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Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias

June 12, 2016 by · Comments Off on Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias
Filed under: General 

Australian business is starting to see the light when it comes to their hiring policies for mature aged employees, and the positive impact they can have on the workplace. A brief visit to main street shopping centre and you will begin to see a few more weathered faces at work than you would have seen a few years ago.

However, if you scratch below the surface, you begin to see this trend still has a long way to play out. A few older workers get hired into the senior ranks where experience and maturity are greatly valued, more older workers are now being hired at the lower end of the corporate scale into unskilled roles, however the numbers being hired into the mid tier ranks remains low.

This barbell approach to hiring mature workers at the top and bottom of an organisation reflects an ongoing bias that remains difficult to overcome. A company is a microcosm of society, and in a perfect world employers should (within reason) seek diversity in the workplace and value skill, experience and aptitude, regardless of age, race or gender.

Unfortunately, we live in a far from perfect world. When it comes to mature aged workers they tend to be penalised on two fronts. Often the first to be made redundant in uncertain economic times, this setback is then compounded when they are regularly overlooked for someone younger as they begin searching for a new job.

As a result of these two biases towards mature aged job seekers, once out of work, the journey back can often be long and arduous. This is reflected in RBA statistics which indicate long-term unemployment at approximately 40% for those aged 45-64, compared to about 25% for those aged between 25 and 44.

So what are the reasons employers provide for not hiring mature aged workers? Typically, reasons include being overqualified or over-experienced. Taken at face value being overqualified or experienced might not seem so bad, but when you hear the same reason trotted out time and again, it becomes less palatable.

Openly negative feedback from employers tend to include perceptions that mature aged workers are not as IT savvy, do not possess the latest skills, or are not as flexible as their younger counterparts. While these reasons may hold true in many instances, many of the older job seekers I speak to, believe these are often used as convenient excuses to exclude them.

Employer feedback that you are not likely to hear include concerns about health (and subsequent cost) or worse insecurity. There are many poor managers in the workplace that may be intimidated by the experience a mature applicant brings to the role. Rather than leveraging the knowledge and experience an older worker can bring to the workplace, the insecure hirer is concerned about the potential competition, and the presence of someone who may know more than they do.

Dealing with many of these preconceived concerns and fears remains an ongoing challenge for the mature aged job seeker. Perhaps the following facts should be mandatory reading for hiring managers. These facts debunk many of the concerns and myths that persist in the workplace relating to mature aged workers;

    • Mature aged workers can deliver cost savings to employers through increased retention rates. For example, workers over 55 are five times less likely to change jobs compared to workers aged 20-24, reducing both recruitment and training costs. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006)Labour Mobility Survey,
    • Mature workers can deliver an average net benefit of $1956 per year to their employer compared to other workers due to high retention rates, lower rates of absenteeism, decreased recruitment costs and greater return on investment.Business, Work and Ageing (2000) Profiting from Maturity: The Social and Economic Costs of Mature Age Unemployment
    • Australians are living longer and are healthier.2005 ABS survey found the proportion of Australians aged 55-64 reporting their health as ‘good’, ‘very good’ or ‘excellent’ was 75.5% – an increase of four per cent since 1995. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006) National Health Survey: Summary of Results, 2004-05
    • Mature workers were the least likely group to take days off due to their own illness or as a carer. In the two week period prior to the survey nearly half the number of mature workers had days off compared to workers aged 25-34. ibid
    • ABS data shows that Australians aged 55-64 are the fastest growing users of information technology. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2005) Year Book Australia,
  • Australian Health Management which examined the daily work habits of 4000 employees found that workers aged 55 years and over performed at their best for approximately seven hours out of an eight-hour day-an achievement that other workers in the study were unable to match. Australian Health Management (2006), Baby boomers give employers a bang for their buck

While government has been doing its part to address mature aged unemployment through initiatives like DEEWR Experience+, the introduction of the Age Discrimination Act (2004) and appointment of an Age Discrimination Commissioner, it remains imperative that older job seekers directly address some of these age bias issues themselves if they are to enhance their prospects for employment.

Following are some helpful hints that mature aged workers can utilise to make themselves more appealing to employers and thus improve their chances of a speedy return to the workforce;

Government or Community Assistance– Take advantage of government or community based initiatives and assistance. There is a considerable amount of free information and assistance available, and I would strongly recommend looking into these resources. For example, the DEEWR “Experience+” initiative provides free career planning and advice for over 45’s until June 2016, along with an Assistance Program delivering refresher and basic training in IT and social media applications.

Value Proposition– Whether writing your resume or cover letter, or sitting in an interview, ensure the focus of discussion clearly remains on the value that you can bring to an organisation. Discuss how you can help, what you have done in the past and what you can deliver going forward. Outline how your experience might bring special insights and perspectives that other candidates may not possess.

Training– Undertake relevant training or up-skilling. Keeping ‘up to date’ is critical if you expect serious consideration for any position, especially if there is a technical element. The benefit will be that an employer will see that you have not fallen behind and therefore will not require retraining, along with any associated cost.

Resume– You will need a properly structured and well written resume to be considered for most roles. Use an appropriate resume style that is tailored to your strengths, skills and experience. Also ensure primary focus of your resume is on the last 5-10 years (include older information where pertinent). Think about getting assistance from a professional resume writer, whocan add significant value if you are looking to ‘get it right the first time’.

Age Bias – To counter potential impact of age bias, you will need to carefully address the following with any potential employer;

Health– Don’t hesitate to communicate your good health and fitness to potential employers at opportune moments. Inform them if you play sport, run, walk or go to the gym regularly. This should allay any potential concerns about health.

IT Savvy –Take every opportunity to indicate your IT capability. Whether it’s your ability to use specialised systems, the MS Office suite or even your use of Facebook or Twitter, this will highlight your ability to embrace new technology.

Adaptability – Highlight your adaptability in the workplace, providing actual examples where appropriate. If you don’t know something, indicate you are keen to learn (and not that you wouldn’t know where to start). Highlighting your adaptability will help to dispel concerns of rigidness and inflexibility.

Team Player –Communicating that you work well as part of a team is critical. It shows a willingness to take direction and work for the common good, and can present you as less threatening, especially if the hirer feels concerned by a mature more experienced candidate.

Be Positive –Though you need to be fully prepared to discuss negative issues, make every attempt to keep the discussion on a positive footing. Unless specifically requested, there is no need to volunteer information of a negative nature.

While industry is beginning to see the light when it comes to acceptance of mature aged workers, the pace of change remains slow. While providence is on the right side due to the ageing Australian population and the inevitable necessity to hire older workers, the fact remains that age discrimination is still entrenched in much current thinking.

As a result, dealing with age bias will continue to be a challenge for the foreseeable future. However with the combination of positive government policy, changing attitudes and a proactive attitude to making oneself more appealing to employers (as outlined above), the situation is not without promise.

Honing your individual approach and message will take time and effort. To strike the right balance the mature job seeker will need to walk a fine line between sounding experienced, but not old, adaptable, but not inflexible and appear keen, not desperate. There is no magic formula for success except practice, perseverance and occasionally seeking help where necessary.

A.J. Bond, is the proprietor of Absolute Resume Writing Services ( http://absoluteresume.com.au ), an Australian based consultancy specializing in the provision of Resume and Cover Letter writing services.

Absolute Resume assists a broad range of job seekers to find their preferred roles, including mature aged job seekers, individuals out of work for a period of time and those made redundant.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7334746

U.S. Veterans Honored by Encore.org’s 2013 Purpose Prize

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Seven Awards for People Over Age 60 Solving the World’s Toughest Social Problems

The Purpose Prize has become a “MacArthur genius award for people who develop a second career as social service entrepreneurs.” – The New York Times.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy organizes a network of volunteers across the country to teach disabled veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan how to combat stress — through fly-fishing.

A public relations executive helps wounded warriors find and renovate foreclosed homes – and transforms lives and neighborhoods in the process.

These are two of the seven winners of the 2013 Purpose Prize, awarded by Encore.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who translate decades of skill and experience into “second acts” that contribute to society’s greater good.

Now in its eighth year, The Purpose Prize is the nation’s only large-scale investment in people over 60 who are combining their passion and experience for the social good. Created in 2005 by Encore.org, the prize is aimed at those with the passion to make change and the wisdom to know how to do it, showcasing the value of experience and disproving the notion that innovation is solely the province of the young.

Two winners will receive $100,000 each and five winners will receive $25,000 each.

This year’s winners:

* Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. ($100,000 winner of The Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra)

* Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron taps into her own experience as a cancer survivor to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. ($100,000)

* Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing emotional wounds through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. ($25,000)

* Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
Fennelly runs a unique summer camp behind bars that is transforming federal prisoners into involved parents. ($25,000)

* Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
Huttinger’s project is on a path to eradicate human schistosomiasis, a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. ($25,000)

* Reverend Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. ($25,000)

* Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
Young’s rise from immigrant nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. ($25,000)

The Purpose Prize winners will be honored on December 5, 2013, at an awards ceremony in Sausalito, Ca. NBC’s Jane Pauley will emcee the event for hundreds of Encore leaders and the Purpose Prize winners.

Twenty-one judges – leaders in business, politics, journalism and the nonprofit sector – chose the seven winners from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees. Judges include Sherry Lansing, former CEO of Paramount; David Bornstein, author and New York Times columnist; Eric Liu, writer and founder of CitizenUniversity; and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, The Purpose Prize is a program of Encore.org, which aims to engage millions of boomers in encore careers combining personal meaning, continued income and social impact in the second half of life.

This year, Symetra is sponsoring the $100,000 Purpose Prize for Future Promise, which recognizes an individual whose approach for helping society has the potential to grow steadily over the next five years. The company plans to sponsor another Purpose Prize for Future Promise in 2014.

“While Purpose Prize winners are helping to solve a wide range of pressing social problems, they have one thing in common,” said Marc Freedman, CEO and founder of Encore.org and author of The Big Shift (PublicAffairs Books). “They – and millions of others in encore careers – are turning personal passions and decades of experience into invaluable contributions across sectors, continents and generations, often through entrepreneurship.”

Short summaries for all winners follow. Photos are attached. Longer bios and higher resolution photos are available.

Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas, winner of this year’s Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra, rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. Following a 35-year-career as a fundraising and marketing dynamo, she became the director of communications at Purple Heart Homes in 2008 in an effort to provide greater services for veterans who have service-connected disabilities. In just three years, Thomas helped take the fledgling nonprofit to new heights. She has raised millions for Purple Heart Homes in financial contributions and material donations. Revenue shot up 600% in her first year with the startup. She’s developed an innovative program that matches veterans with foreclosed homes donated by banks, then raises the funds to renovate a home for the individual veteran’s needs. It’s a win-win for all generations—and communities too. It helps veterans to grow assets, towns to recoup lost taxes and neighborhoods that have struggled with foreclosures to stabilize.

Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron is an award-winning journalist with more than 42 years in television broadcasting. She tapped into her own experience as a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. To focus on the plight of low-income Latinos fighting the disease, Duron founded Latinas Contra Cancer (Latinas Against Cancer), an organization committed to educating, supporting and providing essential services to low-income Spanish speakers often overlooked by the health care system. Latinas Contra Cancer has offered a range of programs that have taught more than 3,000 men, women and teens about the disease, resulting in more than 300 preventative cancer screenings. The group has provided psychological and social support to over 100 patients per year. However, the call to action Duron answered has had an impact far beyond the Bay Area. Her passionate commitment is helping Latino communities across the U.S. gain access to cancer support, information and treatment. Her great empathy for cancer patients has made her utterly clear on her bigger purpose in the second stage of life.

Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing the emotional wounds of battle through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. A cancer survivor and war veteran himself, Nicholson was impressed by the fortitude of disabled veterans at the Walter Reed military hospital, where he was treated for prostate cancer in 2005. It spurred him to found Project Healing Waters, a program dedicated to helping disabled soldiers and veterans recover from the trying aftermath of war through the sport of fly-fishing. One-on-one connections have been key to Project Healing Waters’ approach since the beginning. Nicholson knew there were fly-fishing groups and facilities all over the country. His innovation was to convince them to start, manage and lead fly-fishing instruction and outings with veterans through military and Veterans Administration facilities. The quiet bonds forged over fishing lines began to transform lives. Again and again Nicholson heard from family members who said their loved ones had returned from war withdrawn, angry, and difficult to be around. But after fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters, they’ve become happier, more open and engaged. Project Healing Waters works closely with VA Recreational and Occupational therapies to identify those who would most benefit from the program. Many are in wheelchairs or using prosthetics. A few are blind. Participants reflect of full spectrum of disabled veterans and include all ages, genders, ethnicities and disabilities. Nicholson says the impact “goes well beyond the mechanics of fly-fishing.”

Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
A lifelong social activist who ran homeless shelters in the District of Columbia for 17 years, Carol Fennelly abandoned her plans to retire in 1998 when she learned that D.C. inmates had been transferred to Youngstown, OH. One woman made 10-hour round-trip drives twice a week to visit her son. Moved to answer a social need, Fennelly thought about opening a hospitality house in Youngstown for family members visiting inmates. She soon learned that while 93% of the federal inmate population is male, in sheer numbers there are more programs for mothers in prison than there are for fathers. She decided she had what it took to change things. “I had spent years organizing, dealing with government, making change happen, and that emboldened me to think I could go into prisons and start all these radical programs,” Fennelly says. So she launched an encore career with Hope House, an innovative organization that helps prison inmates stay in regular contact with their children. In the past 14 years, Hope House has hosted 200 video teleconferences, 18,000 personalized book readings by fathers and 31 week-long summer camps, which allow kids to spend time with their fathers free of the usual restrictions that come with visitor hours and family chaperones. California recently decided to implement the Hope House model in its 33 state prisons. Prisons in Texas, Idaho and New Hampshire may follow. In 2013 Fennelly was honored at the White House as a Champion of Change.

Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
International public health expert Elizabeth Huttinger spotted a big idea in shrimp, and launched an encore career that could eradicate a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. Huttinger’s project – founded in 2006 – is targeting human schistosomiasis, an infectious parasite carried by river snails. Understanding that the population of prawns that eat those snails had precipitously declined, Huttinger, 63, has devoted her encore career to restoring the prawn population in the SenegalRiver Basin. Projet Crevette’s mission is multifaceted: the restoration of the prawn population diminishes the spread of schisto, provides new economic opportunities to afflicted communities and heals families infected by the disease. Today, Projet Crevette is a prawn-farming microenterprise, operated by locals at public watering holes. It has brought social innovation, new microbusinesses, environmental restoration and improved health to communities. Huttinger is confident Projet Crevette will meet its bold goal to fully restore the indigenous prawn population—and improve countless lives in the process.

Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Reverend Violet Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. After 14 years as parish pastor trained in psychotherapy, Little left behind her traditional congregation to create a religious refuge for the homeless on the streets of the city, which became the “WelcomeChurch.” The church relies mostly on word of mouth, and services can pop up in a city park or on a sidewalk. No questions are asked, and everyone is welcome. The WelcomeChurch coordinates medical services through local universities, helps people get into rehab or jobs, and offers educational services to the public on the causes of homelessness. Little estimates 40 percent of her congregants have moved off the streets into permanent housing and the WelcomeChurch celebrates each and every one of them, many of whom stay connected with Little through their transition. Little’s congregation has grown to include hundreds of homeless as well as non-homeless volunteers in the EvangelicalLutheranChurch in America.

Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
An immigrant from the West Indies who built a meaningful life on meager income, Young’s gritty rise from nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. She’s encouraged thousands to stand up for their right to earn a living wage, and counsels and trains others to become leaders themselves. In 2004, Young began building a movement to legislate a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in New YorkState, which would make overtime, paid time off and rest days mandatory. In 2009, when she heard then Governor David Patterson say on the radio that he’d sign the bill if it made it to his desk, she put on a full court press, becoming the engine behind passage of the law in 2010. The law is the first of its kind in the country, but Young is committed to making sure it isn’t the last. She’s now a key player in the NDWA’s expansion from 11 to 44 affiliated organizations with 15,000 members, up from 5,000 in 2007. Young’s passion for serving her community has only just begun.

Read More About Encore’s Purpose Prize at www.encore.org/prize.

About Encore.org

Encore.org is a national nonprofit that promotes the idea that people in their second acts have the talent and experience to solve some of society’s greatest problems.

About The Atlantic Philanthropies

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. In keeping with the Giving While Living philosophy of founder Charles “Chuck” Feeney, The Atlantic Philanthropies believes in making large investments to capitalize on significant opportunities to solve urgent problems now, so they are less likely to become larger, more entrenched and more expensive challenges later. The Atlantic Philanthropies also seeks to encourage others of significant wealth to engage in major philanthropic pursuits in their lifetime.

About The John Templeton Foundation

The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, supporting research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.

About Symetra

Symetra Financial Corporation (NYSE: SYA) is a diversified financial services company based in Bellevue, Wash. In business since 1957, Symetra provides employee benefits, annuities and life insurance through a national network of benefit consultants, financial institutions, and independent agents and advisors.

 

CONTACT: Sara Ying Rounsaville, srounsaville@encore.org, 415-952-5121, or Russ Mitchell, rmitchell@encore.org, 510-969-0801

Medicare Annual Open Enrollment Changes Are Expected, Allsup Explains

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Medicare Annual Open Enrollment Changes Are Expected, Allsup Explains

New Medicare plan options for 2014 will be available Oct. 15, but Health Insurance Marketplace enrollment could confuse beneficiaries 

There are only a few weeks before the Medicare annual open enrollment period begins Oct. 15. This year’s Medicare season crosses calendars with the rollout of the Health Insurance Marketplace, so it’s important Medicare-eligible beneficiaries understand the differences between the two government programs, according to Allsup, a nationwide provider of Medicare plan selection services.

During the Medicare annual enrollment period, Oct. 15 to Dec. 7, all Medicare beneficiaries have the option to change their Medicare plans for the coming year to better match their needs. This includes anyone using original Medicare, Medicare Advantage or Part D prescription drug plans.

“Because the federal and state-run health insurance exchanges open for business just two weeks prior to Medicare enrollment, some people may be confused,” said Paula Muschler, manager of the Allsup Medicare Advisor®, a Medicare plan selection service offering personalized help that includes customized research and enrollment assistance.

“Medicare beneficiaries may falsely think they need to enroll in an exchange plan to avoid penalties. Or, they may be so flustered that they don’t carefully evaluate their Medicare plan options for 2014, which could be detrimental if their plan or their needs have changed,” Muschler said.

Another potential area of confusion is for those individuals turning 65 during Medicare annual enrollment. “Because some seniors become Medicare eligible during this time period, they need to look at their Medicare selections for coverage that takes them through year-end 2013, as well as coverage that will begin Jan. 1, 2014,” Muschler said. “These first-time enrollees can benefit from the help of a Medicare specialist like Allsup when it comes to navigating their Medicare plan decisions.”

What to Expect: Medicare Coverage 2014

Nearly 50 million people are enrolled in Medicare. Each year, annual open enrollment brings with it changes that can affect their Medicare plan selections.

Following are factors to keep in mind for 2014 coverage:

Medicare is not part of the Health Insurance Marketplace. Anyone with Medicare is considered covered and won’t face penalties for being uninsured under provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Medicare annual open enrollment runs Oct. 15 to Dec. 7. (Note: Health Insurance Marketplace enrollment is from Oct. 1, 2013, through March 31, 2014, according to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS).)

Medicare recipients reaching the drug donut hole will benefit from lower costs. The gap in prescription drug coverage starts when someone reaches the initial coverage limit, estimated at $2,850 in 2014. It ends when they have spent $4,550, when catastrophic coverage begins. (These are reductions of $120 and $200, respectively, from 2013.) During the donut hole, all costs are covered by individuals out of their own pocket. In 2014, those who reach the donut hole can receive a 52.5 percent discount on brand-name drugs and 28 percent discount on generic drugs (an increase from 21 percent in 2013).

Under catastrophic coverage, they are responsible for a co-pay of $2.55 for generic or preferred multisource drugs (down from $2.65 in 2013) with a retail price up to $51 and $6.35 for all other drugs (down from $6.60 in 2013) with a retail price up to $127. For 2014, however, beneficiaries are responsible for a 5 percent cost-sharing fee for drugs over those retail prices.

Medicare Part B premium changes are expected. In each of the past three years, Part B premiums have increased. The 2013 monthly premium for Medicare Part B (medical insurance) was $104.90, an increase from $99.90 in 2012. In addition, because Part B premiums are based on the beneficiary’s income and those income levels are frozen at 2010 levels, more individuals could see their premiums change. Information on the standard Part B premium for 2014 should be available by the time Medicare annual open enrollment begins Oct. 15.

Prescription drug Part D plans will see slight changes in deductible and premiums. The Part D initial deductible decreases by $15 to $310. HHS also recently reported the Part D monthly premiums will remain relatively stable, at $31 for a basic prescription drug plan in 2014. This is close to the reported average premium of $30 for the past three years (2011-13). Part D premiums are subject to the same income-based thresholds as Part B.

Changes anticipated for Medicare Advantage plans. Not all plans change every year, but common changes include costs, such as premiums, deductibles and co-pays, and changes to covered procedures, tests, medical facilities and other provisions. Some plans may be eliminated, which means beneficiaries will need to select a new plan or default to original Medicare Part B. Enrollment in Medicare Advantage plans continues to grow with 14.4 million people enrolled, an increase of more than 1 million from 2012, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Most Medicare participants will receive their Annual Notice of Change (ANOC) and Evidence of Coverage (EO) from their current Medicare Advantage and Part D providers by Sept. 30, according to Muschler. “It’s crucial people review materials as soon as they receive them and asses their current healthcare needs,” she said.

“Healthcare costs are a critical line item in most people’s budget, and especially so for seniors and people with disabilities,” Muschler added. “Believing your current plan will continue to cover your needs in the same way can lead to unexpected and costly surprises.”

Medicare specialists such as Allsup are available to help consumers and their family members review Medicare plans and choices for 2014 coverage, Muschler added.

“For many people, this can be a time-consuming, confusing and complex evaluation process, especially when comparing Part D plans or Medicare Advantage plans,” Muschler said. “Many Medicare beneficiaries are pleased to find out there are Medicare specialists like Allsup who look at the comparative details of the plans, and then provide them the assistance they need to make choices that suit their needs and budget in the coming year.”

The Allsup Medicare Advisor is an affordable, flat-fee based service for Medicare-eligible individuals.

For an evaluation of Medicare options, call an Allsup Medicare Advisor specialist at (866) 521-7655 or visit Medicare.Allsup.com to learn more about the service.

The Allsup Medicare Advisor also has features that help financial advisors guide their clients to the Medicare plans that match their specific lifestyles and healthcare needs. Employers also use Allsup Medicare Advisor for their employees who are retiring and transitioning to Medicare. For more information, go to FinancialAdvisor.Allsup.com, or call (888) 220-9678.
ABOUT ALLSUP

Allsup is a nationwide provider of Social Security disability, veterans disability appeal, Medicare and Medicare Secondary Payer compliance services for individuals, employers and insurance carriers. Allsup professionals deliver specialized services supporting people with disabilities and seniors so they may lead lives that are as financially secure and as healthy as possible. Founded in 1984, the company is based in Belleville, Ill., near St. Louis. For more information, go to http://www.Allsup.com or visit Allsup on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/Allsupinc.

The information provided is not intended as a substitute for legal or other professional services. Legal or other expert assistance should be sought before making any decision that may affect your situation.

# # #

Contact:
Rebecca Ray, (800) 854-1418, ext. 65065, r.ray@allsupinc.com
Mary Jung, (773) 429-0940, mtjung@msn.com

Caring.com’s New Referral Program Supported by Leading Assisted Living Operators

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Caring.com’s New Referral Program Supported by Leading Assisted Living Operators

Caring.com Named Preferred Provider by Assisted Living Federation of America (ALFA)

SAN MATEO, Calif., May 6, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — A group of the nation’s largest senior living providers — including Brookdale Senior Living (NYSE: BKD), Emeritus Senior Living (NYSE: ESC), Benchmark Senior Living, and Senior Star — have chosen Caring.com as their agency of record for national buying of Internet leads for families looking for housing and care for their elderly loved ones. Separately, the Assisted Living Federation of America (ALFA) named Caring.com as its preferred partner for Internet marketing services.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20070921/AQF020LOGO)

With surging demand in the U.S. senior housing market, more Americans than ever before are turning to the Internet and online word of mouth to find and select the best senior living providers for their senior loved ones. About 30-50% of the senior living industry’s leads are coming from the Internet and that number is expected to rise, as tech adoption among baby boomers and seniors alike continues to increase. Whether seeking independent livingassisted living, or memory care, about two million consumers every month turn to Caring.com to find expert guidance about their options, research local providers, and get help in making well-informed selection decisions.

The country’s top senior living providers have chosen Caring.com to increase visibility of their senior living communities, optimize inquiry-to-visit rates, and leverage Caring.com’s resources to better nurture leads from the moment the search begins, through the research and decision-making phases, all the way to community selection and move-in.

In Q4-2012, Caring.com expanded its service offering with the launch of a new toll-free referral help line. Available seven days a week to those seeking senior housing, Caring.com’s family advisors explain different types of senior living options, help identify local senior communities matched to the prospective resident’s needs and preferences, schedule tours, share and encourage consumer reviews, and answer a range of senior living questions. With this added consumer support infrastructure, as well as other new and expanded capabilities for lead qualification and nurturing, the group of senior living community partners announced Caring.com as the agency of record for lead qualification and development, starting January 1. The help line is now referring nearly four thousand prospective residents per week.

“Caring.com has been great to work with as they’ve added the referral model to their business,” said Jayne Sallerson, executive vice president of sales and marketing at Emeritus Senior Living. “Emeritus wanted to consolidate our Internet lead buying with a company we could trust, and Caring.com has demonstrated their commitment to consumers, to us, and to the industry. Their new program is showing positive signs of increased tours and conversions.”

“Caring.com has proven themselves to be a strong partner for Brookdale,” said Jim Pusateri, senior vice president of sales at Brookdale Senior Living. “Working with fewer Internet lead sources has improved our operational efficiencies, lowered our marketing costs, and improved consumers’ experience with Brookdale Senior Living.”

Separately, ALFA, the largest national association of providers of professionally managed communities for seniors, signed Caring.com as its preferred provider for Web-based lead services as well as to power the organization’s new ALFA Senior Living Community Directory.

“Caring.com is our preferred provider of Web-based services because they are an exceptional online resource,” said Richard P. Grimes, president and CEO of ALFA, which is the largest national association exclusively dedicated to professionally managed, consumer-driven senior living communities. “Caring.com’s high-quality content, easy-to-use directory, and online reviews help prospective residents and their families find the right solutions for their needs — this is good for consumers and good for senior living.”

“From the beginning, we’ve focused on building the most comprehensive and most credible online resource to help those caring for a senior parent, spouse, or other loved one,” says Andy Cohen, co-founder and CEO of Caring.com. “Unlike some other Internet resources that will only share information about those providers who pay them, we’ve stayed true to our social mission and help connect consumers to a variety of quality resources for their needs. Working with ALFA and the leading senior living communities helps enable our ability to best serve those in need of senior care — and we continue to offer referral to free and low-cost support resources as well.”

More information for senior living providers interested in partnering with Caring.com is available here: http://providerinfo.caring.com/ProviderGetListed.html Consumers can begin their search for senior housing here: http://www.caring.com/local

About Caring.com
Caring.com is the leading website for family caregivers seeking information and support as they care for aging parents, spouses, and other loved ones. Caring.com provides helpful caregiving content,online support groups, and the most comprehensive Senior Care Directory in the United States, with 35,000 consumer ratings and reviews and a toll-free senior living referral line (1-866-824-8174). In January 2012, Caring.com launched the Caring Stars award program recognizing America’s best assisted living communities based on consumer reviews. This year, 383 communities in 40 states were named the Caring Stars of 2013. Based in San Mateo, California, Caring.com is a private company funded by DCM, Intel Capital, Shasta Ventures, and Split Rock Partners. Connect with Caring.com onFacebookTwitterGoogle+, PinterestLinkedIn and/or YouTube.

CONTACT: PR@caring.com, 650-762-8190

Senior Citizens and Pets by Kay Catlett

April 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As baby-boomer pet parents reach retirement age it is common to think about  putting aside the dog collars, pet clothing and dog harnesses and retire from  being pet parents. This is especially common as a beloved pet may die. The usual  questions of a grieving pet owner are magnified by older pet owners. The only  real questions with younger owners concerns whether or not they miss the joy of  pet ownership and whether they still possess the desire to take on the  responsibility of another pet. As the pet parent ages, more questions have to be  asked. The age and health of the human along with whether or not the needs of  particular pets can be managed are the most important questions for aging pet  parents.

The primary question concerns whether or not a pet is beneficial for aging  people.

Many seniors crave and miss nurturing. Often, a lifetime of nurturing has  defined a person, first as a parent, friend, spouse or grandparent. With  children and grandchildren growing older, nurturing may no longer required on a  personal basis. Senior citizens may find the circle of friends narrowing as  interests change, people retire and move, and activities lessen. Having a pet to  nurture, and providing that pet with food, comfort, exercise, toys, play and  companionship can fill the void in a changing life.

As the years pass, people may find their lives boring and lonely. Having a  pet cat or dog can fill this void. Taking care of a pet can provide meaning and  provide positive feelings of caring for another being. A pet can provide  structure missed by people following the routine of working outside of the home.  Caring for a pet provides some structure: time to eat, time to play and go  outside, time to be combed, time for naps. At the same time, the pet parent has  a role: to take care of the pet. This sense of responsibility provides structure  as well as a sense of being needed.

Another plus for seniors to have dogs, is for the protection a dog can give.  Seniors are often prey for intruders since the resistance of a senior citizen is  perceived as being lower and often it is known that there are less people living  in the home. However with a dog, the fear of barking or being bitten inhibit the  activities of intruders to that home. Research shows that homes with barking  dogs are violated fewer times than homes without dogs. Dogs provide safety to  seniors.

Another benefit of a senior owning a dog is that it makes them more active.  Owning a dog will compel the senior to live a more active lifestyle then if they  are by themselves. The dog will need to go outside to use the bathroom; feeding  and grooming must take place. These simple activities will give the owner  exercise. Matching the activity needs of the pet to the activity level of the  owner is an important factor to consider in deciding what kind of pet or breed  is best for both the senior and the pet.

Aging pet parents need to think about the future of their pets as time goes  on. A plan for pet care should be arranged so that if a hospitalization is  necessary, or a period of recovery in the home should occur, the needs of the  pets need to be met in those circumstances. Pet care in the home of another,  kennel care or acquiring the assistance of others to provide assistance in the  home are all necessary elements of a pet care plan. Pet parents of every age,  but especially senior citizens need to investigate alternatives in the dire case  of having to give up the pet. This author strongly suggests that “no-kill” pet  shelters need to be listed in the plan in the direst situations.

Overall, a senior owning a pet is an excellent idea. Dogs and cats provide  excellent companions and safety to senior citizens. Studies show that seniors  with pets are happier and live longer then seniors without pets. Preparing the  home properly with crates, dog collars, cat harnesses and pet beds coupled with  preparing plans for all contingencies will make for happy seniors and their  happy pets.

Kay Catlett [http://www.PetCollarStoreAndMore.com]

I believe that as we are humane to our pets, they make us more human. My  online pet store has carefully selected products at competitive prices.

I welcome your input on what products you like and want me to  carry.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kay_Catlett

 

Senior Citizens Singles – Ways to Find a Date By Annielyn Summers

April 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many senior citizens singles today want to get back into dating. They love  the feeling of dating when they were younger. Perhaps now they feel that dating  is for the kids and not themselves anymore. As a senior citizen, one should have  more reason to date. At this time of someone’s life, the most important thing is  to enjoy life as it comes to you. This is the reason why it is better for single  senior citizens to date once again.

There are many ways to find a date. You can join local seniors clubs and meet  people there. The advantage here is you get to see and get to know that person.  Another advantage is you know they live your area, making dating that much  easier to coordinate. You can also try a senior singles cruise or vacation.  These are special trips created with the single senior in mind. You can travel  somewhere with a group of other senior singles. This way would perhaps be more  enjoyable since you get to enjoy the vacation as much as the company of the  people you meet. If you are internet savvy, the best and fastest way is to join  a social networking site like Facebook. All you have to do is join the site and  create your profile. This profile will be how everyone in the world will see  you. You may also search for other senior singles using these sites and have  contact with them. You can also join a dating service in your area. Every town  has one. By paying a small membership fee, the dating service will find  potential matches for you and set dates up for you. You date a few people and  you choose who you felt had the most connection with you. Despite the fee, it is  all worth it.

These are just a few ways to find other single senior citizens to date. When  you are meeting new people, always go with your instinct. You might find your  happiness in the process. You can find other websites about dating single senior  citizens on the internet.

Here’s A Secret Tip!

Love is just waiting for you. Go here –

http://www.senior-singles-dating.com
http://www.sweetesthearts.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Annielyn_Summers

 

The Seasoned Senior Citizen By Irene Reynolds

April 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

At what point does one consider themselves a senior citizen, age 60, 62 or  65. By definition a senior citizen is the condition or fact of being older which  carries with it an abundance of privileges.

At a given point of everyone’s life retirement kicks in, planning what to do  next with your life is a big step. Putting finances in place to continue  residing comfortably is a major fact.

Remember that gold watch your former employer presented to you at your  retirement party, hide it in the back of the drawer, you have quite a bit of  time left on the clock to enjoy your life. So research and discover all of the  financial rewards that are out there for you. Your buying power is greater than  you think.

Here are some known areas to save financially, they are privileges for the  active seasoned senior citizen.

1. Join a senior discount club and receive 50 to 70% off on massages,  facials, spas, classes of interest, tours, special events, movie tickets and  more.

2. Save pennies at the supermarket. Clipping coupons can be fun and a number  of manufacturers are set up to give you free samples of new product, seem on TV,  if you request it. Coupon clubs can bring new friendships your way also.

3. Lower your phone bill. There are several telephone units available that  gives you free phone service. Check the local electronic stores in your area.  These telephone units are generally plugged into the USB port of a computer and  you can chat forever, free.

4. Contact your lending institution and request to have your credit card  interest rate lowered. They will be eager to accommodate you and hold you as a  loyal customer.

5. Need a new cell phone, seniors can get a free cell phone for the asking.  Get on the internet, you’ll be surprised at what you will find.

6. Stop making monthly mortgage payment. Request information on reverse  mortgages. If you decide to travel this avenue, you will never have to make  another mortgage payment for the rest of your life. Investigate it  seriously.

7. Can’t afford designer fashions, did you know that local dry cleaners  donate great looking clothing to charitable businesses. These are items not  picked up by customers within the 30 to 60 days. They are priced reasonably for  resale and will save you money.

8. Fitness clubs are a definite. Reinvent yourself. Getting in shape will  give you energy to spare. Special rates are generally available for seniors and  it’s a great place to meet people.

9. Let someone else do the cooking. Restaurants have a discount senior  citizen menu which includes the same items that non-seniors can order. Eat out,  they would love to have you as their guest.

10.Buy items when they go on sale. The markup on merchandise is unrealistic.  Take the hint, wait for the sale or price match at several stores to get the  best deal.

Erase those concerns standing in your way and your golden senior retirement  days will be inexpensive, stress free and well.

[http://www.weatherradiotracker.com]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Irene_Reynolds

 

Can Senior Citizens Still Find a Partner? by Robert Shorn

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Senior citizens who are left single, divorced or widowed are often confronted  with the question of whether one can still find a partner who will see them  through till the end of their lives.

Luckily, they do not have to go far to start a date. Finding the next true  love of their life may be easier than they ever thought it could possibly be. At  the comforts of their home, they can start dating through websites offering  services of meeting other people, particularly to this age group. Senior  citizens who are consciously searching for their partners are believed to be  able to extend their life just by aggressively searching.

How can this be? Statistics reflects that senior citizens who are regularly  meeting people in search of a life-long partner stay in good health. Clearly,  there is a dual advantage here. Find a partner and live longer. The studies  aren’t wrong and our mental well being has a profound impact on our overall  health and our life expectancy. There are so many benefits that come with  spending your time with someone you love.

Websites that offer online meeting for senior citizens covers the general  concerns of the senior citizens in dating. These sites makes it easier for this  market segment to meet and match. Most of the senior citizens use the following  sites: Senior Friend Finder, Dating For Single Seniors Meet, Senior People Meet,  and Dating For Seniors. There are more that could satisfy one’s need. There are  many by region and others that orient themselves by interest, whether it be  ethnicity, religion, hobbies, political orientation or nearly anything else. The  options are virtually limitless when it comes to these sites.

The sites offer different ways to communicate with the other person. Some  would provide a window to one’s bio data called profile. Still, others allow  people to chat through their websites.

The more sophisticated ones would provide articles on advising people on how  to date. The articles provide the way to bring people together who think the  same way.

Naturally, senior citizens would be cautious in joining such activity because  they feel uncomfortable discussing their age. Why is it difficult when the ones  who will be there share the same concern because they are mostly senior citizens  too?

These people carry similar concerns. They are looking for an opportunity to  love and the person to share it with. They may think positive about the  situation, but are also vigilant.

Looking for truck  tires for sale and roll  up garage doors? Try eBay.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Robert_Shorn

Light Bulbs For Senior Citizens By Atte Aaltonen

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Seeing the Light: Why Lighting Is Important for Senior  Citizens

As people age, they consider home improvements that will make their living  spaces both safer and more enjoyable. Some senior citizens choose to downgrade  to a smaller and easy-to-manage home, while others improve the safety of their  current household by making sure railings are tightly installed, rugs are put on  slippery floors and stairs are covered in soft carpet. One factor that is often  overlooked is the lighting throughout the home. While it may seem simple,  lighting is one of the most important features of the home, especially as people  get older.

According to SeniorJournal.com, senior citizens need three times the amount  of light than younger people do in order to see clearly. This is because the  lenses on the eye thicken and the pupils shrink, causing the eyes to react  slower to lighting conditions. Senior citizens with dementia also suffer from  additional eye impairment because they have a difficulty in distinguishing  objects from their backgrounds.

Not only is lighting necessary for senior citizens because of the effects of  aging, but they also need adequate lighting for safety. Senior citizens are at  an increased risk for slips and falls, so it’s important that they can see  clearly throughout the home.

Where Should Seniors Have Lighting?

It’s essential that every room has adequate lighting for both safety and  comfort, but there are certain areas that require careful attention. Make sure  that stairways and walkways have enough lighting, as these are some of the most  common places for slips and falls. Ideally, seniors should have a light switch  at both the top and bottom of the stairs so that they can switch the lights on  and off without being stuck in the dark. The lights should point toward the  stairs so that each step is well lit.

The kitchen is another room that needs adequate lighting, as this is where  seniors prepare all of their meals and handle appliances. Seniors must be able  to read the labels on food items, buttons on appliances and also be able to  handle cutting and chopping confidently. To increase lighting, consider  installing lights underneath cabinets. Other good choices include low-hanging  lights to go over a breakfast bar or recessed lighting in all corners of the  kitchen.

Another room that deserves attention is the family room or den, where  reading, watching television and relaxing is done. There is no need for seniors  to strain their eyes when engaging in their hobbies, so choose lighting that  will complement activities. For example, floor lamps that have 3-way bulbs are  ideal, since each bulb can be positioned differently, providing light from a  variety of angles.

Nightlights are also important to have throughout the home, especially  because seniors find themselves getting up during the night to use the washroom.  Consider the areas that are dark and often traveled through during the late  hours, such as hallways, stairs and bedrooms. Nightlights are easy to place in  both high and low outlets to provide sufficient lighting, at least until a  senior can reach the light switch.

What Types of Light Bulbs are Best for Seniors?

The standard and most basic type of light bulb is an incandescent bulb. What  makes an incandescent bulb a great option for seniors is that it is easy to  change, easy to keep clean and fits in standard lamps and fixtures. Because  incandescent bulbs contain no mercury or lead, they can be disposed of or  recycled with the regular trash.

Fluorescent light bulbs are another great option for seniors because they are  efficient, produce little heat and last up to 20,000 hours. A longer life means  seniors won’t have to change the bulbs as much. Fluorescent light bulbs do  contain mercury however, so it’s important to dispose of them properly.

Turning Light Bulbs On and Off with Ease

Light bulbs and fixtures aren’t the only important factors to consider;  seniors must also think about how their light bulbs will be turned on and off.  If possible, make sure that all light bulbs can be turned on using a light  switch so that the room is well lit upon entering or exiting. As an added  benefit, choose to install dimmers onto light switches so that the intensity of  the light can be altered using the switch.

Other great options are rocker switches, which are larger than standard  switches and can be turned on and off using an arm, elbow or even a cane. If  there are rooms where the lights are not hooked up to a light switch, clap-on  lights should be considered. These friendly alternatives make it easy for  seniors to gently clap their hands in order to activate light bulbs.

How to Safely Change a Light Bulb

Providing a senior citizen’s home with enough light is not only essential for  safety, but it also allows seniors more independence and confidence. Best of  all, once proper lighting is installed, seniors can maintain their light bulbs  and fixtures themselves. To change a light bulb is simple and requires no tools,  as long as the bulb is in a lamp or fixture that does not contain a glass  reflector. If a glass reflector is present, a small screwdriver can be used to  loosen the screws and remove the bulb.

1. Turn off the electricity and let the bulb cool for 5 minutes.  2. Hold  the base of the bulb firmly with one hand, while turning it counterclockwise  until it is released from the socket. 3. Insert the new light bulb into the  socket, making sure it fits snug. 4. Turn the light bulb in a clockwise  direction until is locked in. 5. Switch the electricity to “on” and make  sure that the bulb is working properly.

What to Look for When Choosing Light Fixtures

There may not be much that seniors can do about existing lighting, but if  updating fixtures or purchasing a new home, there are certain light fixtures to  consider. Look for ceiling fixtures that do not contain globes around them.  These need to be removed and cleaned often in order to maintain their look and  proper lighting. Not to mention, in order to reach these fixtures, seniors will  need a ladder or step stool, which only increases the risk of slips and  falls.

Floor lamps make great lighting options since they are easy to maintain.  Light bulbs can simply be swapped out and a cloth or paper towel can be used to  wipe down the bulbs and fixtures. Best of all, floors lamps are inexpensive, can  be matched to any décor and can be moved throughout the home.

Wall sconces are other great alternatives to ceiling lighting, especially in  stairwells and bathrooms. Wall sconces make it easy to change out light bulbs  and most models have openings on both the top and bottom. Sconces are easy to  clean, have decorative appeal and provide ample lighting, especially is awkward  places and corners.

Proper lighting is vital for the safety and independence of senior citizens.  Fortunately, senior centers and retirement homes have improved their standards  in regards to lighting, but it’s important that the homes of seniors are not  ignored. Take the time to consider new and updated light bulbs and fixtures, as  well as increasing the wattage where applicable. Ultimately, seniors will find  their homes more enjoyable and comfortable with these minor home  improvements.

Visit this site for information about fluorescent light bulbs.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Atte_Aaltonen

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4293228

CVS Caremark Emphasizes Commitment to Older Americans at Annual American Society on Aging Conference

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Company highlights the importance of medication adherence in helping seniors on their path to better health

CVS Caremark (NYSE:CVS) will highlight how medication adherence plays a vital role in helping older Americans on their path to better health at the 2013 Annual American Society on Aging Conference, which is being held in Chicago this week.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20090226/NE75914LOGO )

CVS Caremark, a Titanium Sponsor of the conference, will also be participating in a number of general sessions and panels and will highlight its efforts to ensure customers and patients receive quality care and guidance as they age. David Casey, the company’s Vice President of Workforce Strategies and Chief Diversity Officer, will open the March 12 General Session: Mysteries of Population Aging.

As a pharmacy innovation company, CVS Caremark is committed to developing new ways to lower costs and improve health. By advancing the understanding of medication adherence through research collaborations, the company is gathering important information about why some patients take their medications as prescribed and why others do not. CVS Caremark is also refining the ways it interacts with patients through proven programs, such as Pharmacy Advisor and Maintenance Choice, that help patients stay on their medications and improve health outcomes.

“People age 65 and older typically take two or three times as many medications as younger Americans,” said Casey. “As we reinvent pharmacy care, we will continue to be a trusted health care partner to all of our customers, but particularly to aging Americans who are more likely to have chronic conditions and require more guidance.”

CVS Caremark is not only committed to its older customers and patients, it is also committed to recruiting mature workers and supporting older colleagues who are already part of the company.

“At CVS Caremark, we believe talent is ageless. Our mature colleagues’ knowledge and experience are important assets to our company. They provide us with insight into the best ways to serve our mature customers and sometimes become mentors to their younger colleagues,” added Casey.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 4.7 percent of the nation’s workforce is age 60 and over. Currently, 6.9 percent of CVS Caremark’s workforce is age 60 and over, higher than the national rate. The number of CVS Caremark colleagues who are age 50 and over has grown from approximately 6 percent in 1990 to nearly 20 percent in 2013. To continue this upward trend, CVS Caremark is cultivating public and private partnerships at the local, state, and national level with the goal of recruiting more mature workers into all areas of its workforce.

About CVS Caremark

CVS Caremark is dedicated to helping people on their path to better health as the largest integrated pharmacy company in the United States. Through the company’s more than 7,400 CVS/pharmacy stores; its leading pharmacy benefit manager serving more than 60 million plan members; and its retail health clinic system, the largest in the nation with more than 600 MinuteClinic locations, it is a market leader in mail order, retail and specialty pharmacy, retail clinics, and Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans.  As a pharmacy innovation company with an unmatched breadth of capabilities, CVS Caremark continually strives to improve health and lower costs by developing new approaches such as its unique Pharmacy Advisor program that helps people with chronic diseases such as diabetes obtain and stay on their medications.  Find more information about how CVS Caremark is reinventing pharmacy for better health at info.cvscaremark.com.

Contacts:

Jeff Ventura
Corporate Communications
(401) 770-1990
Jeffrey.Ventura@cvscaremark.com

City Of Las Vegas April 2013 Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle!

 

Spring Celebration and Foster Connect (all ages)
Saturday, April 6, noon to 4 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road, (702) 229-8100.
Families will enjoy a spring celebration with amusement rides, jump houses, crafts, games, farmers’ market, community vendors, music and much more. Interested families will be able to receive information on becoming a foster family.

 

Summer Themed Specialty Camp Registration (ages 6-15)

Thursday, April 11, 8 a.m. registration packets are available for pick up.

Thursday, April 11, 5 p.m., registration opens for Summer 2012 alumni at Mirabelli.

Saturday, April 13, 8 a.m., open registration at both sites in person. No online registration.

Cost: $115 per week for the first child; $110 each additional child from the same family.

MirabelliCommunity Center, 6200 Hargrove Ave., (702) 229-6359.

VeteransMemorialLeisureServicesCenter, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.

Two community centers will offer themed specialty camps with additional activities, cooking, and/or field trips from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday, beginning June 10. A few specialty camps have higher prices. Mirabelli special camp list is available online.

For more information on summer camps, call 229-6175.

 

Summer Camp Registration (ages 6-15)

Registration opens Saturday, April 13, 8 a.m. in person at the following sites.

Cost: $75 per week for the first child; $70 for each additional child from the same family.

Lorenzi Adaptive Summer Camp, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-6358.

CimarronRoseCommunity Center, 5591 N. Cimarron Road, (702) 229-1607; ages 6-11 only.

DoolittleCommunity Center, 1950 N. J St., (702) 229-6374.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

StupakCommunity Center, 251 W. Boston Ave., (702) 229-2488.

Camps will be offered from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays, beginning June 10; Lorenzi Adaptive camp will begin at 7:30 a.m. For more information on summer camps, call 229-6175. No online registration.

 

Ward 6 Free Shredding Event
Saturday, April 13, 10 a.m. to noon.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive.
Bring your documents that need to be shredded. Complimentary shredding takes place in the Centennial Hills Community Center Active Adult Center parking lot. Limit of five boxes per vehicle.

Dula Gymnasium Indoor Pickleball Tournament (ages 18+)

Friday, April 19, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Cost: $15 if registered by April 5; $20 if registered after April 5.

Dula Gym, 441 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6307.

Enter the Inaugural Promotional Pickleball Tournament. Four indoor courts will host Men’s Doubles, Women’s Doubles, Mixed Doubles and 50+ groups with A and B divisions. This is a double-elimination tournament. Minimum registration of four teams per division with a guarantee of three matches. First-place winners will receive awards. Please call 229-6307 for more information and registration flyer.

 

Ward 6 Free Movie in the Park – “Odd Life of Timothy Green”
Friday, April 19, 6:30 p.m.

Free admission.
Centennial Hills Park Amphitheatre, 7101 N. Buffalo Drive, Buffalo and Deer Springs.
Enjoy the PG-rated family film, the “Odd Life of Timothy Green” in the park. Bring a blanket or folding chair to be more comfortable. For more information, call (702) 229-5463.

 

Ward 1/Ward 2 Free Shredding Event

Saturday, April 20, 10 a.m. to noon.

All AmericanSportsPark, 1551 S. Buffalo Drive

Bring your documents that need to be shredded. For more information, call (702) 229-4645.

 

Mayor’s Health Walk (all ages)

Saturday, April 27, 8 to 9:30 a.m.

Free admission and open to the public

Kellogg Zaher Sports Complex, 7901 W. Washington Ave. at Buffalo Drive.
For more information, call (702) 229-6720.

Adaptive Recreation

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)

Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m.  Closed school district staff development days and holidays.

Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

Participants will enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

 

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)

Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

 

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)

Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed school district staff development days and holidays.

Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.

CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Call 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence

Nevada Volunteers to Present over $600,000 to Legislature

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Nevada Volunteers, the Governor’s Commission on Service, will present the Nevada Legislature in Carson City on February 28, 2013 at 9:45 a.m., a check of $679,276.  Nevada Volunteers distributes the AmeriCorps*State funding allocated to Nevada from Congress and is the state authority on volunteer information.

 

“This check represents the value of AmeriCorps members and all the volunteers they recruited last year to address unmet needs throughout Nevada” said Shawn Lecker-Pomaville, CEO of Nevada Volunteers.  “By providing the modest state match to this federal funding and investing in service as a strategy to solve problems, Nevada’s leaders saved the state $679,276.”

 

AmeriCorps*State is a cost-effective program that provides direct, results-driven services in the areas of education, human services, public safety and the environment.  AmeriCorps service gives individuals an avenue to help their communities while gaining real world experience and  earning an education award. During the grant year of 2011-2012 alone, 308 AmeriCorps members served 259,930 hours and recruited an additional 3,579 volunteers.  This impact in Nevada communities continues to multiply each year.

 

Upon completion of a member’s term of service, he or she is offered an education award  equal to the Pell Grant, which  can be used to pay for college, graduate school, vocational training, purchase educational supplies, or to repay student loans.  Those 55 and older during their time of service, can transfer their Educational Award to children, grandchildren or foster children.

AmeriCorps* State Grant Funds Available

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

MAKE AN IMPRINT ON NEVADA

Each year Nevada AmeriCorps grantees impact the quality of life in Nevada through national service funding provided through the Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act. Nevada received more than $2,109,000 in AmeriCorps funding for the 2013-2014 program year and is currently opening its Notice of Funding Opportunity for nonprofits, faith-based organizations, government entities or Indian tribes looking to make a positive imprint through development of a national service program in Nevada.

 

“In 2011-12, more than 308 Nevada AmeriCorps*State programs recruited and managed 3,579 more volunteers throughout the state, an economic impact of in excess of $6,000,000 worth of community service.  AmeriCorps members serve in core areas such as education, human services, public safety and the environment.  We invite new organizations to learn more about how they can become a part of meeting critical needs through national service in Nevada,” said Shawn Lecker-Pomaville, CEO of Nevada Volunteers, the Governor’s Commission on Service that develops and administers AmeriCorps*State programs in Nevada.

 

Applicants must be able to demonstrate the capacity to administer federal funds; implement a detailed plan of action to address a local unmet need; present strong connections to the community it serves, and have the ability to raise the required cash match, which averages $30,000. Applicants are strongly encouraged to attend an AmeriCorps Application Instructions webinar to apply.

 

  • National Service in Nevada: Determining How Your Organization Can Fit?

February 22nd at 10am or March 5th at 2pm

Advanced Registration Required

  • AmeriCorps Application Instructions Webinar

April 2nd at 10am or April 4th at 2pm

Advanced Registration Required

To reserve a place in the webinars and find more information on the Nevada Volunteers AmeriCorps Notice of Funding, visit www.nevadavolunteers.org.

All applications must be submitted electronically through eGrants by May 10, 2013 by 5 p.m. PST.

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!