Warning: trim() expects parameter 1 to be string, array given in /home/nvsenior/public_html/wp-content/plugins/custom-post-order-category/wp-customcategorypostorder.php on line 492
jog | Nevada Senior Guide

5 Tips for Healthy Aging of the Eyes

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

5 Tips for Healthy Aging of the Eyes

September is Healthy Aging Month, making it an ideal time to shed some light on an important issue that impacts millions as we age – our eyesight. With around 1.75 million people in the country having age-related macular degeneration, according to the National Institutes of Health, and another 2.2 million suffering from glaucoma, vision is a crucial issue as we age. The good news is that there are things you can do in order to help your eyes age healthily.

“Healthy eyesight is one of those things that people don’t pay much attention to until there is a problem,” explains Dr. Edward Kondrot, founder of the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center. “Ideally, it’s best to take measures to avoid those problems. Many of the problems people have with their vision as they age can be avoided, and even reversed.”

Regardless of one’s age, it is never too early or too late to do things to maintain healthy eyes. Here are 5 tips for doing just that:

  1. Be proactive. Those who do nothing to protect their vision may find they have problems as they age. Just like being proactive to have a healthy heart or mind, it is important to make healthy vision a priority. This means purposely including healthy vision measures in your lifestyle.
  2. Eat healthy foods. Diet plays an important role in maintaining one’s vision. It is important to eat plenty of antioxidant-loaded fruits and vegetables. They are nutritional powerhouses that will help to protect the eyes. Also, it is crucial to opt for organic foods, so that your body does not take in all the harmful chemicals. Those chemicals provide a toxic overload, which impacts the eyes, as well as the rest of the body.
  3. Stay hydrated. Many people who have eye problems are also dehydrated. Staying hydrated is essential to maintaining good eye health. Start each morning with a full glass of room-temperature water. Drinking things like tea and coffee do not count. Add a little lemon if you prefer, which will also help to flush toxins.
  4. Watch the shades. Millions of people have taken to wearing sunglasses, but may not be choosing ones that actually protect their eyes. Worse yet, they may choose some that actually weaken them. Dark sunglasses are not necessarily a good choice, as many may believe. When selecting sunglasses be sure to opt for those that block ultraviolet A and B light to really offer your eye protection.
  5. Reduce eye stress. People stress their eyes in ways that they are not even aware of, such as sleeping in a room that has a night light, or light coming from an alarm clock or another room. Another way people stress their eyes is to watch television in a dark room. Both of these things can provide unnecessary stress that can cause damage over time.

“Healthy aging of the eyes can be done and is being done by millions,” adds Dr. Kondrot. “It comes down to being aware of what will help and harm the eyes and then taking measures to do what will benefit them in the long run.”

Dr. Kondrot is the author of three best-selling books, including “10 Essentials to Save Your Sight” (Advantage Media Group, July 2012), and president of the Arizona Homeopathic and Integrative Medical Association. He has founded the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center, located just north of Tampa, Fla., which offers alternative and homeopathic routes to vision therapies known as the “Kondrot Program.” The program focuses on such conditions as macular degeneration, glaucoma, dry eye, cataracts, and others. His advanced programs have helped people from around the world restore their vision. The center sits on 50 acres of land and features a 14,000-square-foot state-of-the art complex, an organic ranch, jogging trails, swimming pool, hot tub, and more. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

About Health The Eye & Wellness Center

The Healing The Eye & Wellness Center is located 30 miles north of Tampa, in Dade City, Fla. Founded by Dr. Edward Kondrot, the Center offers world-class alternative therapies for vision conditions, including color and vision therapy, the treatment of glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration, dry eye, and more. The center also offers a variety of seminars, webinars, and training sessions for others in the medical community. Dr. Kondrot is the world’s only board-certified ophthalmologist and board-certified homeopathic physician. He is also author of three best-selling books in the field. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

Headed to the Beach? Don’t Let Your Feet Ruin Your Vacation

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Headed to the Beach? Don’t Let Your Feet Ruin Your Vacation

CHICAGO—July 2, 2013 As millions of Americans hit the beach this summer, the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons offers these foot safety tips:

  • Wear shoes to protect your feet from puncture wounds and cuts. Sea shells, broken glass and other sharp objects when stepped on can ruin your day at the beach. Avoid the water if your skin gets cut – bacteria in oceans and lakes can cause infection. If you do suffer from a puncture wound, have it treated by a foot and ankle surgeon within 24 hours to avoid complications.
  • Feet get sunburned, too. Rare but deadly skin cancers, such as melanoma, can occur on the foot. Prevent skin cancer on your feet by lathering up with sunscreen. Don’t forget to apply to both the tops and bottoms of your feet!
  • Wear shoes to protect your soles from getting burned as you walk on blistering-hot sand, sidewalks and pavement. Take extra precaution if you have diabetes.
  • Be careful with your footing while playing beach sports such as Frisbee or volleyball – walking, jogging and playing sports on soft, uneven surfaces frequently leads to arch pain, heel pain, ankle sprains and other injuries. It’s best to wear supportive shoes while playing beach sports. If injuries occur, use rest, ice, compression and elevation to ease pain and swelling. Any injury that does not resolve within a few days should be examined by a foot and ankle surgeon.
  • Remember jellyfish stings can still occur even if it’s washed up on the beach. Remove any tentacles that may stick to the foot or ankle, and protect your hands. Vinegar, meat tenderizer or baking soda reduce pain and swelling. Most jellyfish stings heal within days, but if they don’t, see a doctor.
  • Diabetes Risks: People who have diabetes face serious foot safety risks at the beach. The disease causes poor blood circulation and numbness in the feet. A person with diabetes may not feel pain from a cut, puncture wound or burn. Any type of skin break on a diabetic foot has the potential to get infected and ulcerate if it isn’t noticed right away. People with diabetes should always wear shoes to the beach, and remove them regularly to check for foreign objects like sand and shells that can cause sores, ulcers and infections.

For more information on foot and ankle health, visit the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeon’s patient education page at FootHealthFacts.org.


About ACFAS

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of more than 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons. Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research and provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its consumer website, http://FootHealthFacts.org.

Keeping Senior Citizens Active by Matthew G Young

May 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Just like anyone else, senior citizens like to stay active. Having a list of activities for your elderly relatives to do will keep them active and alert. Both mental and physical stimulation are proven to be healthy for senior citizens, it’s only a matter of finding the activities that they enjoy the most. This goes for any activity; make sure they are happy with the choice they have made. It’s never too late to switch activities if they become frustrated or unhappy.

Crafts, puzzles, and board games are a good place to start. Crafts especially allow for mental exercise and abstract thinking and they will have created something-with or without your help-that they can be proud of. Whether it is a painting, a drawing, a collage, or something more difficult like a sculpture, both they and their families will love the final product. What’s more, art can be therapeutic, especially for folks with Alzheimer’s.

Cooking is another activity with a great final product. Who doesn’t love eating freshly baked bread, or home-made candies? With a little encouragement, the senior citizen under your care can even go on to having meals ready for their family when they get home. The important thing here is that they are keeping active and stimulating their brain cells. This is a great way to preserve memory in older folks.

Physical exercise requires a bit of caution. While it is true that a daily jog can help with mood and memory, this is not really an option for most senior citizens. Finding alternative ways to exercise can be a great way to keep them feeling and thinking young. Start with their interests. If the person you care for is a fan of watching professional bowling on television, take them to the local bowling alley. Make sure that they use the lighter balls at first, though, as this will reduce the risk of injury. Start small and then see how things go. You want to make sure that the person under your care is enjoying themselves while they get their exercise. Otherwise, they will begin to dread your visits-this will only hinder the progress you hope to make.

Finally, you can consider storytelling. Everyone has a great life story to tell, especially senior citizens. Whether they want a written record of their lives to preserve for future generations, or just want to tell you some stories from their childhood, this activity is a great stimulator as it requires folks under your care to search their brains for memories. If they can’t remember actual events from their lives, fiction is okay too. Every day you can together come up with a short, interesting, story. Whether you want to write it down or not is up to you and those under your care. Either way, telling a story requires brain activity that might otherwise go unaccounted for.

Visit Paradise In Home Care to get more information.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Matthew_G_Young

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!