and remain active in their communities. For more information, please visit:

www.NCOA.org | www.facebook.com/NCOAging | www.twitter.com/NCOAging

 

CONTACT: Dana Kinker, (212) 301-7181, dkinker@wcgworld.com

Columbus Travel Insurance For Senior Citizens by Lee Jacksonlee

September 4, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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perfect-travel-insurance-product

Majority of the senior citizens nowadays opt for insurance whenever they plan for any trips, especially when traveling abroad. It does not matter whether they are experienced travelers or have been waiting for the journey of a lifetime, they would still want to have a safe and enjoyable trip. Moreover, senior citizens and the rest of the people would like to travel with a peaceful mind, knowing that any misfortunes along the way would be well taken care of with minimum distractions.

As a matter of fact, most senior citizens are covered with health insurance at home. So it makes it even more sensible to be safely protected with travel insurance while they are away from home. Where health is concerned, irregardless of how fit and healthy you are, you cannot afford to take the risk of not being insured. The reason being, in the event of any sicknesses or accidents, the medical expenses incurred will be very costly, especially if require hospitalization.

Depending on your destination, less developed countries with unfamiliar and perhaps unhygienic food may be hazardous to health, what more with poor quality drinking water…! The climate may also be another factor contributing to health problems, especially when there is a drastic change in temperature. Besides the issue of health, there are other types of mishaps too, such as flight cancellation, lost luggage or personal belongings, delayed flights, thefts and even accidents.

There are many insurance agencies available online with competitive prices. Some rates provided are more lucrative and affordable than the others so it is wise to scout around for better deals. In fact, there is a variety of comprehensive coverage specially catered to meet the requirements and demands of consumers, namely backpacker and adventure travel insurance, pre-existing medical insurance, business insurance, single and group insurance.

Generally, a customer oriented company will pride themselves on providing quick, efficient and hassle-free service. So go ahead and enjoy your golden years by seeing the world. Travel extensively but do it only under the protection of insurance. Ensure to obtain an adequate coverage to give you and your loved ones peace of mind. Then you can “stop worrying about the potholes in the road and celebrate the journey”… as quoted by Fitzhugh Mullan.

So if your parents want enjoy their vocation with good memories, seek travel insurance from Columbus travel insurance. By doing so, you are not just securing your trip from any unforeseen events but also for a surely wonderful vacation with affordable best travel insurance

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lee_Jacksonlee

In an Aging Society – Are Senior Citizens Driving Safely? by Diane Carbo

August 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Remember when you couldn’t wait until you were old enough to drive. Getting a driver’s license gave us an opportunity to experience a new freedom we did not have before. For those of us with two parents working, driving meant taking ourselves and our siblings to after school activities and work. Driving took us to a level of independence that we had not experienced before. In an aging society of drivers, those very same feelings exist in many today. Driving gives us a sense of independence and freedom, the ability to go out and socialize, go to work or to church. Safety issues are a concern as many move into the golden years. The life expectancy of seniors is increasing. There are more active senior citizens out on the road today than ever before. Since we all age differently, many aging adults, can drive into their seventies and eighties. As we age, the risks for having a serious car accident that requires hospitalization rises. Statistics show that fatal car accidents rise after the age of seventy.

If you know an aging adult driver who is experiencing difficulty with driving, it is important to carefully monitor the situation. This article can help you determine whether you should take steps to encourage the senior to stop driving.

An aging society and risk

Some key risk factors that affect our aging society are:

Vision declines affecting depth perception and ability to judge speed of oncoming traffic. Night vision becomes a problem as our eyes loose the ability to process light. By age 60, you need three times the amount of light that you did at age 20 in order to drive safely after nightfall. We also become more sensitive to bright light and glare. Signs and road markings can be difficult to see.

With age, flexibility may decrease as response time increases. A full range of motion is crucial on the road. Turning your head both ways to see oncoming traffic, moving both hands and feet can be difficult for those with chronic conditions such a rheumatoid arthritis, or Parkinson’s disease, heart disease and diabetes.

Older adults in an aging society will often need to begin to take medications. Certain medications, as well as a combination of medications and alcohol, can increase driving risk. Be aware and careful about medication side-effects and interactions between medications. It is important to talk to your pharmacist to be aware of interactions that could affect your driving safely. Some medications cause drowsiness.

Aging affects our quality of sleep, resulting in daytime sleepiness. Falling asleep at the wheel is a major concern for those that dose off during the day.

The beginning of dementia or mental impairment can make driving more dangerous. A decreased mental capacity or decrease tolerance to stressful driving situations such as complex and confusing intersections may cause delayed reactions to sudden or confusing situations on the road. An aging brain and body does not have the same response time as we did when we were younger.

Look for warning signs

There are multiple warning signs that an aging adult is becoming or is an unsafe driver. Some of them are small, but if there are multiple concerns it may be time to talk about your concerns with the aging driver. Warning signs of an unsafe driver include

 

  • Abrupt lane changes, braking, or acceleration.
  • Increase in the dents and scrapes on the car or on fences, mailboxes, garage doors, curbs, etc
  • Trouble reading signs or navigating directions to get somewhere
  • Range-of-motion issues (looking over the shoulder, moving the hands or feet, etc.)
  • Becoming anxious or fearful while driving or feeling exhausted after driving
  • Experiencing more conflict on the road: other drivers honking; frustration or anger at other drivers. Oblivious to the frustration of other drivers towards them
  • Getting lost more often
  • Trouble paying attention to signals, road signs, pavement markings, or pedestrians
  • Slow reaction to changes in the driving environment
  • Increased traffic tickets or “warnings” by traffic or law enforcement officers
  • Forgetting to put on a safety belt

 

If you are concerned about an aging adult driver, closely monitor their driving before deciding whether they need a refresher coarse on their driving skills or approaching them to give up their driver’s license altogether. Ongoing and open communication is important to addressing the issue of driving. Studies conducted by Harvard and MIT show that while most drivers preferred to discuss the issue with their spouse, doctor or adult children (in that order), this is not the case for everyone. The right person may not necessarily be the most forceful or outspoken one, but rather someone whose judgment and empathy are especially trusted by the driver.

Talk with other family members, your doctor, and close friends to determine the best person for “the conversation.” Remember driving signifies independence, freedom and being self sufficient to active senior citizens. Realize you may meet with resistance and the aging driver may become defensive. Emotion may get in the way of a rational conversation. Express your concerns and give specific reasons for those concerns.

The goal is to get the aging driver be part of the decision making process

You may begin by asking your loved one to make some concessions because of your concerns.

 

  • Taking a driver refresher course
  • Not driving at night
  • Suggest they not drive on busy thoroughfares or during rush hour
  • Taking shorter trips
  • Not driving under adverse weather conditions
  • Encourage a visit to their primary care physician or pharmacist to go over medications that may affect driving skills. Your physician may be able to recommend a Driver Rehabilitation Specialist. This individual can assess driving safety by an office exam and driving test and make recommendations regarding special equipment or techniques that can improve the driver’s safety. Consider ways to decrease the need to drive. Check out alternatives to shopping by car, including:

  • Arrange for home deliveries of groceries and other goods, and try to arrange for home visits by clergy, medical and personal care providers, and government service providers.
  • Use financial services that don’t require bank visits, like automatic bill paying, direct deposit, and bank-by-phone or on-line banking services.

Fears of those living in an aging society 

Fear of isolation and decrease in socializing is a real concern for the aging driver. It is important to keep spirits high as the aging driver makes the adjustments to becoming a non driver. Be in tune to their need for fun, volunteering, work and religious activities. Create a transportation plan that can make it easier for the aging driver to give up driving. You can create a list of friends and family that are willing to drive, contact the church and the local Area Agency on Aging in regards to transportation programs in the area.

Some seniors may adjust better if they can keep their own car, but have others drive them. Their own car may feel more comfortable and familiar, and the sense of loss from not driving may be lessened. Remember, baby boomers have grown up walking out the door and being able to go where they want to go. We need to keep the aging adult driver and those on the road with them safe.

Diane Carbo RN- As a geriatric care manager, that has cared for her father and mother in law in their homes, she learned first hand how overwhelming, stressful, and time consuming caring for a loved one can be. Staying in their homes was very important to them. As a result, Diane started http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com to assist others age in familiar surroundings and avoid the emotional and frustrating task of maneuvering the medical delivery system

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

EarlySense System Implementation Shown to Reduce Falls, Decrease Transfers to Hospitals and Increase the Quality of Care for Elderly in Multi-Center Nursing Home Study

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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  EarlySense System Implementation Shown to Reduce Falls, Decrease Transfers to Hospitals and Increase the Quality of Care for Elderly in Multi-Center Nursing Home Study

Clinical data presented at the 2013 Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Geriatrics Society

 

Waltham, MA, May 3, 2013 —- EarlySense, the market leader in Proactive Patient Care Solutions™, announced today the results of a multi-center clinical study demonstrating that the EarlySense system helps medical teams at rehabilitation centers to reduce patient falls as well as the number of patients transferred back to the hospital.  The clinical data was collected from The Hebrew Home at Riverdale, NY and Dorot Medical Center in Israel.  The data was presented today at the 2013 Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) by Hebrew Home medical director and study principal investigator Dr. Zachary J. Palace in a poster titled The Effect of a Continuous Patient Monitoring System on Reducing Hospitalization and Falls in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

 

Dr. Palace said, “The implementation of EarlySense on the post-acute care units has demonstrated a significant decrease in the total number of falls and a trend towards reduction in the readmission rate back to hospitals, thus improving the overall quality of care for the elderly. The system also alerted regarding early warning signs of patient deterioration which enabled our medical team to proactively respond and literally save four lives. As clinicians we are always on the lookout for better ways to provide safer, more effective care for our patients.”

 

Dr. Palace continued, “Patient falls and subsequent hospital transfers are an ongoing challenge for most rehabilitation centers. The EarlySense system is the first technology to help us more effectively and proactively respond to early warning signs of deterioration and potential falls to secure better patient outcomes. We’ve experienced success and look forward to continuing this trend.”

 

Dorot Medical Center principal investigator Dr. Gad Mendelson said, “As the population ages, we are seeing a growing need to provide safer, smarter care without increasing our staffing level.  In this clinical trial, we saw that the continuous monitoring nature of the EarlySense system and its low level of false alarms allowed our team to reach deteriorating patients earlier without creating alarm fatigue.”

 

Eight-hundred and thirty-three (833) patient records at The Dorot Geriatric Center, a 374-bed facility in Netanya, Israel and seven-hundred and seventy-three (773) records at the Hebrew Home at Riverdale, an 870-bed skilled nursing facility in Riverdale, N.Y. were collected and reviewed over a six month period.  The transfer rate to the hospital decreased by 21% (p=0.12) at Dorot, and the falls rate decreased by 38.5% (p<0.05) at the Hebrew Home.

 

Mr. David Weinstein, Executive Vice President & Chief Operating Officer of the Hebrew Home at Riverdale said, “The Hebrew Home at Riverdale has always been at the forefront of care and technology.  Early Sense compliments our unique platform by offering our residents innovative advancements that are safe and effective.”

 

EarlySense Vice President of Clinical and Regulatory Affairs Dalia Argaman said, “We are fortunate to be able to work with two outstanding and highly skilled nursing facilities like the Hebrew Home and Dorot.  We look forward to continuing what has been a very productive cooperation at both of these fine locations with the vision that the EarlySense system will continue to benefit medical teams, patients and their families within the entire healthcare spectrum, in the various markets across the world where we are actively promoting the EarlySense Solutions.”

 

About EarlySense

EarlySense has brought to market an innovative technology designed to advance proactive patient care and enable clinicians to achieve better patient outcomes, by assisting in preventing adverse events from occurring through the early identification of potential adverse events, in the form of falls, pressure ulcers and/or patient deterioration.  The company’s flagship product, the EarlySense System, is a continuous, contact-free, patient safety monitoring solution that monitors and documents a patient’s vital signs and movement using a sensor that is placed underneath a bed mattress. There are no leads or cuffs to connect to the patient who has complete freedom of movement and is not burdened by any cumbersome attachments.  The system was initially designed to monitor non-ICU ‘lower risk’ patients on medical surgical floors who are usually monitored by nursing staff approximately once every four hours. The system is currently installed at hospitals and rehabilitation centers in the USA and Europe.  It is also commercially available in Canada. Hospital administrators report that patients, their families and staff feel more comfortable knowing the system is in place.  EarlySense Inc. is headquartered in Waltham, MA.  Investors include: JK&B, Pitango Venture Capital, Etgar Challenge Fund, ProSeed VC Fund (TASE: PRSD), Docor International Management, Noaber, and Bridge Investment Fund, and Peter Soderberg, managing partner of Worthy Ventures Resources, LLC and former president and CEO of Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: HRC).  For additional information, please visit www.earlysense.com.

 

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Senior Citizens and Pets by Kay Catlett

April 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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As baby-boomer pet parents reach retirement age it is common to think about  putting aside the dog collars, pet clothing and dog harnesses and retire from  being pet parents. This is especially common as a beloved pet may die. The usual  questions of a grieving pet owner are magnified by older pet owners. The only  real questions with younger owners concerns whether or not they miss the joy of  pet ownership and whether they still possess the desire to take on the  responsibility of another pet. As the pet parent ages, more questions have to be  asked. The age and health of the human along with whether or not the needs of  particular pets can be managed are the most important questions for aging pet  parents.

The primary question concerns whether or not a pet is beneficial for aging  people.

Many seniors crave and miss nurturing. Often, a lifetime of nurturing has  defined a person, first as a parent, friend, spouse or grandparent. With  children and grandchildren growing older, nurturing may no longer required on a  personal basis. Senior citizens may find the circle of friends narrowing as  interests change, people retire and move, and activities lessen. Having a pet to  nurture, and providing that pet with food, comfort, exercise, toys, play and  companionship can fill the void in a changing life.

As the years pass, people may find their lives boring and lonely. Having a  pet cat or dog can fill this void. Taking care of a pet can provide meaning and  provide positive feelings of caring for another being. A pet can provide  structure missed by people following the routine of working outside of the home.  Caring for a pet provides some structure: time to eat, time to play and go  outside, time to be combed, time for naps. At the same time, the pet parent has  a role: to take care of the pet. This sense of responsibility provides structure  as well as a sense of being needed.

Another plus for seniors to have dogs, is for the protection a dog can give.  Seniors are often prey for intruders since the resistance of a senior citizen is  perceived as being lower and often it is known that there are less people living  in the home. However with a dog, the fear of barking or being bitten inhibit the  activities of intruders to that home. Research shows that homes with barking  dogs are violated fewer times than homes without dogs. Dogs provide safety to  seniors.

Another benefit of a senior owning a dog is that it makes them more active.  Owning a dog will compel the senior to live a more active lifestyle then if they  are by themselves. The dog will need to go outside to use the bathroom; feeding  and grooming must take place. These simple activities will give the owner  exercise. Matching the activity needs of the pet to the activity level of the  owner is an important factor to consider in deciding what kind of pet or breed  is best for both the senior and the pet.

Aging pet parents need to think about the future of their pets as time goes  on. A plan for pet care should be arranged so that if a hospitalization is  necessary, or a period of recovery in the home should occur, the needs of the  pets need to be met in those circumstances. Pet care in the home of another,  kennel care or acquiring the assistance of others to provide assistance in the  home are all necessary elements of a pet care plan. Pet parents of every age,  but especially senior citizens need to investigate alternatives in the dire case  of having to give up the pet. This author strongly suggests that “no-kill” pet  shelters need to be listed in the plan in the direst situations.

Overall, a senior owning a pet is an excellent idea. Dogs and cats provide  excellent companions and safety to senior citizens. Studies show that seniors  with pets are happier and live longer then seniors without pets. Preparing the  home properly with crates, dog collars, cat harnesses and pet beds coupled with  preparing plans for all contingencies will make for happy seniors and their  happy pets.

Kay Catlett [http://www.PetCollarStoreAndMore.com]

I believe that as we are humane to our pets, they make us more human. My  online pet store has carefully selected products at competitive prices.

I welcome your input on what products you like and want me to  carry.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kay_Catlett

 

Reasons for Hospitalizations of Senior Citizens by Warren Comer

April 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Experts are saying that senior citizens of today are a lot healthier than the  elderly a few decades ago. Not only are they getting sick less, but they are  also more active. They are living fuller lives, something that the old folks in  the past couldn’t have done.

What the Numbers Say

Statistics show than one third of all seniors need medical attention in a  hospital annually. The reasons for hospitalization are very varied, but most of  it is caused by the declining condition of their bodies. The fact remains  however, that life expectancy is on the rise.

What Increased Life Expectancy Means

The increase in life expectancy means that people people would need care for  a longer period. Though they are living longer years, it does not mean that they  are immune from the more common ailments. Even if they don’t get sick, their  body conditions really aren’t at their top forms anymore.

Common Reasons for Hospitalization

When a person becomes a senior citizen, the chances of being hospitalized are  increased. There are two major reasons why a person can be hospitalized, these  are due to injuries and heart problems.

Common Senior Citizen Injuries

Falls are the most common causes of injuries for the elderly. As people grow  older, the chances of falling are greatly increased. Half of all those who are  over 80 are likely to experience falling at some point.

The most common type of injury for seniors who have fallen is a hip injury.  It accounts for more than 40% of all the injuries that seniors suffer because of  falls

We all know that as people start to age, their bones become a lot weaker.  This would account for the brittleness of the bones. When a person who doesn’t  have a strong structure falls, the bones could easily break.

Other Types of Injuries

There are other types of injuries that seniors are prone to getting. These  include injuries from motor vehicle accidents, poisoning from medications and  fires. Their frail physical conditions can make them suffer more from these  injuries. It is important that they be given immediate medical attention should  they suffer from any of them.

Illness among Senior Citizens

When it comes to illnesses, heart problems are the most common reasons why  seniors get hospitalized. These problems include heart attacks and strokes. When  seniors exhibit signs and symptoms of any heart ailment, they should be brought  to the hospital right away so they can be treated.

Something as simple as flu can cause the hospitalization of a senior. In  their stage in life, a simple flu can cause a great deal of problems already. It  should be treated right away so that it won’t get any worse or cause other  conditions.

These are the most common reasons why seniors get taken to a hospital. If you  are living with a member of your family who is a senior citizen, then you should  know about these things so you can take better care of them. You can also share  what you’ve learned to make them aware of the health risks.

Family First  HomeCare is the perfect solution for seniors and others in need in New  Jersey who are not ready to leave their home for an institutional setting, but  because of illness or chronic conditions need support to remain at home. We  improve your life by providing compassionate, one-on-one care in the comfort of  your own home. Find out more about senior care services in New Jersey.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Warren_Comer

 

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!