Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias

June 12, 2016 by · Comments Off on Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias
Filed under: General 

Australian business is starting to see the light when it comes to their hiring policies for mature aged employees, and the positive impact they can have on the workplace. A brief visit to main street shopping centre and you will begin to see a few more weathered faces at work than you would have seen a few years ago.

However, if you scratch below the surface, you begin to see this trend still has a long way to play out. A few older workers get hired into the senior ranks where experience and maturity are greatly valued, more older workers are now being hired at the lower end of the corporate scale into unskilled roles, however the numbers being hired into the mid tier ranks remains low.

This barbell approach to hiring mature workers at the top and bottom of an organisation reflects an ongoing bias that remains difficult to overcome. A company is a microcosm of society, and in a perfect world employers should (within reason) seek diversity in the workplace and value skill, experience and aptitude, regardless of age, race or gender.

Unfortunately, we live in a far from perfect world. When it comes to mature aged workers they tend to be penalised on two fronts. Often the first to be made redundant in uncertain economic times, this setback is then compounded when they are regularly overlooked for someone younger as they begin searching for a new job.

As a result of these two biases towards mature aged job seekers, once out of work, the journey back can often be long and arduous. This is reflected in RBA statistics which indicate long-term unemployment at approximately 40% for those aged 45-64, compared to about 25% for those aged between 25 and 44.

So what are the reasons employers provide for not hiring mature aged workers? Typically, reasons include being overqualified or over-experienced. Taken at face value being overqualified or experienced might not seem so bad, but when you hear the same reason trotted out time and again, it becomes less palatable.

Openly negative feedback from employers tend to include perceptions that mature aged workers are not as IT savvy, do not possess the latest skills, or are not as flexible as their younger counterparts. While these reasons may hold true in many instances, many of the older job seekers I speak to, believe these are often used as convenient excuses to exclude them.

Employer feedback that you are not likely to hear include concerns about health (and subsequent cost) or worse insecurity. There are many poor managers in the workplace that may be intimidated by the experience a mature applicant brings to the role. Rather than leveraging the knowledge and experience an older worker can bring to the workplace, the insecure hirer is concerned about the potential competition, and the presence of someone who may know more than they do.

Dealing with many of these preconceived concerns and fears remains an ongoing challenge for the mature aged job seeker. Perhaps the following facts should be mandatory reading for hiring managers. These facts debunk many of the concerns and myths that persist in the workplace relating to mature aged workers;

    • Mature aged workers can deliver cost savings to employers through increased retention rates. For example, workers over 55 are five times less likely to change jobs compared to workers aged 20-24, reducing both recruitment and training costs. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006)Labour Mobility Survey,
    • Mature workers can deliver an average net benefit of $1956 per year to their employer compared to other workers due to high retention rates, lower rates of absenteeism, decreased recruitment costs and greater return on investment.Business, Work and Ageing (2000) Profiting from Maturity: The Social and Economic Costs of Mature Age Unemployment
    • Australians are living longer and are healthier.2005 ABS survey found the proportion of Australians aged 55-64 reporting their health as ‘good’, ‘very good’ or ‘excellent’ was 75.5% – an increase of four per cent since 1995. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006) National Health Survey: Summary of Results, 2004-05
    • Mature workers were the least likely group to take days off due to their own illness or as a carer. In the two week period prior to the survey nearly half the number of mature workers had days off compared to workers aged 25-34. ibid
    • ABS data shows that Australians aged 55-64 are the fastest growing users of information technology. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2005) Year Book Australia,
  • Australian Health Management which examined the daily work habits of 4000 employees found that workers aged 55 years and over performed at their best for approximately seven hours out of an eight-hour day-an achievement that other workers in the study were unable to match. Australian Health Management (2006), Baby boomers give employers a bang for their buck

While government has been doing its part to address mature aged unemployment through initiatives like DEEWR Experience+, the introduction of the Age Discrimination Act (2004) and appointment of an Age Discrimination Commissioner, it remains imperative that older job seekers directly address some of these age bias issues themselves if they are to enhance their prospects for employment.

Following are some helpful hints that mature aged workers can utilise to make themselves more appealing to employers and thus improve their chances of a speedy return to the workforce;

Government or Community Assistance– Take advantage of government or community based initiatives and assistance. There is a considerable amount of free information and assistance available, and I would strongly recommend looking into these resources. For example, the DEEWR “Experience+” initiative provides free career planning and advice for over 45’s until June 2016, along with an Assistance Program delivering refresher and basic training in IT and social media applications.

Value Proposition– Whether writing your resume or cover letter, or sitting in an interview, ensure the focus of discussion clearly remains on the value that you can bring to an organisation. Discuss how you can help, what you have done in the past and what you can deliver going forward. Outline how your experience might bring special insights and perspectives that other candidates may not possess.

Training– Undertake relevant training or up-skilling. Keeping ‘up to date’ is critical if you expect serious consideration for any position, especially if there is a technical element. The benefit will be that an employer will see that you have not fallen behind and therefore will not require retraining, along with any associated cost.

Resume– You will need a properly structured and well written resume to be considered for most roles. Use an appropriate resume style that is tailored to your strengths, skills and experience. Also ensure primary focus of your resume is on the last 5-10 years (include older information where pertinent). Think about getting assistance from a professional resume writer, whocan add significant value if you are looking to ‘get it right the first time’.

Age Bias – To counter potential impact of age bias, you will need to carefully address the following with any potential employer;

Health– Don’t hesitate to communicate your good health and fitness to potential employers at opportune moments. Inform them if you play sport, run, walk or go to the gym regularly. This should allay any potential concerns about health.

IT Savvy –Take every opportunity to indicate your IT capability. Whether it’s your ability to use specialised systems, the MS Office suite or even your use of Facebook or Twitter, this will highlight your ability to embrace new technology.

Adaptability – Highlight your adaptability in the workplace, providing actual examples where appropriate. If you don’t know something, indicate you are keen to learn (and not that you wouldn’t know where to start). Highlighting your adaptability will help to dispel concerns of rigidness and inflexibility.

Team Player –Communicating that you work well as part of a team is critical. It shows a willingness to take direction and work for the common good, and can present you as less threatening, especially if the hirer feels concerned by a mature more experienced candidate.

Be Positive –Though you need to be fully prepared to discuss negative issues, make every attempt to keep the discussion on a positive footing. Unless specifically requested, there is no need to volunteer information of a negative nature.

While industry is beginning to see the light when it comes to acceptance of mature aged workers, the pace of change remains slow. While providence is on the right side due to the ageing Australian population and the inevitable necessity to hire older workers, the fact remains that age discrimination is still entrenched in much current thinking.

As a result, dealing with age bias will continue to be a challenge for the foreseeable future. However with the combination of positive government policy, changing attitudes and a proactive attitude to making oneself more appealing to employers (as outlined above), the situation is not without promise.

Honing your individual approach and message will take time and effort. To strike the right balance the mature job seeker will need to walk a fine line between sounding experienced, but not old, adaptable, but not inflexible and appear keen, not desperate. There is no magic formula for success except practice, perseverance and occasionally seeking help where necessary.

A.J. Bond, is the proprietor of Absolute Resume Writing Services ( http://absoluteresume.com.au ), an Australian based consultancy specializing in the provision of Resume and Cover Letter writing services.

Absolute Resume assists a broad range of job seekers to find their preferred roles, including mature aged job seekers, individuals out of work for a period of time and those made redundant.

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How Old Are You Really? Biological Age

May 29, 2016 by · Comments Off on How Old Are You Really? Biological Age
Filed under: General 

People have always been interested in being “forever young” and today’s society is no different. We want to resist the ageing process.

The speed at which we are ageing can be measured – its called biological age, or how old your body really is.

The area of study which is now called longevity, and was once called anti aging, is hugely popular in the states.

It’s something I’m very interested in, and see it as a big part of the future for myself and my clients.

Your chronological age is how old you actually are.

Biological age is the age of your body at the cellular level.

Today we will look into how you can establish, what your biological age is and how you can improve it.

There are a few longevity factors in the list which surprised me!

(Deep question alert!)

What is the purpose of life? I don’t mean any deep seated stuff, like procreation.

I just mean, what is most people’s AIM in life. What do they want to get out of their time on earth?

Firstly and most importantly, people want to be happy. Easier said than done.

Happiness is a state of mind. It’s a feeling.

Ask someone with a big goal (like building a successful business or losing more than three stone).

“What will reaching your goal do for you?”

Often they will say something like “When I get there I will feel happy”, or “satisfied with myself”, or they say “I will feel proud”.

“I will have more energy”.

“I won’t be afraid of trying new clothes on or going out with friends”.

“I don’t want to feel like a slave to food”

“I don’t want to be scared to look in the mirror or get on the scales”.

Life is all about feelings.

People spend their entire lives in search of feelings! (mostly happiness, contentment, satisfaction and love)

How people actually reach this state of “happiness” is different for us all.

Most people I know AIM for a decent job (or business) with decent money.

All with the ultimate goal of having a good retirement.

I hear people say “When I finish work, I’m going to do this or I’m going to… (insert goal)”.

The point here being, if being happy and having a nice retirement is people’s main goal in life, then keeping your body fit and healthy surely must be part of your plan.

I know of a very wealthy man who got cancer and passed away just before his retirement, I’m sure that was not part of the master plan, he had built his business up so he could sell it and have a nice retirement (as most business people do).

He didn’t make it and didn’t get to “cash out”.

Many people don’t make it to retirement because their “plan” is messed up from the start.

Without sounding depressing we only get one shot remember.

This is NOT a rehearsal.

A lot of people get to retirement age and their body is wrecked!

This stops them from being able to enjoy their time off as much. Living life with lots of restrictions. “I can’t go there because of the steep hill”, or “I can’t do that because of my back or my knees”.

After working hard for 40-50 years – to give yourself a good pension and retirement, this is the last thing that anyone wants.

Peoples bodies are like cars.

On one hand you have new cars with high mileage that are not well serviced.

On the other hand you have old cars with low mileage that have been well looked after.

I want YOU to be like a well looked after old car, with low mileage when you get to your retirement.

I know some people, that slog away and get to the age of 40, and feel and look like they’re 50 or 60!

I also know many people who hit retirement age and feel like a 40 year old, and can keep on working and exercising for another 20 years!

This is all dependent on how we live our lives, obviously there are things such as injuries, diseases and other bad things which can impact our lives negatively through no fault of our own but on the whole we are in control of our own health.

What affects our longevity?

Scientists agree that these factors all affect your longevity in some way, big or small. (this is not a definitive list)

Muscle size and strength
Level of education
How pro active you are with going to see the doctor if needed
The amount of friends you can rely on, and love in your life
Your diet
Blood pressure
Your upper body strength
If you enjoy your work or not
Weather you smoke/drink alcohol or not, and the amount
If you exercise or not

Most of us shorten our lives and ultimately kill ourselves, through our bad habits and lifestyle choices, whatever they may be.

As you would of guessed, it is possible to slow down the onset of ageing and even reverse it to some extent.

I must say, that there is nothing wrong with ageing, it is inevitable. It is something we should be proud of, a chance to show our wisdom to the younger generation.

This article is just to show you how you can SLOW the ageing process with ease and actually enjoy it.

The Ageing Process

As we get older our bodies start to slow down and stop being able to function as well, sadly there is no getting away from this.

BUT through healthy living and making the right choices day in day out we can delay our body slowing down by years!

Just think how much more you will be able to enjoy your retirement if you feel like a 40 year old? and can spend it with the people you love.

Compare this to how much you will enjoy it if you can barely walk up a flight of stairs without having tired legs and being short of breath.

Your chronological age doesn’t have to be the same, or worse, than your physiological age.

How to slow the effects of ageing

The list above obviously helps you but here are a few more ideas for you to beat the clock.

When some people think anti aging, I’m sure some of you may think of things like anti wrinkle creams and lotions, hair dying products, botox and maybe even plastic surgery.

That does kind of sum up some of the western world that these are the steps that the majority of people (plastic surgery being an extreme example) will take to make them look younger, rather than eating healthily and exercising.

Aging leads to loss of muscle mass, loss of mental function, low mobility and a lack of energy, and as you know the cosmetic type anti aging steps I mentioned won’t help any of these.

Top tips to delay ageing naturally:

Enjoy the Outdoors – Don’t spend all of your time cooped up indoors behind the computer or watching TV. There are plenty of things to do and see outside, especially on a nice day I can’t think of anything better than going for a walk with the family down the park or beach. Sunlight also is a natural source of Vitamin D.

Yoga & Meditation – I would say that this is one of the most important strategies in staying young. I started to do this myself and it honestly makes me feel great. Yoga and meditation can help you relax and lower your stress levels (linked with aging) dramatically. It can also help you to see things a lot clearer.

Yoga is also great for your flexibility, the more flexible and supple you are the less chance you have in the future of suffering falls and lack of mobility.

Socialise – Loneliness can be a real killer. Socialise as much as possible with your friends and family. Get out there and do things, go to the cinema, concerts, attend an evening class (the more mentally stimulating the better).

Stay Strong & Active – You have to keep moving or your body will come to a standstill. Taking part in regular exercise is absolutely vital. Regular strength training is extremely important.

Losing muscle mass is something you want to avoid or at least delay for as long as possible so strength training will help this as well as keeping your bones strong, this will lower your chances of osteoporosis.

Nutrition

I believe food is medicine, many of the effects you get from modern day medicine you can get from eating the right foods.

Nutrition influences biochemistry. Biochemistry influences everything at a cellular level.

If you eat well there should be no need for some medications.

If you spend your whole life eating fresh, natural whole foods and stay active then it will also show. You will most likely be lean, mobile, disease free and full of energy, a rarity these days.

You should aim to eat a diet containing lots of quality fats and protein’s (the bodies building materials) which will help you to maintain your muscle stores. Also protein boosts the production of HGH in your body, HGH (Human growth Hormone) is your body’s natural ‘fountain of youth’.

As you age the production of this hormone slows down greatly, regular strength exercise (lifting, pushing and pulling heavy stuff) and quality protein keeps the production of this hormone going!

Eat plenty of antioxidant rich foods – Antioxidants which are found in colourful fruit and vegetables help to reduce the damage caused by free radicals in your system.

Free radicals can speed up the onset of ageing; they are unstable electrons (O1 molecules)which are produced during metabolism. They damage the cell nucleus and the mitochondria.

Free radicals bounce around inside your cells like a pin ball, causing damage every time they hit something. They cause absolute havoc.

Antioxidants provide the free radical with the extra O1 molecule they need to become stable O2 molecules.

Good quality natural foods are the best way to combat these harmful free radicals. Natural organic foods are packed with antioxidants which neutralise the free radicals before they cause too much damage.

Eat Omega 3s – They fight inflammation, improve the appearance of your skin and aid brain function. Three vital things that we need as we age. So make sure you get as many omega 3s into your system as you can, the best source is fresh fish, if not a fish oil supplement will do.

Lower Sugar Intake – Aim to cut out any excess sugar that you eat, excess sugars can modify essential proteins in our body which can lead to wrinkles and energy loss.

Look after your skin through good food and lots of water – Eating foods containing vitamin A (sweet potatoes, broccoli, spinach, asparagus and carrots), Vitamin C (red peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, strawberries, oranges, kiwi and pineapple) and Vitamin E (nuts, seeds and spinach) are a great way of helping your skin look healthy.

Stop smoking and limit alcohol intake – There are few things that age you faster than smoking and drinking alcohol every day so cut out smoking and do as much as you can to drink less.

Lower Stress Levels – This is another big one, I just mentioned that there are few things that age you faster than smoking and alcohol; well I think stress is one of them.

Being constantly stressed will ruin your mood, energy levels, social interaction as well as causing so many health problems.

As I mentioned above, I have found deep breathing techniques, yoga and meditation really important and a great way of combating stress.

Let’s be realistic the big medical and health companies aren’t going to promote anti aging through the things I just said, they are going to promote it through new miracle pills, lotions and creams, there is a lot of money to be made from it so they will keep on doing it.

The people who buy these products don’t have to alter their lifestyle one little bit so it suits them which is why it is so popular.

We ultimately reap our rewards in our retirement, if you have invested some time and effort into your “health & fitness account”, you will reap the rewards.

If you haven’t then you won’t!

You can actually measure your biological age online with a biological age calculator.

If all of the things I have mentioned above didn’t require effort or commitment then everyone would be running around into their 90s and later!!

But unfortunately we don’t, we die much younger than that.

Depending on what stats you use, in 2010, UK men were reported to live on average until about 77 or 78, and women on average live until 82 or 83 years old.

Do it naturally and do it right.

Let me know your thoughts on this topic, comment below, I really want to know what you think.

Thanks for reading, take care,

Richard

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The Development of Old Age and Related Issues

April 18, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Development of Old Age and Related Issues
Filed under: General 

In traditional Chinese and other Asian cultures the aged were highly respected and cared for. The Igabo tribesmen of Eastern Nigeria value dependency in their aged and involve them in care of children and the administration of tribal affairs (Shelton, A. in Kalish R. Uni Michigan 1969).

In Eskimo culture the grandmother was pushed out into the ice-flow to die as soon as she became useless.

Western societies today usually resemble to some degree the Eskimo culture, only the “ice-flows” have names such a “Sunset Vista” and the like. Younger generations no longer assign status to the aged and their abandonment is always in danger of becoming the social norm.

There has been a tendency to remove the aged from their homes and put them  in custodial care. To some degree the government provides domiciliary care services to prevent or delay this, but the motivation probably has more to do with expense than humanity.

In Canada and some parts of the USA old people are being utilised as foster-grandparents in child care agencies.

SOME BASIC DEFINITIONS

What is Aging?

Aging: Aging is a natural phenomenon that refers to changes occurring throughout the life span and result in differences in structure and function between the youthful and elder generation.

Gerontology: Gerontology is the study of aging and includes science, psychology and sociology.

Geriatrics: A relatively new field of medicine specialising in the health problems of advanced age.

Social aging: Refers to the social habits and roles of individuals with respect to their culture and society. As social aging increases individual usually experience a decrease in meaningful social interactions.

Biological aging: Refers to the physical changes in the body systems during the later decades of life. It may begin long before the individual  reaches chronological age 65.

Cognitive aging: Refers to decreasing ability to assimilate new information and learn new behaviours and skills.

GENERAL PROBLEMS OF AGING

Eric Erikson (Youth and the life cycle. Children. 7:43-49 Mch/April 1960) developed an “ages and stages” theory of human development that involved 8 stages after birth each of which involved a basic dichotomy representing best case and worst case outcomes. Below are the dichotomies and their developmental relevance:

Prenatal stage – conception to birth.

  1. Infancy. Birth to 2 years – basic trust vs. basic distrust. Hope.
  2. Early childhood, 3 to 4 years – autonomy vs. self doubt/shame. Will.
  3. Play age, 5 to 8 years – initiative vs. guilt. Purpose.
  4. School age, 9to 12 – industry vs. inferiority. Competence.
  5. Adolescence, 13 to 19 – identity vs. identity confusion. Fidelity.
  6. Young adulthood – intimacy vs. isolation. Love.
  7. Adulthood, generativity vs. self absorption. Care.
  8. Mature age- Ego Integrity vs. Despair. Wisdom.

This stage of older adulthood, i.e. stage 8, begins about the time of retirement and continues throughout one’s life. Achieving ego integrity  is a sign of maturity while failing to reach this stage is an indication of poor development in prior stages through the life course.

Ego integrity: This means coming to accept one’s whole life and reflecting on it in a positive manner. According to Erikson, achieving integrity means fully accepting one’ self and coming to terms with death. Accepting responsibility for one’s life and being able to review the past with satisfaction is essential. The inability to do this leads to despair and the individual will begin to fear death. If a favourable balance is achieved during this stage, then wisdom is developed.

Psychological and personality aspects:

Aging has psychological implications. Next to dying our recognition that we are aging may be one of the most profound shocks we ever receive. Once we pass the invisible line of 65 our years are bench marked for the remainder of the game of life. We are no longer “mature age” we are instead classified as “old”, or “senior citizens”. How we cope with the changes we face and stresses of altered status depends on our basic personality. Here are 3 basic personality types that have been identified. It may be a oversimplification but it makes the point about personality effectively:

a. The autonomous – people who seem to have the resources for self-renewal. They may be dedicated to a goal or idea and committed to continuing productivity. This appears to protect them somewhat even against physiological aging.

b.The adjusted – people who are rigid and lacking in adaptability but are supported by their power, prestige or well structured routine. But if their situation changes drastically they become psychiatric casualties.

c.The anomic. These are people who do not have clear inner values or a protective life vision. Such people have been described as prematurely resigned and they may deteriorate rapidly.

Summary of stresses of old age.

a. Retirement and reduced income. Most people rely on work for self worth, identity and social interaction. Forced retirement can be demoralising.

b. Fear of invalidism and death. The increased probability of falling prey to illness from which there is no recovery is a continual source of anxiety. When one has a heart attack or stroke the stress becomes much worse.

Some persons face death with equanimity, often psychologically supported by a religion or philosophy. Others may welcome death as an end to suffering or insoluble problems and with little concern for life or human existence. Still others face impending death with suffering of great stress against which they have no ego defenses.

c. Isolation and loneliness. Older people face inevitable loss of loved ones, friends and contemporaries. The loss of a spouse whom one has depended on for companionship and moral support is particularly distressing. Children grow up, marry and become preoccupied or move away. Failing memory, visual and aural impairment may all work to make social interaction difficult. And if this then leads to a souring of outlook and rigidity of attitude then social interaction becomes further lessened and the individual may not even utilise the avenues for social activity that are still available.

d. Reduction in sexual function and physical attractiveness. Kinsey et al, in their Sexual behaviour in the human male, (Phil., Saunders, 1948) found that there is a gradual decrease in sexual activity with advancing age and that reasonably gratifying patterns of sexual activity can continue into extreme old age. The aging person also has to adapt to loss of sexual attractiveness in a society which puts extreme emphasis on sexual attractiveness. The adjustment in self image and self concept that are required can be very hard to make.

e. Forces tending to self devaluation. Often the experience of the older generation has little perceived relevance to the problems of the young and the older person becomes deprived of participation in decision making both in occupational and family settings. Many parents are seen as unwanted burdens and their children may secretly wish they would die so they can be free of the burden and experience some financial relief or benefit. Senior citizens may be pushed into the role of being an old person with all this implies in terms of self devaluation.

4 Major Categories of Problems or Needs:

Health.

Housing.

Income maintenance.

Interpersonal relations.

BIOLOGICAL CHANGES

Physiological Changes: Catabolism (the breakdown of protoplasm) overtakes anabolism (the build-up of protoplasm). All body systems are affected and repair systems become slowed. The aging process occurs at different rates in different individuals.

Physical appearance and other changes:

Loss of subcutaneous fat and less elastic skin gives rise to wrinkled appearance, sagging and loss of smoothness of body contours. Joints stiffen and become painful and range of joint movement becomes restricted, general mobility lessened.

Respiratory changes:

Increase of fibrous tissue in chest walls and lungs leads restricts respiratory movement and less oxygen is consumed. Older people more likelyto have lower respiratory infections whereas young people have upper respiratory infections.

Nutritive changes:

Tooth decay and loss of teeth can detract from ease and enjoyment in eating. Atrophy of the taste buds means food is inclined to be tasteless and this should be taken into account by carers. Digestive changes occur from lack of exercise (stimulating intestines) and decrease in digestive juice production. Constipation and indigestion are likely to follow as a result. Financial problems can lead to the elderly eating an excess of cheap carbohydrates rather than the more expensive protein and vegetable foods and this exacerbates the problem, leading to reduced vitamin intake and such problems as anemia and increased susceptibility to infection.

Adaptation to stress:

All of us face stress at all ages. Adaptation to stress requires the consumption of energy. The 3 main phases of stress are:

1. Initial alarm reaction. 2. Resistance. 3. Exhaustion

and if stress continues tissue damage or aging occurs. Older persons have had a lifetime of dealing with stresses. Energy reserves are depleted and the older person succumbs to stress earlier than the younger person. Stress is cumulative over a lifetime. Research results, including experiments with animals suggests that each stress leaves us more vulnerable to the next and that although we might think we’ve “bounced back” 100% in fact each stress leaves it scar. Further, stress is psycho-biological meaning the kind of stress is irrelevant. A physical stress may leave one more vulnerable to psychological stress and vice versa. Rest does not completely restore one after a stressor. Care workers need to be mindful of this and cognizant of the kinds of things that can produce stress for aged persons.

COGNITIVE CHANGE Habitual Behaviour:

Sigmund Freud noted that after the age of 50, treatment of neuroses via psychoanalysis was difficult because the opinions and reactions of older people were relatively fixed and hard to shift.

Over-learned behaviour: This is behaviour that has been learned so well and repeated so often that it has become automatic, like for example typing or running down stairs. Over-learned behaviour is hard to change. If one has lived a long time one is likely to have fixed opinions and ritualised behaviour patterns or habits.

Compulsive behaviour: Habits and attitudes that have been learned in the course of finding ways to overcome frustration and difficulty are very hard to break. Tension reducing habits such as nail biting, incessant humming, smoking or drinking alcohol are especially hard to change at any age and particularly hard for persons who have been practising them over a life time.

The psychology of over-learned and compulsive behaviours has severe implications for older persons who find they have to live in what for them is a new and alien environment with new rules and power relations.

Information acquisition:

Older people have a continual background of neural noise making it more difficult for them to sort out and interpret complex sensory input. In talking to an older person one should turn off the TV, eliminate as many noises and distractions as possible, talk slowly and relate to one message or idea at a time.

Memories from the distant past are stronger than more recent memories. New memories are the first to fade and last to return.

Time patterns also can get mixed – old and new may get mixed.

Intelligence.

Intelligence reaches a peak and can stay high with little deterioration if there is no neurological damage. People who have unusually high intelligence to begin with seem to suffer the least decline. Education and stimulation also seem to play a role in maintaining intelligence.

Intellectual impairment. Two diseases of old age causing cognitive decline are Alzheimer’s syndrome and Pick’s syndrome. In Pick’s syndrome there is inability to concentrate and learn and also affective responses are impaired.

Degenerative Diseases: Slow progressive physical degeneration of cells in the nervous system. Genetics appear to be an important factor. Usually start after age 40 (but can occur as early as 20s).

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE Degeneration of all areas of cortex but particularly frontal and temporal lobes. The affected cells actually die. Early symptoms resemble neurotic disorders: Anxiety, depression, restlessness sleep difficulties.

Progressive deterioration of all intellectual faculties (memory deficiency being the most well known and obvious). Total mass of the brain decreases, ventricles become larger. No established treatment.

PICK’S DISEASE Rare degenerative disease. Similar to Alzheimer’s in terms of onset, symptomatology and possible genetic aetiology. However it affects circumscribed areas of the brain, particularly the frontal areas which leads to a loss of normal affect.

PARKINSON’S DISEASE Neuropathology: Loss of neurons in the basal ganglia.

Symptoms: Movement abnormalities: rhythmical alternating tremor of extremities, eyelids and tongue along with rigidity of the muscles and slowness of movement (akinesia).

It was once thought that Parkinson’s disease was not associated with intellectual deterioration, but it is now known that there is an association between global intellectual impairment and Parkinson’s where it occurs late in life.

The cells lost in Parkinson’s are associated with the neuro-chemical Dopamine and the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s are associated the dopamine deficiency. Treatment involves administration of dopamine precursor L-dopa which can alleviate symptoms including intellectual impairment. Research suggests it may possibly bring to the fore emotional effects in patients who have had psychiatric illness at some prior stage in their lives.

AFFECTIVE DOMAIN In old age our self concept gets its final revision. We make a final assessment of the value of our lives and our balance of success and failures.

How well a person adapts to old age may be predicated by how well the person adapted to earlier significant changes. If the person suffered an emotional crisis each time a significant change was needed then adaptation to the exigencies of old age may also be difficult. Factors such as economic security, geographic location and physical health are important to the adaptive process.

Need Fulfilment: For all of us, according to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs theory, we are not free to pursue the higher needs of self actualisation unless the basic needs are secured. When one considers that many, perhaps most, old people are living in poverty and continually concerned with basic survival needs, they are not likely to be happily satisfying needs related to prestige, achievement and beauty.

Maslow’s Hierarchy

Physiological

Safety

Belonging, love, identification

Esteem: Achievement, prestige, success, self respect

Self actualisation: Expressing one’s interests and talents to the full.

Note: Old people who have secured their basic needs may be motivated to work on tasks of the highest levels in the hierarchy – activities concerned with aesthetics, creativity and altruistic matters, as compensation for loss of sexual attractiveness and athleticism. Aged care workers fixated on getting old people to focus on social activities may only succeed in frustrating and irritating them if their basic survival concerns are not secured to their satisfaction.

DISENGAGEMENT

Social aging according to Cumming, E. and Henry, W. (Growing old: the aging process of disengagement, NY, Basic 1961) follows a well defined pattern:

  1. Change in role. Change in occupation and productivity. Possibly change in attitude to work.
  2. Loss of role, e.g. retirement or death of a husband.
  3. Reduced social interaction. With loss of role social interactions are diminished, eccentric adjustment can further reduce social interaction, damage to self concept, depression.
  4. Awareness of scarcity of remaining time. This produces further curtailment of activity in interest of saving time.

Havighurst, R. et al (in B. Neugarten (ed.) Middle age and aging, U. of Chicago, 1968) and others have suggested that disengagement is not an inevitable process. They believe the needs of the old are essentially the same as in middle age and the activities of middle age should be extended as long as possible. Havighurst points out the decrease in social interaction of the aged is often largely the result of society withdrawing from the individual as much as the reverse. To combat this he believes the individual must vigorously resist the limitations of his social world.

DEATH The fear of the dead amongst tribal societies is well established. Persons who had ministered to the dead were taboo and required observe various rituals including seclusion for varying periods of time. In some societies from South America to Australia it is taboo for certain persons to utter the name of the dead. Widows and widowers are expected to observe rituals in respect for the dead.

Widows in the Highlands of New Guinea around Goroka chop of one of their own fingers. The dead continue their existence as spirits and upsetting them can bring dire consequences.

Wahl, C in “The fear of death”, 1959 noted that the fear of death occurs as early as the 3rd year of life. When a child loses a pet or grandparent fears reside in the unspoken questions: Did I cause it? Will happen to you (parent) soon? Will this happen to me? The child in such situations needs to re-assure that the departure is not a censure, and that the parent is not likely to depart soon. Love, grief, guilt, anger are a mix of conflicting emotions that are experienced.

CONTEMPORARY ATTITUDES TO DEATH

Our culture places high value on youth, beauty, high status occupations, social class and anticipated future activities and achievement. Aging and dying are denied and avoided in this system. The death of each person reminds us of our own mortality.

The death of the elderly is less disturbing to members of Western society because the aged are not especially valued. Surveys have established that nurses for example attach more importance to saving a young life than an old life. In Western society there is a pattern of avoiding dealing with the aged and dying aged patient.

Stages of dying. Elisabeth Kubler Ross has specialised in working with dying patients and in her “On death and dying”, NY, Macmillan, 1969, summarised 5 stages in dying.

  1. Denial and isolation. “No, not me”.
  2. Anger. “I’ve lived a good life so why me?”
  3. Bargaining. Secret deals are struck with God. “If I can live until…I promise to…”
  4. Depression. (In general the greatest psychological problem of the aged is depression). Depression results from real and threatened loss.
  5. Acceptance of the inevitable.

Kubler Ross’s typology as set out above should, I believe be taken with a grain of salt and not slavishly accepted. Celebrated US Journalist David Rieff who was in June ’08 a guest of the Sydney writer’s festival in relation to his book, “Swimming in a sea of death: a son’s memoir” (Melbourne University Press) expressly denied the validity of the Kubler Ross typology in his Late Night Live interview (Australian ABC radio) with Philip Adams June 9th ’08. He said something to the effect that his mother had regarded her impending death as murder. My own experience with dying persons suggests that the human ego is extraordinarily resilient. I recall visiting a dying colleague in hospital just days before his death. He said, “I’m dying, I don’t like it but there’s nothing I can do about it”, and then went on to chortle about how senior academics at an Adelaide university had told him they were submitting his name for a the Order of Australia (the new “Knighthood” replacement in Australia). Falling in and out of lucid thought with an oxygen tube in his nostrils he was nevertheless still highly interested in the “vain glories of the world”. This observation to me seemed consistent with Rieff’s negative assessment of Kubler Ross’s theories.

THE AGED IN RELATION TO YOUNGER PEOPLE

The aged share with the young the same needs: However, the aged often have fewer or weaker resources to meet those needs. Their need for social interaction may be ignored by family and care workers.

Family should make time to visit their aged members and invite them to their homes. The aged like to visit children and relate to them through games and stories.

Meaningful relationships can be developed via foster-grandparent programs. Some aged are not aware of their income and health entitlements. Family and friends should take the time to explain these. Some aged are too proud to access their entitlements and this problem should be addressed in a kindly way where it occurs.

It is best that the aged be allowed as much choice as possible in matters related to living arrangements, social life and lifestyle.

Communities serving the aged need to provide for the aged via such things as lower curbing, and ramps.

Carers need to examine their own attitude to aging and dying. Denial in the carer is detected by the aged person and it can inhibit the aged person from expressing negative feelings – fear, anger. If the person can express these feelings to someone then that person is less likely to die with a sense of isolation and bitterness.

A METAPHYSICAL PERSPECTIVE

The following notes are my interpretation of a Dr. Depak Chopra lecture entitled, “The New Physics of Healing” which he presented to the 13th Scientific Conference of the American Holistic Medical Association. Dr. Depak Chopra is an endocrinologist and a former Chief of Staff of New England Hospital, Massachusetts. I am deliberately omitting the detail of his explanations of the more abstract, ephemeral and controversial ideas.

Original material from 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

In the lecture Dr. Chopra presents a model of the universe and of all organisms as structures of interacting centres of electromagnetic energy linked to each other in such a way that anything affecting one part of a system or structure has ramifications throughout the entire structure. This model becomes an analogue not only for what happens within the structure or organism itself, but between the organism and both its physical and social environments. In other words there is a correlation between psychological conditions, health and the aging process. Dr. Chopra in his lecture reconciles ancient Vedic (Hindu) philosophy with modern psychology and quantum physics.

Premature Precognitive Commitment: Dr. Chopra invokes experiments that have shown that flies kept for a long time in a jar do not quickly leave the jar when the top is taken off. Instead they accept the jar as the limit of their universe. He also points out that in India baby elephants are often kept tethered to a small twig or sapling. In adulthood when the elephant is capable of pulling over a medium sized tree it can still be successfully tethered to a twig! As another example he points to experiments in which fish are bred on

2 sides of a fish tank containing a divider between the 2 sides. When the divider is removed the fish are slow to learn that they can now swim throughout the whole tank but rather stay in the section that they accept as their universe. Other experiments have demonstrated that kittens brought up in an environment of vertical stripes and structures, when released in adulthood keep bumping into anything aligned horizontally as if they were unable to see anything that is horizontal. Conversely kittens brought up in an environment of horizontal stripes when released bump into vertical structures, apparently unable to see them.

The whole point of the above experiments is that they demonstrate Premature Precognitive Commitment. The lesson to be learned is that our sensory apparatus develops as a result of initial experience and how we’ve been taught to interpret it.

What is the real look of the world? It doesn’t exist. The way the world looks to us is determined by the sensory receptors we have and our interpretation of that look is determined by our premature precognitive commitments. Dr Chopra makes the point that less than a billionth of the available stimuli make it into our nervous systems. Most of it is screened, and what gets through to us is whatever we are expecting to find on the basis of our precognitive commitments.

Dr. Chopra also discusses the diseases that are actually caused by mainstream medical interventions, but this material gets too far away from my central intention. Dr. Chopra discusses in lay terms the physics of matter, energy and time by way of establishing the wider context of our existence. He makes the point that our bodies including the bodies of plants are mirrors of cosmic rhythms and exhibit changes correlating even with the tides.

Dr. Chopra cites the experiments of Dr. Herbert Spencer of the US National Institute of Health. He injected mice with Poly-IC, an immuno-stimulant while making the mice repeatedly smell camphor. After the effect of the Poly-IC had worn off he again exposed the mice to the camphor smell. The smell of camphor had the effect of causing the mice’s immune system to automatically strengthen as if they had been injected with the stimulant. He then took another batch of mice and injected them with cyclophosphamide which tends to destroy the immune system while exposing them to the smell of camphor. Later after being returned to normal just the smell of camphor was enough to cause destruction of their immune system. Dr. Chopra points out that whether or not camphor enhanced or destroyed the mice’s immune system was entirely determined by an interpretation of the meaning of the smell of camphor. The interpretation is not just in the brain but in each cell of the organism. We are bound to our imagination and our early experiences.

Chopra cites a study by the Massachusetts Dept of Health Education and Welfare into risk factors for heart disease – family history, cholesterol etc. The 2 most important risk factors were found to be psychological measures – Self  Happiness Rating and Job Satisfaction. They found most people died of heart disease on a Monday!

Chopra says that for every feeling there is a molecule. If you are experiencing tranquillity your body will be producing natural valium. Chemical changes in the brain are reflected by changes in other cells including blood cells. The brain produces neuropeptides and brain structures are chemically tuned to these neuropeptide receptors. Neuropeptides (neurotransmitters) are the chemical concommitants of thought. Chopra points out the white blood cells (a part of the immune system) have neuropeptide receptors and are “eavesdropping” on our thinking. Conversely the immune system produces its own neuropeptides which can influence the nervous system. He goes on to say that cells in all parts of the body including heart and kidneys for example also produce neuropeptides and neuropeptide sensitivity. Chopra assures us that most neurologists would agree that the nervous system and the immune system are parallel systems.

Other studies in physiology: The blood interlukin-2 levels of medical students decreased as exam time neared and their interlukin receptor capacities also lowered. Chopra says if we are having fun to the point of exhilaration our natural interlukin-2 levels become higher. Interlukin-2 is a powerful and very expensive anti-cancer drug. The body is a printout of consciousness. If we could change the way we look at our bodies at a genuine, profound level then our bodies would actually change.

On the subject of “time” Chopra cites Sir Thomas Gall and Steven Hawkins, stating that our description of the universe as having a past, present, and future are constructed entirely out of our interpretation of change. But in reality linear time doesn’t exist.

Chopra explains the work of Alexander Leaf a former Harvard Professor of Preventative Medicine who toured the world investigating societies where people  lived beyond 100 years (these included parts of Afghanistan, Soviet Georgia, Southern Andes). He looked at possible factors including climate, genetics, and diet. Leaf concluded the most important factor was the collective perception of aging in these societies.

Amongst the Tama Humara of the Southern Andes there was a collective belief that the older you got the more physically able you got. They had a tradition of running and the older one became then generally the better at running one got. The best runner was aged 60. Lung capacity and other measures actually improved with age. People were healthy until well into their 100s and died in their sleep. Chopra remarks that things have changed since the introduction of Budweiser (beer) and TV.

[DISCUSSION: How might TV be a factor in changing the former ideal state of things?]

Chopra refers to Dr. Ellen Langor a former Harvard Psychology professor’s work. Langor advertised for 100 volunteers aged over 70 years. She took them to a Monastery outside Boston to play “Let’s Pretend”. They were divided into 2 groups each of which resided in a different part of the building. One group, the control group spent several days talking about the 1950s. The other group, the experimental group had to live as if in the year 1959 and talk about it in the present tense. What appeared on their TV screens were the old newscasts and movies. They read old newspapers and magazines of the period. After 3 days everyone was photographed and the photographs judged by independent judges who knew nothing of the nature of the experiment. The experimental group seemed to have gotten younger in appearance. Langor then arranged for them to be tested for 100 physiological parameters of aging which included of course blood pressure, near point vision and DHEA levels. After 10 days of living as if in 1959 all parameters had reversed by the equivalent of at least 20 years.

Chopra concludes from Langor’s experiment: “We are the metabolic end product of our sensory experiences. How we interpret them depends on the collective mindset which influences individual biological entropy and aging.”

Can one escape the current collective mindset and reap the benefits in longevity and health? Langor says, society won’t let you escape. There are too many reminders of how most people think linear time is and how it expresses itself in entropy and aging – men are naughty at 40 and on social welfare at 55, women reach menopause at 40 etc. We get to see so many other people aging and dying that it sets the pattern that we follow.

Chopra concludes we are the metabolic product of our sensory experience and our interpretation gets structured in our biology itself. Real change comes from change in the collective consciousness – otherwise it cannot occur within the individual.

Readings

Chopra, D. The New Physics of Healing. 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

Coleman, J. C. Abnormal psychology and modern life. Scott Foresman & Co.

Lugo, J. and Hershey, L. Human development a multidisciplinary approach to the psychology of individual growth, NY, Macmillan.

Dennis. Psychology of human behaviour for nurses. Lond. W. B.Saunders.

[http://www.psychologynatural.com/DepressionBroch.html]

Dr. Victor Barnes is an Adelaide psychologist and hypnotherapist. He has also had three decades of experience in adult education including serving as Dean of a Sri Lankan college (ICBT) teaching several Australian degrees. His overseas experience includes studies and consulting experience in USA, PNG, Poland and Sri Lanka.

Arbors Memory Care Community Wins Family Owned Business Award

May 22, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Stutchman Family Business Recognized with “When The Going Gets Tough” Award

For the past 40 years the Stutchman family has been in the business of senior care, presently owning and operating Arbors Memory Care Community. During their tenure they’ve seen highs and lows in their business, including economic downturns and the death of a husband/father/principal partner.  Through it all though, they’ve not only survived, but they’ve been able to thrive.

The Stutchman family was recently recognized by the Nevada Business Magazine through the publication’s annual Family Owned Business Awards.  They received the award for “When The Going Get’s Tough.”  The winner of this award is defined as “A business that faced adversity and made changes to adapt to what was sure to be a tough time.”

The magazine received several hundred nominations and narrowed those down to three finalists and then one winner in 10 categories for both the South and North part of the state.

Nevada Business Magazine had this to say about the Arbors, “Founded by Connie and Tom Stutchman, Arbors Memory Care Community is in a tough business, assisted living.  Couple that with the recent economic downturn and the Arbors had to adapt to survive.  Run today by the Stutchman’s daughter, Gina and her husband Jason Lewis, the organization has found a way to adapt their business model and provide affordable, yet quality assisted living.”

Some of the ways the Arbors has adapted is to add triple occupancy to their room mix, creating a more affordable option for families who need care for their over one with Alzheimer’s.  They also began to offer fixed-rate, all-inclusive pricing which enabled families to count on a consistent monthly amount for care throughout their family member’s entire stay.  Lastly the Arbors remodel project has just begun as well which will provide an even brighter and more inviting environment for residents and staff.

“We are absolutely thrilled to win this award and to be recognized by the business community for our years of dedication to quality senior care in Northern Nevada.  We look forward to caring for our seniors and providing jobs in the Reno/Sparks community for another 40 years,” says owner Gina Stutchman.

Arbors Memory Care Community is a locally owned and operated residential community providing care for individuals with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.  The Arbors, which is licensed for 72 beds, consistently receives an A grade in state inspections.

For more information, please contact Arbors Memory Care Community at (775) 331-2229 or visit www.arborsmemorycare.com.

Unprotected Heroes Vests Save K-9s Lives as They Protect and Serve Communities

January 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

11734(Family Features) A German Shepherd named Kilo was shot multiple times during a gun battle in Florida between police and a man suspected of shooting at officers earlier in the night. Fortunately for Kilo, he was wearing a protective vest, which saved his life. Unfortunately, thousands of other K-9s officers across the country perform their duties without proper protective wear, putting them in harm’s way.

 

Bullet and stab protective vests cost around $1,000 each and many departments simply do not have the means to outfit their dogs. PetArmor®, known for its products that protect pets from fleas and ticks, is helping to ensure more K-9s are protected while in the line of duty. Through a yearlong partnership with Vested Interest in K-9s, PetArmor® is providing funding for bullet and stab protective vests for law enforcement teams throughout the United States.

 

“These dogs are out 30 feet in front of us and need these vests,” said Officer Vinnie Curcio, with the Jupiter, Fla., Police Department, which is one of the police departments benefiting from the donation. “They’re leading us into dark, wooded areas after some of the most violent people.”

 

Police forces in most major cities use police dogs to track criminals, sniff out illegal materials, search buildings, and do other jobs human police officers can’t do as well as a dog can. Additionally, their sense of smell is tens of thousands of times more sensitive than that of humans, making them ideal for their duties.

 

Beyond their sense of smell, successful police dogs have exceptional intelligence and strength. Most police dogs are male, and are frequently left unneutered so that they maintain their natural aggression. This aggression must be kept in check with thorough and rigorous training.

 

The most popular breeds used as police dogs are German Shepherds, Belgian Malinois, Dutch Shepherds, and occasionally mixes of these breeds. Other breeds used include Bloodhounds for detection and scent work, and Labrador Retrievers for narcotics and explosives detection.

 

“Police K-9 units provide an invaluable service to their community and deserve the same kind of protection as their human counterparts,” said Sandy Marcal, founder of Vested Interest in K-9s, Inc.  “Thanks to PetArmor®, many more police dogs will be protected from harm while they protect their neighborhoods and towns.”

 

For more information on PetArmor® product offerings, visit www.petarmor.com. Additional information on Vested Interest in K-9s, Inc. can be found on their website, www.vik9s.org/.

Inspirational Stamps Teach History of Civil Rights

January 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
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11725_A(Family Features)  The influence of family can be a powerful thing. When asked who inspired her as a child, Rosa Parks, an extraordinary American activist, answered, “My family, I would say, my mother, and my maternal grandparents. I grew up with them.”

 

On December 1, 1955, Parks was arrested in Montgomery, Alabama, for refusing to give up her seat on a municipal bus to a white man. Her arrest sparked a boycott of the Montgomery bus system that lasted longer than a year, posing an ultimately successful challenge to racial segregation and inspiring others to similar action.

 

Rosa Parks’ lifelong dedication to civil rights has influenced generations of Americans. The U.S. Postal Service wants its 2013 Civil Rights set of stamps to continue to educate and inspire. It released the Rosa Parks Forever® Stamp this year, along with a stamp commemorating the day 50 years ago when nearly a quarter of a million people came together in Washington, DC, to participate in the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. A third stamp in the Civil Rights set celebrates the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation on Jan. 1, 1863, by President Abraham Lincoln.

 

Parents looking for ways to teach their children about historic American events like these can turn to stamps for fun, interactive ways to discuss national milestones and iconic figures with their children outside the classroom. Since 1893, the U.S. Postal Service has issued limited-edition stamps that honor prominent people, places, icons and events of contemporary American life. These miniature works of art serve as excellent resources for teaching about our country and our culture in a new and exciting way that reaches beyond a textbook.

 

In addition, the U.S. Postal Service has developed a worksheet to help guide exploration into civil rights and equality. The worksheet features a “how to” guide for making a family tree, as well as a coloring sheet and exercise that empowers children to think about what equality means to them. Download the worksheet and find other resources at http://blog-stampofapproval.com.

 

Educators will want to explore the U.S. Postal Service’s Community Connection website, found at www.uspsconnection.com, which brings the history and heritage of the Postal Service’s 238 years into elementary grade classrooms, using stamps as a catalyst to spark conversations and learning opportunities for students.

 

Twelve civil rights pioneers, including Mary Church Terrell and Mary White Ovington, have also been honored in the past with their own postage stamp. Every year the Postal Service commemorates notable leaders and cultural milestones through other stamp collections, such as the Black Heritage series and the American Treasures series.

 

Photos courtesy of Daniel Afzal/United States Postal Service

Keepsakes, Family Heirlooms Passed Down More Effectively with New Legacy Builder Tool Chest from LegacyStories.org

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Allianz American Legacy Studies researchers asked a group of Baby Boomers and their parents to rank on a scale of 1-10 (10 being most) what was more important to them when it comes to passing down an inheritance: values and life lessons or financial assets.

Perhaps not so surprisingly, the results showed that passing down values were over seven times more important than passing down valuables.

Yet only a small fraction of these three generations has made any provisions, mostly due to lack of awareness, education and the tools to do the job properly.

In addition to values and life lessons, a lot more should be included when building and passing down a legacy. Keepsakes and awards often represent defining moments and milestone events and can become family heirlooms when the stories behind their acquisitions are documented.

Identifying people in a select group of vintage family photos is one the best ways to document personal history, as some of the people in the old photos might as well be strangers to grandchildren. Those who grew up in the 20th century were first generations to record special events and moments.

Today’s digital technology offers a chance to pass down a purposeful legacy that will survive the ravages of time, and the experts at LegacyStories.org have developed an innovative Legacy Builder Tool Chest to help.

Consisting of fourteen drawers, each “toolkit” focuses on a specific legacy topic with interactive how-to guidebooks, downloadable forms, video tutorials and lots of helpful resources.

Toolkit topics include “Life Lessons and Values“, “Keepsakes & Heirlooms”, “Vintage Legacy Photos”, and one titled “Loved Ones in Care” to help caregivers build a legacy for victims of Alzheimer’s, people in hospice care, or seniors living in assisted or skilled nursing facilities.

“Since passing down life lessons and values is the highest priority, we provide members the ‘Life Lessons and Values’ toolkit at no cost,” says Tom Cormier, co-founder of LegacyStories.org. “Membership in LegacyStories.org is also free so there are no obstacles to prevent anyone from securing an honored place in family history. They just need to take action before regretting it.”

The Legacy Builder Tool Chest is also being recommended by financial advisors, estate planners and elder law attorneys as a means to engage with their clients in a purposeful way.

Content for the individual toolkits is contributed by top legacy experts including members of The International Assoc. of StoryKeepers (I-ASK) and the Association of Personal Historians (APH).

Our goal is to help people establish themselves as “effective elders” while they are alive, and to become “awesome ancestors” when they pass on,” Cormier states. “Our grandchildren and descendants will one day have an interest in learning about their family history. Because so few people will take the time to document their personal history, those who do will live on forever as their descendants’ go-to awesome ancestor.”

Contact info:
Tom Cormier — Co-founder
Phone: 423-295-5904
Email
Website: www.legacystories.org

Read more news from LegacyStories.org

How to Take Care of a Senior Citizen in the Family – Some Do’s and Don’ts by Ruma Sen

September 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Expert Author Ruma Sen

Although the idea may sound quaint to some, having a senior citizen in your home is something unavoidable. Yes, it is burdensome. Yes, it means having frayed nerves. Yes, it means sacrificing your privacy. Yes, you should not expect any pay-back from your elderly parents…this is their time in the sun.

From the outset,let me explain, that there is no one who will understand the problems faced by the family when an elderly person is a permanent resident, unless he/she too is in a similar position. Elders grow even older, and with increasing age comes unexpected blows, in the form of health issues, visits to doctors, and mounting medical bills. Realize that no one from the extended family or even the closer family members will be there to pitch in. It’s a fact of life….no one wants to INVITE trouble!

Most articles on Senior Citizen care lay stress on the fact that it is an honourable task that you have undertaken, to look after an old person. Few go on to explain what measures you can take to avoid those inevitable moments of depression, craziness, and having the blues, whilst you’re at the job.

Being a seasoned caretaker of a permanent live-in elderly in-law for the past two decades, I can only say this: forget your Ego, forget your cravings for instant happiness and impulsive actions. Look at the long term benefits only. Do you really want to ignore an old person’s problems by staying away and pretending to have fun? In that case, you are only playing with fire. With their lack of presence of mind, the family elder may either leave the house premises, and roam unattended, or leave the gas or geyser on, leading to gravely dangerous situations.

Be kind to the elderly, even though it may raise your hackles at times. Remember, their insensitivity and memory losses are something beyond their understanding or intention. Sometimes, the elderly get violent…handle the situation appropriately. Nowadays there are n number of forums, support groups etc who cater to specific problems involved in caring for the elderly.

Here are some pointers to follow at home, in the event of having an elderly person to take care of.

 

  1. Do keep your house well-ventilated, clean and dust-free.
  2. Try keeping the bathrooms of the elderly clean and DRY, to avoid cases of slipping.
  3. Provide ample reading material and interesting things to do, customized to suit the individual.
  4. Music is a great mood elevator; keep music of their generation easily accessible, with simple to operate music systems.
  5. Constant reminders are needed for the elderly; sometimes they react negatively to such instructions. Be prepared to face bouts of anger.
  6. Keep a doctor’s number, an ambulance number handy.
  7. Inform all the people living around your house about the elderly relative you are looking after. This will help avoid situations in which you will feel flustered.
  8. Keep all medicines out of their reach, and administer medicine in your presence.
  9. Employ a part-time help at home in cases where you feel helpless.
  10. Try to involve them in family outings and fun.
  11. Make them feel respected, loved and wanted. This is an uphill task, as the next generation has no patience to communicate with the elderly.
  12. Keep all the financial support ready. This may be in the form of medical insurance, pensions, savings and other schemes. One never knows when an emergency situation requiring a sudden lumpsum of money may arise.
  13. Make them carry some form of an identity on their person if they happen to be going out for a walk, by themselves.

 

Lastly, do pay attention to their diet.

It finally does not matter whether the senior citizen you are looking after happens to be an in-law or your own parent. In both cases, remember you are dealing with aging problems, and this is not an easy task. It calls for a lot of patience on your part. And when I say Patience, I mean patience! Try not to shout and express your feelings of disgust, anger, and rage: even though these might feelings may be uppermost on your mind.

Balance your own life out by reading, meditation, having friends over, or going out for a break. A strong family bond will ensure that the stressful moments will be counterbalanced with relaxed ones. Lastly, always boost yourself up by reminding yourself that the present situation could have been worse!

This article is an original one. The contents have been garnered from various sources, online, books and real life experiences. In case the reader wishes to add any new dimension to this, I would welcome it.
http://rumasen77.wordpress.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ruma_Sen

Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

National Council on Aging Launches Second Year of Education Program for Older Adults and Those Who Care for Them Aimed at Helping to Protect More Older Adults from the Flu

Actor Lee Majors, best known for his iconic roles on The Big Valley, The Fall Guy, and The Six Million Dollar Man, is joining the National Council on Aging (NCOA) Flu + You program to help protect older adults from influenza (commonly known as “the flu”). Flu + You aims to inform adults 65 and older, their caregivers, and those who care about them, about the dangers of the flu, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options.

As a part of his involvement in the Flu + You campaign, Majors will appear in a public service announcement (PSA) that follows him as he embarks on an important and action-packed mission: learning about his vaccine options and getting vaccinated against the flu. The PSA will educate the public about the increased risk of flu in adults 65 years of age and older and the importance of knowing your vaccine options and getting a flu vaccine, even for tough guys like Majors.

Every year in the United States, roughly nine out of 10 flu-related deaths and more than six out of 10 flu-related hospitalizations occur in people 65 and older. Older adults are at a greater risk for flu due, in part, to the weakening of the immune system that typically occurs with age. This means that no matter how healthy or youthful we feel, as we age we become more vulnerable to the flu and its related complications.

“The CDC recommends an annual flu vaccine as the single best way to protect yourself from the flu, yet a third of people 65 and older still don’t get vaccinated,” said Richard Birkel, PhD, MPA, NCOA Senior Vice President for Healthy Aging and Director of NCOA’s Self-Management Alliance. “As NCOA continues to educate older adults about the flu and the potential severity of the illness, we hope to encourage more people to protect themselves and their loved ones by getting an annual flu shot.”

The flu vaccine offers the best defense to protect against the flu, and adults 65 years of age and older have several vaccine options. In addition to the traditional flu vaccine (which helps protect against three strains of the flu virus), there is also a quadrivalent vaccine (which helps protect against four strains), and a higher dose vaccine that was designed specifically for adults 65 and older. By improving the production of antibodies in older patients, the higher dose vaccine can provide a stronger immune response to the flu than traditional vaccines. All flu vaccines are covered as a Medicare Part B benefit, which means there is no copay for Medicare beneficiaries 65 years of age and older.

“I get the flu shot every year and encourage my peers to do the same – it’s a simple step you can take to protect yourself from the flu,” says actor Lee Majors.  “I urge everyone 65 years of age and older to talk to their health care provider about their vaccine options this flu season.”

The flu can make existing health conditions worse, and it is especially dangerous for people with lung disease, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer—conditions that commonly affect older adults. Nationwide, 86 percent of adults 65 years of age and older have at least one chronic health condition and approximately 66 percent of Medicare beneficiaries have two or more chronic conditions, putting them at increased risk of the flu and flu-related complications, which can be severe and include hospitalization and even death.

For more facts about flu, and to order free educational materials, including a brochure and fact sheet, visit www.ncoa.org/Flu.

About Flu + You
Flu + You is a national public education initiative, from the National Council on Aging with support from Sanofi Pasteur, to educate adults 65 years and older about the dangers of the influenza virus, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options. Older adults and their caregivers can learn more on the Flu + You website, www.ncoa.org/Flu, which features a public service announcement with Lee Majors and facts about the flu. Also available on the website is a calendar of Flu + You events that will be held in 12 cities throughout the United States in September and October. At the events, older adults will have the opportunity to learn more about their risks for flu and available vaccine options, as well as talk to a health care provider and receive a flu vaccination.

About NCOA
The National Council on Aging is a nonprofit service and advocacy organization headquartered in Washington, DC. NCOA is a national voice for millions of older adults—especially those who are vulnerable and disadvantaged—and the community organizations that serve them. It brings together nonprofit organizations, businesses, and government to develop creative solutions that improve the lives of all older adults. NCOA works with thousands of organizations across the country to help seniors find jobs and benefits, improve their health, live independently, and remain active in their communities. For more information, please visit:

www.NCOA.org | www.facebook.com/NCOAging | www.twitter.com/NCOAging

 

CONTACT: Dana Kinker, (212) 301-7181, dkinker@wcgworld.com

Debt and Senior Citizens by David Cunningham

August 28, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

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We are in a consumer driven world. There are so many things all around us that make our lives easier and, in a way, influence us to think that we must have them. There are always things that we want which we simply cannot afford. As banks and credit card companies mushroom out of control, we are barraged with opportunities to accept so-called help from these financial institutions just so we can buy more merchandise we want but do not need.

The best part is that you do not even have go to them asking for the credit that you want. They will be at your beck and call offering credit cards, store credit cards (from those stores you wanted to purchase from anyway), merchandise cards (you’re given hundreds of dollars in credit to purchase from the company’s specific catalog), and leasing arrangements that allow you to pay over time.

The only problem with buying on credit is paying it off. Using an analogy, it is easier to step into quicksand than it is to get out. There isn’t always a branch lying around attached to a willing helper. Credit may be no problem if your current job earns enough money to repay your debts completely each month. It simply becomes part of your overall expenses. What happens, though, when your debt overextends your pay check?

Unfortunately, retired senior citizens are more susceptible to this pitfall. In prior years, they worked and earned a certain amount of money, but upon retirement are saddled with little more than Social Security – definitely a blow to the pocket book. Their income is not as flexible as it once was. There are solutions, however, from which seniors can benefit. Some are even geared specifically toward them.

As a senior citizen, you can request the help of a professional. Financial advisors are available to help tackle your problems. Asking for the aid of one such professional can save you a great deal of anxiety, credit ruin and, more importantly, stress. Your financial advisor can act as a mediator between you and creditors to develop “payoff amounts” that won’t leave you destitute – and usually at a fraction of your current payments. If you feel that you’re drowning financially, you shouldn’t wait until the water is over your head. Contact a financial advisor now for assistance.

Before meeting with an advisor, there are steps you should take to be best prepared for the discussion. Grab a notebook and pen to list all your creditors. List them in order of importance, starting with your mortgage (or rent or community fees, etc.) and ending with small payments like store credit cards. List their amounts as well. If you owe $50,000 on your home then list $50,000 and your current monthly payment. For example:

ABC Mortgage Company $50,000 (debt), $775 (monthly payment)

Listing the information this way will show your credit advisor that you are serious about getting your debt in order. It also is incredibly useful for the advisor in contacting your creditors since your financial advisor can then, at a glance, see what you owe and to whom. A sample short list follows below.

It is important that you have a clear comprehension of your financial situation. The best solution to debt is to not get into any that you cannot handle. However if you have already reached that “destination,” especially as a retired senior, then utilizing a financial advisor is certainly a great option to help rid yourself of the burden.

And now, the sample I promised:

John Smith

Total Monthly Income: $1200

DEBTS / MONTHLY PAYMENTS

ABC Mortgage $50,000 (debt), $750 (monthly payment)

Car Payment $20,000 (debt), $450 (monthly payment)

Credit Bank #1 $3,000 (debt), $25 (monthly payment)

Credit Bank #2 $1,200 (debt), $15 (monthly payment)

Store Credit Card #1 $5,000 (debt), $75 (monthly payment)

House Phone $50 (monthly payment)

Cell Phone $55 (monthly payment)

Total Debt $79,200

Total Monthly Payments $1,400

As you can see from this example, this person is losing $200 every month ($1400 monthly payments minus $1200 income). A financial advisor can usually negotiate with the credit card companies. They may even suggest that this person discontinue either their home phone or cell phone, for example, as most can probably get along with just one or the other.

For practical debt & credit assistance [http://www.debt-credit-assistance.com/credit_card_debt_solutions.shtml] information, please visit [http://www.debt-credit-assistance.com], a popular site providing great insights concerning how to address your issues and worries related to nagging debt struggles [http://www.debt-credit-assistance.com/usa_debt_management.shtml].

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Cunningham

 

Ways You Can Get a Senior Citizen Up and Active Again by Kristie Brown

August 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Expert Author Kristie Brown

Ask almost any senior citizen if they prefer to just sit around and take things easy, and they’re going to tell you “no way”. Mistakenly many of us equate an advanced age with lack of vitality and interest in the world around them, but as people are living longer, they’re retaining these characteristics well into their golden years. It’s possible you may know a senior who is somewhat limited in mobility or crippled up with arthritis, but you’ll find that if you suggest an activity, they’ll be more than willing to go with you. Here are some ideas for getting them up and active again:

1. If the person is lonely and enjoys company, you might be able to interest them in going to a local senior center or joining some type of club. Here they can find the companionship they seek, meet new friends, and enjoy activities with peers. In the beginning it may be difficult to get the person to go, because something new can be a challenge to anyone. Talk to the director of the center or club and find out when a good time to visit might be. Maybe there’s a time when the center isn’t very busy so that your senior wouldn’t be intimidated by a whole room full of strangers. You could invite them to go to dinner with you at a center potluck, or entice them with some of the activities you know they’d particularly enjoy. Once you get them involved, it’s a sure bet they’ll want to go back again and again.

2. Volunteering offers unique experiences for willing seniors. The different types of jobs abound, and your loved one will be sure to find something out there that he or she enjoys doing. Not only do these activities involve working as productive members of the community, but they can also come with perks, such as free dinners, small gifts, and service recognition awards. A senior who has been busy their entire lifetime doesn’t like to feel that they aren’t able to be an active part of the work community any longer. They can begin feeling depressed and worthless. Volunteering will demonstrate to them that they still have plenty to give and that their efforts are appreciated.

3. With the help of your senior, plan a get-together for others in the age group who live nearby in order to establish friendships. This is especially important when the person reaches an age where they are losing friends and need to find other people to share their world. Make sure to allow the senior to help with everything from planning to clean up. You may have to modify tasks to their abilities, but you also might find them working rings around you, because older folks have strong work ethics. Plan a simple menu and a few “get to know you” games to break the ice. They will have a lot to talk about, because they have shared similar experiences, such as the Great Depression, health problems, parenting,and other events from their lifetimes.

Need additional information on home care Maple Grove? Get high quality, customized home care that fits your needs here: home care.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kristie_Brown

Senior Citizen Assisted Living Can Help Baby Boomers Keep Their Independence by Susan Elizabeth

August 2, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Elderly-Couple-Walks-Retirement

Reaching your golden years is a great accomplishment. It is in fact one of the best things about living in the times that we do. There are so many opportunities and activities available now that did not exist previously, that it is almost impossible to take advantage of them all.

Senior citizen assisted living is one of those ideas that has come of age in a time when there are more people than ever who are retiring. The baby boomer group is the largest demographic group on the planet and many of them are reaching retirement age right now.

This has created a need for all manners of senior retirement arrangements that range all the way from complete and total care, kind of like the nursing homes used to be, through senior assisted living facilities which help seniors maintain all the independence they can for as long as is possible, to active adult retirement communities where often the primary focus is one golf or some other sport.

This range of choices is absolutely unprecedented in our society. Not only that, but with the touch of a few buttons on the computer keyboard, the internet springs to life and brings you tons of information about all these various living arrangements so you can decide exactly what kind of facility you need.

Assisted living facilities do a great job of tailoring specific service plans for their residents. This means that each person gets the care they need on an individual planned out basis. The goal is to not change the senior person’s lifetime of habits or lifestyle but still make it possible for them to receive the care they need to live a great and fulfilling life.

There are many of these facilities in many locations and each of them is a little different in what they have to offer their residents. The types and levels of services offered can be quite different one state to another, and because the industry is overseen more by the individual states rather than the federal government, it is important to make sure that the kind of care you need is available in an assisted living facility in the state that you are thinking of living in.

It is not that any of the care is worse in some states than in others, it’s just that the laws and regulations are a bit different. But as fare as getting the help you might need when you are living in a senior citizen assisted living community, all of them deliver exactly what you need. And not more than you need.

The goal is always is keep the most amount of independence possible and in the retirement community world, the assisted living facilities do the best job overall of juggling between providing care and maintaining independence.

Susan is a full fledged baby boomer and avid internet researcher who writes about active retirement communities and other baby boomer topics on her site at www.second50years.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Susan_Elizabeth

Senior Citizens Can Do Well in Network Marketing by Irene Mori

July 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, General 

Golden Years

If you have become a senior citizen, you have reached the golden years. It is time to enjoy life. Hopefully, you are healthy enough in mind and body to gain fulfillment in the autumn of your years.

Senior citizens have earned the right to sit back, relax, and enjoy life. Often this is not possible because the financial means are not there. It is a struggle to make ends meet as rising prices and dwindling resources have taken their toll. The bills for your daily needs, including medical and prescription costs, may have increased to the point where they are difficult to pay.

Enjoying life does not necessarily mean retiring from daily employment or work. Some seniors enjoy working well into their eighties and nineties. If they are able to do so, more power to them. Some politicians are good examples of this. They just keep working, serving, and giving even though they are financially able to retire and relax. They put themselves into the line of fire daily because they want to serve. Older entrepreneurs may be in the same boat.

Life has not dealt everyone with the same resources. As has always been true, life is not fair. Yet we take what we have been given and run with it, so to speak. We should make the best of our situation and do what we can to improve it.

As many older people have been forced into taking on menial jobs just to make some extra income or they found employment for the pure enjoyment of being out and seeing people, more senior citizens are working now than in earlier times. At this time in their lives, they may consider joining the network marketing industry for the first time. This can be a good thing or it can be a disaster.

There are hundreds of network marketing companies, and many are similar to each other. They all offer hope, but they often do not deliver. The main thing is to find a sponsor who is willing to help you succeed and to be willing to work hard. You will need to study and learn about all aspects of the company. You need to go in with an open mind and realize that the possibilities are there if you are willing to make it happen.

It is possible to achieve financial success so that you can enjoy your golden years, whether that means relaxing or continuing to work. The hope is alive.

Irene Mori is a distributor with a network marketing company selling a liquid nutritional supplement made from seven super fruits. If you are interested in receiving help with leads and recruiting for building ANY MLM company, check out: http://www.moremlmsuccess.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Irene_Mori

Senior Citizens Can Benefit From Network Marketing by Irene Mori

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Senior citizens can seldom make it on a small fixed income such as only social security. Most must have or probably have additional retirement income of some sort such as from past employment, IRA’s, or other retirement vehicles and savings. That may not be enough to offer a secure retirement in their winter years. Earning money is important even to the older generation.

There are many seniors who are working menial jobs in retail or fast food outlets. Although they may be working partly for the social aspect and to keep themselves active, many need that small amount of extra money they are able to earn to supplement their social security benefits. Their cost of living may have decreased, but their medical expenses and prescriptions have likely increased in their later years.

Even the wealthy often work well past the normal retirement age just to keep busy and engaged. Business executives may stay in the work force longer now than in previous years. They may choose to work into their eighties and nineties in some cases. Some do not need the money, but they keep earning.

For those who want to make some money but want to keep their freedom, the network marketing (MLM or multi-level marketing) industry offers people the chance to have a home based business for a small outlay of capital. It gives anyone the opportunity to find financial success through hard work and dedicated effort. Although most people who start a network marketing business never make any substantial money at it, there are senior citizens who are among the leaders in the industry who are finding or have found true financial success. Some had never previously been involved in network marketing until they became senior citizens.

The older generation can find good benefits from many of the products sold through network marketing. There are many health products sold through this medium which might prove beneficial to their health. Liquid nutritional supplements are being sold in increasing numbers as are various vitamins. Cosmetics and skin care products have been marketed through MLM for decades and continue to do so. Many have added anti-aging products to their lines. These products are of interest to those who do not want to look old. They may still feel young and vibrant which makes them want to appear younger than they actually are.

Network marketing allows people to work at their own pace and have their own schedule. Those who want to earn lots of money spend lots of hours working at it to find the success they desire. Those who just want a little extra income can make it work.

Irene Mori invites you to check out http://www.moremlmsuccess.com for information on a home based business opportunity which has the potential to create life changing income with products which may be beneficial to your health.

If you are interested in emergency preparedness and food storage, visit this website: http://www.preparedforlife.net.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Irene_Mori

 

Starting a Home Based Business – A Consideration For Senior Citizen Retirees by Jed Tooke

June 21, 2013 by · Comments Off on Starting a Home Based Business – A Consideration For Senior Citizen Retirees by Jed Tooke
Filed under: Articles 

Who needs to consider starting a home based business? The answer is YOU and the overwhelming majority of people, due to the Recession. However, in particular and one of the most vulnerable to the affects of the Recession are senior citizen retirees.

Many individuals from age 55 and above who are retired and receiving Social Security or a company pension may have to come out of retirement and find a job. Retired senior citizens face a huge challenge when competing for jobs against those who are younger. Retirees do not want to cut back their lifestyle at this stage of the game.

Recently, a study done by Charles Schwab & Co. estimates that a large number of senior citizen retirees in the United States are considering returning to the workforce on at least a part-time basis.

What Can Senior Citizens do about it?

Since older job seekers, especially those who have been out of the workforce in the recent past will have a difficult time competing. The best option is to start a home business on the Internet.

They need to prepare themselves with the necessary information and skills needed to accept the challenge of starting a business on the Internet. If some retirees already have the needed technical skills and resources they are good to go.

For those who do not, I encourage you to first purchase a state-of-the-art computer and learn basic computer and Internet skills. That can be done by way of the thousands of free online tutorials. You will most likely need a mentor, friend or some other person to guide you from beginning to end. Do not let the idea of training and learning something new cause you to give up. Also, neither age nor gender is a factor in this industry; it is open to everyone.

In addition to those resources, you will need be self-disciplined and self-motivated to get started with building a home business and ultimately become financially secure. If doing it on a part-time basis is sufficient to supplement your income, all well and good. However, you should know that there is no limit on the amount of income you can generate, either part-time or full-time.

Also, for those who think you can simply join a home business opportunity, promote it for a couple of weeks and expect to get rich, is not reality. Dismiss that idea and do it the right way. If you join a legitimate home business opportunity, you will be on the road to starting a home based business and ultimately, financial freedom.

Learn the real truth about starting a home based business [http://homebasedbusinessteam.com/03/starting-a-home-based-business-4/] working with a team. Discover how working with a team in building a business for you that yields residual income which means independence and financial freedom.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jed_Tooke

Online Home Business is a Good Alternative For Senior Citizens That Still Want to Work by Per Fossum

June 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Most people looking forward to the day they become senior citizens and the right to enjoy every day. Many do this as well, especially those who have put aside a lot of money for the retirement existence, have a holiday house boat, like to travel or engage in other forms of leisure life and activities.

But, what about those who have not put aside money or do not have any of the other things? For these people, there will be a lot of sitting home and watching TV. One day is equal to the second and with little variation. After a time they want a work again.

To find a job in retirement is not easy, unless you are expert in a field and can start up the service with this in one form or another. For example, information and training, repairs, etc.

Internet business from home can be a good solution, but the problem is that many of these newly established senior citizens have no experience with PC or the Internet. For these are the first to familiarize themselves with basic computer usage and internet through books or courses. If this is right for them, they can invest in a PC and do an Internet connection.

We have learned from the past that we should have patience and not go too fast forward in many different contexts. This applies also to build an online business.

To build up an online business is like going up a ladder, you have to take one step at a time and not try to skip a step. Then you can fall down and have to start over again. I hope you understand the comparison.

Many Senior Citizens and older people have here some problems versus younger people. Most forgets faster, hear and do not look so good anymore and they do not work as quickly as before. Therefore also use the slightly longer time to learn things. They have simply not sufficient time to have patience. They want to get started as soon as possible.

It is then better to buy services in order to get things done, and it is perhaps much better. But, be wise. . . be careful.

Seniors are often targeted by criminals because it can sometimes be easier to gain the trust of a senior, and also because the older ones probably have set aside savings and thus become a more lucrative target.

It can be helpful to keep some of the following tips in mind to help you or your loved one protected against scams and frauds, especially when shopping or working online.

For those seniors who need to make money, considering starting an online business opportunity program, here are some tips.

You do not have to pay hundreds of dollars for nothing! Any company looking for a great deal of money from you to do business, you should stay away completely!

You are strongly urged not to make a move on any kind of internet marketing opportunity that requires the outlay of that kind of money.

Most internet opportunities can be up and running for only a few hundred dollars in a day or two and that would be a fairly big deal.

At last. . . As I said before, older people forget faster, so please try to remember this. If you sign up for a 30 day trial program for $1, then later, after 30 days, you will be charged for $25 per month,

Do not forget to cancel if you do not want to continue.

Per Fossum is from Norway and a former Forex trader.After his retirement,he moved to Thailand where he works with his own online Home Business.
Made his website from Site Sell.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Per_Fossum

 

Top 10 steps to prepare for a remodel

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Top 10 steps to prepare for a remodel

NARI offers tips in honor of National Home Improvement Month.

  

Des Plaines, Illinois, May 8, 2013—In honor of National Home Improvement Month this May, the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) advises homeowners of the 10 most important steps to take before the remodeling project starts.

“The planning and researching phases of a project are the most critical steps in the remodeling process,” says NARI National President Art Donnelly, MCR, CKBR, Legacy Builders & Remodelers Corp., based in Mount Sinai, N.Y. “The more knowledgeable and prepared a homeowner is, the more they protect themselves.”

What can a homeowner do to prepare for a remodel? NARI provides a top 10 list of steps homeowners should take before breaking ground on their next remodel.

  1. Research your project. Taking time to research projects on the Internet and NARI.org will provide a good sense of what is involved such as price, scope of work, return on investment and new product/material options. Also, research property values in your neighborhood to make sure your project is in line with other homes in the area.
  2. Plan project around the long-term. How long do you plan to stay in your home? How might your family structure change over time? Life can change quickly—these questions should be answered early on to ensure your project will fit your lifestyle long after it’s complete.
  3. Set your budget. Deciding on a realistic budget and arranging finances to support your project are essential. This number needs to include everything—the project, products, contingencies, etc. Don’t be afraid to share this with your remodeler; professionals are respectful of a client’s budget and will create a plan around it, not over it.
  4. Use advanced search for professionals. The online world makes it easy to gather information about strangers. Ask friends, family and neighbors for referrals and then spend time researching that person online. Professional remodelers take their reputation seriously and hold credentials beyond licensing, such as certifications, memberships in trade associations and additional training. Look for examples of press coverage or involvement in industry presentations or events. Check online reviews and social media to see how they interact with past clients and peers.
  5. Ask the right questions. Time and cost are important, but getting the right information requires the right questions. Ask your professional remodeler about his educational background, training, specialties or past issues with clients. Ask about how the remodeling process will work.
  6. Verify your remodeler. Don’t take their word for it. Check the information given to you such as references, license numbers, insurance information and certifications by calling providers to verify. Request a visit to an active client’s jobsite. Make it known that you are checking on him—a true professional considers that as a positive sign to working with a homeowner.
  7. Review contracts word-by-word. A remodeling contract protects you and your remodeler. Homeowners should review this carefully. Professional remodelers have done this before, and know what should go in a contract. Homeowners are not as familiar with remodeling and should ask about terms if they don’t understand. Pay attention to details about change orders, payment, additional fees, timeline and responsibilities. If it’s not in the contract, it doesn’t exist.  
  8. Keep design in mind. Your design guides the entire project. Think about what you dislike about your current space and the intended use of the new space. Use Websites such as Pinterest.com and Houzz.com to gather design ideas. Make sure you can articulate specifically what you like about that design when talking to your designer. Professionals don’t recreate a photo—they incorporate accessibility, functionality, ease of modification, style and value into your design.
  9. Make your selections. Deciding on products and materials is a larger process than most imagine. With so many options to choose from, product selections are one of the primary reasons for project timelines to get extended. Base decisions on quality, function, price, style and availability. Include selections in the contract to lock down pricing and keep your budget intact.
  10. Create a communication plan. A common downfall in remodeling is lack of communication between homeowners and remodelers. Your remodeler should lay out a communication plan at the beginning of the project. If not, ask them to do so. This plan should clarify roles of everyone involved, communication methods, availability, and frequency of communication that is expected.

As an industry that struggles with a persistent negative perception of remodeling contractors, these tips serve both the industry and consumers in elevating real professionals from the pack.

The first step to hiring a professional is through NARI, whose members are vetted and approved by industry peers to ensure they live up to the professional standards that NARI sets. “NARI members are proud of their affiliation and commitment to professionalism, and it’s a reputation they work hard to protect,” Donnelly says.

Consumers may visit www.NARI.org to find a qualified professional who is a member of NARI or call NARI National at (847) 298-9200 and request a free copy of NARI’s brochure, “How to Select a Remodeling Professional.”

Click here to see an online version of this press release.

EDITOR’S NOTE: NARI can provide hi-res digital photos of award-winning projects to accompany your story. Contact NARI with your photo request at marketing@nari.org or ask for Morgan Zenner at (847) 298-9200.

# # #

About NARI: The National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) is the only trade association dedicated solely to the remodeling industry.  The Association, which represents member companies nationwide—comprised of 63,000 remodeling contractors— is “The Voice of the Remodeling Industry.”™ To learn more about membership, visit www.NARI.org or contact national headquarters, based in Des Plaines, Ill., at (847) 298-9200.

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

At a time when thousands of Baby Boomers are reaching the age of 65 every day, the issues of senior rights, elder laws, and anti-ageism have never been more important, more volatile, or more questioned. After all, this is the generation that was ready to take down the establishment fifty years ago, and they haven’t lost any of their desire to change the world for the better. And, they have the numbers to do it. Here are our 100 top blogs for seniors dealing with senior rights, law & policy, and anti-ageism.

Boomers Against The Law

  1. Elder Law Plus: lawyer Evan H. Farr blogs about topics concerning elder law, including probate strategies and parental care.
  2. Michigan Elder Law Blog: the attorneys at Barsch & Joswick provide seniors and their loved ones with sage advice on a variety of Elder law issues.
  3. Everything Elder Law: Evan Farr is back at it again, this time focusing on Elder Law news, concepts, and innovations from around the country.
  4. Massachusetts Estate and Elder Law Blog: lawyer and blogger Stephanie Konarski gives tips on estate planning and other elder law topics.
  5. New York Elder Law Attorney Blog: your source for elder law news and comment in New York, this blog analyzes nursing home legislation and elder care costs.
  6. Elder Law Prof. Blog: Elder Law professor Kim Dayton authors a really nice blog that covers a wide range of Elder law issues, from Supreme Court cases to seminars.
  7. The Pop Tort: can a consumer advocates blog dealing with civil justice be cute? This blog proves it can, complete with an adorable “Pop Tort” logo, even while exploring such issues as Medicare and Medicaid lawsuits, nursing home scams, and medical malpractice against the elderly, among other legal issues.
  8. Supportive Senior Solutions: this blog from a geriatric care management practice in New York covers issues related to geriatric care, caregiving, and healthcare laws for the elderly and infirm.
  9. Aging Beats the Alternative: elder care specialist Lorie Ebers uses her blog to talk about overcoming the challenges of aging, caring for aging parents, and the less talked about side of elder law: Boomer divorce.
  10. Elder Law Blog: lawyer Ronald C. Morton’s elder law blog is full of sage advice for seniors looking how to tap into Veteran’s benefits, how to plan for their golden years, and more.
  11. The Best Elder Law Blog: published by the attorneys at Lamson & Cutner, this blog discusses elder law cases, the Affordable Care Act, and same-sex marriage.
  12. Elder Law Tips and News: the lawyers at Cooper, Adel & Associates bring you posts on living trusts, aging issues, and general estate planning.
  13. The Connecticut Elder Law Blog: lawyer Michael Keenan provides his readers with estate planning tips, elder fraud, and Medicare rules.
  14. The Teddy Bear Lawyers: attorney Rick Law gives readers a great resource for Elder Law in the Chicagoland area. Find articles on protecting vulnerable seniors and financial planning.
  15. Oregon Elder Law: attorney Orrin Onken blogs on elder law, estate planning, and probate proceedings in plain, easy to understand language.
  16. Florida Elder Law and Estate Blog: this informative blog includes great articles on VA benefits, estate planning, and trusts.
  17. Golden Law Center: written by attorney Sasha Golden, the Golden Law Center blog discusses elder law, special needs planning, guardianship, wills and trusts, and estate administration.
  18. Kraft Elder Law: attorney Robert Kraft blogs about Medicaid, Medicare, wills, trusts, probate, veterans benefits, and other elder law topics.
  19. Pennsylvania Law Blog: this elder law blog by the attorneys at the law offices of Shober & Rock discusses Medicaid, taxes, Veterans, banks, and annuities.
  20. Long Beach Elder Law Blog: this blog focuses on elder abuse, estate protection, the Cal MediConnect program, and reform of health law.
  21. Houston Elder Law Blog: the folks at Wright Abshire Attorneys blog about care planning, estate planning, Medicaid Planning, Probate & Estate Administration, and and Veteran’s Benefits.
  22. Hauptman Law Blog: readers of this blog can learn more about elder, estate, and special needs law. Includes articles on the Medicare Settlement and VA Aid.
  23. Fulkerson Elder Law Blog: the function of this elder law blog is for the firm to respond to common questions clients have about elder law and review developments in the law impacting elder law and estate planning.
  24. CMLP Estate Planning and Elder Law Blog: readers can look forward to reviewing articles on simplifying their estate plan and elder law news items of note.
  25. Massachusetts Estate Planning and Probate Blog: attorney Matthew Karr keeps readers up to date on estate planning and probate news and information.
  26. Marshall Elder and Estate Planning Blog: the author of this elder law blog has over 30 years experience in estate planning, special needs planning, and estates.
  27. Hartford, CT Elder Law Blog: the attorney’s at Ruggiero Ziogas & Allaire discuss estate planning, care planning, Medicaid, Veteran’s Benefits, and Probate.
  28. El Paso Elder Law Blog: the law firm of Stephanie Townsend Allala and Associates blogs on estate planning, guardianships, Medicaid Planning, Nursing Home Abuse, and Trust & Probate.
  29. Miami Probate Law Blog: the folks at the Byrant law firm keep readers up-to-date on estate administration, probate court, estate litigation, and the nuisances of will and trust disputes.
  30. Elder Law News: attorney Brian A. Raphan is based in New York City and specializes in Wills, Estates, Trusts, and Elder Care issues. His blog is full of great resources.
  31. Aging & Law in West Virginia: this blog contains news in law and aging in West Virginia, written by the West Virginia Senior Legal Aid organization.
  32. Florida Elder Law and Estate Planning: this Florida Certified Elder Law attorney provides in depth insights and news to help Floridians protect themselves and preserve their assets.
  33. Family Law Blog Maryland: while this blog looks at all matters pertaining to Family Law, elder law sneaks in as a prevalent theme in many of the cases discussed. They look at legal matters like when divorce and retirement coincide, or when grandparents wish to take custody of their grandchildren.
  34. Phoenix AZ Family Law Blog: looking at issues older couples face in Arizona, this family law blog explores the specific challenges elders face in divorces and custody battles, complete with the latest policy changes and laws.
  35. Otherspoon: hospice volunteer and blogger Ann Neumann talks about care-giving and the realities, politics, and senior rights involved in death and dying.

Seniors Talk Policy And Politics

  1. Aging in Place: this blog is concerned with seniors who are dealing with shrinking benefits and increasing costs—seniors find answers on how to protect themselves.
  2. Estate in Denial: providing news, analysis, and commentary on abusive practices occurring in probate courts. Features original perspective and direct communication.
  3. Florida Estate Planning Lawyer Blog: this blog covers estate planning legal issues, cases of interest, and news with a focus on Florida elder law.
  4. McGuire Woods: the people at McGuire Woods author this great blog on long term care legal issues, including timely news, articles, and white papers.
  5. Illinois Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: published by the law office of Wilson & Wilson, this blog covers asset protection, banking, estate planning, and trusts.
  6. Illinois Nursing Home Abuse Blog: covers Illinois nursing home law, including Supreme Court cases and other information relating to residents and family members.
  7. Law Office of Donald D. Vanarelli Blog: provides readers in New Jersey with information on elder law, estate and special needs planning, and mediation services.
  8. Maryland Nursing Home Lawyer Blog: this blog offers insight on nursing home abuse reports, legislation, and legal opinions of elder law in Maryland.
  9. Massachusetts Estate Planning, Probate & Elder Law: elder law attorney Brian Barreira writes on legal issues involving death, taxes, special needs, and long-term elder care.
  10. New Jersey Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: blog posts explore life and death in New Jersey from a perspective of estate planning, elder law, taxation, probate, and estate administration.
  11. Medina Law Group: postings provide readers with advice on estate planning and management, estate taxes, elder law, and VA benefits.
  12. North Carolina Wills and Trusts: this blog provides readers with estate planning and elder law news with a North Carolina focus.
  13. California Nursing Home Abuse Law Blog: covers nursing home abuse, elder law abuse, and features many quality articles relating to California elder law.
  14. Nursing Home Law Blog: this well written blog discusses elder issues, legislation, legal news, protections of elder rights, and helpful health tips.
  15. PA Elder Estate and Fiduciary Law Blog: focuses on elder law, long-term care, end-of-life and health care surrogate decision-making, and estate planning.
  16. Patti’s Blog: find information about this lawyer’s practice, which concentrates on advocacy for seniors. She shares personal interests and her passions.
  17. Pennsylvania Nursing Home Abuse Lawyer Blog: this blog discusses nursing home abuse laws, cases, and news items from Pennsylvania.
  18. Barbara Cashman Blog: Barbara blogs about elder law and policy issues, and often hosts guest bloggers to share their insights on elder law and news.
  19. NJ Elder Law: lawyer Kenneth Vercammen blogs about topics related to estate planning and elder law. He was once awarded the NJ State Bar Municipal Court Practitioner of the Year.
  20. The Senior Sentinel: a blog compiling news and information for Baby Boomers, the Senior Sentinel concentrates on the intersection of ageism and public policy both nationally and world-wide.
  21. Elder Consult: this geriatric medicine blog not only covers Alzheimers, dementia, financial decision making, and medications, it also discusses related legal issues such as elder financial abuse.
  22. Grey Pride: a UK blog by the Anchor Digital Marketing team is dedicated to keeping older people at the top of the political agenda and petitioning the government to create a Minister for Older People to ensure their needs are met.
  23. Over 65 Blog: project organizers from Harvard, Yale, and The Hastings Center host this blog for “seniors seeking solutions for health care and security, mainly looking at health care system reforms, elder law policies and practices, and how seniors can achieve a stronger role in the future of health care.
  24. Reaping Hope Blog: a blog from an NGO in Nepal promoting dignified aging and elder rights, Reaping Hope explores elder abuse and elder oppression while actively helping elderly people claim their rights and challenge discrimination.

Age Against The Machine: Anti-Ageism

  1. Ageist Beauty: the musings, product reviews, and random thoughts of a woman who is fighting against her age.
  2. Everyday Ageism Project: this blog aims to capture people’s everyday experiences dealing with ageism. The author has discovered that ageism is the most commonly experienced form of prejudice.
  3. The Lonely Gerontologist: professor Kelly Yokum blogs about all things aging—including aging stereotypes and other aging topics that come to mind.
  4. My Elder Advocate: this blog provides comprehensive coverage of ageism, the dangers of nursing homes, elder abuse, and elder care.
  5. The Roaming Boomers: David and Carol are great examples of a couple who doesn’t let age get in the way of living life to the fullest.
  6. The Gypsy Nester: Veronica and David show readers how to rock the empty nest and get the most out of life as you age.
  7. Changing Aging: this multi-blog platform challenges conventional views on aging. The authors believe aging is a strength, rich in developmental potential and growth.
  8. The Elders: founded by Nelson Mandela in 2007, the Elders is a group of seniors committed to addressing global challenges, including child marriage and climate change.
  9. Beauty and Wisdom: the blog of photographer Robbie Kaye, who traveled to salons throughout the US to photograph and interview women in their 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s and discovered that beauty is ageless.
  10. Advanced Style: don’t tell these women they are too old to model hip and alluring fashions. This blog teaches women how to dress to impress and that age is only a number.
  11. RL TV: the only cable network and online destination for folks 50+, features a nice blog that provides tips on elder issues and promotes active living.
  12. The 70-Something Blog: blogger Judy informs readers how to live a full and engaging life as she chronicles her journey of aging.
  13. Retirement is Work: newly retired librarian and blogger resolves to post one good thing about retirement every day for a year, but along the way struggles with senior rights and anti-ageism.
  14. Yo Is This Ageist?: a humorous blog by Ashton Applewhite dedicated to determining whether age-related remarks are offensive, “challenging the stereotypes that segregate us by age.”
  15. This Chair Rocks: a smart and sassy blog by Ashton Applewhite that challenges the ideas of ageism with humor and snark. All stereotypes and insensitive remarks are grounds for brilliant blog posts.
  16. Senior Planet: “aging with attitude” is the tagline of this blog community of older adults using technology to connect with each other and take on the issues of ageism and senior rights.
  17. Changing Aging: a blog founded by Dr. Bill Thomas to promote “a radical reinterpretation of longevity” which focuses on anti-ageism and senior rights, as well as getting the most out of a long life.
  18. Time Goes By: Ronni Bennett takes on aging, ageism and related issues with humor, exploring the truth of “what it’s really like to get old.” She starts by rejecting the “cutesy” terms for old people – they’re called “elders” around here!
  19. The Magic of Middle-Aged Women: author Daniel Even Weiss – a man – blogs on the theme of his latest book, The Magic of Middle-Aged Women, where he challenges the prevailing ageist idea that women don’t get better as they age. They do.
  20. Advanced Style: Ari Seth Cohen, a young-ish photographer, roams the New York City streets photographing stylish and creative elders. Here, art challenges the paradigm that age and beauty can’t co-exist.
  21. The New Old Age: the New York Times blog on aging takes advantage of the newspaper’s top writers to explore the unprecedented intergenerational challenge of the Baby Boomers.
  22. The Little Old Lady Stays Put (or doesn’t): explores the “lives, lifestyles and issues of interesting older people,” touching on the issues surrounding ageism, elder rights, living with dementia, and overcoming the struggles of aging with strength and good humor.
  23. Naked at Our Age: advocate of ageless sexuality, Joan Price, talks about sex and aging, taking on Senior Rights subjects like safer sex for seniors while providing helpful tips.
  24. Aging & Work at Boston College: scholars, academics, and researchers share their findings on ageism in the workplace and the challenges aging workers face in this PhD-heavy blog by The Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College.
  25. Ethnic Elders: this newsy blog by New America Media examines the Senior Rights issues and Elder Law of minority groups such as age discrimination, lawsuits related to Social Security, and elder healthcare reform.
  26. The Everyday Ageism Project: blending blogging and research, this site’s goal is to capture the experience of age discrimination. The forum is full of people sharing their experiences in a supportive environment.
  27. Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens Blog: the Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens sub-blog offers wide ranging posts on issues including senior rights and ageism – with its signature left-wing perspective.
  28. Clinical Geriatrics: created as more of a peer-reviewed clinical journal by the American Geriatrics Society, some of the top scholars in geriatrics converge on this blog to discuss geriatric health and wellness issues, which often cross over into legal and anti-ageism issues.
  29. Age Action Alliance: this organization brings together a network of 300 organizations and individuals committed to helping older people. Its blog is dedicated to improving older people’s lives through advocating against ageism, particularly in Britain.
  30. Manitoba Senior Centres: this Canadian blog covers the rampant ageism in Canada and promotes world elder abuse awareness. It also has a list of resources for older adults.
  31. Fierce with Age: defying ageism goes mainstream at this blog, created by veteran journalist Dr. Carol Orsborn. Having written about the Boomer generation for major newspapers and blogged for the Huffington Post and NPR’s Next Avenue, Orsborn is well equipped to take on the spiritual and policy hurdles of aging.
  32. Live Better Boomer!: a Philadelphia-based blog, by social worker Tiffany Matthews, devoted to helping educate and empower Boomers advocate for their own improved healthcare.
  33. Third Age: billed as “health for Boomers and beyond,” Third Age offers relatively fluffy fare, like “Change your Mood with Color,” to the legal issues surrounding Boomer divorce and care-giving.
  34. The Old Gunhand: one facet of senior citizen rights you don’t see every day is elder gun advocates. This website not only tells you the best types of guns for elderly wielders, it also goes into gun policy and senior self-defense.
  35. Age Discrimination Info: a simple name for a one-stop source of statistics and information on age discrimination, including legislation, cases, news, publications, events and training. The perfect resource for the activist.
  36. Age UK: the largest organization in the United Kingdom for working with and for older people, this website has an entire section dedicated to age discrimination and ageism.
  37. National Youth Rights Association: not just for youngsters, the National Youth Rights Association combats ageism in all its forms. In fact, they probably wouldn’t appreciate being called “youngsters.”
  38. Disability and Representation: a blog by writer, photographer and activist Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg that discusses (and tries to change the discourse about) disability rights and ageism, along with autism.
  39. Over 50: Career coaching and workshops for the over-50 crowd, this blog doesn’t stop at finding a job. This site explores Baby Boomer activism in and out of the workplace.
  40. Activist Post: while this blog deals with many topics requiring advocacy, they often include issues that regard Senior Rights, Elder Law and anti-ageism.
  41. California Booming: an informational blog dedicated to California Baby Boomers, this blog covers everything from sex, to diet, to politics of the Boomer generation, including issues concerning senior rights and ageism in the workplace.

Senior Citizens and the Job Search by Mort Ferguson

June 4, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Although many employers are looking for new graduates or someone younger with a bit of experience, there are still plenty of jobs that you can secure as a senior citizen. Opportunities in the work force abound for older Americans. On the surface it may seem harder to find such roles; however they are available – you just need to know where and how to approach the search.

There is a great potential among older employees. They have more experience, are (generally) easier to work with, and typically more flexible than the person fresh from college who is more likely to have an implanted ideal of what their job should be like. In other countries such as the Netherlands and Australia, younger employees are losing jobs to the more experienced and mature adults; in North America, this is a growing trend as well.

It is illegal, of course, to have someone ask your age when applying for a job, but hiring personnel can tell from application and resume information whether you may have been in the work force for some time. That is why instead of talking strictly about your age, you need to highlight your experience. When putting together your resume, clearly list your accomplishments over the years and all your previous jobs. In your cover letter, focus on why you would be better suited for the job than a young applicant – even if you committed decades at home to raise children – thus helping employers understand the benefits in hiring you over a recent graduate with no real life experience.

If you have been out of work for a while or entering a field in which you have not had that much experience, consider enrolling in a class that can refresh your memory about that market or a class that can update you on new policies. Businesses are constantly changing, and part of entering the work force again means learning contemporary methods of working rather than continuing the way work was done when you were younger.

The Internet has web sites offering opportunities for senior citizens, and shows relevant vacancies in the city in which you work. There are even specific agencies that work solely with senior citizens to make sure you can find a job in which you would be welcome. Some of the fields that value the knowledge of a senior citizen include healthcare, public speakers, and writers. You simply need to determine what you may be interested in doing and then make the move to apply for jobs in your chosen field.

It is not so difficult to land a job when you are 60; you just need to become a bit savvy at learning where to look.

For practical job hunting & career [http://www.job-hunting-careers.com/medical_billing_and_coding_career.shtml] information, please visit [http://www.job-hunting-careers.com], a popular site providing great insights on your search for just the right job or career, ranging from US Post Office to a travel nurse [http://www.job-hunting-careers.com/travel_nurse_employment.shtml] position and many more!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mort_Ferguson

Marketing to Senior Citizens – Assume Nothing! by Marte Cliff

May 3, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Once upon a time, senior citizens were old people. They were assumed to be  suffering from ill health and in need of care. They sold their homes so they  could move in with children or move to a care facility. Not any more.

Now senior citizens exhibit the same variety of health and fitness as  people much younger. In fact, those who have actively taken care of  themselves are probably more fit than those in their teens and 20’s who shun  exercise and live on junk food.

So, assume nothing, because senior citizens come in many varieties,  with many different goals.

Many choose to remain in their homes, while others want a change of scenery.  But even those want to sell have different reasons.

Some want to get away from excessive maintenance chores. They’ll  choose a smaller home with a smaller yard – or perhaps a condo. They may be in  failing health, but don’t assume so. They may just want to pursue hobbies or  take up volunteer work or be free to travel. Many have something they want to do  that they couldn’t do before, and they don’t want to be tied down by a high  maintenance home.

Others want to find a new home with a large yard, or even acreage, so  they can take up gardening or buy a horse or raise dogs.

Some just want to get away! They’ll sell the old homestead and move  into a motor home so they can see the places they’ve been dreaming about for all  those years when they were tied to work.

Some want to move to a more temperate climate – they’re tired of the  cold and snow and want to get outdoors and play all year. Some have always  dreamed of living on a lake or in the mountains or on the desert. Some wanted to  get away to a small town with a slower pace – or to move to a city with opera  houses and art galleries and the theater. But until now, they were stuck because  they were afraid to move away from their work. Now they can go where they  want.

Of course, there still are those seniors who are selling because they do need  to move in with the kids or to an assisted living facility.

Your job as an agent is to not assume anything. If you want  to sort your lists, set up a capture on your website with information about  downsizing to a smaller home, and a separate capture with information about  transitioning to assisted living. You could even have different pages on your  site – just like you might have different pages and different information for  first time buyers and move-up buyers.

When you get a call to list a home for a senior citizen, go with no pre-set  ideas. Wait and talk to the homeowner before you try to anticipate just what  kind of assistance they need. Otherwise, you’ll risk alienating a new client  before you get a chance to show your stuff!

Marte Cliff is a Freelance Copywriter who specializes in writing for real  estate and related industries.

She’ll help you with one letter, or an entire marketing plan. For Real Estate  agents and brokers who are ready to get full value from their websites, she’ll  be happy to put together an entire package – from the web copy to the lead  generation packages that make an agent’s phone ring.

For busy agents on a budget, Marte offers pre-written letter sets for use in  postal mail or in e-mail continuity campaigns. The current selection includes  letters for FSBO’s, Expired Listings, Short Sale sellers, First Time Buyers, and  a set for new agents to send to buyers. Read what’s included in these sets by  visiting http://www.copybymarte.com/pro/prospecting.html

Marte’s weekly ezine for real estate professionals offers tips and hints for  building a successful business. To subscribe, and to see other resources  available for real estate sales professionals, visit her at http://www.copybymarte.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Marte_Cliff

 

Finding Cheap Senior Travel For Senior Citizens On The Go by Bruce A. Hoover

April 27, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

More and more senior citizens are rediscovering their youth by planning  vacations. Many choose to revisit locations that bring back old memories, such  as revisiting their hometowns, yet many others are stepping it up and taking  their trips to places that are more exotic. Having worked their whole lives and  getting a bit bored with the television and armchair routine, many seniors are  ready to get out-of-town and escape being home bound. Taking these vacations has  been found to be a major asset to their lives. They get to get out and enjoy  life without the hassles that working people face. Therefore, with no deadlines,  and no jobs to return to, seniors are able to have the time of their lives  without the stress that comes with being a full-time employee.

Many seniors are on a tight budget, so the ones who are computer savvy are  turning to the internet to discover cheap senior travel. This is not only great  for them, but the travel agencies, hotels, resorts, and other popular vacation  spots as well. Many discover it is easier and cheaper to book mode of  transportation, hotels and activities in advance. With senior discounts  available worldwide, more are able to visit places they may not have been able  to afford without them. In today’s society, there are many modes of travel, one  can choose flying, cruising, riding a train or road trips in RVs. With so many  choices available, seniors can have a lot of fun deciding and planning their  vacation. Being able to access a wealth of information on the internet helps  them to discover their destinations and plan activities they may not have been  aware of otherwise.

Many find it therapeutic to be able to make decisions and plan activities.  Whether they plan their vacation, or a travel agency does, they are left with  the excitement of their upcoming trip. While many seniors can plan activities  that are physically demanding, others are not so fortunate and have to resort to  planning their trips in places that cater to disabilities. There are more and  more vacation hot spots that are gearing up for seniors and others with  disabilities so finding a great place to visit is not as difficult now for those  with special needs. Some vacation resorts even have fun activities to entertain  those who are unable to get out and participate in activities that are  physically demanding.

It is unfortunate but retirement can make a senior citizen feel as if their  sense of independence is withering away. So, with all of the options available  to those planning vacations, senior citizens are more able to do things they  normally wouldn’t do; and are finding that their sense of independence can  return while they plan and enjoy their travels. Many are even planning vacations  with their families, which makes their travels more memorable for them as well  as their families. In some cases, these vacations are the only time they get to  spend a lot of time together. Some only see family on holidays so being able to  have family together in an exciting place is enticing more and more seniors to  planning travels all around the world. In today’s fast-paced society, even those  that are retired get caught up in the rat race so these vacations are a great  escape for seniors more so now than ever.

Next, by reading this you have come across a number of ways to find cheap senior travel. Click here for more senior citizens travel ideas!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Bruce_A._Hoover

 

The Senior in Senior Citizens Doesn’t Automatically Mean Senile by Jeanne Gibson

April 27, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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I am well aware that teenagers often think that people over thirty don’t know  anything. They are partially right—many of us don’t know much about  things that interest teenagers, and don’t really want to. But that’s not what I  meant by the title of this article.

When a group is formed at church or in some other organization, a Senior  Citizen is seldom asked to lead it. It is just assumed that they aren’t capable  of thinking clearly enough for such an important job.

If a senior citizen applies for a regular 9-5 job, he or she is not likely to  get it if there are other equally qualified applicants, or often some not as  qualified applicants.

Should a Senior Citizen choose to run for President, a major talking point  against him is his age. He is referred to as dottering, senile, not all there,  and/or suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. (Although, I don’t see how they could  prove that last point since even doctors admit that they have to examine a brain  after the patient has died to be sure of that diagnosis.)

Today, I was called “Hon,” at least 3 times by a clerk that waited on me in a  local store. Do you think she would have called a woman in her 30’s or 40’s  “Hon?” I don’t think so. Do we older people look like little children or  something?

Sometimes, when a older person loses a spouse or someone close to them, they  experience a temporary period of time during which they may appear to be  withdrawn and confused, but this is not limited to seniors. It is often used,  however, to take advantage of seniors.

Recently, an elderly relative of mine lost her husband, who left a legally  witnessed will, leaving everything to her, but, within a few weeks relatives  began to descend on her, claiming that “Dad,” or “Uncle,” or “Grandpa,” had  promised him or her a particular item.

His wife, still grieving, and a bit bewildered by it all, rather than risk  dishonoring a promise her husband may have made, handed over the items without  question. It was months later that she realized she had been the victim of  greed.

Even senior citizens are sometimes guilty of assuming another person is  senile just because of their age.

I overheard two older single men in a group I belonged to discussing a  lovely, but very quiet widow lady in our group. One suggested that the other  invite the lady in question to a movie, but the reply was, “No way. I think  she’s senile because she doesn’t say much. Besides, she’s too old for my taste.”  Neither man was under 70 and both were overweight and almost bald. They assumed  that this woman was senile without even knowing her. The truth is that she was  younger than either of them and her shyness kept her from talking much until she  got to know a person well.

Senior citizens are not all senile, as some people seem to think. True, many  are not quite as strong in body as they were a few years ago, but most still  have as much if not more wisdom than many younger people today. If you are  guilty of leaping to conclusions due to a person’s age, take another look. You  may be missing out on one of the very best relationships of your life.

Jeanne Gibson writes from her home in Springfield, Oregon on a variety of  subjects such as marriage, divorce, kids, cats, electric bikes, working from  home and senior citizen issues. To learn more about keeping your brain alert,  check out her blogpost at: http://sowingseedsthatmatter.blogspot.com/2010/07/perk-up-old-brain-cells.html

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jeanne_Gibson

 

Why You Deserve Senior Citizens Employment by Raymond Angus

April 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Are you a senior, and are you actively searching for senior citizens  employment? Before you answer, think about it.

Sure you say! I have in mind just the kind of job I want to get and I even  know the names of some companies and individuals I want to work for.

Bravo! But have you done your real homework? Are you convinced, really  convinced, that you’re the best qualified person to walk away from a job  interview with a senior citizens employment offer in your pocket?

Have you prepared for every job interview? Actually visualized going through  the process of anticipating your answers to questions that will probably arise?  Why, you ask? I know what I’m going to say.

While there is such a thing as over preparation. Far worse than that is the  opposite result, lack of practice. Let me tell you a story!

Many years ago, back in the middle of the last century, one of the greatest  batters in professional baseball was a tall, lean fellow named Ted Williams. He  was a super star, even before the description was used.

One day, early in the morning, even as the sun was just coming up, another  ball player who was sharing a hotel room with Williams on a road trip woke  up.

He saw Ted Williams in his pajamas standing in front of a full length mirror,  bat in hand watching his reflection swinging at imaginary pitches.

What are you doing, the fellow asked incredulously? Hitting home runs,  Williams answered taking another swing at an imaginary pitch.

Get the point? The best performing individual at any line of endeavor stays  on top with practice. Preparation and practice may begin with the same letter of  the alphabet, but they sure don’t mean the same thing.

You’ve taken your first step to nailing down your senior citizens employment.  You’ve selected the job of work that you absolutely want to have. You have also  taken the second key stride, you’ve made a list of several name businesses and  individuals you are going to contact and interview with.

Now, prepare your written and oral presentation, and then stand up in front  of your own personal mirror like Ted Williams did and make your delivery. And  then practice swinging the bat and hitting the imaginary ball again and again  until it becomes your second nature.

Visualize hitting your own home run, getting a bona fide senior citizens  employment offer.

Actually visualize yourself walking into the interviews one by one. Picture what you’re going to wear and rehearse your opening greeting. The wonderful thing about children at play is how real they get at make believe. Recapture make believe and really feel yourself at an employment interview.

A very important key point to remember is this. At the end of every  visualized job interview, see and hear yourself being offered actual  employment.

Make your personal senior citizens employment project the keystone of your  day, every day. It may take a while of time before it bears fruit. But it will  happen. You deserve success, you deserve seniors employment.

Raymond Angus is the best selling author of http://www.TheSeniorsLife.com. He writes about how seniors  find employment in today’s ever changing world. Are you a senior and do you want  tips on how to work and live in this bleak economy? Go to http://www.TheSeniorsLife.com and click on  employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Raymond_Angus

 

Senior Citizen Jobs – Great Opportunities Revealed by Abhishek Agarwal

April 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

It cannot be denied that some employees prefer to employ younger people. In  spite of this, job market researches have shown that senior citizens have a wide  range of job opportunities before them.

The following statistics reveal that the number of employers who realize the  potentials of senior citizens, and the benefits of employing them, is on the  rise.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics has shown that from August 1989 to August  2003, the positions of over 380,000 employees aged between 15 and 24 were  replaced by senior citizens. To explain the point further, when a large number  of Australia’s younger workers left their jobs to become full-time students,  their employers preferred to employ older people in their stead.

More than 500,000 employees in Netherlands are aged 55 and above, and the  number has been steadily rising since 1995.

Competing with the Younger Generation

In order to compete with the younger generation, a senior job seeker has to  take the following factors into consideration.

When you are preparing your resume, emphasise on your accomplishments,  without seeming to brag about them. You have one advantage over the younger  applicants and, that is, your experience, along with a list of achievements and  posts held over a long period of time.

Your work history is just as important as your personality. Employers have a  tendency to notice gaps in employment when a person has been unemployed;  however, they also emphasize on how long a person has served each of his or her  previous employers.

Refresh and enhance your skills by reading voraciously and enrolling in a  variety of programs that will improve your expertise. Keep in touch with the  latest developments and trends in your particular field of service.

Continuously research the Internet for fresh opportunities. Several agencies  place advertisements on the Internet, especially stressing their preference for  senior citizens. The availability of a number of search engines and job sites  will definitely make your job easier.

Best Jobs for Senior Citizens

Here is a list of opportunities that do not focus on the applicants age.

Specialized jobs: For example, people applying for the position of a doctor  are hired on the basis of experience and not age.

Lecturers or speakers: Senior citizens are paid to speak on a topic of their  expertise, and here, age does not really matter. What matters, however, is  qualification, knowledge, and experience.

Writers: A writer’s age is irrelevant. All that is required for novelists,  playwrights, or children’s writers is an excellent hold over language. Moreover,  they can work in peace and comfort from their own houses,  a real bonus for  those who are advanced in years.

Abhishek is an expert at conducting interviews and he has got some great  Interview Success Secrets [http://www.Career-Guru.com/4/index.htm] up his  sleeves! Download his FREE 82 Pages Ebook, “How To Ace Any Interview”  from his website [http://www.Career-Guru.com/4/index.htm]. Only limited Free  Copies available.

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Senior Citizen Homes by David Stillwagon

April 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As the birth rate continues to go down in most of the world the senior  citizens population as a percentage of the total population is increasing. One  of the main reasons is health care that is geared toward older folks and the  increasing awareness of making the most of your later years. Not only are senior  citizens staying active they are also involved in their community and where they  want to reside. Senior citizens homes and apartments have become an important  issue in this country and others.

What are the issues facing senior citizens regarding where they live?

If you are an older person or couple and your children have left the house  then you might feel as though your present home is a little too big and you want  to down size. Of course it would be a tough decision not only for you but also  for your children. They probably don’t want to see you sell the house where they  grew up in and had so many memories. But you find that it is just too big for  the two of you now and taking care of the house and a lawn might be more than  you can handle.

Finding a home that is affordable, comfortable and one that meets your needs  can be a job for anyone no matter what age group you are in. The major indicator  of which house you choose is probably the price of the house. This is especially  true if you are a retiree living on a fixed income, you know what you can afford  and what you can’t. Unfortunately some of the houses that you may have thought  ideal were probably out of your pricing range.

Selling a house can be a real hassle whether the economy is good or bad. And  if you are in the market for a home it makes it twice as bad. But you have to  take your time find the house that is just right for you. Are there enough  bedrooms and bathrooms, is there room if you have overnight guest? And what  about that yard, is the right size to take care of?

It’s not only the house that you have to think about it is also the  neighborhood. What is the crime rate? Are the other houses in the neighborhood  taken care of? How close are you to your doctors and a hospital?

Finding senior citizen homes and apartments is a worthy task that takes time  and effort to achieve.

David Stillwagon blogs about health and age issues such as senior citizen homes

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Jobs for Senior Citizens – A Few Things to Think About by Thomas Freers

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Jobs for senior citizens are very popular among those who want to be active  even after retirement. However, are there any opportunities really available for  such people? There are quite a lot of jobs available but you will have to be  very careful about the option you select and will have to think twice before  taking any decisions. Depending on your professional profile you will be able to  find an opportunity that will be suitable for you. This would be a great way to  earn a living and be active even after retiring from your regular job.

Select an Opportunity that is Suitable for You

One of the most important things about jobs for senior citizens is that you  will have to find something that you really like to do. The first and the most  crucial step in the direction is to specify your particular needs and wants  before you actually go ahead and start looking. Whether you want to select  something that is completely different than the job you had been doing for all  these years or finding something in the same industry is another factor that you  will have to think about. You will also have to think about how much time you  would be comfortable working for. Thinking about all of these factors will  ensure that you find something that you would be comfortable with in the long  run.

A Few Things to Think About

Given below are a few things that you must think about before you go for jobs  for senior citizens:

• Your financial goals and the amount that you wish to make working.

• The abilities and the skills that you enjoy using now.

• The type of skills that you no longer wish to use

• Skills that may be transposed in a different field or industry

• Any special talents that you may not have used before but may be used  now

• Any personal project that you may have in mind that you may want to  achieve.

Opportunities Available

For senior citizens the possible job opportunities include freelance work,  sales representative, financial advisory, school brigadier, bus driver, student  tutor, community teacher, mentor, coach or teacher, horticulture, gardening and  retail trade adviser. All of these jobs will give you the chance to do something  that you really like doing. Working after retirement is all about personal  fulfillment rather than financial requirements. For this reason it would be  important for you to find a job that will provide you immense satisfaction. With  so many jobs for senior citizens available today you will definitely be able to  find something useful.

You must learn more about Jobs for  Senior Citizens and other marketing secrets.Thomas Freers is an Online  Marketing Coach for what is arguably the World’s Largest Internet Marketing  School available today. He specializes in Article Marketing, Social Media  networking and various other marketing strategies and works with small and large  companies to help them customize their marketing campaigns. With over 50  different marketing strategies available today you must learn which one suits  your personality. To learn more about Thomas Freers and to see more effective  principles to explode your Internet business to create big profits and get  results go to http://www.earn-1k-a-day-for-life.com

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Senior Citizens Assisted Living Options by Sean Lightfoot

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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A recent study on seniors has shown that independent senior citizens assisted  living is the #1 choice for them versus living with a loved one. Most people  feel that living with others would cause them to be a burden on them. As an  individual grows older, they begin to need the assistance of others more and  more.

Unlike a decade ago, seniors have become a part of the information age by  learning about computers and the latest gadgets. Due to this fact, there has be  a flux of new state-of-the-art senior facilities catering to computer savvy  seniors.

Many of the senior citizens that have just retired from jobs that required  them to work with computers prefer to continue to be around computers as they  have become accustomed. Senior citizens assisted living facilities that make a  point to stay up to date, helps those seniors feel right at home.

In recent years senior facilities have began to offer many different options  and services to their residents. So much so that these facilities are now  categorized into 3 major groups.

Nursing Homes – For those that are incapacitated and/or require supervised or  administered medicines. These facilities have full-time medical staff on hand in  case of emergencies.

Assisted Living – This type of facility caters to those that need assistance  with their daily routines such as cleaning, shopping, laundry and cooking.

Independent Living – Independent living is good for those that can live  totally independent and is still able to cook and clean. Some seniors start out  by moving to one of these facilities and relocate as their needs change later  on. The units are usually fully furnished apartments with full kitchens.

There are many more options available to seniors so it is highly advised that  one turns to a professional advisor to assist in seeking the facility and  services that are needed. There are professionals that offer these services free  of charge. They give you a list of facilities that can cater to your needs and  help with visiting and checking out each of them. They usually make money from  your insurance company of the facility that is chosen.

If you need help with researching Senior Citizen Assisted Living  [http://www.elderlyhelpandhomes.com/], visit www.elderlyhelpandhomes.com  [http://www.elderlyhelpandhomes.com/]. Learn about a FREE program that assists  in finding the services that you or your loved one may needs.

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Where Are Senior Citizens Job Opportunities? by Raymond Angus

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Are There Really Senior Citizens Job Opportunities Out There?

Are you a senior, and have you convinced yourself that there aren’t any more  senior citizens job opportunities lurking in the underbrush these days, let  alone walking down main street U.S.A.? Do you subscribe to the notion that all  senior citizens job opportunities are now being grabbed up by smooth  complexioned youngsters that don’t remember a world with Ted Williams and Frank  Sinatra in it doing their thing?

Wake up! Look around you. Sure the economy is in some pretty sorry straits,  but this kind of down turn has happened numerous times throughout history and  men and women have all survived it. There are real, honest to goodness senior  citizens job opportunities out there right now needing someone with your unique  talents and skills to fill them. You’re right. Maybe you don’t know where the  senior job openings are. But they don’t know where you are either and they’re  sure not going to come knocking on your door while you’re watching TV soap  operas.

You have to stand up straight and tell yourself your new mantra. I am  proactive. Write it on a piece of paper and stick it on your refrigerator with  one of those little magnet gizmos made for such things. Things don’t happen to  you, you’re now going to take charge of your senior citizens job opportunities  search and make things happen. Sit down at your table or desk, grab a tablet of  paper and a pen and make a list of five topics. Understand that first of all  this is your personal work sheet and is not available for public consumption.  It’s not a resume or a pitch for employment. This is your outline for a  proactive battle plan to find the perfect employment for you.

1. What kind of job do you really want. Don’t list employment that you  suspect is available. Write down what you really and truly want to do.

2. List the jobs that you’ve actually held during your life. Did you deliver  newspapers as a kid? Write it down and decipher the skills needed later.

3. List the jobs you actually performed for past employers. If you cleaned  floors, washed windows, ran machinery, waited on customers, kept records; list  them, they are building blocks for your action plan.

4. How did your personal activities at each employer affect the overall  operation of the business?

5. This is a tough one and it will require giving some clarity of thought.  Why did you leave each job? If you were terminated, it would be best to be less  than forthright.

You’re not finished yet. Make a list of your hobbies. Don’t laugh! Think  about it. Do you like bowling or fishing? How about gardening? Can you imagine  the skills you’ve amassed from these endeavors, let alone the factual knowledge  related to them. Are you a guy and do you do some of your automobile work  yourself.

Think about all of this and then contact employers that would find your  skills invaluable. Most important! There are senior citizens job opportunities  all over the landscape. But only go after the ones your actually would enjoy  doing.

Be proactive! After all is said and done, getting a job is in your hands  alone.

Raymond Angus is the best selling author of http://www.TheSeniorsLife.com. He writes about how seniors  find employment in today’s ever changing world. Are you a senior and do you want  tips on how to work and live in this bleak economy? Go to http://www.TheSeniorsLife.com and click on  employment.

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Senior Citizens – Burdened With Grief and Anger by Jessie Penn

April 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Grief and anger often becomes a heavy burden for people as they age. Throughout life, people experience grief over many things. They grieve if there home burns down, lose a job or a pet. However, an area of loss that is not usually considered with grief is the physical decline during the aging process.

Grief can be detected, in seniors, by the comments they make about losing their youth. Many times, they speak with remorse at lost youth, decreased functionality, and body strength. When a senior citizen notices they are losing muscle strength, or begin experiencing arthritis, stiffness, and joint pain, it’s not unusual to notice anger. They become upset and wish to escape the betrayals of their bodies, and become very angry in the process.

No one asks to get old or feeble. Most likely, if we had a choice, most of us would vote to discontinue and ban getting old. A person might grieve when they are bestowed the title of “Senior Citizen.” At first, a senior citizen, might not notice the changes that are taking place in the physical aspects of the body or the mind. And, perhaps, as much as they hate the thought of getting old, family members also grieve about losing the ‘young’ mom or dad they once knew.

Unfortunately, getting angry about growing old has no escape; there’s no one to blame it on. So, sometimes the result is that seniors lash out at the ones closest to them. Anger and frustration with the aging body can cause tempers to rage or flare up unexpectedly. Many times, a senior lashes out at a loved one or caregiver because they are nearby and easily accessible. The aging person knows it isn’t fair, but may have a hard time explaining their actions.

Learning how to cope with anger about aging is necessary so you don’t hurt the innocent ones around you. But, it is also unhealthy to keep your grief bottled up inside you. If seniors are not allowed to vent and get rid of their anger, the body can decline at a faster rate.

It’s been suggested that people become angry because they feel a false sense of entitlement. This crops up when expectations do not line up with reality. A feeling of undo entitlement happens when we believe we do not deserve to get old.

There is just one way to confront getting older, and that is to recognize that we are not alone, everyone will get old, and we are not entitled to be exempt from the aging process. Recognizing this fact can help to eliminate anger from the arena as we cope with the affects of aging.

Attempting to deny the advance of life’s end, is probably the sole cause of midlife crisis’s. Trying to behave as if they are not getting older and hiding emotional responses to aging can cause devastating results. Avoiding the feelings about aging has caused many to act irresponsibility or make bad decisions.

By recognizing the problems that naturally happen through aging, some of the anger can be avoided. Instead of dwelling on declining abilities, senior citizens can minimize the impacts by living with a healthier attitude toward aging.

Focusing on your diet, exercise, keeping busy, and doing everything you can to stay rested and emotionally sound. Thinking about or getting involved with other people can help to create a healthier attitude toward aging and minimize its effects.

Try to keep your spirits up, be happy through achievements and seemingly small enjoyments. Keep a young at heart attitude and get in touch with the child inside you. You’ve come too far, traveled many winding paths, and you deserve to feel content and happy. Emotions about how you feel about yourself can play a major role in the person you choose to be as a senior citizen.

Get free information to protect your loved ones when a medical emergency or security treat happens. Go to http://personalsecuritydevices.walkinsarewelcome.com

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The Benefits of Becoming a Senior Citizen by Rahmat Suki

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Most people hate or dislike the fact that in the years to come, they will be  living the second half of their lives as an old man or as an old woman. Being  old has been stereotyped to becoming ugly, slow, weak and isolated. But this is  not the reality at all times; some people grow old without the comfort of their  loved ones or even the care of other concerned citizens, but most of us have the  privilege to stay with our families and loved ones as we grow older each day.  Aging has its own disadvantages and unpleasant consequences, but there are a lot  of privileges being given to a senior citizen. The benefits that you can derive  from growing old are truly valuable and can help you deal better with aging.

To be considered as a senior citizen, one must reach the age of sixty-five in  the United States or depending on the age stated on the laws of a country. The  age of becoming a senior citizen is also considered as the retirement age for  professionals who have dedicated themselves to their work. Every month, there  are over one million people who turn sixty-five and imagine the fraction of the  population that belongs to this age group. By the time you have reached this  age, you are qualified for numerous benefits exclusive.

In the official context, a senior citizen is a term used for legal and  policy-related causes in verifying individuals who are eligible for specific  benefits to the age group. Some of the benefits of aging include caregivers  resources, consumer protection for seniors, education, jobs, and volunteerism  for seniors, end-of-life issues, federal and state agencies for seniors, health  for seniors, housing for seniors, laws and regulations concerning seniors, money  and taxes for seniors, retirement and travel and recreation for seniors. Even  for those seniors who are raising their own grandchildren have corresponding  benefits for doing so. Becoming old is not entirely full of detriments.

Senior citizen is a responsibility of every community. Every country has  responded to the needs of their graying population and being a senior citizen  means that you have fulfilled your role in your own community.

Do visit [http://www.agingpeople.net] to find out more FREE tips and secrets  of Anti-aging solutions.

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Opportunity Village Hosted “All-Star Celebrity Apprentice” Viewing Party OVIPs enjoyed show featuring Penn Jillette as Project Manager

April 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 


Opportunity Village Hosted “All-Star Celebrity Apprentice” Viewing Party OVIPs enjoyed show featuring Penn Jillette as Project Manager

LAS VEGAS , Nev. – Opportunity Village , Las Vegas ’ favorite charity, hosted a viewing party at its Engelstad Campus for an episode of “All-Star Celebrity Apprentice.” The episode featured longtime Opportunity Village supporter and board member, Penn Jillette acting as Project Manager. Jillette and his team won the week’s task and Jillette was awarded two $20,000 checks for Opportunity Village .   “We are extremely grateful to Penn and The Apprentice. The money raised in this episode for Opportunity Village will help assist the nearly 3,000 OVIPs we serve each year,” stated Linda Smith, Associate Executive Director of Opportunity Village . “We can’t wait to continue watching this season and everyone at our organization, including our OVIPs, are rooting for him, along with the rest of Las Vegas !”

OV_Photo 1

Opportunity Village supporter and board member Penn Jillette presented his “All-Star Celebrity Apprentice” winnings to Associate Executive Director of Opportunity Village , Linda Smith. Jillette is once again competing on “Celebrity Apprentice” on behalf of Opportunity Village and recently won $40,000 for the charity.

OV_Photo 2

 

 

 

 

 

Penn Jillette, longtime supporter of Opportunity Village , visited the organization’s Engelstad Campus to present two checks totaling $40,000 that he won for the charity by participating in “All-Star Celebrity Apprentice.” Jillette’s visit to Opportunity Village aired on the Apr. 14 episode of “All-Star Celebrity Apprentice.”

OV_Photo 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

OVIPs cheered on longtime Opportunity Village supporter and board member, Penn Jillette at a viewing party for “All-Star Celebrity Apprentice” held on Thursday, Apr. 11.

ABOUT OPPORTUNITY VILLAGE MISSION Opportunity Village is a not-for-profit organization that serves people within our community with significant intellectual disabilities, to improve their lives and the lives of their families. Opportunity Village was founded in 1954 by seven families who were determined to give their disabled children the best lives possible. 59 years later, Opportunity Village is one of the most recognized and respected Community Rehabilitation Programs in the United States . Nevada ’s largest employer of people with disabilities, Opportunity Village serves more than 3,000 individuals annually, providing vocational training, employment, habilitation and social recreation programs and services that make their lives more productive and interesting.   Opportunity Village citizens – individuals who were previously considered unemployable – work at Opportunity Village’s Employment Resource Centers and in jobs throughout the community, collectively earning wages amounting to more than $7.6 million in 2012.  They are hard-working and diligent, proudly paying taxes and happily leading more fulfilling lives.   Primarily a self-funded organization, Opportunity Village generates the majority of its operational funding through its employment contracts and fundraising efforts such as the Magical Forest and Great Santa Run, saving Nevada taxpayers $33.7 million.

Senior Citizens Can See The World With Travel Insurance By W Scott

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Retirement age can be the golden age of your life! Your children have grown  up and are independent. You do not have a full-time job. There is nothing  holding you back. This is the time of your life to fulfill all your dreams of  traveling the world! There is virtually nothing holding you back!

Know The Ins And Outs Of Travel Insurance

Senior citizen travel insurance is vitally important when planning any trip.  A travel insurance policy helps to protect you against unforeseen circumstances,  such as trip cancellations. There are numerous travel insurance firms that offer  great packages for senior citizens who are 65 and older. There are even policies  these days that provide for those who are 50 and above.

Senior citizen travel insurance is provided in two formats; annual travel or  single trip coverage. Annual travel is ideal for individuals who take a variety  of vacations over the course of the year. Single trip coverage is, as the name  implies, for a single travel event. Coverage details vary from company to  company. Receive quotes from several different travel insurance companies.  Compare each policy in detail to find the one that suits individual needs at an  affordable price.

Choose An All Inclusive Travel Insurance Package

Senior citizen travel insurance packages provide overall coverage for low  risk individuals. A good senior citizen travel insurance package will include  coverage for luggage theft or loss. Some packages also provide cover for medical  costs, including medical assistance or emergency services, which may be incurred  while on holiday.

Be sure to review your travel insurance policy in full. Ensure that you  understand every aspect of your travel plan. It must provide full financial  protection for any mishap that occurs while on holiday.

Look Before You Leap!

It is always wise to carefully review each portion of a senior citizen travel  insurance policy. Do not feel rushed. Do not feel intimidated or overwhelmed.  This is an entitled right when reviewing any insurance policy. A travel  insurance policy is no different. Ensure each portion of the policy pertains to  individual travel coverage needs. In the event that it does not, move on to  another insurance policy or insurance agency.

An often unmentioned fact about insurance policies is that the document is  considered a legal agreement. This means that in a court of law the terms and  conditions presented in the policy are legally binding. Obtain clarification of  anything that is not easily understood up front. Ask as many questions as  necessary until all aspects of the travel insurance policy are clear. Anything  not understood should be clarified by an insurance agent. If an agent is not  willing to do so, simply find one who will.

Senior citizen travel insurance is not intended to restrict travel  intentions. Rather, it is a sound financial decision providing protection and  peace of mind for senior citizens. With policy in hand, a senior citizen is  ready to explore the four corners of the world.

William Scott has authored a number of articles on holiday insurance. His site http://HolidayInsuranceTips.com, offers further  information on selecting the right senior citizen travel insurance  [http://www.holidayinsurancetips.com/category/senior-citizen-travel-insurance]

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Who Wants to Be a Senior Citizen? By Lynn Dorman, Ph.D.

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Funny, people want to be Senior Product Managers and Senior  Developers, but who wants to be a Senior Citizen? Sarah E. Bourne

 

Often, the very same word or words, in differing contexts, have very  different meaning. The word Senior when used in industry, medicine, research, or  municipal agencies, means a higher-level job, higher income, or a more  prestigious position. Even being, or becoming, a High School Senior is an  admired level of life.

Yet that same word, senior, or the words Senior Citizen, when applied to  people over 65 is all too often seen as derogatory.

Why? How did the word senior get to be seen as so negative for just this one  group?

Some random thoughts on this issue:

Was the negativity because of some feelings the younger persons had about the  use of “their” terminology to describe “old folks”?

Those using the word senior to describe their own achievements [Senior  Associate, Senior Resident, Senior Analyst, etc.] may have felt that using the  word for older persons denigrated it’s use for them?

Was Senior Citizen at one time also meant to imply higher status or was it  always “negative”

Using the Internet, it seems the term Senior Citizen was first used in 1938  in the United States – but the word senior was used “way back when” in reference  to the father of a son with the same name [i.e. Senior and Junior]

In 1938, the life expectancy of that Senior Citizen was approximately 75ish.  The life expectancy of a person who is 65 now [2010] is approximately 80ish. Add  to this that we now live more healthy older lives; it may be that in the early  1940’s the term was used to describe a person who was unhealthier or more frail  than that 65-year-old is today.

And so the term may have become a negative one as it might have been  describing in reality what we now see as stereotypical thinking about seniors.  Back then these descriptions [frail, sick, bent over] may have been more  accurate for the then senior citizen cohorts.

But – getting back to today: The term Senior citizen needs to be itself  “retired” or there needs to be a move to bring this term into the positive realm  of those other “senior” labels.

It’s probably easier to work at changing the connotation than it is at  deleting the words – they have been part of our popular vocabulary for too  long.

So – here’s to making it as prestigious to be Senior Citizens as it is to be  Senior Product Managers or Senior Developers!

Please go to http://growolderbetter.com and let’s have a discussion about  making Senior Citizen an honorable title!

We can chat about other aging topics as well…

From Lynn Dorman, Ph.D. who at 70 is fighting stereotypes as she skis, bikes  and hikes – and writes about active healthy “older” persons – no matter what  they are labeled.

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Should You Send Your Elders to a Senior Citizen Home? By Cindy Heller

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Asking your elders to move to a senior citizen home can be a very complicated situation. Most elders dislike the idea as they prefer to stay at their old home. If the elders are suffering from Alzheimer’s, it may make the situation much simpler as their memory has lost gradually. In normal condition, it is often for children to enroll their parents or grandparents in one of these places under terrible feelings of guilt.

Unfortunately, sometimes senior citizen housing is the only choice that you have. You cannot leave your parents or grandparents alone at home where they may endanger themselves. There is no one who can take care of them or assist them as they start needing help to do certain activities that they used to be able to do by themselves. Many accidents have happened because people keep leaving their elders alone at home although they know that those elderly people cannot take care of themselves as they used to be.

The positive aspects of senior citizen home

When we pass our prime time and start becoming seniors, it can be a frustrating experience, especially if we need others to help us to do certain things. In today’s fast-paced world, it is common that children do not have enough time to take care of parents. Children are busy with works and other social events that they need to attend so they leave their elderly parents at home.

A good senior citizen home can be the solution for this issue. You can place your elders in one of these places so they will have experienced staffs to take care of them. Another positive aspect is that they will not be lonely because they can have a social life with other people of their own age. Senior citizen home also offers regular activities to its residents to avoid monotonous life. Loneliness is one of the most common problems for elders and this facility may have the answer for their problem.

The negative aspects of senior citizen home

If you think back how your parents have taken care of you when you were only a small boy, it is hard not to do the same thing for them. It can be a traumatic experience for the whole family to place their elders into one of these senior citizen homes. In addition, many elders, even if they cannot take care of themselves properly anymore, prefer to stay home and welcome death rather than moving into a senior citizen home. Therefore, in many occasion, children force their elders to move.

This is indeed a dilemmatic situation as it seems that elders do not have any rights anymore and they are being lowered to an object. Some elders feel that they are helpless and unloved, which is not the way people should feel for their remaining lives.

What alternatives that you have?

If you do not want to place your elders in a senior citizen home, you have a couple other alternatives. You can hire an au pair for your elders. You should understand that many au pairs come from developing countries so you will not be surprised when you try to find one. An au pair is a good addition to your household as she can help with daily activities of elders, such as preparing meals, serving, and bathing.

Hiring a geriatric care nurse, either part time or full time, is another alternative that you can consider. For both alternatives, you should make sure that you choose the right person who has experiences in taking care of elders and has compassion in doing her job. These alternatives can answer your problem so you do not need to place your elders in a senior citizen home.

Cindy Heller is a professional writer. Visit Senior Home Plan to learn more about senior citizen retirement home.

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What Kinds of Job Opportunities Are There For Senior Citizens? By Stephen Chua

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Because of improved health and the desire to stay active more and more senior citizens are looking for job opportunities. Certainly because of this the job market for those that are now over 50 is improving. Certainly projections are showing that by 2010 senior citizens will make up 1/3 of the entire workforce in the United States. So just what types of senior citizens job opportunities are there available to them?

In this article we take a look at a number of different opportunities that are available for senior citizens. Although it can be quite intimidating for anyone who has been out of work for sometime finding a new job there are now employment resources specially dedicated to helping senior citizens make the transition back into the job market. There are many Governmental, private and public organizations which provide assistance to senior citizens in relation to career guidance, education, job training, job placement and resume and interview skills.

However there are some job opportunities available for senior citizens which need little or no qualifications in order to do them.

1. Baby Sitting

Unfortunately there are lots of children out there who do not have Grandparents. Certainly more and more parents would be happy to leave their children with a more experienced and mature senior than a 14 year old. It is quite easy to get set up just place an advert on your local supermarket bulletin board, home owner’s association newsletter or at your church. You will soon be amazed at the responses you will get.

2. House Sitting

Many people are now traveling to see their children or friends. So these people will spend long times away from their home and there are plenty of opportunities now for senior citizens to offer their services as house sitters. Many people will know that their homes will be well cared for by such people.

As you can see from above no longer do senior citizen’s need to stay at home and wile away the hours doing nothing. There are plenty of senior citizens job opportunities available. So why not contact your local senior citizen group or one of the employment resource centers that have been specifically set up to find employment for those senior citizens who want to do more with their lives.

For more information to seniors living [http://seniorselderly.com], please visit [http://seniorselderly.com]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Stephen_Chua

Sierra Club Responds to NV Energy Proposal for Retiring Coal Plants

April 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Carson City, Press-Media Releases 

Sierra Club Responds to NV Energy Proposal for Retiring Coal Plants

Coal retirements promising but questions remain on mix of renewables, energy efficiency, and gas

Carson City – A proposal being rolled out by NV Energy today in the state legislature would set new retirement dates for Nevada’s coal plants, including speeding up retirement of the controversial Reid Gardner plant. The legislation also increases new renewable energy and allows NV Energy to build several new gas plants.

In response, the Sierra Club Energy Task Force issued the following statement:

The Sierra Club welcomed news of NV Energy’s intention to retire the Reid Gardner coal plant by 2017 and to end its contract with Navajo Generating Station’s coal-fired power by 2019. The Club also expressed support for adding new renewable energy projects to replace some of the coal power.

“With this legislation, NV Energy unequivocally acknowledges that Nevada wants and needs to leave coal behind. Closing the Reid Gardner coal plant would clean up Nevada’s air pollution and reduce health risks for thousands of Nevadans,” said Jane Feldman, Sierra Club state Energy Task Force chair. “We strongly support closing that plant and fully cleaning up the site, including the polluted lands, air and water near the Moapa Band of Paiutes’ Moapa River Reservation.”

“Replacing that coal power with renewable energy will create jobs for Nevadans and a better future for our children. We are pleased to see additional renewable energy called for in this bill,” said Feldman.

However, Sierra Club said that concerns remain over NV Energy’s proposals to build new natural gas plants and suggested that more emphasis on energy efficiency and renewable energy is needed. “Energy efficiency can put money right back into the pockets of consumers every month,” said Feldman. “And if we build more renewable energy, costs remain stable for decades because the fuel costs for solar, wind and geothermal are free,” she continued.

Sierra Club is continuing to study the bill and will provide detailed input to the legislature as these proposals move forward.

SLCC Joins National Program to Train Baby Boomers for Jobs

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Salt Lake Community College was recently chosen to join the Plus 50 Encore Completion Program, a national effort to train 10,000 baby boomers for new jobs in healthcare, education and social services. The program is sponsored by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC).

The College will assist adults age 50 and over in completing degrees or certificates in high-demand occupations that give back to the community. With many adults age 50 and over out of work or seeking to transition to a new career, the program offers skill updates and career makeovers. Salt Lake Community College will prepare older adults for careers such as pharmacy or ultrasound technicians and medical terminology specialists. In addition, the College’s Transition to Teaching program is offered in partnership with the State Office of Education to prepare students as elementary and secondary educators.

“The Plus 50 Encore Completion Program represents a meaningful, national validation of the work the College’s Division of Continuing Education has undertaken. The program will support individuals who want to design a second career—either out of practical necessity or personal interest,” said Jennifer Saunders, Associate Dean of Continuing Education. “People returning for education and training at this stage of their lives are building on rich employment histories, valuable interpersonal skills, and knowledge achieved through experiential learning. These resources are then being coupled with the most current workforce education.”

The program will be implemented utilizing a variety of strategies, including accelerated classes, flexible scheduling and cohort models, which provide groups of students with similar goals an opportunity to move through a program together.

Since 2008, AACC and its network of Plus 50 Initiative colleges have worked with baby boomers to help them prepare for new careers. An independent evaluation of AACC’s Plus 50 Initiative found that 89 percent of students agreed that college work force training helped them acquire new job skills, and 72 percent attributed landing a job to such training.
“Many adults age 50 and over want to train for new jobs that help others and are hiring, but they need to update their skills. Community colleges offer a supportive environment where baby boomers can train for new jobs quickly and affordably,” said Mary Sue Vickers, director for the Plus 50 Initiative at AACC.

In addition to grant funds to augment training programs, participating colleges gain access to toolkits and extensive marketing resources tailored to reach baby boomers. They’ll also benefit from the advice and support of staff at other community colleges that have successfully implemented programs for older learners and understand the unique needs of the plus 50 student population.

The Plus 50 Encore Completion Program is funded with a $3.2 million grant to AACC provided by Deerbrook Charitable Trust—supporting AACC’s work to increase the number of students who finish degrees, certificates, and other credentials. In April 2010, AACC committed alongside other higher education organizations, to promote the development and implementation of policies, practices and institutional cultures that will produce 50 percent more students with high quality degrees and certificates by 2020.

While the AACC Encore Completion Program focuses on serving the Plus 50 population, Salt Lake Community College welcomes anyone interested in making a career transition to learn more about the broad range of training opportunities available at: www.slcccontinuinged.com.

For more information about the Plus 50 Initiative at AACC, see: http://plus50.aacc.nche.edu.

The Encore Institute at Salt Lake Community College is an innovative program designed for adult learners who want to expand their knowledge through career and personal enrichment courses. The Institute offers flexible class scheduling, non-degree and degree learning experiences and affordable training to deepen or expand the personal and professional skills of students.

The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) is a national organization representing close to 1,200 community, junior and technical colleges nationwide. Community colleges are the largest and fastest growing sector of higher education, enrolling more than 13 million credit and non-credit students annually. More information is available at: http://aacc.nche.edu.

About the College: Salt Lake Community College is an accredited, student-focused, urban college meeting the diverse needs of the Salt Lake community. Home to more than 62,000 students each year, the College is the largest supplier of workforce development programs in the State of Utah. The College is the sole provider of applied technology courses in the Salt Lake area, with 13 sites, an eCampus, and nearly 1,000 continuing education sites located throughout the Salt Lake valley. Personal attention from an excellent faculty is paramount at the College, which maintains a student-to-teacher ratio of less than 20 to 1.

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts March 2013 Calendar Of Events

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts March 2013 Calendar Of Events

495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101
Contact: Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993 Feb. 11, 2013
Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org
City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Spring Class Registration at Charleston Heights Arts Center (ages 2-adult)
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
March 1-April 3 registration for 7- to 8-week session of classes April 3-May 24.
Offered courses include ballet, jazz, hip hop, ballroom dancing, visual arts and private lessons in music and dance by appointment. For more information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org. Register for classes at www.artslasvegas.org/classes/register.htm beginning March 1.

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Spring Drama Class Registration (ages 4-17)
Registration Opens March 1 for 7-week class sessions that begin the week of April 3.
Cost: Fees range from $49 to $70.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
To register or for more information, call (702) 229-6553 or 229-6383, or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m.
Admission: $4 dollars per person per week at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of fun learning international dance styles, including Arabic, Armenian, Bulgarian, Chinese, Greek, Israeli, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian and Turkish folk dances. No need to bring a partner. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Contra Dances (ages 8+)
Saturdays, March 2 and 23. Group lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7 to 10 p.m.
Admission: $10 adults; $5 members, students & military; $3 children under 16 & non-dancers; pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance to a live acoustic band playing joyful fiddle tunes, driving reels and a waltz or two. All dances are taught and called; newcomers and families welcome. No need to bring a partner. Wear comfortable flat-soled shoes and casual clothing. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.
Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Auditions for “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale”
Saturday, March 2, 2013, 1 p.m.
No fee to audition.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Auditions for the Rainbow Company musical production of “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale” will start promptly at 1 p.m. Roles are available for ages 12 through adult. Comfortable clothes that allow for movement should be worn and a prepared song is strongly recommended. The show will be performed April 26-May 5. For more information, call 229-6553.

“The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle” presented by Target and ArtsPower (all ages)
Saturday, March 9, 10:30 a.m.
Cost: $3 general admission.
Historic Fifth Street School Auditorium, 401 S. 4th Street, 229-3515.
ArtsPower’s “The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle” tells the uplifting story of an ordinary train that performs an extraordinary feat of strength and courage. The story follows the adventures of The Little Blue Engine, who dreams of someday pulling the Piney Vale Ex¬press just like her best friend Rusty. For tickets and information, call 229-3515 or 229-6469 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, March 9, 7 to 11 p.m. Dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Admission: $5 members, military and students ages 13-25; $10 for non-members. Pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St. (702) 229-6383.
Presented by USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. For more information, call (702) 813-6694 or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org.

Downtown Cultural Series – Bill & Kate Isles Concert (all ages)
Friday, March 15, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
Bring your lunch to enjoy a concert by Bill and Kate Isles, an acoustic singer/songwriter duo based in Duluth, Minn. They tour nationally, entertaining audiences with a wide variety of musical styles, catchy melodies and memorable songs. For more information, visit www.billandkateisles.com or www.artslasvegas.org, or call (702) 229-3515.

Poets’ Corner
Friday, March 15, 7 p.m.
Admission is free.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Hosted by Keith Brantley, this monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants features the best local poetry talent.

St. Patrick’s Day Dance (adults)
Saturday, March 16, 7 p.m.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Admission: $10 in advance; $15 event day.
It’s easy to be green! Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day early by dancing to songs from the 1940s- 70s, from swing and foxtrots to Latin and jazz, performed by the Carl Grove Combo.
For tickets or information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.
Women and Young Women’s Conference 2013 (ages 14+)
“The Spirit Of A Woman…Body & Soul”
Saturday, March 23, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Admission is free, but advance registration is required. Call (702) 229-4800 to register.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
This dynamic event will promote personal empowerment and mentorship, with a focus on sisterhood. The purpose of the event is to strengthen communication between women and young women, creating and enhancing opportunities for understanding. A series of specialized workshops will be offered throughout the day to benefit and assist women as they share, teach, and learn from each other. Participants are asked to wear comfortable active wear for the workshops. Each adult participant is encouraged to bring a young lady or mentee of high school age, friend, mom, sister, or aunt to the event. The event is cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District.

Spring II Class Registration at the West Las Vegas Arts Center (all ages)
March 23-April 6 registration for 6-week session of classes April 10-May 18.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Cultural arts classes include African Drum; African Dance for Children and African Dance for Teens/Adults; Keep it Moving…Ballet & Tap; Ballet–Beginner/Intermediate; Modern Dance; Hip Hop; Zumba; Tae Kwon Do; Video & Documentary Creation; Music Production; Arts & Crafts – Kids Create and Craft It Up; and Private Piano/Voice lessons. To register, or for more information, call (702) 229-4800 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Folk Celebration and Stage Performance (all ages)
Saturday, March 23, 12:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Admission: $10.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Admission includes a 2 p.m. theatre concert performance in the Jeanne Roberts Theatre, featuring international dance artist “Zarnia,” who specializes in Middle Eastern dances with elaborate costuming, musician RJ Fox playing Flamenco-style guitar accompanied by flamenco dancers, and talented Las Vegas Kaminari Taiko Drummers, a performance group affiliated with the Japanese American Citizens League. View demonstrations and information 12:30-1:45 p.m., take dance lessons 3:30-6:30 p.m. A concert ticket stub will provide half off admission to the Contra Dance at 6:30 p.m. A food vendor will be on site from 12:30 to 6 p.m. This event coincides with the 2013 National Folk Organization’s Las Vegas conference. For tickets or information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Rainbow Company Spring Break Drama Workshop (grades 2-6)
Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Cost: $135. Advance registration is required.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Students will enjoy five full days of drama, with a performance on the main stage Saturday, March 30. For information and registration, call 229-6553 or 229-6383 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Spring Break Dance Camp (ages 12-18)
Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 3:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Cost: $75. Advance registration is required. Registration opened Feb. 1.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dedicated young dancers will flourish within this weeklong intensive and disciplined atmosphere available to intermediate- and advanced-level students (or students with a minimum of one year of dance instruction). Instruction led by Jackie Koenig and Jennifer Kidder. Dance attire required; please bring snacks. A student demonstration for family and friends at 6:30 p.m. Friday will conclude the camp. To register or more information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.
Spring Break Arts Workshop (ages 10-18)
Wednesday-Friday, March 27-29, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Admission is free, but advanced registration is required.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
This will be a heritage development workshop, exploring traditions and discovering individualities. Call (702) 229-4800 for information and registration.

Life Skills & Job Readiness Workshop (ages 14-19)
Saturday, March 30, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Admission is free, but registration is required.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Life Skills Training is a dynamic, skills-based program that promotes health and personal development. It is designed for those facing the new roles and responsibilities of becoming young adults transitioning into the workplace. The workshop focuses on goal setting, communication, decision making, risk, and maintaining relationships. The program is cosponsored by Nevada Partners. For more information and registration, call (702) 924-2134.
Exhibitions

“Narratives of Progress”
Artist Armin Mühsam
Through March 16, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
About his work, Mühsam says, “My work focuses on the relationship between the natural and the human-built. I imagine the land after technology has rendered it nearly uninhabitable, despite its promises to create a better world. I paint the absence of humans but not of humanity — man-made, sterile landscapes after the disappearance of the natural.” For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

“African-American Heritage”
Artist Lolita Develay
Through April 18, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
Lolita Develay is a 2014 Master of Fine Arts candidate at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She lived in Hollywood, Calif., prior to moving to Las Vegas in 2008. Her works are well painted surfaces which reflect her interest in traditions of realism, often focusing on the intrigue of light acting on an object. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

“Sculptures in Glass”
Artists Larry Domsky and Barbara Domsky
Feb. 26-May 30, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Grand Gallery, 495 S. Main St., First floor, (702) 229-1012.
Glassworks designed and created by this husband-and-wife team will be displayed. The work will include newer pieces that fit the format and space of City Hall as well as pieces from their collection of glassworks. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.
Nevada Watercolor Society’s 2013 Signature Members’ Exhibit
Feb. 28-March 23, during the reception and by appointment.
Artists’ reception Feb. 28, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information about the city gallery programs, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org. More information about the Nevada Watercolor Society can be found at www.nvws.org/.

“Spirit Journeys”
Artist Rainer Bertrams
March 21-May 4, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Artist’s reception March 21, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The images will focus on meditative subjects and themes that explore human kind’s existential struggles for a universal understanding of human nature. For questions about this exhibit or the gallery program, call 229-1012 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

“Equinox”
March 28-June 8, during reception and by appointment only.
Artists’ reception March 28, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

No more “empty nest”: middle-aged adults face family pressure on both sides

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

The “empty nest” of past generations, in which the kids are grown up and middle-aged adults have more time to themselves, has been replaced in the United States by a nest that’s full – kids who can’t leave, can’t find a job and aging parents who need more help than ever before.

According to a new study by researchers at Oregon State University, what was once a life stage of new freedoms, options and opportunities has largely disappeared.

An economic recession and tough job market has made it hard on young adults to start their careers and families. At the same time, many older people are living longer, which adds new and unanticipated needs that their children often must step up to assist with.
The end result, researchers suggest, are “empty nest” plans that often have to be put on hold, and a mixed bag of emotions, ranging from joy and “happy-to-help” to uncertainty, frustration and exhaustion.

“We mostly found very positive feelings about adults helping their children in the emerging adulthood stage of life, from around ages 18 to 30,” said Karen Hooker, director of the OSU Center for Healthy Aging Research.

“Feelings about helping parents weren’t so much negative as just filled with more angst and uncertainty,” Hooker said. “As a society we still don’t socialize people to expect to be taking on a parent-caring role, even though most of us will at some point in our lives. The average middle-aged couple has more parents than children.”

The findings of this research were just published in the Journal of Aging Studies, and were based on data from six focus groups during 2009-10. It was one of the first studies of its type to look at how middle-aged adults actually feel about these changing trends.
Various social, economic, and cultural forces have combined to radically challenge the traditional concept of an empty nest, the scientists said. The recession that began in 2008 yielded record unemployment, substantial stock market losses, lower home values and increased demand for higher levels of education.

Around the same time, advances in health care and life expectancy have made it possible for many adults to live far longer than they used to – although not always in good health, and often needing extensive care or assistance.

This study concluded that most middle-aged parents with young adult children are fairly happy to help them out, and they understand that getting started in life is simply more difficult now. Some research has suggested that age 25 is the new 22; that substantially more parents now don’t even expect their kids to be financially independent in their early 20s, and don’t mind helping them through some difficult times.

But the response to helping adult parents who, at the same time, need increasing amounts of assistance is not as uniformly positive, the study found – it can be seen as both a joy and a burden, and in any case was not something most middle-aged adults anticipated.

“With the kids, it’s easy,” is a general purpose reaction. With aging parents, it isn’t.

“My grandparents died younger, so my parents didn’t cope with another generation,” one study participant said.

Many middle-aged people said it was difficult to make any plans, due to disruptions and uncertainty about a parent’s health at any point in time. And most said they we’re willing to help their aging parents, but a sense of being time-starved was a frequent theme.
“It brings my heart joy to be able to provide for my mom this way,” one study participant said. “There are times when it’s a burden and I feel resentful.”

The dual demands of children still transitioning to independence, and aging parents who need increasing amounts of care is causing many of the study participants to re-evaluate their own lives. Some say they want to make better plans for their future so they don’t pose such a burden to their children, and begin researching long-term care insurance. Soul-searching is apparent.

“I don’t care if I get old,” a participant said. “I just don’t want to become debilitated. So I would rather have a shorter life and a healthy life than a long life like my mom, where she doesn’t have a life. She doesn’t have memories. Our memories are what make us who we are.”

An increasing awareness of the challenges produced by these new life stages may cause more individuals to anticipate their own needs, make more concrete plans for the future, reduce ambivalent approaches and have more conversations with families about their own late-life care, the researchers said in their study.
About the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences: The College creates connections in teaching, research and community outreach while advancing knowledge, policies and practices that improve population health in communities across Oregon and beyond.

WestStar CU Converts Smiles to Cash for Opportunity Village

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Las Vegas, Nev. – On Friday, Jan. 4 at 4 p.m., WestStar Credit Union will be making a $16,000 donation to Opportunity Village as the culmination of their 2012 charity campaign: A Mile of Smiles. In August 2012, WestStar Credit Union set out on a mission to collect a mile’s worth of smiles with the intention of donating $1 for every smile collected to Opportunity Village. The Nevada-based credit union launched the Mile of Smiles campaign to remind Nevadans that a simple smile can make a difference; that a smile is contagious and has the ability to make someone’s day brighter. They have met their goal and this sentiment now equates to a $16,000 donation from WestStar Credit Union, on the behalf of the smiling participants, to Opportunity Village, Las Vegas’ Favorite Charity.

Over the past several months, WestStar sent teams of volunteer employees out to different local venues including Fremont Street, UNLV campus, local malls, Las Vegas Wranglers hockey games, The Great Santa Run and even the Magical Forest at Opportunity Village to capture pictures of people’s smiles. Their efforts, partnered with the local Las Vegans who uploaded their own smile pictures to the gallery at www.amileofsmiles.org <http://www.amileofsmiles.org> , will conclude in one giant donation to Opportunity Village.

The donation presentation will be at the Magical Forest located at 6300 W. Oakey Blvd. Las Vegas, NV 89146, this Friday, January 4 at 4 p.m. WestStar’s CEO, Rick Schmidt, Vice President of Business Development, Mona Joseph, and Marketing Manager, Kelly Cook will be presenting the donation to Dawn Newburg, Resource Development Director for Opportunity Village.

Membership in WestStar Credit Union is open to anyone employed in the Gaming Industry of Nevada and many other employer groups, including employees and members of AAA Nevada and members of the Friends of Nevada Wilderness conservation group. Family members and those living in the same household of anyone who is eligible are also eligible. A full list of eligible employer groups can be found on their website, www.weststar.org/eligibility <http://www.weststar.org/eligibility> .
ABOUT OPPORTUNITY VILLAGE
MISSION
Opportunity Village is a not-for-profit organization that serves people within our community with significant intellectual disabilities, to improve their lives and the lives of their families.

Opportunity Village was founded in 1954 by seven families who were determined to give their disabled children the best lives possible. 58 years later, Opportunity Village is one of the most recognized and respected Community Rehabilitation Programs in the United States.

Nevada’s largest employer of people with disabilities, Opportunity Village serves nearly 2000 individuals annually, providing vocational training, employment, habilitation and social recreation programs and services that make their lives more productive and interesting.

Opportunity Village citizens – individuals who were previously considered unemployable – work at Opportunity Village’s Employment Resource Centers and in jobs throughout the community, collectively earning wages amounting to more than $7.6 million in 2012. They are hard-working and diligent, proudly paying taxes and happily leading more fulfilling lives.

Primarily a self-funded organization, Opportunity Village generates the majority of its operational funding through its employment contracts and fundraising efforts such as the Magical Forest and Great Santa Run, saving Nevada taxpayers $33.7 million annually.

Financial Solution for Baby Boomers is to Start Their Own Businesses, Says Founder of Bizstarters

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Jeff Williams proclaims the benefits of starting a business at the age of 50 or older 

CHICAGO, Jan. 9, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Americans over age 50 face a profound dilemma today – the vast majority want to keep working well into their sixties but fewer and fewer of them are welcome in the corporate world, often because of their age. But, according to Chicago-based business start-up expert Jeff Williams, running a business today is a relatively low risk, high reward alternative to a corporate job for these individuals.
Jeff Williams is the CEO and Chief Coach for Bizstarters.com, a nationally known coaching company helping individuals age 50 and over start their own businesses.
Over the past seven years Williams has seen a boom in business startups by people over 50, but he says: “Many, many more older boomers need to seriously look at starting a business if they want to continue to work. And, many will if they understand the new lower cost, higher profit version of small business that’s possible today.”
Williams suggests seven reasons why starting a business is “THE way to work today” for 50+ boomers:
• Your age doesn’t matter when you run your own business. Your customers don’t care how old you are. They only care that you deliver what you promised when you promised it.
• Technology lets you look big when you’re small. Thanks to technology, more and more business owners are working from home, earning $100,000 or more per year.
• New businesses last longer than new jobs. More than 50% of new hires today only last 18 months in the job. More than 55% of new businesses last at least two years, with many running five years or longer.
• You have a lot of people near your age to sell. You have 78 million boomer peers to sell to – they see you as a “sister or brother.” You have 42 million people over age 70 to sell to – they see you as a “son or daughter.”
• It’s never been cheaper to run a business. Many highly profitable businesses today cost less than $500 per month to run.
• You determine your financial progress. You set financial goals as you wish and create plans to achieve them. You are the “boss.”
• You can continue to run your own business for as long as you wish. In fact the IRS gives you a number of ways to legally put away up to 40% of your salary in deferred retirement accounts.
Jeff Williams is widely quoted in articles on boomer entrepreneurs and spoke on the topic at the recent AARP convention held in New Orleans. He offers tips for starting a successful business in his new free digital e-book: “10 Keys to Starting a Profitable Business After 50” available at www.bizstarters.com.
Contact: Jeff Williams, 847-305-4626, cell – 224-300-1820, jeff@bizstarters.com, www.bizstarters.com.

Helping Hands Surgical Care Selects Eight Uninsured Nevadans to Receive no-cost surgeries on Second Annual Charity Surgery Day

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Helping Hands Surgical Care Selects Eight Uninsured Nevadans to Receive no-cost surgeries on Second Annual Charity Surgery Day

WHAT: Eight uninsured Nevadans suffering from a variety of conditions will receive surgeries at no cost from Helping Hands Surgical Care (HHSC), a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization founded by Dr. Kevin Petersen and his wife, Kelly Petersen, who also serves as HHSC’s unpaid executive director. The surgeries will be performed by Dr. Petersen and other Las Vegas surgeons, with the assistance from the medical staff at Valley View Surgery Center – all of whom are volunteering their services for the day. A medical advisory board screened the applications to select patients to receive no cost surgeries. HHSC’s mission is to fund and facilitate surgeries for uninsured and underinsured Nevadans without the means to pay for medically necessary surgeries.

WHEN: CHARITY SURGERY DAY – HELPING HANDS SURGICAL CARE
November 13, 2012
Surgeries scheduled on the hour from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (First arrivals starting at 8 a.m.)
Patients and doctors are available to media prior to or on surgery day.

WHERE: Valley View Surgery Center
1330 S. Valley View Blvd.
Las Vegas, NV 89102
PATIENTS:
Jeffery Silverman, 52, Hernia repair, mesh removal
Silverman had an initial hernia repair in 2009 and has been in constant pain ever since. With very little money left in the bank and no insurance, he is embarrassed to ask for help, but grateful Dr. Petersen is willing to remove the mesh that was used in his initial surgery and repair it again without mesh. He has formed a large support group on Facebook comprised of people around the country suffering from the same condition, and he is grateful to be chosen for free surgery. He can’t wait to reclaim his life.

Donald Sykes, 51, Umbilical hernia repair
Sykes is minister of Pentecostal Temple Church of God in Christ, married with four children and eight grandchildren. He had insurance at one point but lost it due to his inability to keep up with the payments. Sykes has suffered from his hernia condition for nine years and is in considerable pain. He is grateful that the pain will be gone soon, that his life will be extended and the hernia will no longer be visible through his clothing.

Mariana Flores, 26, Umbilical hernia repair
Flores is married with two sons, ages 2 and 7. She is excited she will be able to help her sons and be active again. She feels she has not been a good mother since her mobility has been so limited by excessive pain. In fact, she has not been able to clean her home. She is so grateful she was chosen to receive charity surgery so she can become a better mother and wife and not dependent on others.

Mark Babcock, 54, Umbilical and Right inguinal hernia
Babcock, who is single with three children, is unable to work because of his medical condition. He currently lives with a friend free of charge. He has been to the emergency room twice and was turned away both times because the surgery to cure his condition is considered elective. He is looking forward to regaining the confidence he has lost over the last seven years as he has struggled with debilitating pain. He is extremely thankful to finally receive the help he needs to get back his life.

Mario Zaccone, 49, Right inguinal hernia
Zaccone has suffered from his hernia for five years and is unemployed because of his inability to work due to pain. Previously, he worked in the food industry where he was required to lift, which is impossible for him now given his current condition. He is single with four children and lives with his mother because of his inability to provide for his children and care for himself. He is extremely grateful for HHSC and looks forward to beginning his life again.

Paul Labarre, 42, Umbilical hernia repair
Labarre is a veteran construction worker who with specific skills in flooring and laying carpet. He is unable to work due to his hernia and has lost his home and insurance. He currently lives with his parents and is looking forward to being healthy again and passing a physical so he can go back to work and provide for his family.

Michael Haws, 53, Left inguinal hernia repair
Haws has worked for years in the construction and oil industries. He has not been able to lift due to his hernia condition. Unable to provide for himself, he has been forced to move in with his brother. His current situation has had a major effect on his self-esteem, and he feels drained both physically and emotionally. He is thrilled to be chosen and looks forward to a bright future.

Linda Willis, 59, Trigger finger
Willis has been without medical insurance since she lost her job several years ago. Right-handed, she has not been able to do anything with her right hand for a long time. This includes preparing food, writing and simple daily tasks. Willis has been forced to move in with her daughter for both financial support and assistance with her daily care. She is excited about the future and the possibility of regaining some independence. She particularly looks forward to resuming things she enjoys, including sewing and refinishing furniture.

PARTICIPATING DOCTORS:

Dr. Kevin C. Petersen, General Surgeon
Dr. Bishr Hijazi, Hand Surgeon
Dr. Jon Darwin Halling, Anesthesiologist
Dr. Hosny Habashy, Anesthesiologist

COMMUNITY SUPPORT:
The Las Vegas community is coming together to support the efforts of HHSC.
• Valley View Surgery Center is donating the use of the one operating room for an entire day.
• The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf is providing coffee and breakfast for the physicians and medical staff (up to 35 people) on surgery day.

About Helping Hands Surgical Care
Helping Hands Surgical Care is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization whose mission is to fund and facilitate surgeries for uninsured and underinsured individuals without the means to pay for medically necessary, quality of life surgeries. Founded by Dr. Kevin Petersen of Las Vegas, Nevada based No Insurance Surgery, Helping Hands Surgical Care values the health and well-being of each individual regardless of their ability to pay. The organization is guided by its focus on the physician-patient relationship and its dedication to transforming and improving the lives of those it serves. For more information, visit www.HelpingHandsSurgicalCare.com or call 702-242-5393.

Baby, It’s Cold Outside and Getting Colder: 6 Ways to Save on Heating Costs

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Baby, It’s Cold Outside and Getting Colder: 6 Ways to Save on Heating Costs

Temperatures are already dipping in colder climates, and weather experts are warning consumers everywhere to brace for a colder winter than last year.

That means you’ll be paying more to heat your house this winter – and even more if you haven’t sealed it up and/or taken other energy efficiency measures.

If you think energy efficiency steps aren’t that big a deal, the founder of Angie’s List says you should think again.

“The average heating and cooling system accounts for about 54 percent of the average home’s total energy costs,” says Angie Hicks. “Even small things can add up to big heating bill savings – and many of them are jobs you can do yourself.”

Angie’s List, a national resource for consumer reviews on local service experts, including HVAC companies, went to highly rated heating experts to compile 6 ways to save on your heating bill:
1. All systems go? Check your furnace filters each month and replace if necessary. A clean filter distributes heat better and cuts your energy costs. Plus, it’s an inexpensive and easy task you can do yourself. An annual furnace checkup from a reputable heating system expert will help detect and fix small problems before they result in a system failure.
2. Block and tackle: Is your couch or a bookcase blocking a baseboard radiator? Take a look to be sure you have good airflow around registers and radiators to increase energy efficiency.
3. Drafting good for auto racing; not so much for homes: As much as 20 percent of the air moving through the average home’s duct system is lost to leaks and poor connections. Sealing up leaks with caulk, spray foam and/or weather stripping will stop that. Check doors and windows, too and caulk, seal and weather-strip any drafts.
4. Solar power: The sun offers free energy that you can tap even without solar panels. Keep your blinds up and the curtains open on a sunny winter day to absorb heat. Close them up at night to keep the heat inside.
5. Through the roof: Heat rises, which means if you don’t have enough insulation on the ceiling and in the attic, your heat is literally going through the roof. If you can see the floor joists in your attic, you probably don’t have enough insulation. Be sure to get the right R-value for your area.
6. Programmed to save: Use a programmable thermostat to easily adjust the temperature while you’re away or sleeping and save up to 30 percent on your bill, according to Energy Star.

###

Angie’s List helps consumers have happy transactions with local service professionals in more than 550 categories of service, ranging from home improvement to health care. More than 1.5 million paid households use Angie’s List to gain unlimited access to local ratings, exclusive discounts, the Angie’s List magazine, and the Angie’s List complaint resolution service.

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 Senior Special Events

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 Senior Special Events

Las Vegas Residents Invited To Celebrations, Luncheons & Activities At City Centers

The city of Las Vegas active adult and senior centers offer exercise, fitness, craft, arts, dance, music and computer classes; cards; games; discussion and social groups; luncheons; sports; and special events Monday through Friday to residents age 50 and better. Many of these activities contribute to wellness and a healthy lifestyle. A listing of classes and activities is published in the Beyond the Neon Leisure Guide, available in the centers and online at www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. All activities are subject to change. Most activities require $2 annual membership to city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all senior and active adult centers.

Golf Lessons (ages 50+)
Mondays at 9 a.m. or 10:15 a.m. Registration for October sessions begins Sept. 17.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Bring in a couple of clubs that you need to work on.

Oktoberfest Brunch (ages 50+)
Thursday, Oct. 4, 10 a.m. Registration open Sept. 3-28.
Cost: $3.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.
Celebrate Oktoberfest with some Bavarian brunch delicacies!

Breakfast Nook (ages 50+)
Friday, Oct. 5, 8:30 a.m.
Cost: $3, includes French toast casserole, sausage, fruit, coffee and juice.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Flu & Pneumonia Shots (all ages)
Tuesday, Oct. 9, 9 a.m. to noon.
Cost: Call for information. Various insurances accepted.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Southern Nevada Health District staff will administer flu and pneumonia vaccinations. Call 759-0850 for more information on pricing and which insurances will be accepted.

Chili Cook-off
Wednesday, Oct. 10, noon.
Cost: Free to enter; $2 to taste.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Make your best chili to enter in the annual chili cook-off. Prizes will be awarded to the winner. Salad and cornbread provided for those who taste and help judge the best chili!
-more-

Helping You Understand Your Medicare Benefits and Options (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct., 16, 10 a.m. Registration opens Sept. 17.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Receive information to help you make your best Medicare choices.

Flu Shots (all ages)
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 10 a.m. to noon.
Cost: Call for information.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Southern Nevada Health District will provide annual flu shots. A list of accepted insurances will be available closer to the date of the clinic. Please call to be put on the reservation list.

Annual Texas Hold’em Poker Tournament (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 12:30 p.m.
Cost: $4.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Prepare for this fun tournament by joining the Thursday class at 1 p.m. or playing in the weekly games on Tuesdays and Fridays at 12:30 p.m. Enjoy hot and cold refreshments. Top three winners will receive a prize basket!

Getting Paid to Talk (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 1 to 3:30 p.m. Must be registered by Oct. 5.
Cost: $15.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.
This exciting workshop will teach you how to get paid to talk – by reading for audio books, animated shows and more. The field is wide open. Learn how to market yourself, where to go to find voice-over jobs, how to do voice-overs, etc.

World Food Day Luncheon (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Oct. 17, 11:30 a.m. Registration open Sept. 3-Oct. 12.
Cost: $5.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.
Give back to our community in honor of World Food Day. Bring a non-perishable food item with you and enjoy a delicious lunch. Feel good, doing good!

Oktoberfest Luncheon (ages 50+)
Thursday, Oct. 18, 11:30 p.m.
Cost: $5.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Celebrate the rich heritage of the German people with bratwurst, sauerkraut and a great party!

Flu and Pneumonia Shots (all ages)
Tuesday, Oct. 23, 9 to 11 a.m.
Call the beginning of October for pricing.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Southern Nevada Health District staff will administer flu and pneumonia vaccinations for a fee. Pneumonia vaccination is recommended for adults age 65 and older. For more information on flu vaccines, go online to www.southernnevadahealthdistrict.org/immunizations/flu-shots.php.
-more-
Cooking Club: What Can You Make from a Pumpkin? (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 23, 11 a.m.
Cost: $5.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Lillian’s Fashion Divas (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Oct. 24, 11:00 a.m. for fashion show; brunch immediately following.
Fashion show is free and open to the public. Brunch cost: $3. R.S.V.P. by Oct. 17 for brunch.
West Las Vegas Library Theatre for fashion show, 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd.
Doolittle Senior Center for brunch, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Active adults from Doolittle Senior Center present fashions created in the master seamstress classes. They will showcase fall fashions, including casual wear, evening wear and Sunday’s best. The event is presented by the Doolittle Senior Center and hosted by the city of Las Vegas and Las Vegas-Clark County Library District. Call 229-6125 for more information.

# # #

What Types of Senior Jobs Exist? (Nevada Senior Guide)

September 27, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many seniors aren’t content to take the company watch and spend the rest of their lives in complete retirement. Part time and full time senior jobs exist, but the problem is finding them.

Wanting to stay busy isn’t the only reason seniors are looking for full and part-time jobs. Retirement and social securing incomes just aren’t enough to live on anymore, and seniors find themselves needing to work to pay the bills and buy food.

Some want to continue working simply because they love the feeling. They may be highly creative or well-educated and talented in a certain field. A job will provide these seniors with the sense of satisfaction they need.

The world has changed, and retirees don’t need to hold down a 9 to 5 job anymore, but they may be confused about what they’re qualified to do. Knowing just a little about the Internet lets seniors find suitable jobs or build a business and work from home.

If you’re searching for senior jobs, first decide what type of job appeals to you. If you’re an outgoing, people-person, you may want to seek jobs that take advantage of this talent. A job in retail might be just the thing that makes you happy and will supplement your income enough.

You may have enjoyed working for your old company or being in a certain line of work so much that you’ll want to speak to your employer about staying on with the company – perhaps on a part time basis. Most companies will love the fact that you’re bringing experience to the table.

Freelance jobs are extremely popular now. Many companies are outsourcing work to freelancers so that they won’t have to pay health care and other benefits to full time employees. You may be able to market yourself as a consultant and work as much or as little as you want.

A recent ‘Dear Abby column entitled, “Boomers finding new opportunities as they hit 65” brought to light that between 7,000 to 10,000 people will have a 65th birthday every day for the next 19 years. That’s right – approximately 76 million people will soon be hitting the big 65.

These seniors don’t want to be counted out of the work force. They want to be contributors and participators in life and in society. The impact on our world will be enormous. As these intelligent, hard-working people reach ‘retirement’ age, they won’t retire, but instead find ways to keep working – and that means more senior jobs.

Today, seniors have so many more opportunities than their parents – computers and the Internet has made it possible to begin a whole other career, build your own business and create a way to make a great income far into retirement years.

Don’t give up if you’re looking for senior jobs that fit your criteria. Search the Internet for business opportunities that might be just the chance you’re looking for.

Marjorie Chaddock

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Marjorie_Chaddock

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5771360

Senior Living Community Trends (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Senior living communities are relatively new, are responding to constantly changing demands and while even this industry is reacting to the current economic downturn, baby boomers are creating and responding to trends in a variety of ways. A recent survey conducted by Mather LifeWays with Life Services of Illinois in late 2008 revealed some interesting findings. This survey is “significant because there are few published studies that examine trends in programs, amenities, and environments among aging services providers,” states Mary Leary, President and CEO, Mather LifeWays.

Independent living is at the top of the list for most seniors and most are serious about technology. That means that senior living communities must offer state-of-the-art systems for computer savvy seniors. Those leaving the workforce today have become accustomed to and very adept at building their careers and a portion of their personal lives around computers. Seniors want services available that will allow them to maintain independence.

New models in Senior Living Communities
The Beacon Hill model, as described in American Association of Retired Persons Magazine is an innovative program that allows residents to stay in their homes and maintain their independence safely and comfortably. Beacon Hill Village in Boston is being embraced by communities with seniors across the nation because of its model as a full-service concierge program dedicated to linking older residents of the neighborhood with anything from a ride to the doctor’s office to house painting services to free lectures and exercise classes. Members must live in the neighborhood and pay an annual fee. The Beacon Hills Village program has sparked grassroots movements across the country.

“The New Retirement Survey” released in 2005 by Merrill Lynch focused on how baby boomers, who are quickly approaching retirement age, will have a noticeable impact on all aspects of senior living, including housing. In fact, because baby boomers will fundamentally reinvent retirement by living longer and remaining engaged and employed beyond age 65, the impact will influence all trends in senior living communities. The survey describes the “turning point”: 76% of boomers intend to keep working and earning after retiring from their current job and even exploring entirely new careers. This desire to continue working is motivated by earnings and by a desire for “continued mental stimulation and challenge which will motivate them to stay in the game.” Naturally, this finding supports the senior living community trend of a desire for further education. Visit the Bernard Osher Foundation to learn about the location of classes and opportunities for lifelong learning offered by this well-regarded foundation.

Trends can also be observed in surveys targeting the operators and owners of these communities. The Mather Lifeways survey describes trends in senior living communities that include wellness and lifelong learning options available as well as environmental considerations, such as green living standards. The survey also found that wireless technology is opening even more opportunities to pursue a wealth of knowledge. Currently, 22% of continuing care retirement communities are now offering Web-based education; however that number is expected to soar to 69% over the next four years, while wellness offerings, including classes and recreation, are projected to grow to 52%, up from 25%. Studies also reveal that 35% of senior living community providers are expected to observe “green” standards in new construction or renovation.

Another study, by Ziegler Capital Markets, queried senior living community owners, explores senior living community trends from a marketing standpoint. The majority of respondents stated that their multi-site organizations have been impacted by the current downturn in the economy. When asked how they intend to react, most said they will offer a variety of discounts on monthly service and entrance fees, which will naturally be attractive to those considering a senior living community. Marketing programs are also focusing more on what their community can offer in response to trends in senior living communities.

Technology, independence, education, health and environmental concerns will undoubtedly keep the newest members of the senior population occupied, challenged and productive for many years.

SeniorHomes.com is a free resource for people looking for senior housing or senior care for a loved one or themselves. Browse valuable articles to help you through or search or find assisted living, independent living, Alzheimer’s care, or a retirement community with our nationwide directory. Visit our website to stay abreast of the latest trends in senior living communities.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Angela_Stringfellow

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The Need for Senior Living Jobs (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

For people currently looking at different career options, there are several things that you need to weigh. You need to pursue a career that you will thoroughly enjoy doing, that will allow you to help people, and that will pay you a decent amount of money. Senior living jobs are fall under all those categories, and they are in very high demand. There is expected to be a shortage of those working in the elderly healthcare industry, making it something that high school and college students should consider.

There are plenty of different types of senior living jobs, some that don’t require any schooling after high school, to those that require a Masters degree or a Doctorate degree. In other words, you can essentially decide how much time you want to spend in school and choose your career helping seniors accordingly. Or, you can go to convalescent homes and apartments, as well as assisted living communities, and volunteer. You will be able to get a lot of experience working with the elderly, and they will enjoy the company quite a bit.

One of the best parts of working with the elderly, in fact, is how much that they enjoy the company of others. There are very few industries quite like the senior healthcare industry in that respect. The people that you are helping will be so happy to see you and so thankful for you every day. If that isn’t enough to help sway your decision though, you will be happy to learn that the average salary of those in the senior living industry is between $40,000 and $60,000. That is not a bad amount of money to make at all, especially in the current economy, where jobs are scarce.

The other benefit to senior living jobs is the fact that you will be able to make your own schedule. Since there is a need for people working every hour of every day, that gives you a lot of flexibility with regards to when you will work. If you are someone that does not like the idea of working Monday through Friday from eight in the morning until five at night, then this is definitely something you should think about. In the end, you will find the senior healthcare industry to be a very rewarding road to go down.

Click here to check out the available senior living jobs in your area and what they pay.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mark_J_Sinclair

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Nevada-Senior-Guide Food Assistance Directory – Northern Nevada Rural

Carlin Open Door Senior Center

320 Chestnut St., Carlin, NV 89822

(775) 754-6465 Elko County

Provides daily meals at noon and
transportation, Social Activity, Tax Info

 

Elderly Nutrition & Transportation

Silver Sage Senior Center

213 First St., Wells, NV 89835

(775) 752-3280 Elko County

e-mail: ellsseniorcenter@wrecwireless.coop

Nutritional hot lunches M-F, Meals-on-Wheels,
frozen meals on weekends and transportation                     provided for errands.

 

Fannie Komp Senior Center

(775) 468-0466 – Eureka County

www.co.eureka.nv.us/crescent/senior01.htm

The Eureka County Food Pantry distributes                        TFAP for Emergency Food and Food Pantry &              Homebound meals for those with medical and                       periodic illness, within 5 mile radius of senior             center

 

Hawthorne Senior Center – Mineral County

Care and Share Senior Center – Hawthorne

975 K St., Hawthorne, NV 89415

(775) 945-5519 Mineral County

The Meals on Wheels Program, social activities.                 Senior service specialist, M-F Lunch at Noon

 

Lincoln Senior Services – Lincoln County

Senior Services. (775) 728-4477

Provides congregate meals, Meals-on-Wheels                      for homebound seniors, recreational
opportunities, homemaker program (call for                        addt’l info)

 

Mina Senior Center – Mineral County Care

and Share Senior Center – Mina

211 8th St., Mina, NV 89422. (775) 573-2344

Senior Services – Provides congregate meals                       noon daily, Meals-on-Wheels for homebound,               transportation for medical appointments and
shopping, out-of-town trips once a month,                             Open Tues., Wed., and Thurs. 9am-1:30pm,

Sr. advocate, computers

 

Older Americans of Lyon County Senior Ctr.

117 Pilson Way, Yerington, NV 89447

(775) 463-6550 Lyon County

Provides meals (call for hours), recreation,                        exercise, transportation for appointments                                and errands, gift shop, Meals on Wheels,                           Advocacy, Legal Info, M-F 7am – 3pm.

 

Olsen Senior Ctr. – Lincoln County Sr. Svcs.

240 Front Street, Caliente, NV 89008

(775) 726-3740

Provides congregate meals, Meals-on-Wheels,                     recreational opportunities, and transportation                      to medical appointments

Pleasant Senior Center

1480 Lay Street, Winnemucca, NV 89445

(775) 623-6211 Humboldt County

*Congregate meals, Meals On Wheels, crafts,                     art lessons, exercises. Senior health

awareness, transportation for medical
appointments and shopping. Elder lawyer,                             SHIP Program, Social activities. M-F Noon.*

 

Salvation Army Social Services for Seniors

Salvation Army – Reno. (775) 688-4555

Services, Food, Clothing, Referrals, Adult                          Rehab, Job opportunites

Silver Springs Senior Center

2945 Ft. Churchill Rd., Silver Springs, NV

(775) 577-5014 Lyon County, Call for Hours

www.LyonCounty.org. Provides congregate                         meals at the center ($2 donation),

Provides information and referral services,

Transportation to medical appointments in

Carson City or Reno, shopping and special

events, Legal services, Meals-on-Wheels

 

Washoe County Senior Services

(775) 328-2581. Provides hot meals to seniors
aged 55 or older who are homebound.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Employment Assistance Directory – Northern Nevada Rural

JOIN, Inc. Job Opportunities in Nevada

(775) 684-0400 Carson City County

(775) 423-5115 Churchill/Fallon County

(775) 753-1900 Elko County

(775) 289-1616 White Pine County/Ely

www.join.org

JOIN operates programs which provide
services to low-income adults, laid off workers,  welfare recipients, senior citizens, and former welfare recipients who are currently working

Nevada-Senior-Guide Financial Assistance Directory – Northern Nevada

CARE Chest of Sierra Nevada

7910 N. Virginia Street, Reno, NV 89506

(775) 829-CARE (2273), www.carechest.org

Provides low interest loans for people with

disabilities, assisted technology, medical

equipment, Rx assistance, Independent

Living Program, Call for Additional Referrals,
Wellness education programs

Energy Assistance Program

2527 N. Carson St., #260, Carson City, NV 89706

(775) 684-0731, www.welfare.state.nv.us

Low income – call for info regarding utilities

Financial Guidance Center

3100 Mill Street, #111, Reno, NV 89502

(775) 337-6363 Toll free 1-800-451-4505

www.ccanevada.org. Assisting with financial                        goals through counseling & education. Call for hrs.

 

Reno District Welfare Office

4095 S. Virginia St., Reno, NV 89502

775-684-7200. Call for Info

Senior Law Project-Washoe County Residents

204 Marsha Ave., Ste. 101, Reno NV 89509                            (775) 284-3491 Call for other locations.

Provides services pertaining to consumer                             debt, garnishment, attachment and advice                  regarding small claims actions, Government                                benefits, estate planning, housing issues,                   guardianship, foreclosure assistance, Pro                          Bono program

 

Social Security Administration

1170 Harvard Way, Reno, NV 89502

1-888-808-5481 OR 1-800-772-1213

www.socialsecurity.gov, Call for benefits & hours.

 

The Salvation Army CORPS.

1931 Sutro Street, Reno, NV 89512

(775) 688-4555 Donation pick up service.                               Food, Clothing, Adult Rehab, Job Opportunities

 

The Salvation Army

661 Colorado Street, Carson City, NV 89701

(775) 887-9120

Crisis intervention, disaster response,                                   emergency food, and referral, Social Services

 

Washoe County Assessor’s Office

1001 E. Ninth Street, Bldg. D, Reno, NV 89512

(775) 328-2277, www.co.washoecounty.us

Veterans exempt discount. Disabled Vets,                              Blind Persons and Surviving Spouse

Nevada-Senior-Guide Employment Directory – Northern Nevada

AARP Senior Community Service

Employment Program. 1-775-323-2243

1135 Terminal Way, Ste. 102, Reno, NV 89502

Job training and placement. New work search                     program 55+ (call for info and appoinment).                             Work program for low income seniors.

 

JOIN, Inc

1201 Terminal Way, Suite 104, Reno, NV 89502

(775) 336-4450, www.join.org

Job opportunities in Nevada, Need appointment,
Help with Short Term Training

 

NV Job Connect

4001 S. Virginia Street, Ste H, Reno, NV 89502

www.nevadajobconnect.com

(775) 834-1970 Resource center, call for info

 

Financial Assistance

 

CARE Chest of Sierra Nevada

7910 N. Virginia Street, Reno, NV 89506

(775) 829-CARE (2273), www.carechest.org

Provides low interest loans for people with

disabilities, assisted technology, medical

equipment, Rx assistance, Independent

Living Program, Call for Additional Referrals,
Wellness education programs

Energy Assistance Program

2527 N. Carson St., #260, Carson City, NV 89706

(775) 684-0731, www.welfare.state.nv.us

Low income – call for info regarding utilities

Financial Guidance Center

3100 Mill Street, #111, Reno, NV 89502

(775) 337-6363 Toll free 1-800-451-4505

www.ccanevada.org. Assisting with financial                        goals through counseling & education. Call for hrs.

 

Reno District Welfare Office

4055 S. Virginia St., Reno, NV 89502

775-684-7200. Call for Info 8am-5pm

Senior Law Project-Washoe County Residents

204 Marsha Ave., Ste. 101, Reno NV 89509                            (775) 284-3491 Call for other locations.

Provides services pertaining to consumer                             debt, garnishment, attachment and advice                  regarding small claims actions, Government                                benefits, estate planning, housing issues,                   guardianship, foreclosure assistance, Pro                          Bono program, Indian Law

 

Social Security Administration

1170 Harvard Way, Reno, NV 89502

1-888-808-5481 OR 1-800-772-1213

www.socialsecurity.gov, Call for benefits & hours.

 

The Salvation Army CORPS.

1931 Sutro Street, Reno, NV 89512

(775) 688-4555 Donation pick up service.                               Food, Clothing, Adult Rehab, Job Opportunities

 

The Salvation Army

661 Colorado Street, Carson City, NV 89701

(775) 887-9120

Crisis intervention, disaster response,                                   emergency food, and referral, Social Services

 

Washoe County Assessor’s Office

1001 E. Ninth Street, Bldg. D, Ste. 140

Reno, NV 89512

(775) 328-2277, www.co.washoecounty.us

Veterans exempt discount. Disabled Vets,                  Blind Persons and Surviving Spouse

Nevada-Senior-Guide Multiple Services Directory – Southern Nevada

AARP – Nevada State Office / Contact Center

5820 S. Eastern Ave. #190, LV, NV 89119

Toll Free 1-866-389-5652

www.aarp.org/nv

Advocacy, Employment Assistance, Safe

Driving Instruction, Tax Services, Legal Services

Catholic Charities of So. Nevada

531 N. 30th St., Las Vegas, NV 89101

(702) 382-0721

Foster Grandparent Program, Senior                                     Companion Program, Retired Senior Volunteers.                    Mon-Fri 7:30am-4pm. Telephone reassurance,                     Legal services

City Mission of Las Vegas

2214 N. Pecos Rd., Las Vegas, NV 89115

(702) 384-1930. Referral Service, Counseling                     Services, Donations; Geriatric, Friendly
Visitation, Food Boxes, clothing, Breakfast
8:30-9:30, Need application on file.

 

Clark County – Public Guardian

515 Shadow Lane, Las Vegas, NV 89106

(702) 455-4332, www.accessclarkcounty.com

Guardianship, Provide financial management

Clark County Social Services

1600 Pinto Lane, LV, NV 89106

(702) 455-7051, www.clarkcounty.com

Referral Service, Alternative Healthcare,

Long-Term Care, Homemaker Program,                   Financial Help, U.S. Citizens and Legal

Residents, Short Term Info, 7am-4:30pm

 

Friends in the Desert, Inc.

43 West Pacific Avenue, Henderson, NV 89015

(702) 565-8742

Meals served 6 days a week, Call for times,                          Clothing needed, Legal Assistance

 

Grace Care Center

2020 W. Bonanza Rd., LV, NV 89106

702-749-6332

Wellness, Mentoring Center, Basic Skills,                           Psycho-Social Rehab. Call for additional info

 

Hope Link of Southern Nevada

178 Westminster Way, Henderson, NV 89015

(702) 566-0576. Rental/Utilities assistance,                         Food Pantry, Henderson Residents, Mon –                  Thur, 8am – 6pm, Closed 12pm – 1pm for                             Lunch, closed Friday. Need proof of income                              and residency, NV ID, SS Card

 

Help of Southern Nevada

1640 E. Flamingo Rd., LV, NV 89119

(702) 369-4357, www.helpsonv.org

Travelers Assistance, Home Repairs, Shelter,

Food, Clothing, Family Resources, Lifeline,

Respite Services, Bus tokens, weatherization.

Renters utility services, HOPWA Program,

7am-5pm, Work Center, Homeless Services.                           Closed Fri.

Helping Hands of Henderson

102 E. Lake Mead Pkwy., Henderson, NV 89015

(702) 616-6554

Community Research, Referrals, Transportation,

60+ Older Henderson Residents, 8am-4:30pm

Helping Hands of NLV

3640 North 5th St., Suite 130, N. LV, NV 89032

(702) 649-7853. Referral, Paper Goods/Pantry
Distribution, Transportation to Doctor, Repair
– small jobs – inside only & miscellaneous.

Helping Hands of Vegas Valley

2320 Paseo Del Prado Bldg. B #204, LV, NV 89102

(702) 633-7264, www.hhovv.org

Referral Service, Respite Care, Volunteer

Transportation, The Pantry, Wheelchair van                        available. 60+ Over

Jewish Family Service Agency

4794 S. Eastern Ave., Ste. C, LV, NV 89119

(702) 732-0304, www.jfsalv.org. Call for hours.

Counseling, Holocaust Survivor Assistance,                       Adoption, Career Development, Pantry.

Las Vegas Rescue Mission

480 West Bonanza Road, Las Vegas, NV 89106

(702) 382-1766, www.vegasrescue.org

8am-6:30pm, Phone assistance for info

Shelter, Referral, Counseling, Nutrition, Eye                    Glasses, Thrift Store

 

Las Vegas Senior Citizens Ctr.

451 East Bonanza Road, Las Vegas, NV 89101

(702) 229-6454. Tripsters, Socialization,
monthly luncheons,  arts & crafts, exercise,
computers, music,  singing, billiards.

 

Lend A Hand, Inc.

400 Utah St., Boulder City, NV 89005

(702) 294-2363. Transportation, Referral,                           Friendly Visitation, Respite Care (3 hrs), Health         equipment M – F 9:00am – 2:00pm, In-Home                                Services, Lend a Hand Program

 

Lutheran Social Services of NV

73 Spectrum Blvd., LV, NV 89101

(702) 639-1730, www.lssnv.org

Food Pantry (over 62), Housing/Rental

Assistance, Utility assistance, Help getting                          State ID & Birth Certificates, Call for Info.                7:30am-4pm. Special programs.

Nevada Senior Services

901 N. Jones Blvd., LV, NV 89108, 702-648-3425

Creative aging, caregiver support groups,                             outreach programs, home modification. Call                             for additional assistance. Senior Assessment

 

Nevada SMP Senior Medicare Patrol

1860 E. Sahara Ave., LV, NV 89104

702-486-3403 or 1-888-838-7305

Prevention of fraud & medicare abuse, File claims

 

Nevada State Contractors Board

2310 Corporate Cir., Ste 200

Henderson, NV 89074

(702) 486-1100, www.nscb.nv.gov

Regulatory agency promoting quality

construction by Nevada licensed contractors.                   Provides contractor license verifications,

assistance with contractor workmanship

issues and homeowner education

regarding unlicensed contractors.

 

Nevada Talking Book Services (Library)

100 N. Stewart St., Carson City, NV 89701

1-800-922-9334, www.nevadaculture.org

Provide books, magazines, auto books

for blind and physically handicapped

Nevada Talking Book Services

6655 W. Sahara Ave., Ste B200, LV, NV 89146

(702) 486-3737, www.nevadaculture.org

Outreach and public awareness

 

RAGE Program – Aging & Disability

Resource Center           (702) 333-1038

2901 El Camino Ave., S-102, LV, NV 89102

Referral Service, Home Modification:

Minor, Build Handicap Ramps, Durable

Medical, Home & Vehicle Modification,                   Prescription Assistance

 

 

Senior Life Line/Goldberg Senior Center

2309 Renaissance Dr. #B, LV, NV 89119

(702) 933-1191. Transportation for Groceries
+ DRs, Homemaker Service, Nutritional
Program, Kosher Meals On Wheels, Home                             Safety Program, Limited Space, Henderson                    Transportation, Lunch on Fridays, Taxi
Vouchers

So. NV Center for Independent Living

4100 N. Martin Luther King, Ste. E100,

N. Las Vegas, NV 89030. www.sncil.org

(702) 649-3822, (800) 398-0760 toll free

People with disabilities, Counseling, Housing

Assistance, Advocacy, Technical Assistance,                        Public Awareness, Education, Referral info for                     food and transportation

 

State of NV Aging & Disability Services Division

Community Home-Based Initiatives Programs

1860 E. Sahara Ave., LV, NV 89104, 702-486-3545

Referral Service, Homemaker Program, Meal                      Delivery, Advocacy, Community Ombudsman,
Medicare counseling, taxi coupons, RX
Assistance, Elder Abuse and Neglect, Grant                        Programs, CHIP, Complaints.

 

Sun City Summerlin Charities, Inc.

10362 Sun City Blvd., Las Vegas, NV 89134

(702) 254-5831. Hours: 8:30am-11am

Residents Only. Transportation, Small

handyman jobs

 

The Salvation Army-Family Services

1581 N. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101

(702) 649-8240. Food Assistance, Case
Management, Referral,  gas & electric out
reach program, Age 62 (need to call for
qualification)

 

The Salvation Army

2900 Palomino Lane, Las Vegas, NV 89107

(702) 870-4430. Administrative Offices, Church

Donations welcome.

Veterans So. NV, Health Care System

N. Las Vegas, NV 89036

(702) 791-9000 for clinic connections

1-800-273-8255 Suicide, Opt 1 Lifeline

Pharmaceutical & Medical Assistance,

Psychiatric, Counseling, Support Groups,                            Respite Care, Assisted Care, Transportation                            to and from various clinics, VA benefits and                          services, Flu shots, Care Giver Program

Women’s Dev. Ctr. for Independent Living

4020 Pecos-McLeod, Las Vegas, NV 89104

(702) 796-7770. Affordable Rental Program,                      Clothing donations welcome. Call for Food                             Bank Info

Nevada-Senior-Guide Employment Assistance Directory – Southern Nevada

Employment Assistance, Community Service

Employment Program, Senior Work Search Program

Catholic Charities of So. Nevada

1501 N. Las Vegas Blvd.

Las Vegas, NV 89101

(702) 215-4703, www.catholiccharities.com

Senior Employment – 8:00am to 3:00pm

Catholic Charities of So. Nevada

2065 E. Sahara Ave., S-C

Las Vegas, NV 89104

(702) 382-0721

Hours: Mon – Fri. 7:00am to 3:30pm

Foster Grandparent Program, Volunteer Program,

Respite, SR Companion

CHR, Inc.

2980 S. Jones Blvd., Suite H

Las Vegas, NV 89146

(702) 889-4466

Employment Skills, Resume writing, Interview

techniques, Occupational job training, Gateway

to employment training for seniors.

Foundation for an Independent Tomorrow (FIT)

1931 Stella Lake Dr., Las Vegas, NV 89106

(702) 367-4348

www.lasvegasfit.org

Employment Services – Teaching job skills, resume

updates, vocational training funding, on-site computer

classes, and workplace readiness assistance

Goodwill of So. NV Vocational Services

1280 W. Cheyenne Avenue

N. Las Vegas, NV 89030

(702) 597-1107, www.sngoodwill.org

Mon-Thurs 9am-4pm, Fri 9am-Noon

Employment Training, Job Placement, Job Opportunities

Donations Welcome

Nevada Job Connect

3405 S. Maryland Pkwy.

Las Vegas, NV 89169

(702) 486-0100, Hotline: (702) 486-0173

8am-5pm daily, Mon – Fri

Employment Assistance, Training Opportunities

N. Las Vegas (702) 486-0200

Henderson (702) 486-0300

Southern Nevada

Sponsored by Nevada Senior Guide 55

Opportunity Village-ARC

6300 West Oakey Blvd.

Las Vegas, NV 89146

(702) 259-3700, www.opportunityvillage.org

Rehabilitation, Employment, Mentally Challenged,

Work Training Center

SCORE So. NV

400 S. 4th Street, #250-A, Las Vegas, NV 89101

(702) 388-6104, www.scorelv.org

Business Consultants for new small businesses

Monthly Seminars, Volunteer Programs

State of Nevada Casual Labor Office

1001 North A Street

Las Vegas, NV 89106

(702) 486-3441, 6am – 3pm

Short-term employment, Day Labor (cleaning,

heavy moving labor), construction, Landscape

Nevada-Senior-Guide KNPR 88-9 Radio – Las Vegas

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Leisure 

http://www.knpr.org/

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Nevada Public Radio KNPR

Radio Reading Service
Nevada Public Radio
 Do you know someone who has a problem reading?Let Nevada Public Radio Help.The Radio Reading Service offers free reading broadcast 24 hours a day, seven days a week for people who are visually and print impaired.Statewide newspapers including the Review-Journal, Las Vegas Sun and Reno Gazette-Journal
National publications including Newsweek and the Wall Street Journal
Best-selling and critically-acclaimed booksSpecial radio receivers are provided free of charge for the broadcasts.

For an application, call Jay Bartos at
702-258-9895

KNEWS 970am

970 AMKNUU Las Vegas

Business & Financial Talk

Your money

Your life

Your radio station

News, Traffic & Weather throughout the day

Community shows on finance and lifestyle

Plus Paul Harvey, Ray Lucia

Bruce Williams, Lou Dobbs,

Wall Street Journal Reports

Donald Trump & Andy Vierra

Streaming on the web 24/7

970KNUU.com

Frequently Asked Questions About Nevada Public Radio
  • Privacy Policy
  • Mailing List Policy
  • Membership Information
  • Prize Giveaway Guidelines
  • Annual Report
  • Contact
  • Programs
  • Features
  • Radio Reading Service
  • Sponsors
  • Transmitters
  • Jobs
  • Auto Donation
  • E News
  • HD Radio
“Nevada Public Radio will be recognized as the leading independent source of information and cultural expression, and a catalyst for civic engagement.”

Our history…

Nurtured in its formative years by the Clark County Library District, Nevada Public Radio was incorporated in December, 1975 as an independent, Nevada non-profit corporation. Its flagship station, KNPR signed on the air March 24, 1980 as Nevada’s first National Public Radio (NPR) affiliated station.

Nevada Public Radio operates a non-commercial, radio broadcast network comprised of seven stations, KNPR Las Vegas (88.9), KCNV Las Vegas (89.7), KTPH Tonopah (91.7), KLNR Panaca (91.7), KWPR Lund/Ely (88.7), KSGU St. George (90.3), KLKR Elko (89.3), plus five rural translators. It is overseen by a volunteer Board of Directors including founder and Director Emeritus, Lamar Marchese.

The staff includes full-time staff of 30, plus part time and contract employees, and dozens of administrative and fundraising volunteers. More than 9,000 members and 50 corporations and foundations support the stations.

KNPR broadcasts with 100,000 watts (ERP), at 88.9 FM. It programs a 24 hour service of National Public Radio (NPR) news and information, with specialty shows like A Prairie Home Companion and Car Talk. (See our program schedule.)

Nevada Public Radio produces 10 hours a week of original content. KNPR’s State of Nevada is a national award-winning public affairs program supported by a dynamic web site.  Launched with a $500,000 grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, KNPR’s SoN has been honored locally and nationally for program excellence including the ACE Award from the Public Radio Program Directors Association.

Independent research shows the combined Nevada Public Radio weekly audience is more than 200,000 listeners, our website attracts approximately 240,000 visitor sessions each month and more than 200,000 audio downloads of original content.

To serve residents of Nevada and adjacent states, Nevada Public Radio operates a series of transmitters extending service to more than 150,000 residents within its 49,000 square miles coverage area, including Tonopah, Panaca, Ely, Mesquite, Laughlin and Scotty’s Junction, NV, plus Death Valley and Ridgecrest, CA, Lake Havasu City, AZ and St. George, UT.

In 1993, responding to another unmet need, Nevada Public Radio established the state’s first and only Radio Reading Service. This closed-circuit, 24 hour reading service delivers timely, original information totally free of charge to blind and visually-impaired listeners throughout the coverage area. With the cooperation of KUNR-Reno and KNCC-Elko, the service is available to 98% of the Nevada population.  It is also available online.

After many years of effort in 2003, Nevada Public Radio signed on a new full-service station in Las Vegas, Classical 89.7, which provides 24-hours a day classical music.

Our newest, full-service station is in Elko, NV – News 89.3 KLKR, which provides 24-hours a day news and information.

Nevada Public Radio operates on an annual budget of $4.7-million. See our latest Annual Audited Financial Statement  and our latest Form 990.

This on-line Annual Report informs members, underwriters, grantors and other community shareholders about the financial health of Nevada Public Radio, including investments, station goals and objectives.  The member recognition includes profiles of some the supporters of Nevada Public Radio.

In 1996, Nevada Public Radio was one of seven applicants, out of 1,300 candidates, to receive a grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation. NVPR received $4.5 million dollars to construct and equip a new permanent home for KNPR.

Endowment

In accepting the Reynolds award, the Board of Directors committed itself to raising a minimum of $1.5 million in endowment funding. That commitment has increased to $2.2 million. The endowment campaign received a lead gift from the L. J. Castle family, along with early contributions from the Boyd Foundation, the Nevada Arts Council, the Lincy Foundation, Frances Saxton, Jim Rogers, J. A. Tiberti, John Klai, the Laub family (Bill Sr., Mary and Bill Jr.), Louis Castle and Westwood Studios, The National Endowment for the Humanities, the Union Pacific Foundation, as well as individual contributions from the listeners, staff and Board of Directors of Nevada Public Radio.

Nevada-Senior-Guide The Way Out Christian Fellowship

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

www.thewayoutcf.com

The Way Out Christian Fellowship

Senior Pastor Earl Kennedy

My name is Earl Kennedy, I came to the Lord in 1991 leaving behind a lifestyle of drug addiction and witchcraft.  I was lost and broken with no hope in life when God came to me.  He sent me back to the streets that I came from to help others.  We now have sober living homes for people who want help.  They are able to start their lives over again with the Lord leading the way.

Ministry

Recovery Homes

We have both men and women recovery homes up and running.  The homes are set in a family atmosphere to give people something many are not used to.  We have people staying anywhere between one month to 2 years. When they are ready to leave , then they go. Our goal for everyone  who comes to us is that they never have to be addicted to anything again.  Most are also restored to their own families.  Above all else they leave with a relationship with the Lord that solves all their problems.  This is a 24 hour a day job and the blessings that come with watching lives change in this manner are not measureable.  God has blessed the houses and those who live in them.

Lionheart Academy

We are in the process of opening a boarding school in the Las Vegas Valley.  It is a place for children rescued from slavery.  Most people know about this as child trafficking.  Housing both sex and labor trafficked children, we will take children from preschool age through 17 years old. We will also take them from anywhere in the US or internationally.  www.LionheartAcademy.org

 

Mission

The purpose of THE WAY OUT CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP is:

“For the equipping to the saints for the work of service, to the building up of the body of Christ; until we all attain to the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to a mature man, to the measure of the stature which belongs to the fullness of Christ.  As a result, we are no longer to be children, tossed here and there by waves, and carried about by every wind of doctrine, by the trickery of men, by craftiness in deceitful scheming; but speaking the truth in love, we are to grow up in all aspects into Him, who is the head, even Christ, from whom the whole body, being fitted and held together by that which every joint supplies, according to the proper working of each individual part, causes the growth of the body for the building up of itself in love”.  (Ephesians 4:12-16)

STATEMENT OF FAITH

We believe that there is one living and true GOD, eternally existing in three Persons: The Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit , equal in power and glory; that this tri-une God created all, upholds all and governs all.

We believe that the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments are the Word of God, fully inspired without error in the original manuscripts, and the infallible rule of faith and practice.

We believe in GOD THE FATHER, an infinite, personal Spirit, perfect in holiness, wisdom, power and love; that He concerns Himself mercifully in the affairs of men; that He hears and answers prayer; and that He saves from sin and death all who come to Him through the SON, Jesus Christ.

We believe in Jesus Christ, God’s only begotten Son, conceived by the Holy Spirit.  We believe in His virgin birth.  His sinless life, His miracles and teachings, His death for our sins according to the Scriptures, His burial, His bodily resurrection, His finished work on the cross, His ascension into Heaven, and His perpetual intercession for His followers.

We believe in the Holy Spirit, Who came from the Father and Son to convict the world of sin, righteousness and judgment, and to regenerate, sanctify and empower for ministry all who believe in Christ; we believe the Holy Spirit indwells every believer in Jesus Christ and that He is an abiding Helper, Teacher, and Guide.  We believe in the present ministry of the Holy Spirit and in the exercise of all the Biblical gifts of the Spirit and all Biblical callings.

We believe that all People are sinners by nature and choice, and therefore, are under condemnation and therefore, in need of salvation and regeneration.  We believe that eternal life and salvation is only by God’s grace through faith in our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.

We believe in the True Church, the living spirit body, of which Christ is the Head and all regenerated persons are members.  “And He put all things under His feet, and gave Him to be the head over all things to the church, which is His body, the fullness of Him who fills all in all”.  (Ephesians 1:22-23NKVJ)

Nevada-Senior-Guide Silver Sky at Deer Springs – Las Vegas

www.silverskylasvegas.com 

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Silver Sky at Deer Springs

An Exceptional Retirement and Assisted Living Community for Nevada Seniors

Silver Sky at Deer Springs Assisted Living pulled out the stops to create a family-style Retirement and Assisted Living setting while providing services that reflect both quality and caring. We feel it’s so exceptional that it places us in a class of our own.

The Deer Springs staff takes pride in their jobs and provide quality services tailored made to meet your every need. They’ll take time to get to know you personally and to put a smile on your face too. It isn’t their intention to become part of your family but when they spend as much time with you as they do, it just happens.

The Deer Springs staff takes pride in their jobs and provide quality services tailored made to meet your every need. They’ll take time to get to know you personally and to put a smile on your face too. It isn’t their intention to become part of your family but when they spend as much time with you as they do, it just happens.

State of the Art Kitchen

Silver Sky at Deer Springs Assisted Living is bright, clean, and spacious. When friends and family visit they will enjoy your apartment home because of the attractiveness, details, freshness and personality built into the design. Each apartment comes equipped with a refrigerator/freezer and microwave oven. Our classic design and colors are suitable for all tastes and create a lot of compliments.

Outside your personal apartment at Silver Sky at Deer Springs Assisted Living you’ll find plenty of space to share and enjoy with family and friends. A brightly decorated reception area and lobby, library, living room, activity room and a delightful Bistro for beverages, snacks, ice cream and plenty of visiting await you.

Recreation Room

Knowing the importance of quality of life, Silver Sky at Deer Springs Assisted Living supports dignity, independence, choices, flexibility, and style for seniors who thrive on quality of life.

Silver Sky at Deer Springs Assisted Living serves the needs of all seniors in compliance with Fair Housing Laws and the general public seeking affordable housing. (Income restrictions apply).

Our Neighborhood

Our Apartments Are Centrally Located

A shopping center is only a block away and is home to many stores and shops including Wal-Mart, Costco, Stein Mart, Wells Fargo Bank, Bed Bath and Beyond as well as many great restaurants, and other shopping is close at hand.

Centennial Hills Hospital Med Center is just five and half miles away and Mountain View Medical Center is a short 7 miles away.

Services

Assisted Living Services

If and when you need a little extra help, we can assist you with the activities of daily living. These services are provided in the comfort of your apartment home without necessitating a need to move. Some of our services include: Personal laundry, daily housekeeping, medications, bathing, and dressing, transportation, hygiene, and nutrition.

Emergency Communication System

All apartments are connected to an emergency communication system that allows residents to reach our staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week, in case of emergency.

Transportation

We provide scheduled transportation for shopping trips, organized social and recreational activities, and medical and dental appointments.

Dining

The dining room is open, airy, and intimate yet comfortable and provides you with three nutritious meals daily.  Our Executive Chef’s at Silver Sky and at Deer Springs love to create fresh and flavorful meals with variety and nutrition and always with your health in mind. In fact, our menus are seasonal and reviewed by a Registered Dietician. Invited Guests and Family are always welcome to dine with you.

Our culinary team prepares over 200,000 meals annually and savors the opportunity to create your favorites! Theme dinners are offered throughout the year to celebrate special events such as Cinco De Mayo, St. Patrick’s Day, Thanksgiving, and the entire holiday season plus special luaus and so much more.

Veteran Information

Any wartime veteran with 90 days of active duty, one day beginning or ending during a period of war, is eligible to apply for the Aid & Attendance Improved Pension. A surviving spouse may also apply. The individual applying must qualify both medically and financially.

To qualify medically, a wartime veteran or surviving spouse must need the assistance of another person to perform daily tasks, such as eating, dressing or undressing, taking care of the needs of nature, etc. being blind or in a nursing home for mental or physical incapacity, or residing in an assisted living facility also qualifies.

Eligibility must be proven by filing the proper Veterans Application for Pension or Compensation. This application will require a copy of DD-214 or separation papers, medical evaluation from a physician, current medical issues, net worth limitations, and net income, along with out-of-pocket medical expenses.

To qualify financially, an applicant must have on average less than $80,000 in assets, excluding their home and vehicles.

You must still be income qualified as well as pass the other qualifiers to become a resident at Deer Springs Assisted Living.

FAQ’s

What’s Included in my Monthly Fees?

Monthly fees include all utilities (with the exception of phone and internet), breakfast, lunch and dinner. Also included are weekly housekeeping, bus transportation, and fun activity and wellness programs, concierge service, educational and cultural events and 24-hour staffing.

Do You Accept Veterans?

Yes we do.

How is behind Silver Sky? Are the communities stable places to live?               Yes, they are stable communities.

How is the food?

The food is great. If you’d like, stop by some time and try it out.

Is living at a Silver Sky Community fun?

Our residents think so. We have a slate of fun things to do and keep you active.

What’s the staff like at your communities?

We invite you to schedule an appointment to meet everyone.

Do you have two bedroom apartments?

Yes we do.

 

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!