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How Old Are You Really? Biological Age

May 29, 2016 by · Comments Off on How Old Are You Really? Biological Age
Filed under: General 

People have always been interested in being “forever young” and today’s society is no different. We want to resist the ageing process.

The speed at which we are ageing can be measured – its called biological age, or how old your body really is.

The area of study which is now called longevity, and was once called anti aging, is hugely popular in the states.

It’s something I’m very interested in, and see it as a big part of the future for myself and my clients.

Your chronological age is how old you actually are.

Biological age is the age of your body at the cellular level.

Today we will look into how you can establish, what your biological age is and how you can improve it.

There are a few longevity factors in the list which surprised me!

(Deep question alert!)

What is the purpose of life? I don’t mean any deep seated stuff, like procreation.

I just mean, what is most people’s AIM in life. What do they want to get out of their time on earth?

Firstly and most importantly, people want to be happy. Easier said than done.

Happiness is a state of mind. It’s a feeling.

Ask someone with a big goal (like building a successful business or losing more than three stone).

“What will reaching your goal do for you?”

Often they will say something like “When I get there I will feel happy”, or “satisfied with myself”, or they say “I will feel proud”.

“I will have more energy”.

“I won’t be afraid of trying new clothes on or going out with friends”.

“I don’t want to feel like a slave to food”

“I don’t want to be scared to look in the mirror or get on the scales”.

Life is all about feelings.

People spend their entire lives in search of feelings! (mostly happiness, contentment, satisfaction and love)

How people actually reach this state of “happiness” is different for us all.

Most people I know AIM for a decent job (or business) with decent money.

All with the ultimate goal of having a good retirement.

I hear people say “When I finish work, I’m going to do this or I’m going to… (insert goal)”.

The point here being, if being happy and having a nice retirement is people’s main goal in life, then keeping your body fit and healthy surely must be part of your plan.

I know of a very wealthy man who got cancer and passed away just before his retirement, I’m sure that was not part of the master plan, he had built his business up so he could sell it and have a nice retirement (as most business people do).

He didn’t make it and didn’t get to “cash out”.

Many people don’t make it to retirement because their “plan” is messed up from the start.

Without sounding depressing we only get one shot remember.

This is NOT a rehearsal.

A lot of people get to retirement age and their body is wrecked!

This stops them from being able to enjoy their time off as much. Living life with lots of restrictions. “I can’t go there because of the steep hill”, or “I can’t do that because of my back or my knees”.

After working hard for 40-50 years – to give yourself a good pension and retirement, this is the last thing that anyone wants.

Peoples bodies are like cars.

On one hand you have new cars with high mileage that are not well serviced.

On the other hand you have old cars with low mileage that have been well looked after.

I want YOU to be like a well looked after old car, with low mileage when you get to your retirement.

I know some people, that slog away and get to the age of 40, and feel and look like they’re 50 or 60!

I also know many people who hit retirement age and feel like a 40 year old, and can keep on working and exercising for another 20 years!

This is all dependent on how we live our lives, obviously there are things such as injuries, diseases and other bad things which can impact our lives negatively through no fault of our own but on the whole we are in control of our own health.

What affects our longevity?

Scientists agree that these factors all affect your longevity in some way, big or small. (this is not a definitive list)

Muscle size and strength
Level of education
How pro active you are with going to see the doctor if needed
The amount of friends you can rely on, and love in your life
Your diet
Blood pressure
Your upper body strength
If you enjoy your work or not
Weather you smoke/drink alcohol or not, and the amount
If you exercise or not

Most of us shorten our lives and ultimately kill ourselves, through our bad habits and lifestyle choices, whatever they may be.

As you would of guessed, it is possible to slow down the onset of ageing and even reverse it to some extent.

I must say, that there is nothing wrong with ageing, it is inevitable. It is something we should be proud of, a chance to show our wisdom to the younger generation.

This article is just to show you how you can SLOW the ageing process with ease and actually enjoy it.

The Ageing Process

As we get older our bodies start to slow down and stop being able to function as well, sadly there is no getting away from this.

BUT through healthy living and making the right choices day in day out we can delay our body slowing down by years!

Just think how much more you will be able to enjoy your retirement if you feel like a 40 year old? and can spend it with the people you love.

Compare this to how much you will enjoy it if you can barely walk up a flight of stairs without having tired legs and being short of breath.

Your chronological age doesn’t have to be the same, or worse, than your physiological age.

How to slow the effects of ageing

The list above obviously helps you but here are a few more ideas for you to beat the clock.

When some people think anti aging, I’m sure some of you may think of things like anti wrinkle creams and lotions, hair dying products, botox and maybe even plastic surgery.

That does kind of sum up some of the western world that these are the steps that the majority of people (plastic surgery being an extreme example) will take to make them look younger, rather than eating healthily and exercising.

Aging leads to loss of muscle mass, loss of mental function, low mobility and a lack of energy, and as you know the cosmetic type anti aging steps I mentioned won’t help any of these.

Top tips to delay ageing naturally:

Enjoy the Outdoors – Don’t spend all of your time cooped up indoors behind the computer or watching TV. There are plenty of things to do and see outside, especially on a nice day I can’t think of anything better than going for a walk with the family down the park or beach. Sunlight also is a natural source of Vitamin D.

Yoga & Meditation – I would say that this is one of the most important strategies in staying young. I started to do this myself and it honestly makes me feel great. Yoga and meditation can help you relax and lower your stress levels (linked with aging) dramatically. It can also help you to see things a lot clearer.

Yoga is also great for your flexibility, the more flexible and supple you are the less chance you have in the future of suffering falls and lack of mobility.

Socialise – Loneliness can be a real killer. Socialise as much as possible with your friends and family. Get out there and do things, go to the cinema, concerts, attend an evening class (the more mentally stimulating the better).

Stay Strong & Active – You have to keep moving or your body will come to a standstill. Taking part in regular exercise is absolutely vital. Regular strength training is extremely important.

Losing muscle mass is something you want to avoid or at least delay for as long as possible so strength training will help this as well as keeping your bones strong, this will lower your chances of osteoporosis.

Nutrition

I believe food is medicine, many of the effects you get from modern day medicine you can get from eating the right foods.

Nutrition influences biochemistry. Biochemistry influences everything at a cellular level.

If you eat well there should be no need for some medications.

If you spend your whole life eating fresh, natural whole foods and stay active then it will also show. You will most likely be lean, mobile, disease free and full of energy, a rarity these days.

You should aim to eat a diet containing lots of quality fats and protein’s (the bodies building materials) which will help you to maintain your muscle stores. Also protein boosts the production of HGH in your body, HGH (Human growth Hormone) is your body’s natural ‘fountain of youth’.

As you age the production of this hormone slows down greatly, regular strength exercise (lifting, pushing and pulling heavy stuff) and quality protein keeps the production of this hormone going!

Eat plenty of antioxidant rich foods – Antioxidants which are found in colourful fruit and vegetables help to reduce the damage caused by free radicals in your system.

Free radicals can speed up the onset of ageing; they are unstable electrons (O1 molecules)which are produced during metabolism. They damage the cell nucleus and the mitochondria.

Free radicals bounce around inside your cells like a pin ball, causing damage every time they hit something. They cause absolute havoc.

Antioxidants provide the free radical with the extra O1 molecule they need to become stable O2 molecules.

Good quality natural foods are the best way to combat these harmful free radicals. Natural organic foods are packed with antioxidants which neutralise the free radicals before they cause too much damage.

Eat Omega 3s – They fight inflammation, improve the appearance of your skin and aid brain function. Three vital things that we need as we age. So make sure you get as many omega 3s into your system as you can, the best source is fresh fish, if not a fish oil supplement will do.

Lower Sugar Intake – Aim to cut out any excess sugar that you eat, excess sugars can modify essential proteins in our body which can lead to wrinkles and energy loss.

Look after your skin through good food and lots of water – Eating foods containing vitamin A (sweet potatoes, broccoli, spinach, asparagus and carrots), Vitamin C (red peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, strawberries, oranges, kiwi and pineapple) and Vitamin E (nuts, seeds and spinach) are a great way of helping your skin look healthy.

Stop smoking and limit alcohol intake – There are few things that age you faster than smoking and drinking alcohol every day so cut out smoking and do as much as you can to drink less.

Lower Stress Levels – This is another big one, I just mentioned that there are few things that age you faster than smoking and alcohol; well I think stress is one of them.

Being constantly stressed will ruin your mood, energy levels, social interaction as well as causing so many health problems.

As I mentioned above, I have found deep breathing techniques, yoga and meditation really important and a great way of combating stress.

Let’s be realistic the big medical and health companies aren’t going to promote anti aging through the things I just said, they are going to promote it through new miracle pills, lotions and creams, there is a lot of money to be made from it so they will keep on doing it.

The people who buy these products don’t have to alter their lifestyle one little bit so it suits them which is why it is so popular.

We ultimately reap our rewards in our retirement, if you have invested some time and effort into your “health & fitness account”, you will reap the rewards.

If you haven’t then you won’t!

You can actually measure your biological age online with a biological age calculator.

If all of the things I have mentioned above didn’t require effort or commitment then everyone would be running around into their 90s and later!!

But unfortunately we don’t, we die much younger than that.

Depending on what stats you use, in 2010, UK men were reported to live on average until about 77 or 78, and women on average live until 82 or 83 years old.

Do it naturally and do it right.

Let me know your thoughts on this topic, comment below, I really want to know what you think.

Thanks for reading, take care,

Richard

If you would like to receive weekly health and fitness updates on the top news in the industry along with several free gifts then follow this link: http://richard-clarke.co.uk/

Just enter your email address in the box on the right to receive a free 3 Day Detox Plan, an Easy Weight Loss Diet Sheet plus some free, easy to do, exercise routines.

There are also many easy to read helpful articles and information which can inspire you to reach your fitness and exercise goals FASTER!

Thanks for reading.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7963927

Aging Is a Treatable Disease

May 22, 2016 by · Comments Off on Aging Is a Treatable Disease
Filed under: General 

Live Healthy – Look Marvelous – Live Longer

There are actions you can, and should take today to dramatically improve your health, your appearance and your longevity. You can control 70% of the factors affecting your longevity; only 30% are controlled by genetics until very late in life when genetics become more controlling

Almost all of the effects of aging and the common diseases that come with aging are treatable, to at least some extent. The key is early detection and early treatment.

Our understanding of the aging process is advancing rapidly. Some scientists believe that the first immortal human may be living today.

In 1786, life expectancy was 24 years. Better diets and some medical innovations allowed it to double to 48 years in the next 100 years.

Modern medicine has now increased life expectancy to over 76 years. Future medicine promises to increase it to over 100 years during our lifetime.

“Over half the baby boomers here in America are going to see their hundredth birthday and beyond in excellent health.” says Dr. Ronald Klatz of the American Academy of Anti-Aging. “We’re looking at life spans for the baby boomers and the generation after the baby boomers of 120 to 150 years of age.”

The key to Live Healthy – Look Marvelous – Live Longer is to delay the diseases of aging so that when they do occur, it is very late in your life.

The causes of aging are finally being understood. There are actions you can take today to take advantage of the recent medical developments. Dr. Rudman ran a series of tests on aging people and demonstrated that the effects of aging could be slowed and even reversed. He concluded: “The overall deterioration of the body that comes with growing old is not inevitable.”

The Causes of Aging

Almost all life on earth blossoms with youth, until it has reproduced and passed its genes on to the next generation. After that, the flowers wilt and die, and we humans began to age. Yes, we begin to age while we are still in our 20’s.

We age because the products of our metabolism, I.e., the “ashes” from the oxidation processes that produce energy in our cells, accumulate faster then our endocrine system can remove them. This is because most of the cleansing hormones that surged through our youthful bodies begin to decrease as we begin to age. Some of these more critical hormones have decreased by about 10 to 30% as we enter our 30’s. The decreases become ever more dramatic as we enter successive decades of life. Most of our hormones have decreased by over 50% and some have been reduced to near zero as we enter our 70’s. So we age. Our muscles and bones weaken; our reaction time slows; we lose our agility; all combine to make us more susceptible to accidents. Our immune system weakens and makes us more susceptible to disease. And we die.

The Death Clock

Dr. Hayflick has shown that we have another cause of aging. He has shown that we have a built-in death date of about 120 years, if diseases or accidents do not get us earlier. The point at which our cells have divided a fixed number of times sets this death date. It has been termed the “Hayflick limit.”

Our cells divide to produce new cells to replace the old cells damaged by metabolic ash build-up, free radicals, toxins, and other wear and tear mechanisms. As the cells divide, the chromosomes split to provide chromosomes for the new cells. When the chromosomes split, they lose part of their telomeres – the genes at their ends that keep the chromosomes organized. After a certain number of splits, the telomeres wear away and become too short to keep the chromosome organized and therefore the cell dies without being able to replace itself.

You can think of telomeres as analogous to the plastic bands on the ends of shoelaces. Telomeres hold the important DNA code intact, preventing it from fraying as the molecules replicate over time.

Resetting the Death Clock

But tests over the past few years have shown that the “Hayflick limit” can be extended by the use of an enzyme that causes the “organizing genes” at the ends of the chromosomes (the telomeres) to re-grow. This enzyme is called telomerase.

Telomerase treatments on human cells in the laboratory have indicated that telomerase can make human cells immortal. Doctors and researchers involved in these treatments are reporting that it is their belief that death is not inevitable.

Telomerase is actually an enzyme (a catalytic protein) that is able to arrest or reverse the telomere shortening process. The body produces telomerase when we are embryos in the womb to accommodate the very rapid growth of the embryo. But, unfortunately our bodies do not produce telomerase after birth except possibly for the creation of sperm.

So for humans to extend life we must do two things: first, eliminate the oxidants and toxins in our foods and environment; and find a dietary or pharmaceutical method for increasing and preserving the length of our cells’ telomeres.

Promising Anti-Aging Research

There are many ongoing projects that promise to solve our problems of aging. One is from a team of South Korean scientists. They report that they have created a newly-synthesized molecule, named CGK733 that can make cells younger.

“All cells face an inevitable death as they age. On this path, cells became lethargic and in the end stop dividing but we witnessed that CGK733 can block the process,” Prof. Kim Tae-kook reported. He further stated: “We also found the synthetic compound can reverse aging, by revitalizing already-lethargic cells. Theoretically, this can give youth to the elderly via rejuvenating cells.”

Kim expects that the CGK733-empowered drugs that keep cells youthful far beyond their normal life span would be commercialized in less than 10 years.

Researchers at The Wistar Institute have defined a key target of an evolutionarily conserved protein that regulates the process of aging. The study provides fundamental knowledge about key mechanisms of aging that could point toward new anti-aging strategies and cancer therapies.

Aging saps our strength and ability to enjoy life, cripples us, and eventually kills us. Tens of millions die from age-related conditions each and every year. Comparatively few people know that degenerative aging can be slowed with diet and lifestyle choices, medicines and nutracuetials.

Comparatively few people are aware of the many serious scientific efforts, presently underway, aimed at understanding and intervening in the aging process – in order to one day reverse its effects.

Your objective should be to have a healthy life and continue to live long enough to take advantage of all the medical advances and technologies now in development.

Our health is determined by our genetics, our diets, and our past and current lifestyles. You can now optimize your current and future health by defining and taking medications, vitamins, and other supplements and treatments tailored to your specific health needs. The program to do this recognizes the validity of three basic themes:

  • The Future of Medicine is in Personal Tailoring
  • Preventative Medicine is Key
  • Aging is a Treatable Disease.

Your Anti-Aging Longevity Plan

It is strongly recommended that you get familiar with the latest anti-aging information and develop your personal Longevity Plan. The key to longer life is to detect any health issues as early as possible and take advantage of the available technology to address them. Time really is of the essence.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5073181

Fight the Flu with Healthy Habits

January 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

11949(Family Features) With cold and flu season upon us, it may be tempting to hibernate until the danger of red, puffy eyes and a stuffy nose disappears. Waiting for a cold or flu to run its course can truly feel like an eternity, especially when the symptoms have you looking as bad as you feel.

 

While there is no guaranteed strategy for avoiding the flu or sniffles, there are steps you can take to safeguard yourself and your family. And if you do fall ill, taking extra care will help ease you through until you’re on the mend.

 

While the Centers for Disease Control recommends the flu shot as the single best preventive measure, you can also help ward off illness with healthy habits like these:

 

  • Keep yourself and your belongings away from others who may be sick to prevent the spread of germs. Don’t share dishes and utensils in the kitchen, and provide sick family members with their own hand towels in the kitchen and bathroom.

 

  • Wash your hands frequently using soap and water or an alcohol-based rub. Avoid unnecessarily touching your eyes, nose and mouth, which are easy portals for germs to enter your body.

 

  • Keep your immune system running strong by eating sensible and nutritious meals, exercising regularly, managing stress in a healthy way and getting plenty of sleep.

 

If your prevention falls short and you find yourself combatting sniffles, take these steps to nudge yourself back to good health:

 

  • Consult with your pharmacist or doctor about which medications may help relieve your symptoms.

 

  • Use a soft facial tissue on your irritated skin. Puffs Plus Lotion is dermatologist-tested to be gentle and helps soothe irritated skin by locking in moisture

 

  • Stay home for at least 24 hours after a fever passes. This will help you catch up on much-needed rest and prevent the chance of passing anything contagious on to your friends and co-workers.

 

  • Calm stuffy sinuses with the steam of a long, hot shower. Take the sinus soothing a step further by using Puffs Plus Lotion with the Scent of Vicks.

 

  • Cover your nose or mouth with a tissue like Puffs when sneezing or coughing to minimize the spread of germs.

 

As your symptoms ease, remember to take it easy and allow your body to fully recover so you don’t suffer a setback that needlessly prolongs your illness.

 

For more tips for warding off discomfort from a cold, flu or allergies, visit www.puffs.com.

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Drug interactions causing a significant impact on statin use

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

A new study has found that many people who stopped taking cholesterol-lowering statin drugs were also taking an average of three other drugs that interfered with the normal metabolism of the statins.

The other drugs can contribute to a common side effect of taking statins – muscle pain – and often led people to discontinue use of a medication that could otherwise help save their life, researchers learned.

The interactions of many drugs with statins have been known of for some time, researchers said, but are not being adequately managed by physicians and pharmacists, who could often choose different medications or adjust dosages to retain the value of statin drugs without causing this side effect.

The research, done as part of a survey of more than 10,000 current and former statin users, found that use of medications which interfere with statin metabolism almost doubles the chance that a person will discontinue statin use due to muscle pain.

The issue is of growing importance because statin drugs are some of the most widely used medications in the world, proven to lower LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, and decrease the risk of heart attacks, heart disease, strokes and death. About 20 million people in the U.S. now take statins, and new guidelines have just been issued to further expand the types of health conditions for which statins may be of benefit. Based on those guidelines, the number of statin users could increase to more than 30 million.

The findings were published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology by scientists from Oregon State University and four other universities or research institutes.

“We’ve known for some time of many medications that can interact with statins, but only now is it becoming clear that this is a significant contributor to the side effects, and often the reason some patients stop taking statins,” said Matt Ito, a professor in the OSU College of Pharmacy and president of the National Lipid Association, which funded this study.

“This issue is something physicians, pharmacists and patients all need to be more aware of,” Ito said. “There’s a lot we can do besides discontinue use of these valuable medications. You can change dosages, use drugs that don’t cause interactions, use different types of statins. Patients need to be proactive in understanding this issue and working with their health care providers to address it.”

Persons who have problems taking statins should discuss options with their physicians or pharmacists, Ito said, and not assume the drug has be to discontinued. A Medscape web site at http://reference.medscape.com/drug-interactionchecker also can help individuals learn more about possible interactions between statins and the full range of medications they may be taking.

Statins are usually well-tolerated, but in the recent survey, a muscle-related side effect was reported by 29 percent of participants. In former statin users, 62 percent of the people said that side effects, mostly muscle pain, were the reason they stopped taking the drugs.

There are many drugs that can interfere with statin metabolism, increase systemic exposure to the statin and raise the risk of this muscle pain, the researchers said in their report. This can include some common antibiotics, cardiovascular drugs, and others taken for treatment of cancer, mental health, HIV treatment and other conditions.

These interactions are not always adequately considered by physicians and pharmacists, however. One recent report found that as many as 20 percent of significant statin-drug interactions were missed in 64 pharmacies.

Besides drug interactions, statin side effects are also more common in women and associated with increasing age, history of cardiovascular disease, and some other conditions. Statin discontinuation has been associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and death.

About the OSU College of Pharmacy: The College of Pharmacy prepares students of today to be the pharmacy practitioners and pharmaceutical sciences researchers of tomorrow by contributing to improved health, advancing patient care and the discovery and understanding of medicines.

New Survey Reveals that Aging Parents and Adult Children Aren’t Always On the Same Page!

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

In honor of National Family Caregivers Month, life transition planning and daily money management firm LifeBridge Solutions, LLC surveyed nearly 400 aging parents and adult children. The national survey was conducted online November 12 – 14, 2013.

Survey results indicate that adult children are generally more concerned about their aging parent’s wellbeing than the older adult is about his or her own situation. Both generations are concerned about the older adult’s general health and safety and about driving. However, the aging parents top concerns include worry about running out of money and how they will pay for care, while the adult children worry about their parent not asking for (or accepting) the help they need and about their parent’s inability to manage medications.

LifeBridge Solutions’ President Sheri L. Samotin says, “Unfortunately, adult children often live a long distance from their aging parents and don’t see them as often as they’d like. As a result, they worry about what’s going on with Mom or Dad and feel a need to put mechanisms in place to keep their parent safe. By the same token, many aging parents are adept at hiding their need for assistance from their children as they fear that their children will try to take over.” Samotin is the author of the forthcoming book, Facing the Finish: A Road Map for Aging Parents and Adult Children (www.FacingtheFinish.com).

While only 25% of the aging parents surveyed report that they are stressed because of their adult children, nearly twice as many adult children report being stressed because of their aging parents. Consistent with these results, it is not surprising that more adult children than aging parents would change something about their relationship with the other generation. However, the top thing both groups would change is to live closer to and/or see the other more often. The next most common wish for both groups is to have better relationships with one another.

According to government statistics an estimated 25% of adult children currently provide hands-on and/or supervisory care for one or more of their parents. This number has tripled over the past fifteen years and is expected to increase dramatically as the population ages. Caring for aging parents is often referred to as the new mid-life crisis.

LifeBridge Solutions, LLC, founded in 2009 provides life transition planning, daily money management and medical billing advocacy services to clients nationwide.

For more information contact:
Sheri L. Samotin, President, LifeBridge Solutions, LLC
323.452.2680

Read more news from LifeBridge Solutions.

Baby Boomers and Seniors face nutritional triple threat of obesity, weight loss and lack of balanced meals

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Livliga dishware is a new solution to help these two generations eat right and stay healthy 

Americans are living longer than ever, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, but the fight to stay healthy is just as challenging as it has been with past generations. Recent studies show that the Silent Generation, born from 1927 to 1945 and Baby Boomers, born from 1946 to 1964, collectively face three major nutritional challenges.

 

A Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine study shows Baby Boomers have higher rates of hypertension, diabetes, obesity and high cholesterol when compared to their previous generation. The Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations also shows the highest obesity rates are currently found in Baby Boomers.

 

For the Silent Generation, currently ages 68 to 85, the National Institute on Aging says its main challenge is related to lack of balanced nutrition and getting enough calories.

The NIA says this group has:

  • decreased appetite
  • trouble chewing food
  • less socialization around food
  • diminished sense of taste and smell
  • medication interference with food enjoyment
  • fixed incomes

One new solution is Livliga, a tool Baby Boomers and Silent Generation seniors can use to promote right-sized food portions to reach target weights as well as to guide intake of balanced nutritional meals. Created with an Advisory Committee including a cardiologist and certified nutritionist, Livliga offers easy, subtle cues to improve and control the food environment.

 

“Livliga is a solution for every stage of life,” says inventor, Sheila Kemper Dietrich. “It can be used by people who are under eating and need to be reminded to take in more calories or to help those who are struggling to shrink their waistlines. The guide to portion sizes combined with reminders of what comprises a balanced meal are the keys to better health for both groups.”

 

Livliga is Swedish for LIVELY, VIBRANT or VIVID, which is the company’s core philosophy. Kemper Dietrich’s vision was to create an attractive suite of place settings designed for a healthy lifestyle and suitable for entertaining family and friends in both formal and informal settings. The beautiful designs on the dishware offer elegant visual cues to guide appropriate and right-sized servings. The initial product launch was a 4-piece place setting in two patterns, including a dinner plate, salad/luncheon plate, bowl and mug. Livliga also offers a serving bowl, etched water and wine glasses.

 

For Baby Boomers or Silent Generation seniors with grandchildren, Kidliga can also be helpful to promote healthy habits for the entire family. Kidliga is whimsical, fun dishware for kids, accompanied by a health-oriented children’s storybook. Sammie & Sax in the Land of Quinoa: The Search for a Balanced Meal just won a Moonbeam Award in the Health Issues category and is a useful tool and solution to help families in the fight against childhood obesity.

 

Livliga products are specifically designed to help both adults and children address the “psychology of eating”.  The rim sizes, color palette, and designs all combine to encourage slower eating, make portion sizes look larger, as well as make food more visually appealing.

 

A 4-piece Livliga place setting is available on the company website at www.LivligaHome.com at an introductory price of $49.95 (MSRP $59.95). All of the additional products and pricing can be easily found on the website as well. Kemper Dietrich says plans call for further product launches, including additional patterns and a set of LivSpoons that makes for easy, everyday measuring and serving of right-sized portions.

 

To purchase Livliga, visit the online store at www.LivligaHome.com.  “Like” Livliga on Facebook at facebook.com/LivligaHome, follow on Twitter @LivligaHome and visit our blog at LivligaHome.blogspot.com.  Watch our videos on YouTube.com/LivligaHome.

 
Audrey Strong
Agency Zero Public Relations
audrey@agencyzero.com
720.231.6097

Study Shows that People Who Undergo Cataract Surgery to Correct Visual Impairment Live Longer

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Australian researchers find a 40 percent lower mortality risk among patients who had their vision corrected through the procedure  

SAN FRANCISCO – Sept. 4, 2013 – People with cataract-related vision loss who have had cataract surgery to improve their sight are living longer than those with visual impairment who chose not to have the procedure, according to an Australian cohort study published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. After comparing the two groups, the researchers found a 40 percent lower long-term mortality risk in those who had the surgery.

The research is drawn from data gathered in the Blue Mountains Eye Study, a population-based cohort study of vision and common eye diseases in an older Australian population. A total of 354 persons aged 49 years and older and diagnosed with cataract-related vision impairment –  some of whom had undergone surgery and others who had not – were assessed between 1992 and 2007. Adjustments were made for age and gender as well as a number of mortality risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, smoking, cardiovascular disease, body mass index and measures of frailty and comorbid disease. Follow-up visits took place after five and ten years since the baseline exam.

Previous research had indicated that older persons with visual impairment were likely to have greater mortality risk than their age peers with normal vision, and that cataract surgery might reduce this risk. These studies – unlike the Blue Mountains Eye Study – compared people who had undergone cataract surgery with those in the general population or with those who had not had cataract surgery, and did not link vision status to the surgical status.

“Our finding complements the previously documented associations between visual impairment and increased mortality among older persons,” said Jie Jin Wang, Ph.D., of the Westmead Millennium Institute and one of lead researchers of the study. “It suggests to ophthalmologists that correcting cataract patients’ visual impairment in their daily practice results in improved outcomes beyond that of the eye and vision, and has important impacts on general health.”

The association between correction of cataract-related visual impairment and reduced mortality risk is not clearly understood, but plausible factors may include improvements in physical and emotional well-being, optimism, greater confidence associated with independent living after vision improvement, as well as greater ability to comply with prescription medications.

Dr. Wang noted one limitation of the study is that participants with cataract-related visual impairment who did not have cataract surgery could have had other health problems that prevented them from undergoing surgery, and that these other health problems could partly explain the poorer survival among non-surgical participants. This issue is addressed by the researchers in a subsequent study.

Caused by the clouding of the lens, cataract is a leading cause of treatable visual impairment that will affect more than half of all Americans by the time they are 80 years old.[1]  Surgical removal of the opaque lens with an artificial lens implanted is a successful procedure of cataract treatment. If completing everyday tasks is difficult, cataract surgery should be discussed with an ophthalmologist − a medical doctor specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

Seniors who are seeking eye care but are concerned about cost may qualify for EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, which offers eye exams and care at no out-of-pocket cost to qualifying seniors age 65 and older. Learn more at www.eyecareamerica.org. For more information on cataracts and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology 
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons — Eye M.D.s — with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who has the education and training to treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trusted and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

About Ophthalmology
Ophthalmology, the official journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, publishes original, peer-reviewed, clinically applicable research. Topics include the results of clinical trials, new diagnostic and surgical techniques, treatment methods technology assessments, translational science reviews and editorials.

Checklist Helps Seniors Through Medicare Open Enrollment

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Older adults can follow a few simple tips to avoid uncovered expenses in the upcoming year.

With Medicare open enrollment beginning Oct. 15, now is the time to start preparing for future health care needs.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130710/CG45364LOGO-b)

Frank Nelson, program manager at the Central Coast Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program, regularly educates Medicare beneficiaries about the importance of open enrollment. He urges seniors to use this period to reevaluate their Medicare Part D coverage and make the most of their policies.

In an interview with MySilverAge.com, Nelson said many beneficiaries feel overwhelmed or have questions about their plans: “It can be a complicated maze. There are a lot of ways you can get tangled up in the nuances.” To avoid the headaches that often come with health insurance, Nelson advises seniors to:

  • Check changes to Medicare Part D. Part D plans should be specific to an individual’s medication needs. Seniors will need to make sure their prescriptions are still covered each year during open enrollment.
  • Request local pharmacy pricing. Open enrollment is a good time to check pricing of prescriptions, as each pharmacy can differ.
  • Purchase a supplemental policy. Older adults might consider Medigap to cover health care costs that aren’t already covered by Medicare.

The steps outlined in this checklist help readers successfully navigate the complexities of Medicare open enrollment and stay on top of their health care plans. Read the full checklist here: http://www.mysilverage.com/medicarechecklist.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

AARP Report Highlights Need for Innovative Long-Term Care for the Aging Baby Boomer Population; Japan’s Technological Secrets May Hold the Answers

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

A newly published AARP report illustrates a profound demographic shift that will have consequences for decades to come, particularly in the senior living and long-term care industry. Baby boomers are entering their retirement years, while the ratio of potential family caregivers to those who require long-term services and support is beginning to drop. Fewer available caregivers will mean the senior living industry must rapidly adapt to a surging market. The AARP’s full report is available here: http://bit.ly/156phYi

Family caregiving is a low-cost but often burdensome approach to elder care. Becoming a primary caregiver often involves leaving behind a career, among other sacrifices. Plus, these well-intentioned caregivers may not have the expertise necessary to provide the level of care needed by an aged parent. Adults in these roles often feel enormous pressure and stress, sometimes even resentment. At any rate, the nation’s changing demographics will make today’s family caregiving situation far different in the near future.

Between 1990 and 2010, there were about 7 potential caregivers for every one person aged 80-plus. That ratio is at the start of a freefall that will force society to change the way it cares for its elderly members. By 2030, the ratio of caregivers to elderly will be 4 to 1. All remaining baby boomers will have reached their years of highest risk (80+) by 2050, when the caregiver ratio will have plummeted still further to 3 to 1.

Kevin Williams, president of SeniorMarketing.com, suggests innovative thinking will be required to bridge this care gap: “Naturally, with fewer family caregivers available, the responsibility will largely shift to senior living communities, care agencies and already overextended government programs. But it will take more than simply building more communities or training more staff—assuming an adequate number of candidates are even available. Technological innovation may be the silver bullet to raise the standard of living for aging boomers, improve efficiency, and reduce costs.”

The nation of Japan, which has the greatest life expectancy and one of the oldest average populations in the world, has recently experienced a demographic transition of its own. Recently, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare put out a call for 2 million new professional caregivers, but only received 1.3 million eligible candidates. With low birth rates being the norm, that shortfall will only increase. A tech-savvy society to begin with, the Japanese have embraced robotics and automation as a solution to the elder care issue. Motorized, assistive devices can help older individuals perform tasks themselves, while automated pill dispensers can prevent dangerous medication mistakes. A recent blog post on The Economist explained Japan’s inventive approach to the elder care dilemma: http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2013/05/automation-elderly

Williams concluded: “This demographic shift is a great challenge but also a great opportunity. Forward-thinking, entrepreneurs will be leading the way in this new environment. Technology to assist with daily tasks, provide medical care, monitor, and connect seniors to loved ones is advancing at a faster pace every year. It’s not unreasonable to predict that the future will witness even better care for our future seniors.”

About SeniorMarketing.com

Baltimore-based SeniorMarketing.com was created with twin goals in mind. First, the company helps connect caregivers and seniors with local, affordable care options. Second, the company increases income for senior living communities and health care agencies.

Contact:

Kevin M. Williams, President
SeniorMarketing.com
5024 Campbell Blvd., Suite D-3
Baltimore, MD 21236
Phone: 1-888-523-3311

105-Year-Old Woman Surprised With New Car from Anonymous Fan

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

105-Year-Old Woman Surprised With New Car from Anonymous Fan

Gift enables California’s oldest driver to continue volunteering regularly at Direct Relief

California’s oldest driver, 105-year-old Edythe Kirchmaier, received a big surprise when she was gifted a brand new car from an anonymous fan.

Kirchmaier has a perfect 86-year driving record with no accidents, parking, or moving violations. She renewed her driver’s license this January after passing her test with flying colors.

The longtime Santa Barbara resident garnered international attention earlier this year with appearances on The Ellen DeGeneres Show, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, and Access Hollywood Live in which she inspired the world to make a difference by raising awareness for her beloved charity, Direct Relief.

As the oldest registered Facebook user, Kirchmaier’s 105th birthday wish was to get 105,000 people to like Direct Relief’s Facebook page by lighting a candle on the world’s largest virtual birthday cake that the humanitarian organization created for her.

Kirchmaier was given a brand new 2013 Honda Civic after the anonymous fan heard her 1997 minivan was having lots of break downs and needing many repairs, jeopardizing her ability to continue volunteering at Direct Relief, as she has for the past 40 years.

Driving since she was 19, Kirchmaier learned to drive on a Ford Model T.  

About Direct Relief
Direct Relief is a leading medical relief organization, active in all 50 states and in 70 countries. It works with more than 1,000 health clinics across the U.S. to assist in emergencies and an ongoing basis, providing them with free medications for people in need. The organization has been among the world’s largest medical suppliers in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake, has top charity ratings, including four-star and “top-notch” rating from Charity Navigator, and a 99% fundraising efficiency rating from Forbes magazine. For more information visit www.DirectRelief.org.

CONTACT:
Kerri Murray, (805) 452-7599
kmurray@directrelief.org

Fraudbuster Reports from Fraud Protection Network Can Protect Senior Citizens from Financial Losses

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Fraudbuster Reports from Fraud Protection Network Can Protect Senior Citizens from Financial Losses

New services are designed to offer added protections for the vulnerable senior citizen market and will provide guidance and help for these at-risk individuals.

The launch of Fraudbuster Reports by leading consumer and investor protection services firm Fraud Protection Network (FPN) is designed to help senior citizens avoid falling prey to common scams and fraudulent schemes in the consumer marketplace. Due to the prevalence of these types of crimes, the National Council on Aging has called scams that target seniors “the crime of the 21st Century.” FPN’s full line of services can provide guidance and support for older individuals and couples in avoiding fraudulent transactions and protecting themselves against financial scammers.

 

Each year, older Americans lose billions of dollars to sham investments, dishonest commercial transactions and outright scams.

  • Major insurer MetLife estimates that individuals over 60 years of age experienced losses of nearly $3 billion due to scams, frauds and sham investments in 2010. This represents a 10 percent increase over similar loses in 2009.
  • According to research performed by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, the average amount lost by senior citizens to these fraudulent transactions is $141,000.
  • Figures released by the Federal Trade Commission indicate that older Americans lose an estimated $35 million each year trying to claim fake lottery and sweepstakes prizes.

Senior citizens may be especially vulnerable to certain types of fraud that include the following tactics:

  • Healthcare scams that bill insurers for services not rendered or not needed
  • Counterfeit prescription medications that can actually harm patients when used as directed
  • Fake lottery and sweepstakes prizes that solicit a small advance cash payment to claim a much larger sum
  • Reverse mortgages from disreputable or unknown companies

These fraudulent schemes are among the most common scams that target senior citizens in the U.S. The Fraudbuster Reports service can be used to check out any company that offers services or provides investment opportunities for senior citizens. Fraudbuster Reports from FPN can be used to obtain a wide range of data on potential investments and retirement plans:

Protections for Consumers:

  • Comprehensive identity and background checks on businesses that target the senior citizen market, especially medical insurance plans, reverse mortgage offers and online prescription medication companies
  • Assessment and evaluation of online complaints to verify their credibility
  • Licensing checks to ensure proper federal and state credentials and business licenses
  • Contact with listed corporate references to ensure the authenticity of companies that offer services to older individuals

Senior citizens also receive personalized services from their own personal account executive to streamline the investigative process and ensure a comfortable working relationship.

Protections for Investors:

  • Due diligence investigations that identify primary stockholders and officers for companies and that disclose liens, judgments, pending charges and bankruptcies
  • In-depth evaluation of all information provided to senior citizens regarding the investment opportunities
  • Previous and current employment histories for company officers and board members
  • License checks for brokers to ensure appropriate state and federal licensing and to identify any areas of concern in the brokerage history
  • Reference checks and financial data for brokers and investment advisors
  • Investor protections also include all features available in the consumer protection tier

FPN does not evaluate the likely profitability of investments. However, the services rendered by FPN can help senior citizens avoid fraudulent investment schemes that offer no chance of financial gain.

To promote these new services and the launch of Fraudbuster Reports, FPN has begun a major media push that includes advertising spots on major networks that include CNBC, Fox News, Fox Business, MSNBC, CNN and CNN Headline News and Bloomberg TV. The commercial can also be viewed online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ocieWK1hDq8.

About Fraud Protection Network:
Since its founding in 2012, FPN has provided advanced investigative services to help clients avoid being taken in by scammers and fraudulent companies. Because senior citizens are especially vulnerable to these dishonest schemes, FPN provides an exceptional range of services that are specifically designed to prevent scammers from preying on older Americans. The newly released Fraudbuster Reports products will offer even more protection for these at-risk individuals and can ensure a brighter financial future for senior citizens.

Contact:
Fraud Protection Network
Raul Martinez, COO
raulm@fraudprotectionnetworkinc.com
855-203-0683
www.fraudprotectionnetworkinc.com

Video with caption: “Fraud Protection Network TV Ads.” Video available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ocieWK1hDq8

In an Aging Society – Are Senior Citizens Driving Safely? by Diane Carbo

August 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Remember when you couldn’t wait until you were old enough to drive. Getting a driver’s license gave us an opportunity to experience a new freedom we did not have before. For those of us with two parents working, driving meant taking ourselves and our siblings to after school activities and work. Driving took us to a level of independence that we had not experienced before. In an aging society of drivers, those very same feelings exist in many today. Driving gives us a sense of independence and freedom, the ability to go out and socialize, go to work or to church. Safety issues are a concern as many move into the golden years. The life expectancy of seniors is increasing. There are more active senior citizens out on the road today than ever before. Since we all age differently, many aging adults, can drive into their seventies and eighties. As we age, the risks for having a serious car accident that requires hospitalization rises. Statistics show that fatal car accidents rise after the age of seventy.

If you know an aging adult driver who is experiencing difficulty with driving, it is important to carefully monitor the situation. This article can help you determine whether you should take steps to encourage the senior to stop driving.

An aging society and risk

Some key risk factors that affect our aging society are:

Vision declines affecting depth perception and ability to judge speed of oncoming traffic. Night vision becomes a problem as our eyes loose the ability to process light. By age 60, you need three times the amount of light that you did at age 20 in order to drive safely after nightfall. We also become more sensitive to bright light and glare. Signs and road markings can be difficult to see.

With age, flexibility may decrease as response time increases. A full range of motion is crucial on the road. Turning your head both ways to see oncoming traffic, moving both hands and feet can be difficult for those with chronic conditions such a rheumatoid arthritis, or Parkinson’s disease, heart disease and diabetes.

Older adults in an aging society will often need to begin to take medications. Certain medications, as well as a combination of medications and alcohol, can increase driving risk. Be aware and careful about medication side-effects and interactions between medications. It is important to talk to your pharmacist to be aware of interactions that could affect your driving safely. Some medications cause drowsiness.

Aging affects our quality of sleep, resulting in daytime sleepiness. Falling asleep at the wheel is a major concern for those that dose off during the day.

The beginning of dementia or mental impairment can make driving more dangerous. A decreased mental capacity or decrease tolerance to stressful driving situations such as complex and confusing intersections may cause delayed reactions to sudden or confusing situations on the road. An aging brain and body does not have the same response time as we did when we were younger.

Look for warning signs

There are multiple warning signs that an aging adult is becoming or is an unsafe driver. Some of them are small, but if there are multiple concerns it may be time to talk about your concerns with the aging driver. Warning signs of an unsafe driver include

 

  • Abrupt lane changes, braking, or acceleration.
  • Increase in the dents and scrapes on the car or on fences, mailboxes, garage doors, curbs, etc
  • Trouble reading signs or navigating directions to get somewhere
  • Range-of-motion issues (looking over the shoulder, moving the hands or feet, etc.)
  • Becoming anxious or fearful while driving or feeling exhausted after driving
  • Experiencing more conflict on the road: other drivers honking; frustration or anger at other drivers. Oblivious to the frustration of other drivers towards them
  • Getting lost more often
  • Trouble paying attention to signals, road signs, pavement markings, or pedestrians
  • Slow reaction to changes in the driving environment
  • Increased traffic tickets or “warnings” by traffic or law enforcement officers
  • Forgetting to put on a safety belt

 

If you are concerned about an aging adult driver, closely monitor their driving before deciding whether they need a refresher coarse on their driving skills or approaching them to give up their driver’s license altogether. Ongoing and open communication is important to addressing the issue of driving. Studies conducted by Harvard and MIT show that while most drivers preferred to discuss the issue with their spouse, doctor or adult children (in that order), this is not the case for everyone. The right person may not necessarily be the most forceful or outspoken one, but rather someone whose judgment and empathy are especially trusted by the driver.

Talk with other family members, your doctor, and close friends to determine the best person for “the conversation.” Remember driving signifies independence, freedom and being self sufficient to active senior citizens. Realize you may meet with resistance and the aging driver may become defensive. Emotion may get in the way of a rational conversation. Express your concerns and give specific reasons for those concerns.

The goal is to get the aging driver be part of the decision making process

You may begin by asking your loved one to make some concessions because of your concerns.

 

  • Taking a driver refresher course
  • Not driving at night
  • Suggest they not drive on busy thoroughfares or during rush hour
  • Taking shorter trips
  • Not driving under adverse weather conditions
  • Encourage a visit to their primary care physician or pharmacist to go over medications that may affect driving skills. Your physician may be able to recommend a Driver Rehabilitation Specialist. This individual can assess driving safety by an office exam and driving test and make recommendations regarding special equipment or techniques that can improve the driver’s safety. Consider ways to decrease the need to drive. Check out alternatives to shopping by car, including:

  • Arrange for home deliveries of groceries and other goods, and try to arrange for home visits by clergy, medical and personal care providers, and government service providers.
  • Use financial services that don’t require bank visits, like automatic bill paying, direct deposit, and bank-by-phone or on-line banking services.

Fears of those living in an aging society 

Fear of isolation and decrease in socializing is a real concern for the aging driver. It is important to keep spirits high as the aging driver makes the adjustments to becoming a non driver. Be in tune to their need for fun, volunteering, work and religious activities. Create a transportation plan that can make it easier for the aging driver to give up driving. You can create a list of friends and family that are willing to drive, contact the church and the local Area Agency on Aging in regards to transportation programs in the area.

Some seniors may adjust better if they can keep their own car, but have others drive them. Their own car may feel more comfortable and familiar, and the sense of loss from not driving may be lessened. Remember, baby boomers have grown up walking out the door and being able to go where they want to go. We need to keep the aging adult driver and those on the road with them safe.

Diane Carbo RN- As a geriatric care manager, that has cared for her father and mother in law in their homes, she learned first hand how overwhelming, stressful, and time consuming caring for a loved one can be. Staying in their homes was very important to them. As a result, Diane started http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com to assist others age in familiar surroundings and avoid the emotional and frustrating task of maneuvering the medical delivery system

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

Recovering from Hip Replacement Surgery

August 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Recovering from Hip Replacement Surgery

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One of the most complex joints in the human body is the hip. In order for the thighbone to move smoothly and normally in the socket, the body must have healthy cartilage and adequate joint fluid.

Disruption of this system — disintegrating cartilage, fluid imbalance, fractures, etc. — can cause the joint to swell, bringing severe pain and stiffness that makes daily activities and work almost impossible. Osteoarthritis, overuse of the joint, injury and other medical conditions can cause these problems.

Treatment Options

If physical therapy and medication do not control hip pain or improve mobility, doctors may consider one of two surgical options. One treatment is hip resurfacing, a procedure that caps the ball of the joint with a metal prosthesis and replaces the socket. The other treatment option is hip replacement, a procedure that replaces the original joint with an artificial one.

Hip Replacement Surgery and Complications

Hip replacement surgery is a very serious procedure that requires a lot of preparation on the patient’s end. In addition, it is important that recovery plans and follow-up treatment are tailored carefully to the needs of the patient to ensure safe and effective healing. Without a proper recovery plan, complications and additional surgeries could follow.

The most common complications from hip replacement surgery are infection and blood clots. To reduce the risk of infection, patients are usually given antibiotics after surgery. To prevent blood clots, health care providers may choose medication and/or physical therapy.

Some patients experience complications with the hip implants themselves. Implants with two or more metal parts, including some made by manufacturers Biomet and DePuy, can lead to metal poisoning and other severe complications. Zimmer manufactures the Durom Cup, which can come loose and cause serious pain. Patients need to contact their surgeon right away if they have any serious complications after hip surgery.

Recovery

After hip replacement surgery, it is important to do mild strengthening exercises, such as contracting and releasing the leg muscles, and short pumps of the ankles. However, patients must limit the movement of their hips. Exercises should be initially performed with a physical therapist, and then at home after proper instruction has been given.

Patients should plan ahead to have family and/or friends assist them at home for at least the first week or two after hip replacement. In addition, patients will not be allowed to drive for up to four weeks and will need to plan transportation to doctor appointments, physical therapy and the grocery store.

After hip replacement, patients should avoid using lotions or oils on the hip area, especially around or near the incision. Keeping the area dry is important in order for the incision area to heal properly. Within one to two months, physical activities and daily routines should start to return to normal, however, these activities should be resumed gradually to avoid falls and other injuries that might damage the hip again.

Slow walks with leverage from a crutch or cane can be helpful during recovery. Patients should avoid steps, hills and slopes. Routine visits to the physician should occur at three, six and 12 weeks, as well as six and 12 months after surgery.

 

Jennifer Mesko is the managing editor of Drugwatch.com. She keeps the public informed about the latest medical news, recalls and FDA warnings.

Convenience and Product Selection Encourage More People to Manage Incontinence Online, Parentgiving.com Survey Reveals

July 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Convenience and Product Selection Encourage More People to Manage Incontinence Online, Parentgiving.com Survey Reveals

For the first time in its five-year history, the senior wellness site Parentgiving.com conducted an opinion survey on incontinence, reaching out to nearly 5,000 of its customers who shop for self-care products in this category. The focus was to learn how people best cope with incontinence and if a greater awareness about it as a medical issue has erased its stigma and prompted more people to talk to their doctors about treatment. Respondents were also asked to share both their frustrations and their strategies for maintaining quality of life.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130724/PH51806LOGO)

Results show that progress is being made. Slightly over 70 percent have talked to their healthcare provider about incontinence—many of them are taking or have tried medications, and a few have had surgical procedures.

But nearly 30 percent of respondents have still not sought medical attention. Reasons are varied. A few people still feel too embarrassed to bring it up, even in front of a doctor, while some assume it’s just a normal part of old age (it’s not!) or don’t know that there are treatments that might help. Others say they have more life-threatening medical issues, from diabetes to stroke recovery, that take precedence when they’re at the doctor’s office. For a few, the possibility of yet another medication to add to their existing regimen would be financially out of the question.

More Key Points From the Parentgiving Survey

* Fear of accidents is the top concern.
Two-thirds of respondents ranked this as their number one worry. The lack of product selection came in second at 21%. People want more product choices, which will, in turn, help them feel more secure about avoiding accidents.

* Online is the way people want to buy products.
Nearly 46% buy products online where they can get the widest selection and have anonymity.

* Absorbency is the key feature in choosing products.
An overwhelming 81% ranked this first. Information on a product’s absorbency should be front and center on product descriptions, say the respondents. Comfort ranked second and the ability to buy a product online ranked a strong third at 36%, above both cost and anatomical design of items.

* Many people are satisfied with their incontinence products. In fact, 40% are very satisfied. However 44% are only somewhat satisfied—there’s room for better education about products to help people find those that are more effective for them and the respondents had numerous suggestions for incontinence product manufacturers to improve styles.

For complete survey results, go to http://www.parentgiving.com/elder-care/incontinence-survey-results/. There is also a companion article, “Survey Says: 50 Top Strategies for Managing Incontinence,” featuring respondents’ experiences and suggestions at http://www.parentgiving.com/elder-care/survey-says-50-top-strategies-for-managing-incontinence/. For more information, please contact Julie Davis, Chief Content Officer at 203-984-4424 or email.

About Parentgiving. Parentgiving.com is the online destination dedicated to the health and wellness needs of seniors and their caregivers. A comprehensive website, Parentgiving offers hundreds of informative articles on eldercare, plus Q&As with experts on healthy aging. The Parentgiving Store sells find thousands of products from medical supplies to practical tools for the activities of daily living. Everything can be ordered by phone or online with fast shipping right to the senior. For more information please visit www.Parentgiving.com or follow us on Twitter.

World’s Leading Ophthalmologist, Dr. Edward Kondrot, Cycling 335 Miles to Raise Awareness for Macular Degeneration

July 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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World’s Leading Ophthalmologist, Dr. Edward Kondrot, Cycling 335 Miles to Raise Awareness for Macular Degeneration

DADE CITY, FLORIDA – (July 18, 2013) – On July 19, 2013, Dr. Edward Kondrot and his wife, Ly, are beginning a 335-mile bike through the beautiful Great Allegheny Passage. Their journey starts in Pittsburg, PA and ends in Washington, DC, an estimated ten-day ride. The couple are biking to raise awareness about alternative treatments for macular degeneration and asking for sponsors to pledge anything from 10 cents to $10 per mile. All the funds raised will go to Restore Vision Foundation, an Arizona non-profit Corporation.

According to the National Eye Institute, Age-Related Macular Degeneration, or AMD, is a common eye condition, usually occurring in adults 50 years and over. It is the leading cause of vision loss in older adults as the macula is destroyed, creating blurry images. Your risk of developing AMD rises with age, as well as if you are a smoker or if you have family members with macular degeneration.

“I think it’s important to highlight the statistics of AMD due to the sheer number of people that are affected,” affirms Dr. Kondrot, the world’s leading ophthalmologist and founder of Healing the Eye & Wellness Center. “Most people with AMD are recommended to get laser surgery or injections, but alternative treatments are much less invasive and have incredible results.”

“If I’m going to bike 335 miles in my sixties, I think the cause is important,” adds Dr. Kondrot, “I want people to realize that harsh surgeries and medication is not the only way to go to prevent or treat macular degeneration. The goal is to raise awareness about alternative therapies, which can be more effective and less invasive. We hope to raise a lot of money for the Restore Vision Foundation.”

Dr. Kondrot is the author of three best-selling books, including “10 Essentials to Save Your Sight” (Advantage Media Group, July 2012), and president of the Arizona Homeopathic and Integrative Medical Association. He has founded the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center, located just north of Tampa, Fla., which offers alternative and homeopathic routes to vision therapies known as the “Kondrot Program.” The program focuses on such conditions as macular degeneration, glaucoma, dry eye, cataracts, and others. His advanced programs have helped people from around the world restore their vision. The center sits on 50 acres of land and features a 14,000-square-foot state-of-the art complex, an organic ranch, jogging trails, swimming pool, hot tub, and more. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

To pledge, please visit: http://ow.ly/n0FFp

To follow Dr. Kondrot and his wife on their journey, visit: http://ow.ly/mZikP

To learn more about the Restore Vision Foundation: http://www.restorevisionfoundation.org/RVF/Welcome.html

About Health The Eye & Wellness Center

The Healing The Eye & Wellness Center is located 30 miles north of Tampa, in Dade City, FL. Founded by Dr. Edward Kondrot, the Center offers world-class alternative therapies for vision conditions, including color and vision therapy, the treatment of glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration, dry eye, and more. The center also offers a variety of seminars, webinars, and training sessions for others in the medical community. Dr. Kondrot is the world’s only board-certified ophthalmologist and board-certified homeopathic physician. He is also author of three best-selling books in the field. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

# # #

Source:

National Eye Institute. Age-Related Macular Degeneration.http://www.nei.nih.gov/health/maculardegen/armd_facts.asp#1

Quality of Nation’s Nursing Homes Improving under Five-Star Quality Rating System

July 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Quality of Nation’s Nursing Homes Improving under Five-Star Quality Rating System

Three States Lagging, Study Finds

DURHAM, NCThe quality of nursing homes has improved in most states and in the District of Columbia since the 2008 implementation of the Five-Star Quality Rating System by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), an Abt Associates’ analysis finds.

The study shows that between 2009 and 2011, the percentage of nursing homes with an overall five-star rating, or much better than average quality, increased in all but three states and the proportion with a one-star rating, or much below average quality, dropped as well. There are more than 15,500 nursing homes in the country, and all of them are rated with between one and five stars.

“Between 2009 and 2011, the percentage of nursing homes with a four- or five-star rating grew in every state except for Hawaii, Montana, and Idaho,” said Alan White, Ph.D., a principal associate at Abt Associates who worked with CMS to develop the rating system. “While we don’t know the extent to which the existence of the rating system itself has led to this improvement, most nursing home operators pay close attention to their ratings and seem to be motivated to improve them. Some use their ratings as part of their marketing efforts, branding their facilities as ‘five-star’ nursing homes.”

White said the Five-Star Quality Rating System was created to help consumers, their families, and caregivers more easily compare nursing homes when visiting CMS’s Nursing Home Compare website.  There they can learn about a facility’s overall performance rating and how it performs in three separate domains—health inspection surveys, staffing, and quality measures. The ratings are updated monthly.

While there has been an 8% increase in four-and five-star facilities in overall performance nationwide between 2009 and 2011, five states stand out as experiencing the greatest change in their proportion of nursing homes with a four- and five-star overall rating. These are Delaware, Tennessee, Georgia, Oregon and Indiana. The percentage of Delaware’s five-star facilities jumped by nearly 23%; Tennessee’s by about 16%; Georgia’s by nearly 15%; and Oregon’s and Indiana’s each by about 14%.

In addition to overall performance, the study provides state ratings in each of the performance domains. Health inspection ratings are drawn from standard and complaint surveys over three years, White said, explaining that nursing homes are inspected every 12 months on average to ensure they are following state and federal regulations.

“The inspection surveys provide a comprehensive assessment of the nursing home, examining such areas as kitchen/food service, medication management, proper skin care, and the safety, functionality, cleanliness and comfort of the environment.” White said.  “If an inspection team finds that a nursing home doesn’t meet a specific standard, it issues a deficiency citation, and the health inspection rating is based on the number and severity of deficiencies cited by surveyors.”

The staffing rating, said White, is based on the number of hours of care on average provided to each resident each day by nursing staff.  “The ratings consider differences in how sick the nursing home residents are in each nursing home, since that makes a difference in how many staff members are needed.”

The quality measures rating is an assessment of nine different physical and clinical measures for nursing home residents that indicates how well nursing homes perform on important dimensions of care related to each resident’s functioning and health status.

While the Five-Star Quality Rating System can help consumers, their families and caregivers compare nursing homes more easily, White cautioned that it cannot address all of the considerations that go into deciding which nursing home is best for a particular individual. “The rating system is an excellent tool but it should be used in combination with other sources of information, including an onsite visit, in making nursing home placement decisions,” he said.

If you would like to interview Dr. Alan White, please contact Sandy Cogan at (301) 347-5913 or (202) 617-0123 or sandy_cogan@abtassoc.com.

About Abt Associates

Abt Associates is a mission-driven, global leader in research and program implementation in the fields of health, social and environmental policy, and international development. Known for its rigorous approach to solving complex challenges, Abt Associates is regularly ranked as one of the top 20 global research firms and one of the top 40 international development innovators.  The company has multiple offices in the U.S. and program offices in more than 40 countries. www.abtassociates.com

CONTACT:

Sandy Cogan

Sandy_Cogan@abtassoc.com

301-347-5913

A Guide to Medications For Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

June 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Although modern medicines have many benefits for senior citizens in treatment of age-related disease, caution needs to be taken when using a combination of medicines. Medicine or “drugs” can refer to any substance you get with a prescription, any oral or topical substance used for pain relief, and dietary supplements. Any substance that has the potential to interact with other substances in the body can be considered in this category. To prevent mixing medicinal substances together that could be harmful, always let your doctor know what medications you take in addition to those prescribed. Senior citizens should keep a list of medications and doses that they take and bring it to every doctor’s appointment.

It is very important to practice safe habits with medication as many drugs can be lethal is taken in the wrong way. Senior citizens should use the following tips to ensure safe use of medication. Companions or caregivers should use these tips to help facilitate and encourage proper medication use.

Tips for when you are Prescribed Medications

When a doctor prescribes a new medication for specified symptoms, remember the following tips for how to proceed afterward:

 

  • Tell your doctor about all other medications you currently take,
  • Remind primary care physicians about allergies that you have or side effects that you experience from other types of medications.
  • Be sure that you understand exactly how all of your medications work and how to properly take them.

 

Here are some helpful questions to get this information:

 

  • What is the name of the medication?
  • Why am I taking it?
  • How many times a day should I take it?
  • Should I take this medication before, during, or after meals?
  • What does “as needed” mean?
  • When should I stop taking the medication?
  • If I forget to take the medication, what should I do?
  • What side effects can I expect?

 

You can also ask your pharmacist these questions and others to get more information about your medication. By having all of your medications filled at the same pharmacy, the pharmacy may be able to predict harmful interactions if all of your medications are kept on file. When getting a prescription filled at the pharmacy, keep these tips in mind:

 

  • Be sure that you can read and understand all directions and writing materials that accompany prescribed medication.
  • Check that you can open the container the medicine is in.
  • Let your pharmacist know if you have difficulty swallowing pills, so that you can get a liquid variety if available – Do not crush or chew medication meant to be swallowed.
  • Ask about the best way to store the medication.
  • Be sure that the label of the medication indicates that it is the correct medication you were prescribed and displays your name.

Tips for Taking Medications 

After filling a prescription for a medication that you received from your doctor, you should be sure that you follow directions for taking that medication. Here are some tips for safely taking a combination of medications:

 

  • Have a list of medications; include the doctor who prescribed it, the name of the medication, the reason you take it, and the directions for use.
  • Read and save all written information that comes with prescribed medication
  • Take your medication exactly in the way that it is meant to be taken.
  • Let your doctor know immediately if you experience any unexpected side effects from the medication.
  • Use charts, calendars, or weekly pillboxes to help you remember which medications to take on a daily basis.
  • Make sure companions or caregivers know when and how you are supposed to take your medication so that they can remind you.
  • Do not skip medication – if you have trouble affording medication, research programs that can aid in funding for needed medications. Medicare, a government program for senior citizens, may be a good place to start.
  • Avoid mixing alcohol and medication – alcohol can cause medications to not work correctly.
  • Take medication until it is finished or your doctor instructs you to stop.
  • Do not take medication prescribed to others.
  • Do not take medication in the dark to avoid making a mistake.
  • Check expiration dates on your pill bottles in case a medication should be replaced.
  • Do not leave your medication in the open where children or pets could get to them.

 

The Caring Space
http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space
We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

 

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

At a time when thousands of Baby Boomers are reaching the age of 65 every day, the issues of senior rights, elder laws, and anti-ageism have never been more important, more volatile, or more questioned. After all, this is the generation that was ready to take down the establishment fifty years ago, and they haven’t lost any of their desire to change the world for the better. And, they have the numbers to do it. Here are our 100 top blogs for seniors dealing with senior rights, law & policy, and anti-ageism.

Boomers Against The Law

  1. Elder Law Plus: lawyer Evan H. Farr blogs about topics concerning elder law, including probate strategies and parental care.
  2. Michigan Elder Law Blog: the attorneys at Barsch & Joswick provide seniors and their loved ones with sage advice on a variety of Elder law issues.
  3. Everything Elder Law: Evan Farr is back at it again, this time focusing on Elder Law news, concepts, and innovations from around the country.
  4. Massachusetts Estate and Elder Law Blog: lawyer and blogger Stephanie Konarski gives tips on estate planning and other elder law topics.
  5. New York Elder Law Attorney Blog: your source for elder law news and comment in New York, this blog analyzes nursing home legislation and elder care costs.
  6. Elder Law Prof. Blog: Elder Law professor Kim Dayton authors a really nice blog that covers a wide range of Elder law issues, from Supreme Court cases to seminars.
  7. The Pop Tort: can a consumer advocates blog dealing with civil justice be cute? This blog proves it can, complete with an adorable “Pop Tort” logo, even while exploring such issues as Medicare and Medicaid lawsuits, nursing home scams, and medical malpractice against the elderly, among other legal issues.
  8. Supportive Senior Solutions: this blog from a geriatric care management practice in New York covers issues related to geriatric care, caregiving, and healthcare laws for the elderly and infirm.
  9. Aging Beats the Alternative: elder care specialist Lorie Ebers uses her blog to talk about overcoming the challenges of aging, caring for aging parents, and the less talked about side of elder law: Boomer divorce.
  10. Elder Law Blog: lawyer Ronald C. Morton’s elder law blog is full of sage advice for seniors looking how to tap into Veteran’s benefits, how to plan for their golden years, and more.
  11. The Best Elder Law Blog: published by the attorneys at Lamson & Cutner, this blog discusses elder law cases, the Affordable Care Act, and same-sex marriage.
  12. Elder Law Tips and News: the lawyers at Cooper, Adel & Associates bring you posts on living trusts, aging issues, and general estate planning.
  13. The Connecticut Elder Law Blog: lawyer Michael Keenan provides his readers with estate planning tips, elder fraud, and Medicare rules.
  14. The Teddy Bear Lawyers: attorney Rick Law gives readers a great resource for Elder Law in the Chicagoland area. Find articles on protecting vulnerable seniors and financial planning.
  15. Oregon Elder Law: attorney Orrin Onken blogs on elder law, estate planning, and probate proceedings in plain, easy to understand language.
  16. Florida Elder Law and Estate Blog: this informative blog includes great articles on VA benefits, estate planning, and trusts.
  17. Golden Law Center: written by attorney Sasha Golden, the Golden Law Center blog discusses elder law, special needs planning, guardianship, wills and trusts, and estate administration.
  18. Kraft Elder Law: attorney Robert Kraft blogs about Medicaid, Medicare, wills, trusts, probate, veterans benefits, and other elder law topics.
  19. Pennsylvania Law Blog: this elder law blog by the attorneys at the law offices of Shober & Rock discusses Medicaid, taxes, Veterans, banks, and annuities.
  20. Long Beach Elder Law Blog: this blog focuses on elder abuse, estate protection, the Cal MediConnect program, and reform of health law.
  21. Houston Elder Law Blog: the folks at Wright Abshire Attorneys blog about care planning, estate planning, Medicaid Planning, Probate & Estate Administration, and and Veteran’s Benefits.
  22. Hauptman Law Blog: readers of this blog can learn more about elder, estate, and special needs law. Includes articles on the Medicare Settlement and VA Aid.
  23. Fulkerson Elder Law Blog: the function of this elder law blog is for the firm to respond to common questions clients have about elder law and review developments in the law impacting elder law and estate planning.
  24. CMLP Estate Planning and Elder Law Blog: readers can look forward to reviewing articles on simplifying their estate plan and elder law news items of note.
  25. Massachusetts Estate Planning and Probate Blog: attorney Matthew Karr keeps readers up to date on estate planning and probate news and information.
  26. Marshall Elder and Estate Planning Blog: the author of this elder law blog has over 30 years experience in estate planning, special needs planning, and estates.
  27. Hartford, CT Elder Law Blog: the attorney’s at Ruggiero Ziogas & Allaire discuss estate planning, care planning, Medicaid, Veteran’s Benefits, and Probate.
  28. El Paso Elder Law Blog: the law firm of Stephanie Townsend Allala and Associates blogs on estate planning, guardianships, Medicaid Planning, Nursing Home Abuse, and Trust & Probate.
  29. Miami Probate Law Blog: the folks at the Byrant law firm keep readers up-to-date on estate administration, probate court, estate litigation, and the nuisances of will and trust disputes.
  30. Elder Law News: attorney Brian A. Raphan is based in New York City and specializes in Wills, Estates, Trusts, and Elder Care issues. His blog is full of great resources.
  31. Aging & Law in West Virginia: this blog contains news in law and aging in West Virginia, written by the West Virginia Senior Legal Aid organization.
  32. Florida Elder Law and Estate Planning: this Florida Certified Elder Law attorney provides in depth insights and news to help Floridians protect themselves and preserve their assets.
  33. Family Law Blog Maryland: while this blog looks at all matters pertaining to Family Law, elder law sneaks in as a prevalent theme in many of the cases discussed. They look at legal matters like when divorce and retirement coincide, or when grandparents wish to take custody of their grandchildren.
  34. Phoenix AZ Family Law Blog: looking at issues older couples face in Arizona, this family law blog explores the specific challenges elders face in divorces and custody battles, complete with the latest policy changes and laws.
  35. Otherspoon: hospice volunteer and blogger Ann Neumann talks about care-giving and the realities, politics, and senior rights involved in death and dying.

Seniors Talk Policy And Politics

  1. Aging in Place: this blog is concerned with seniors who are dealing with shrinking benefits and increasing costs—seniors find answers on how to protect themselves.
  2. Estate in Denial: providing news, analysis, and commentary on abusive practices occurring in probate courts. Features original perspective and direct communication.
  3. Florida Estate Planning Lawyer Blog: this blog covers estate planning legal issues, cases of interest, and news with a focus on Florida elder law.
  4. McGuire Woods: the people at McGuire Woods author this great blog on long term care legal issues, including timely news, articles, and white papers.
  5. Illinois Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: published by the law office of Wilson & Wilson, this blog covers asset protection, banking, estate planning, and trusts.
  6. Illinois Nursing Home Abuse Blog: covers Illinois nursing home law, including Supreme Court cases and other information relating to residents and family members.
  7. Law Office of Donald D. Vanarelli Blog: provides readers in New Jersey with information on elder law, estate and special needs planning, and mediation services.
  8. Maryland Nursing Home Lawyer Blog: this blog offers insight on nursing home abuse reports, legislation, and legal opinions of elder law in Maryland.
  9. Massachusetts Estate Planning, Probate & Elder Law: elder law attorney Brian Barreira writes on legal issues involving death, taxes, special needs, and long-term elder care.
  10. New Jersey Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: blog posts explore life and death in New Jersey from a perspective of estate planning, elder law, taxation, probate, and estate administration.
  11. Medina Law Group: postings provide readers with advice on estate planning and management, estate taxes, elder law, and VA benefits.
  12. North Carolina Wills and Trusts: this blog provides readers with estate planning and elder law news with a North Carolina focus.
  13. California Nursing Home Abuse Law Blog: covers nursing home abuse, elder law abuse, and features many quality articles relating to California elder law.
  14. Nursing Home Law Blog: this well written blog discusses elder issues, legislation, legal news, protections of elder rights, and helpful health tips.
  15. PA Elder Estate and Fiduciary Law Blog: focuses on elder law, long-term care, end-of-life and health care surrogate decision-making, and estate planning.
  16. Patti’s Blog: find information about this lawyer’s practice, which concentrates on advocacy for seniors. She shares personal interests and her passions.
  17. Pennsylvania Nursing Home Abuse Lawyer Blog: this blog discusses nursing home abuse laws, cases, and news items from Pennsylvania.
  18. Barbara Cashman Blog: Barbara blogs about elder law and policy issues, and often hosts guest bloggers to share their insights on elder law and news.
  19. NJ Elder Law: lawyer Kenneth Vercammen blogs about topics related to estate planning and elder law. He was once awarded the NJ State Bar Municipal Court Practitioner of the Year.
  20. The Senior Sentinel: a blog compiling news and information for Baby Boomers, the Senior Sentinel concentrates on the intersection of ageism and public policy both nationally and world-wide.
  21. Elder Consult: this geriatric medicine blog not only covers Alzheimers, dementia, financial decision making, and medications, it also discusses related legal issues such as elder financial abuse.
  22. Grey Pride: a UK blog by the Anchor Digital Marketing team is dedicated to keeping older people at the top of the political agenda and petitioning the government to create a Minister for Older People to ensure their needs are met.
  23. Over 65 Blog: project organizers from Harvard, Yale, and The Hastings Center host this blog for “seniors seeking solutions for health care and security, mainly looking at health care system reforms, elder law policies and practices, and how seniors can achieve a stronger role in the future of health care.
  24. Reaping Hope Blog: a blog from an NGO in Nepal promoting dignified aging and elder rights, Reaping Hope explores elder abuse and elder oppression while actively helping elderly people claim their rights and challenge discrimination.

Age Against The Machine: Anti-Ageism

  1. Ageist Beauty: the musings, product reviews, and random thoughts of a woman who is fighting against her age.
  2. Everyday Ageism Project: this blog aims to capture people’s everyday experiences dealing with ageism. The author has discovered that ageism is the most commonly experienced form of prejudice.
  3. The Lonely Gerontologist: professor Kelly Yokum blogs about all things aging—including aging stereotypes and other aging topics that come to mind.
  4. My Elder Advocate: this blog provides comprehensive coverage of ageism, the dangers of nursing homes, elder abuse, and elder care.
  5. The Roaming Boomers: David and Carol are great examples of a couple who doesn’t let age get in the way of living life to the fullest.
  6. The Gypsy Nester: Veronica and David show readers how to rock the empty nest and get the most out of life as you age.
  7. Changing Aging: this multi-blog platform challenges conventional views on aging. The authors believe aging is a strength, rich in developmental potential and growth.
  8. The Elders: founded by Nelson Mandela in 2007, the Elders is a group of seniors committed to addressing global challenges, including child marriage and climate change.
  9. Beauty and Wisdom: the blog of photographer Robbie Kaye, who traveled to salons throughout the US to photograph and interview women in their 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s and discovered that beauty is ageless.
  10. Advanced Style: don’t tell these women they are too old to model hip and alluring fashions. This blog teaches women how to dress to impress and that age is only a number.
  11. RL TV: the only cable network and online destination for folks 50+, features a nice blog that provides tips on elder issues and promotes active living.
  12. The 70-Something Blog: blogger Judy informs readers how to live a full and engaging life as she chronicles her journey of aging.
  13. Retirement is Work: newly retired librarian and blogger resolves to post one good thing about retirement every day for a year, but along the way struggles with senior rights and anti-ageism.
  14. Yo Is This Ageist?: a humorous blog by Ashton Applewhite dedicated to determining whether age-related remarks are offensive, “challenging the stereotypes that segregate us by age.”
  15. This Chair Rocks: a smart and sassy blog by Ashton Applewhite that challenges the ideas of ageism with humor and snark. All stereotypes and insensitive remarks are grounds for brilliant blog posts.
  16. Senior Planet: “aging with attitude” is the tagline of this blog community of older adults using technology to connect with each other and take on the issues of ageism and senior rights.
  17. Changing Aging: a blog founded by Dr. Bill Thomas to promote “a radical reinterpretation of longevity” which focuses on anti-ageism and senior rights, as well as getting the most out of a long life.
  18. Time Goes By: Ronni Bennett takes on aging, ageism and related issues with humor, exploring the truth of “what it’s really like to get old.” She starts by rejecting the “cutesy” terms for old people – they’re called “elders” around here!
  19. The Magic of Middle-Aged Women: author Daniel Even Weiss – a man – blogs on the theme of his latest book, The Magic of Middle-Aged Women, where he challenges the prevailing ageist idea that women don’t get better as they age. They do.
  20. Advanced Style: Ari Seth Cohen, a young-ish photographer, roams the New York City streets photographing stylish and creative elders. Here, art challenges the paradigm that age and beauty can’t co-exist.
  21. The New Old Age: the New York Times blog on aging takes advantage of the newspaper’s top writers to explore the unprecedented intergenerational challenge of the Baby Boomers.
  22. The Little Old Lady Stays Put (or doesn’t): explores the “lives, lifestyles and issues of interesting older people,” touching on the issues surrounding ageism, elder rights, living with dementia, and overcoming the struggles of aging with strength and good humor.
  23. Naked at Our Age: advocate of ageless sexuality, Joan Price, talks about sex and aging, taking on Senior Rights subjects like safer sex for seniors while providing helpful tips.
  24. Aging & Work at Boston College: scholars, academics, and researchers share their findings on ageism in the workplace and the challenges aging workers face in this PhD-heavy blog by The Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College.
  25. Ethnic Elders: this newsy blog by New America Media examines the Senior Rights issues and Elder Law of minority groups such as age discrimination, lawsuits related to Social Security, and elder healthcare reform.
  26. The Everyday Ageism Project: blending blogging and research, this site’s goal is to capture the experience of age discrimination. The forum is full of people sharing their experiences in a supportive environment.
  27. Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens Blog: the Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens sub-blog offers wide ranging posts on issues including senior rights and ageism – with its signature left-wing perspective.
  28. Clinical Geriatrics: created as more of a peer-reviewed clinical journal by the American Geriatrics Society, some of the top scholars in geriatrics converge on this blog to discuss geriatric health and wellness issues, which often cross over into legal and anti-ageism issues.
  29. Age Action Alliance: this organization brings together a network of 300 organizations and individuals committed to helping older people. Its blog is dedicated to improving older people’s lives through advocating against ageism, particularly in Britain.
  30. Manitoba Senior Centres: this Canadian blog covers the rampant ageism in Canada and promotes world elder abuse awareness. It also has a list of resources for older adults.
  31. Fierce with Age: defying ageism goes mainstream at this blog, created by veteran journalist Dr. Carol Orsborn. Having written about the Boomer generation for major newspapers and blogged for the Huffington Post and NPR’s Next Avenue, Orsborn is well equipped to take on the spiritual and policy hurdles of aging.
  32. Live Better Boomer!: a Philadelphia-based blog, by social worker Tiffany Matthews, devoted to helping educate and empower Boomers advocate for their own improved healthcare.
  33. Third Age: billed as “health for Boomers and beyond,” Third Age offers relatively fluffy fare, like “Change your Mood with Color,” to the legal issues surrounding Boomer divorce and care-giving.
  34. The Old Gunhand: one facet of senior citizen rights you don’t see every day is elder gun advocates. This website not only tells you the best types of guns for elderly wielders, it also goes into gun policy and senior self-defense.
  35. Age Discrimination Info: a simple name for a one-stop source of statistics and information on age discrimination, including legislation, cases, news, publications, events and training. The perfect resource for the activist.
  36. Age UK: the largest organization in the United Kingdom for working with and for older people, this website has an entire section dedicated to age discrimination and ageism.
  37. National Youth Rights Association: not just for youngsters, the National Youth Rights Association combats ageism in all its forms. In fact, they probably wouldn’t appreciate being called “youngsters.”
  38. Disability and Representation: a blog by writer, photographer and activist Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg that discusses (and tries to change the discourse about) disability rights and ageism, along with autism.
  39. Over 50: Career coaching and workshops for the over-50 crowd, this blog doesn’t stop at finding a job. This site explores Baby Boomer activism in and out of the workplace.
  40. Activist Post: while this blog deals with many topics requiring advocacy, they often include issues that regard Senior Rights, Elder Law and anti-ageism.
  41. California Booming: an informational blog dedicated to California Baby Boomers, this blog covers everything from sex, to diet, to politics of the Boomer generation, including issues concerning senior rights and ageism in the workplace.

Traveling With Senior Citizens by Karissa Price

May 28, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Traveling with elderly patients can certainly be a challenge, but there are many things that caregivers and family members can do to make it easier, safer, and less stressful. Planning ahead is essential to make sure everything goes smoothly and also to ensure that the traveler gets the most for their money. Last minute bookings are often expensive and should be avoided if possible.

When flying, here are some tips for easier travel:

1. Arrive at the airport with plenty of time to spare; getting through security can take much longer if the airport is busy or the patient moves slowly, and having to rush will only add to the stress
2. If possible, arrange in advance to have a wheelchair available and access to any special services offered to senior citizens
3. Make sure that the traveler has all of their identification, insurance information, itinerary, money, and medications; have copies of any instructions from physicians about medications or medical devices such as a pacemaker
4. Try not to pack too many clothing or other items; comfortable shoes are definitely necessary
5. To make the actual flight more comfortable, take a pillow and reading material or anything else for entertainment on the flight such as crossword puzzles or card games.

A common theme among senior citizen travel is to visit out of town family members, especially children, grandchildren, or even great grandchildren for a special event or just for a vacation. As soon as a wedding, birthday, or graduation announcement arrives, start planning the vacation! In addition to visiting family, there are many vacation destinations that cater to senior citizens. Many cruise lines have special senior citizen cruises, which can be a wonderful social experience for any seniors who want to enjoy the company of others and make new friends on their trip. Many destinations (such as Branson, Missouri, for example) have tons of specialty tours for senior citizens. Caregivers can find an abundance of information online about these tours, and should also check with the Better Business Bureau to make sure they are legitimate companies before paying for anything.

For more information, please visit http://www.trustedhandsnetwork.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Karissa_Price

Senior Citizens May Find Time is Running Out by Irene Mori

May 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

For senior citizens, sometimes it feels like time is running out. The oldest  of the baby boomers entered the realms of becoming seniors several years ago.  This large group of the population has been influencing markets for years and  still do so. Now as they enter the twilight years, they must come to realize  that their youthfulness has been spent and there may not be that many more  spring times left. Health and wellness is still an issue.

Many seniors have already commenced vigorous pursuit of the completion of  their “bucket list” which includes the experiences they want to have before they  leave this earthly existence. It’s time for this segment of people to be  concerned with themselves and to do the things they enjoy while they still can  do them.

If and when good health and a stable mental capacity leave a person, it then  becomes too late to pursue the interests which may be there now. Senior citizens  are able to have active, busy lives full of productivity and enjoyment.

Because money is not plentiful for a number of seniors, many are working  menial jobs at stores or fast food outlets. The reasons for doing so may be  varied such as for extra income necessary to make ends meet or to simply have a  place to go and enjoy the company of other people. Many are searching for home  based businesses as a means of supplementing their social security or other  meager retirement income.

Although there are thousands of wealthy senior citizens, there are  undoubtedly many more who struggle in their daily lives. They find it difficult  to pay for necessities like shelter, food, and medications. Some seniors find  life has little meaning, but it does not have to be that way. Keeping one’s mind  and body active helps a person feel better and act younger.

Dorothy Dale Kloss is an example of someone who is young at heart and young  in actions although at age 85, she is the oldest showgirl in the Universe  according to the Guinness Book of World Records. Dorothy decided she needed  something to do fourteen years ago so she auditioned with the Fabulous Palm  Springs Follies. She got the job and now dances at about nine performances each  week. She has been dancing since she was five years old and obviously loves to  dance. Upon seeing and meeting her, there is no way that anyone would guess that  she is 85.

Although time may be running out, seniors can still find ways of being  productive, engaged citizens who can still enjoy life to the fullest.

Irene Mori lives near the Nation’s capital where she is able to regularly  experience the happenings of the government. She is involved with home based  business and network marketing. For information on an affordable money making  opportunity with a company which provides discount savings on everyday purchases  and cash back for online shopping along the chance to make some extra income,  visit http://www.moremlmsuccess.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Irene_Mori

Senior Citizen Assisted Living Facilities by David Crumrine

May 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Assisted living is an alternative living arrangement for senior citizens requiring moderate elder care, including help with activities like eating, getting dressed, bathing, and using the bathroom as opposed to the more intensive care provided in nursing homes. This type of care serves as an intermediate between in home care for the elderly and the elder care provided by a nursing home. Facilities for this type of living may be in connection with retirement communities, nursing homes, home health care agencies, or complexes for senior citizens, or they may be separate facilities. This type of elder care is known by many names, such as residential care, board and care, congregate care, and personal care.

Assisted Living Facilities

When looking for an assisted living facility, you can usually expect to have your own room or apartment, provided meals, a staff of caregivers for support, and some or all of the following services:

  • housekeeping and laundry
  • security
  • recreational activities and exercise
  • transportation
  • guidance and monitoring of health care
  • reminders about or help taking medication
  • support with dressing, bathing, and eating

Choosing the Right Assisted Living Community

 

With these ideas in mind, it is important to choose the right facility for you. Each facility may have different ideologies of caring for the elderly, so not every facility may be a match for the kind of care and services you are looking for. When searching for elder care in an assisted living facility, there are a number of ways to determine whether a certain place will provide you with the comfort, security, and level of care you need:

  • Think about your future needs and determine whether the facility can provide the right kind of care for those needs.
  • Figure out whether the facility is near family, friends, and shopping centers or other businesses you’d like to walk to.
  • Are there admission and retention policies that do not allow people with severe cognitive impairments or physical disabilities to live there?
  • Is there a written statement of the philosophy of elder care of the facility, and do you agree with it?
  • Make more than one trip to each facility you are considering, sometimes unannounced.
  • Try to make some of those trips during mealtimes to check out the quality of food and service to the residents.
  • Take note of interactions between residents and those providing the elder care.
  • Ask whether each facility offers social, recreational, and spiritual activities based on your interests.
  • Talk to residents.
  • Find out what kind of training caregivers receive and how often they are trained.
  • Review state licensing reports.

Researching Assisted Living Centers

 

If you have concerns after performing some of the preceding suggestions-or if you would simply like to be thorough in your search-you may also wish to consider the following:

  • Call your state’s long-term care ombudsman as well as the local Better Business Bureau to ask about recently issued complaints against the facilities you are considering.
  • If a facility is connected to a nursing home or home health care agency, you may want to find out more its counterpart. You can find information about nursing homes on the Medicare website (www.medicare.gov/nhcompare/home.asp).

Assisted Living Financial Considerations for Seniors

 

Another aspect of assisted living facilities to consider is cost. Assisted living is generally less expensive than nursing home care, but more expensive the in home care for the elderly. The usual range is anywhere from $10,000 per year to over $50,000 per year, so it is important to know what you can afford and how much each facility costs. Another thing to know is that there may be fees not included in the basic rate. It will be helpful to figure out how much extra you will have to pay to live in a certain home.

Insurance may help cover some of these costs, but usually charges are covered primarily by the senior citizens who decide to live in these residences or family members responsible for their elder care. Some facilities also offer financial assistance programs, which you may want to inquire about.

Medicare does not cover the costs of these residences or the elder care provided there. Medicaid-the joint federal and state program that helps senior citizens and people with disabilities pay for health care when they are unable to afford it-may cover the service component of assisted living in certain states.

It is important to consider the different options in elder care. If cost is a concern, it may be helpful to consider in home care for senior citizens. This type of elder care may provide sufficient care for your needs in the comfort of your own home. If the degree of elder care provided by in home care or an assisted living facility does not meet your needs, consider a nursing home.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

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Gifts for Senior Citizens by David Stillwagon

May 13, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Whether it is at Christmas time or a birthday coming up buying gifts for some  people seems to take up time and a lot of pondering. Do you want to buy  something practical that they can use all the time or maybe surprise them with  something unique, much of the decision depends on the person that you are buying  for. One group of folks that tend to be difficult to buy for is senior citizens.  Gifts for senior citizens shouldn’t be any harder to find than for any other age  group. The perception is that since they are older they are pickier about what  they will like, which really isn’t the case. Another misconception is at their  age they probably have received just about every gift that you can think of,  which is also incorrect.

One of the best and easiest gift choices is books. Although you may think  that not everyone is a reader you would be surprised especially if you find a  subject that is interesting to the person you are buying it for with the World  Wide Web buying books like everything else is pretty easy. Not only can you  order the books from your home you can also send them directly to the gift  recipient. But take your time looking there are a million books out there; try  to find one that would be interesting the whole way through.

Is gardening an interest of the person you are getting the gift for. Although  gardening can only be done during the growing season it is great for older folks  because they get to stay active and they are outside. Tool sets or possibly a  garden caddy that makes it easier to cultivate the ground are great choices. It  is probably best to let them buy the plants, you never really know what kind of  flowers or vegetable they want in their gardens.

As we get older we help with certain things like keeping our balance,  remembering to take medication or remembering doctor’s appointments. There are  many products out there specifically for the elderly or senior citizens. Of  course you have to be careful getting something like this for some folks because  they may not feel that they need these things. But then again practical gifts  are always good especially if they can be put to use.

Funny or gag gifts are great ways to lift the spirit and bring on a good  laugh. There are many places on the internet that you can find such gifts, but  just remember to think about the person that you are giving it too. Are they  sensitive or can they take a joke?

If you take some time and a little effort buying gifts for senior citizens  isn’t that difficult at all.

David Stillwagon blogs about health and age issues like Gifts for Senior Adults

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Healthy Eating For Senior Citizens by Ian Pennington

May 2, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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All too often we resort to medication to help with our medical problems when  a change in our diet could be all that was needed. As we grow older our diet  becomes more and more important and healthy eating for senior citizens can  improve their quality of life considerably.

In an ideal world, we would be following a healthy diet throughout our lives  and our medical problems later in life would be negligible. This, however, is  unlikely to be the case and there will not doubt be a range of conditions  appearing as we get older. One of these is likely to be osteoporosis. This is a  condition which will weaken the bones and can lead to an increased risk of  fractures. A plan for healthy eating for senior citizens who have, or are at  risk of getting osteoporosis would include a possible reduction in protein. We  are not saying that you should discard it from your diet, just do not eat too  much. Your body uses acid in the digestion of protein and if there is too much  you may need to counterbalance this by taking calcium from your bones.

Other conditions that the elderly are prone to include rheumatoid arthritis.  There are many debates regarding the affect of certain foods on rheumatoid  arthritis and healthy eating for senior citizens who suffer with the condition.  Some claims have been subject to research and others are still just a case of  hearsay. It is very difficult to say if there is any link between diet and the  condition and many studies are underway.

The best advice that can be given regarding healthy eating for senior  citizens is to eat a good, balanced diet with plenty of fresh foods. Do not eat  too much protein and try and reduce red meats a little. Calcium is great for the  strengthening of bones but do consider the fact that this is protein and bear in  mind what we said earlier.

Often, as you get older, you find that your appetite is not as great as it  was when you were younger. You may find it easier to digest more, smaller meals  rather than one or two larger ones. Sometimes you may feel lethargic about  preparing a meal. If this is the case try to eat something which does not  require much time and effort. This does not mean that it has to be lacking in  nutritional value. Even a bowl of cereals can be very healthy and satisfying and  will make you feel better in the short term. In the long term, however, you  would be wise to make the effort to produce a good hot, nutritious meal for  yourself and your family. Healthy eating for senior citizens is by far the best  way to ensure you keep your energy levels high. This way you will be able to  enjoy your leisure time and fight infections and ill health.

Ian Pennington is an accomplished niche website developer and author.

To learn more about healthy eating  [http://www.seniorhealthtoday.info/healthy-eating-for-senior-citizens], please  visit Senior Health Today [http://www.seniorhealthtoday.info] for current  articles and discussions.

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Senior Citizen Health Insurance – How to Make it Affordable? by Reina Raine

April 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Senior citizen health insurance becomes a necessity as Medicare alone might  be insufficient unless you have a good savings plan or 401K during working  years. Retirement is a time when you get away from the daily grind and do things  that you love to do. However, when you consider the cost of a senior citizen  health insurance plan and added medications versus the fixed income of the  retirees, the picture looks quite bleak. Why is senior citizen health insurance  so expensive to secure? Is there anything that can be done to help the situation?

Getting an insurance policy is paying against a calculated risk. People get  hurt or sick, and the insurance company takes this risk into consideration when  calculating the premium. The greater the risks, the higher the premium.

With increasing age, people are more susceptible to illness and injury.  Illnesses such as hypertension and diabetes require long term care and  medication, hence increasing the overall cost. Age is seen as a high risk factor  to the profitability of the insurance company. This results in the premiums for  senior citizen health insurance being higher.

However, there are some ways to help you prepare for this. When setting up  your 401K savings plan, make sure that you take into consideration both the cost  of living after retirement and the cost of health care. Include the projected  costs for the premium payments for the senior citizen health insurance.

Sign up for the plan prior to retirement as the plan will be less expensive  if you are younger at the beginning of the policy. Check the details to verify  that the plan covers everything that you want and is compatible with Medicare.  Your chosen plan should be supplemental to government provisions and is not  intended to replace them. Always read the policy carefully before signing the  acceptance of the policy.

While this may seem like an extreme expense, the additional coverage provided  by these policies is worth paying for considering the kind of expenses that  might be incurred.

When purchasing the senior citizen health insurance cover, shop around to get  the best possible rates and coverage for your needs.

To learn much more on other aspects of health insurance  [http://healthinsuranceconsiderations.com/] visit  healthinsuranceconsiderations.com where you will find information on how to find  affordable health insurance [http://healthinsuranceconsiderations.com/] and how  to ensure you get best value for your money.

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Safety Tips for Traveling With Senior Citizens by David Stillwagon

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Feeling safe and secure is vital when you are traveling whether you are  traveling by yourself or with a group or family. It is always a big concern when  you have children especially when you are in an area that isn’t familiar to you.  Children have a habit of wandering away so keeping an eye on them is extremely  important. But it isn’t just children that need to be careful when traveling;  senior citizens also have to extra cautious.

Before you head out the door it is always a good idea whether you are a  senior citizen or not to check to make sure that your medications are with you.  Forgotten things like medication can be a major disruption to your trip.

A good detailed itinerary is the best place to start when planning a trip  with senior citizens. Knowing the times of travel, how long it is going to be  before getting there and what you will be doing helps to lessen the confusion  and questions that might arise. If you are traveling by car you should make an  estimate on how long the trip will take. If you are traveling with senior  citizens they may need more breaks should include that with your estimate.  Taking your time when traveling and enjoying the ride makes it more pleasant for  everyone.

If you are travelling on a plane then you need to take a few things into  account such as giving yourself plenty of time at the airport to check in and go  to the rest room if necessary. If the airport is large then you might want to  request a wheelchair if your senior citizen traveling partner gets tired on  their feet. Remember also that security is a lot tighter now so the time that  you are standing in line has increased greatly.

Seating arrangements on a plane or a bus should be considered with the older  adult in mind. If they have to take more restroom breaks that it is a good idea  to get them an aisle seat close to the restroom that way they won’t be have to  be climbing over folks.

After the plane ride is over and you leave the plane it might be a good time  to take a rest and a bathroom break. While the plane ride might not be tiring to  you it might be to others. A little rest now will definitely help out later.

Planning ahead and taking all the right precautions can make for enjoyable  trips with senior citizens.

David Stillwagon blogs about age and health issues

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Senior Citizen Travel Insurance: What You Need To Know by Jane Conway

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Finding travel insurance can be difficult for anyone, but if you are over a  certain age, then you may discover that getting the coverage you need is even  more challenging. This article covers the basics of why finding senior citizen  travel insurance can be more difficult, and what specifics you need to look for  in your plan.

In the world of insurance, money talks. Money, and statistics. And according  to statistics, senior citizens are more likely to make insurance claims than are  younger travelers. This results in less money made and more money paid out by  the insurance companies. The result? They are reluctant to offer insurance plans  to travelers over a certain age. While some insurers cap their age limits at 65,  others may go as high as 70, 75, or even 80. Still, over a certain age, you’ll  be unable to get travel insurance with many agencies, no matter how good your  current health is. Other companies may offer coverage, but at higher costs, and  with fewer benefits.

Not only is travel insurance for seniors more difficult to find, there are  also a lot of needs and issues that you may need to think about in an insurance  plan. For example, older travelers are more likely to have preexisting  conditions that need covered. Many older travelers will also be bringing medical  equipment or medications with them. Things such as walkers, wheelchairs, or  prescription drugs, can be easily lost or stolen, and they can be difficult and  expensive to replace while you are traveling. A good senior citizen travel  insurance plan will have coverage for these things. Another thing to think about  as you are looking for your travel insurance plan is to look out for reduced  benefits. As mentioned above, it is not uncommon for insurers to offer higher  costs and less coverage to seniors. Make sure that you know the exact details of  the plan that you are purchasing,

If you are having trouble finding insurance through regular insurers, then  you may want to consider looking into specialty plans. There are a number of  companies out there that specialize in travel insurance for senior citizens. Not  only do they have no upper age limit, they also give you specific coverage that  is tailored to your needs as an older traveler. With these plans, it is much  easier and hassle-free to get coverage for your preexisting conditions or for  medical equipment. Many people also find that they have some insurance cover  through retirement organizations that they belong to. Check to find out what  coverage you already have.

The most important thing is to make sure that you have coverage when you  travel. You never know what medical problems, injuries, or disasters may happen,  and the last thing that you want is to spend your precious retirement years  burdened with financial debt.

Check out these resources if you need more information about senior citizen travel insurance, or age concern travel insurance.

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Tips For Senior Citizen Travelers by Gerry Restrivera

April 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Traveling is one thing that even older people can enjoy. Whether you are a  seasoned traveller or someone who is just beginning to enjoy traveling, these  travel advice can help you plan a safe and enjoyable trip. Here are some helpful  tips for senior citizen travelers:

Prepare your documents as early as possible. Passport is the most important  document and you can apply in person, through passport agencies and by mail.  When you receive your passport, be sure to fill in the information page so that  your family and friends can be notified in case of accident or emergency. Most  countries requires visa, so after acquiring a valid passport, you also need a  valid visa. These documents need time for processing and for senior citizen  travelers, it is best to apply 2-3 months before your trip to avoid stress and  rushing that could be bad for you.

Do not bring more than you need. Bring only the things that you need because  it will be so tiring to carry heavy suitcases. Senior citizen travelers, should  not burden themselves with too much luggage.  Wash and wear clothing is a  good idea so that you will not bring too many clothes.  Avoid bringing  valuable things like jewelries and dress simply to avoid being a target of  thieves. Bring only reasonable cash with you. Bring your additional budget in  the form of traveler’s check, credit card and ATM card.

Senior citizen travelers should check their health condition with their  doctor before traveling. Find out if you need immunization before traveling to  protect you from serious diseases abroad. If you are under medications, it is  important to bring enough supply to maintain your health. Bring your medicines  in its original packages or bottles and bring your doctor’s prescription to  avoid narcotics issues in foreign countries or airports. Review your insurance  policy and check if it covers your medical expenses abroad, if not it is best to  buy a policy that covers your travel medical expenses.

Read and get information about the country you want to visit. It is best for  senior citizen travelers to know the current situation of their destination in  terms of security, weather, culture, people, laws and other important things  about your destination.  You can protect your health, security and enjoy  more on your trip if you know more about your destination.

Don’t stress yourself. Senior citizen travelers should not subject themselves  to stressful situations. Even if this is the travel you’ve been waiting all your  life, it is not wise to stress yourself and fill in all your time with a lot of  activities. Take time to relax, you will not enjoy if you are too  tired.

Look for best deals to get the best out of your travel. Traveling could be  really expensive if you do not know where to find the best deals. There are a  lot of perks available especially for senior citizen travelers. Getting  discounts on your accommodation and airfare will give you more opportunity to  enjoy your trip. Find out how to get cheap airfare visit Your World Travel Guide  [http://www.yourworldtravelguide.com/]

To travel on a budget visit Travel Secrets

Gerry Restrivera writes informative articles on various subjects including  Tips for Senior Citizen Travelers. You are allowed to publish this article in  its entirety provided that author’s name, bio and website links must remain  intact and included with every reproduction.

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Taking Care of a Senior Citizen in Your Own Family by Richard Fowler

April 19, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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You may want to take care of a member of your family who is already a senior  citizen. Your desire is sincere and is definitely there and you truly want to be  of help, but you should be aware of a lot of things before you actually do so.  It is not an easy thing to do, for one thing. There are plenty of challenges  involved in taking care of a senior citizen, and that’s even if you take into  consideration the fact that you are going to do it for a member of your own  family.

It is important that you know right away of the challenges that you are  likely to face early on, so that you can decide if you really want to do it. The  difficulty of dealing with elderly family members is a good place to start. You  would have to be prepared to deal with them, with their behavior and the  tantrums that they are likely to have once you do assume the task of taking care  of them. And of course there are the health issues that are quite serious when  you talking about senior citizens. The costs of their medication and different  health issues are something that you really need to consider seriously.

Above all that however, is the fact that you want to do it because you  genuinely care for them. The love that you have for your senior family members  goes beyond any of the things that you need to deal with or worry about. It all  becomes easy and even fun to do and you are not really going to worry about all  the stuff that is connected with taking care of your senior family member.  However, even if you have all the right intentions, you still need some tips and  the right information about how you could do things the right way.

Here then are some tips for you to follow if you are going to take care of a  citizen at home:

  • Make sure that the bathrooms in your home, especially those that are  frequently used by the elderly, are always clean and kept as dry as you can so  that they would not slip and fall. There have been too many cases of senior  citizens slipping and falling in bathrooms and you definitely don’t want that to  happen to your loved ones.
  • Needless to say, the home where you and your senior citizen family members  are staying should be as clean as possible. You need to make sure that your  home; specifically its interiors and the rooms where the elderly are staying are  free from dust and have very good ventilation.
  • Senior citizens need to be reminded of different things on a constant basis.  It can be about anything, the medication that they need to take or the time that  they need to take their nap. The important thing is that you remain patient even  though they may display some irritability and some anger at times. Just maintain  your patience and understanding at all times.

If you or someone you love suffers from a handicap or disability due to an  accident, disease, or illness and find it difficult to get around and function  in the current home environment, then you have come to the right place. We offer  chair lifts new jersey that are commercially available or just make whatever you may need from  scratch.

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Reasons for Hospitalizations of Senior Citizens by Warren Comer

April 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Experts are saying that senior citizens of today are a lot healthier than the  elderly a few decades ago. Not only are they getting sick less, but they are  also more active. They are living fuller lives, something that the old folks in  the past couldn’t have done.

What the Numbers Say

Statistics show than one third of all seniors need medical attention in a  hospital annually. The reasons for hospitalization are very varied, but most of  it is caused by the declining condition of their bodies. The fact remains  however, that life expectancy is on the rise.

What Increased Life Expectancy Means

The increase in life expectancy means that people people would need care for  a longer period. Though they are living longer years, it does not mean that they  are immune from the more common ailments. Even if they don’t get sick, their  body conditions really aren’t at their top forms anymore.

Common Reasons for Hospitalization

When a person becomes a senior citizen, the chances of being hospitalized are  increased. There are two major reasons why a person can be hospitalized, these  are due to injuries and heart problems.

Common Senior Citizen Injuries

Falls are the most common causes of injuries for the elderly. As people grow  older, the chances of falling are greatly increased. Half of all those who are  over 80 are likely to experience falling at some point.

The most common type of injury for seniors who have fallen is a hip injury.  It accounts for more than 40% of all the injuries that seniors suffer because of  falls

We all know that as people start to age, their bones become a lot weaker.  This would account for the brittleness of the bones. When a person who doesn’t  have a strong structure falls, the bones could easily break.

Other Types of Injuries

There are other types of injuries that seniors are prone to getting. These  include injuries from motor vehicle accidents, poisoning from medications and  fires. Their frail physical conditions can make them suffer more from these  injuries. It is important that they be given immediate medical attention should  they suffer from any of them.

Illness among Senior Citizens

When it comes to illnesses, heart problems are the most common reasons why  seniors get hospitalized. These problems include heart attacks and strokes. When  seniors exhibit signs and symptoms of any heart ailment, they should be brought  to the hospital right away so they can be treated.

Something as simple as flu can cause the hospitalization of a senior. In  their stage in life, a simple flu can cause a great deal of problems already. It  should be treated right away so that it won’t get any worse or cause other  conditions.

These are the most common reasons why seniors get taken to a hospital. If you  are living with a member of your family who is a senior citizen, then you should  know about these things so you can take better care of them. You can also share  what you’ve learned to make them aware of the health risks.

Family First  HomeCare is the perfect solution for seniors and others in need in New  Jersey who are not ready to leave their home for an institutional setting, but  because of illness or chronic conditions need support to remain at home. We  improve your life by providing compassionate, one-on-one care in the comfort of  your own home. Find out more about senior care services in New Jersey.

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Useful Tips For Senior Citizen Trips by James Redder

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The best way to keep senior citizens engaged is by making them take part in  senior citizen trips. There are many organizations and clubs that organize such  trips regularly. Letting the elderly people travel and relax for a while is one  of the best gifts for them. The best thing about the trips is that they can meet  many similar people and share a lot of things between them. They can make new  friends and see many new places.

How to find such clubs? The best place to start the search is the internet.  Look for travel organizations that conduct regular trips for seniors. Gather  information about many such clubs and choose the best according to one’s  requirements. If possible they should enroll in the organizations and enjoy  various other benefits too. The trips may be of various types. They can either  be a one-day type or for many days. The people who are participating in the  travel should inquire about a lot of things to make their travel  comfortable.

If the tour has been planned to a far off place and is more than two or three  days then a lot of preparations have to be done before going for the tour. It is  better read and understand about the location planned for the trip. Try to know  about the climate also because the appropriate clothing will need to be packed.  Though the members will keep the members informed it is better to have some idea  beforehand.

Most of the senior citizens have to take different medications for various  ailments. While packing for senior citizen trips ensure that all needed  medications are also packed accordingly. Try to carry a first aid kit with all  the necessary medications for common ailments like cold, aches, diarrhea etc.  These can be useful in case of minor problems and at times when a doctor is not  available. Make a checklist of things to be carried and take all the necessary  things. Keep them in places where they are easily accessible.

The greatest advantage of participating in senior citizen trips is that a lot  of new places can be seen along with many people. Instead of traveling alone and  getting into problems it is better to go with senior citizen travel groups. Try  to find the best travel clubs and become a member. The tour will be planned  carefully in such a way that they are very comfortable and useful for older  people.

Next, now you are better informed on the benefits of senior citizen trips. Will you start planning one of your own?  Read more information concerning senior citizen travel groups on this website.

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Hearing Loss in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Many senior citizens are affected by some hearing problems. If left  untreated, any extent of hearing loss may worsen over time. It is important that  senior citizens with difficulty hearing consult their doctor. Companions or  caregivers who notice a senior citizen is experiencing trouble hearing should  facilitate and encourage the senior to seek medical attention. Knowing the  symptoms and taking appropriate treatment measures can help stop and, in some  cases, even reverse hearing degradation.

Hearing is very important for daily functioning so problems with hearing are  quite serious and should be addressed as soon as possible. Senior citizens who  experience hearing problems may feel isolated or embarrassed as a result. Still,  if you find that you have trouble hearing, talk to your doctor about the many  treatment options available.

Symptoms

Senior citizens who have hearing loss often complain of:

  • Having trouble hearing on the phone
  • Difficulty with following conversations, especially when multiple people are  talking
  • Needing to have volume levels of electronics so high that others notice and  complain
  • Difficulty hearing things over background noise
  • Sensing that people always seem to mumble
  • Cannot understand when women or children speak to  you

Diagnosis

 

If a doctor finds that you have hearing loss, they may refer you to an  otolaryngologist who specializes in the ear, nose, and throat. After this doctor  conducts diagnostic tests, they may refer you to an audiologist who is trained  to measure hearing function. Audiologists can test your hearing for certain  pitches and loudness levels in order to find if a hearing aid is needed. These  tests are painless.

Hearing loss is caused by degeneration of nerves with age, one of the reasons  it is prevalent among senior citizens. Other common contributions to hearing  loss are earwax build-up, exposure to very loud noises over long periods of  time, viral and bacterial infections, heart conditions, head injuries, tumors,  medications, and heredity.

Types of Hearing Loss

Some different types of hearing loss include:

Presbycusis: This is age-related hearing loss. Senior citizens  affected by this condition can either have a hard time hearing or have low  tolerance for loud noises. It can be caused by damage to the inner ear known as  sensorineural hearing loss.

Tinnitus: This condition is characterized by hearing ringing, roaring,  or some other continuous noise in the ears. It can be caused by exposure to loud  noises, hearing loss, medications, other health problems, allergies, and  conditions of the heart and blood vessels. The source of noise caused by  tinnitus is unclear and varies in how long it affects the sufferer. Senior  citizens can treat the condition by either using a hearing aid to make other  sounds louder or using a masker that makes tinnitus noise less noticeable.  Others use music to drown out the extra noise. Avoiding smoking, alcohol, and  loud noises can decrease the effects of tinnitus.

Conductive hearing loss: This is caused by blockage between eardrum  and the inner ear. This can be caused by ear wax build-up, fluid in the middle  ear, abnormal bone growth, punctured ear drum, or ear infections. For ear wax  blockage specifically, it is suggested that sufferers use mild treatments like  mineral oil, baby oil, glycerin, or commercial ear drops to soften ear wax. If  you think the eardrum may be damaged, you should contact a doctor.

Treatment

Senior citizens who suffer from hearing loss have many options for treatment  and alleviating symptoms of decreased hearing functioning. These include:

Hearing aids: these are small devices placed on the ear that make  certain noises louder. Audiologists can help find the right hearing aid for you  and may allow you to test it in a trial period. Pick a hearing aid manufacturer  who will work with you while you adjust to wearing the product, and be sure that  you are aware of how to maintain a hearing aid, such as replacing batteries and  how to use it properly.

Assistive / Adaptive devices: There are a variety of products that fit  within this category like:

  • Telephone amplifying device: can be a receiver or entire phone that makes  phone conversations louder
  • TV and radio listening systems: avoids having to turn the volume up on  regular devices
  • Assistive listening systems: these are sometimes available in public venues  like theaters, churches, synagogues, and meeting places
  • Alerts: allow for signals that replace doorbells, smoke detectors, and alarm  clocks in order for the hearing impaired to hear them properly. These usually  employ vibrations or flashing lights to replace noise.

Cochlear  implants: If hearing loss is severe, a small electronic device can be placed  under the skin, behind the ear. It allows sound to bypass the malfunctioning  part of the ear and send signals directly to the brain. This process is not  helpful for all cases of hearing loss or deafness.

 

Tips for Senior Citizens

For senior citizens affected by hearing loss, here are some helpful hints for  communication:

  • Let people know you have trouble hearing them
  • Ask people to face you, talk slower, or ask them to speak without  shouting
  • Pay attention to facial expressions and gestures
  • Let people know when you don’t understand them
  • Ask people to reword things for you when you don’t  understand

Tips for Caregivers

 

Elder caregivers taking care of senior citizens who suffer from hearing loss  can use these helpful hints when speaking to their patients:

  • Face the person and talk clearly
  • Speak at a normal speed and do not cover the mouth
  • Stand in good lighting and avoid background noises
  • Use facial expressions and physical gestures
  • Repeat yourself if necessary
  • Keep a hearing impaired person involved in a conversation rather than  talking to others  about the individual while in their presence
  • Be patient,positive and relaxed during the interaction
  • Ask how you can help them understand you

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects  caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for  families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking  employment.

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Senior Citizens Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, and Arthritis – Causes and Treatments By David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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“Arthritis” does not mean only that someone has stiff, aching joints. Many types of arthritis exist, each with its own symptoms and treatments. Most types are chronic, meaning that they can be a source of discomfort for an extended period of time. Arthritis can afflict joints almost anywhere in the body and may cause changes you can see and feel, including swelling, warmth, and redness in the joints. It can last for a short time but be very painful or continue for a long time with less pronounced results while still damaging the joints.

Arthritis is extremely common in the United States, especially among senior citizens. Still, there are many steps they and those providing care for the elderly can take to relieve the different types of arthritis. The most common types in this population are osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and gout.

Osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis in senior citizens and begins when cartilage, the type of tissue that pads joints, begins to wear away. This can eventually cause all the cartilage between bones to wear away, forming painful rubbing of bones against each other. This type of arthritis is most common in the hands, neck, lower back, knees, and hips.

Symptoms of OA can range from stiffness and mild pain that accompanies exercise or bending to severe pain in the joints even in times of physical rest. OA can also cause stiffness during times in which you haven’t used specific joints in a while, like when you’re on a long car ride, but this stiffness usually goes away when you move your joints again. OA can eventually lead to problems moving joints and sometimes to developing a disability if the areas affected are the back, knees, or hips.

Aging is often the greatest risk factor for developing OA. Other factors depend on the area of the body afflicted-for instance, OA in the hands or hips may be caused by genetic factors; OA in the knees may be caused by being overweight; and injuries or overuse of joints in the knees, hips, and hands may lead to OA.

Rheumatoid arthritis.

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) differs from OA in that it’s an autoimmune disease, meaning that your immune system attacks and damages the lining of a joint as if it were an injury or disease. RA leads to inflammation of the joints, which causes pain, stiffness and swelling, sometimes in multiple joints at once. It may be severe enough to prevent you from moving a certain joint. Senior citizens with RA may often experience fatigue or fever. You can develop RA at any age, and it’s more common in women.

RA can afflict almost any joint in the body and is often symmetrical, meaning that if you have RA in a specific joint on one side of your body, you probably experience RA in the same joint on the other side of your body. RA can damage not only joints, but also the heart, muscles, blood vessels, nervous system, and eyes.

Gout.

Senior citizens with gout experience the most severe pain relative to many other arthritis patients. An attack begins when uric acid crystals form in the connective tissue or joint spaces, leading to swelling, stiffness, redness, heat, and pain in the joint. Attacks often follow eating foods like shellfish, liver, dried beans, peas, anchovies, or gravy. Drinking alcohol, being overweight, and taking certain medications may worsen the symptoms. In senior citizens, using certain medications to lower blood pressure may also be a risk factor for a gout attack.

Gout is most common in the big toe, but it can occur in other joints such as the ankle, elbow, knee, wrist, hand, or other toes. Swelling may cause discoloration and tenderness due to skin stretching tightly around the joint. If you see a doctor during an attack, he or she may take a sample of fluid from the affected joint.

Other forms of arthritis.

Other forms include psoriatic arthritis  in patients who have psoriasis; ankylosing spondylitis, which mainly affects the spine; reactive arthritis, which occurs as a reaction to another illness in the body; and arthritis in the temporomandibular joint, the point at which the jaw attaches to the skull.

Arthritis Symptoms and Warning Signs.

Senior citizens and those providing their elder care should look out for the following symptoms as they may be indications of arthritis:

  • lasting joint pain
  • swelling in a joint
  • stiffness in a joint
  • tenderness or pain when touching a joint
  • difficulty in using or moving a joint normally
  • warmth and redness in a joint

 

Any of these symptoms lasting longer than two weeks should be addressed by a physician. If you experience a fever, feel physically ill, have a suddenly swollen joint, or have problems using a joint, a doctor should be contacted sooner. You will have to answer questions and go through a physical exam. Before suggesting treatment options, your doctor may want to run lab tests and take X-rays.

Arthritis Treatment.

Some common treatment options exist even though each type of arthritis is treatedsomewhat differently. Rest, exercise, eating a healthy diet, and becoming educated about the right way to use and protect the joints are key to minimizing the effects of arthritis. Proper shoes and a cane can minimize pain the feet, knees, and hips while walking, and some technology exists for helping open jars or bottles, turn doorknobs more easily, and otherwise improve quality of life in senior citizens with arthritis.

Additionally, some medications can lower the pain and swelling. Acetaminophen (in Tylenol) and some NSAIDs are sold over-the-counter and can ease pain. Other NSAIDs must be prescribed. It is important for senior citizens and those providing their in home care to pay attention to the warnings on both prescribed and over-the-counter drugs and to ask a doctor about how to properly and best use over-the-counter medicine to treat arthritis. The FDA also has information about many medications.

Some treatment options are specialized for individual types of arthritis.

Osteoarthritis Treatment.

There are medicines to help senior citizens with pain associated with OA, and rest and exercise may ease movement in the joints. Managing weight is also important. If one experiences OA in the knees, a doctor can provide shots in the knee joint, which can help to move it without as much pain. Surgery may also be an option to repair or replace damaged joints in senior citizens.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatments.

Treatment can diminish the pain and swelling associated with RA and cause joint damage to slow down or stop. One will feel better overall, and it will be easier to move around. On top of pain and anti-inflammatory medications, a doctor might prescribe DMARDs, which are anti-rheumatic drugs that can slow damage from RA. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, can minimize swelling while waiting for DMARDs to kick in. Additionally, biogenic response modifiers block the damage inflicted by the immune system and help people with mild to moderate RA when other treatments have failed to work properly.

Gout Treatment.

If you’ve gone through a gout attack, talk to a doctor to discuss possible causes and future prevention of attacks. Work together with your doctor and other elder care providers to plan and execute a plan for prevention. Commonly, NSAIDs or corticosteroids are recommended for an acute attack. This treatment diminishes swelling, allowing you to feel better fairly shortly after treatment. Usually, the attack fully stops within a few days. If one has experienced multiple attacks, a doctor may be able to prescribe medication to prevent further attacks.

Exercise can help Arthritis.

In addition to taking the proper medication and allowing your joints to rest, exercise can help senior citizens to stay in shape, maintain strong muscles, and control symptoms of arthritis. Daily exercise like walking or swimming keeps joints moving while lessening pain and strengthening the muscles around joints. Before starting any new exercise program, it is important to discuss options with your physician.

Three types of exercise are the best for senior citizens with arthritis:

  • Range-of-motion exercises reduce stiffness, improve flexibility, and keep joints moving. Activities like dancing fit into this category.
  • Strengthening exercises strengthen muscles, which improves support and protection to your joints. Weight training fits into this category.
  • Aerobic or endurance exercises improve health in the heart and arteries, prevent weight gain, improve how your body works overall, and may decrease swelling in some joints. Riding a bike fits into this category.

Other things to do to manage Arthritis.

 

On top of exercise and weight control, a number of other methods may help senior citizens ease the pain around joints. Applying heat or cold to joints, soaking in a warm tub, or swimming in a heated pool may help you feel better and move your joints more easily.

Surgery may be an option when damage has become disabling or when other treatment options have not adequately diminished pain. With surgery, joints can be repaired or replaced with artificial ones. Commonly, arthritic knees and hips are replaced.

Unproven remedies.

Many senior citizens with arthritis try treatments that have not been tested or proven to help. Some are harmful, like snake venom, while others are harmless yet unhelpful, like copper bracelets.

Here are a few ways to determine whether a treatment is unproven:

  • The remedy is said to work for all types of arthritis and other diseases
  • Scientific support is from only one research study
  • The label doesn’t include directions or warnings of use

Areas for further research.

 

Studies suggest that acupuncture could ease OA pain in some senior citizens. Dietary supplements such as glucosamine and chondroitin are also under investigation and may reduce OA pain. More research is needed to determine whether these types of treatments actually work to reduce symptoms and damage to joints.

Talk to your doctor and others involved in your elder care.

Try not to make light of your symptoms by telling yourself that joint pain or stiffness is simply caused by aging normally. Your doctor and other elder care providers can discuss possible treatment options with you to safely minimize your pain and stiffness and prevent more serious joint damage.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

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Healthy Eating, Exercise and Lifestyle Guide For Senior Citizens By David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Healthy Eating and Lifestyle

While it is important for people of all ages to stay healthy, it is especially important for senior citizens to maintain healthy eating habits as well as to stay active which is important in the prevention of chronic illnesses like diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. By practicing healthier living practices, senior citizens can maintain a healthy weight, avoid depression, and stay mentally sharp. Those participating in caring for the elderly should be aware of these healthy living practices and work to both encourage and facilitate them.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a healthy diet includes many different types of food that are rich in nutrients. They have outlined specifically what this eating plan entails at the website.. Because this eating plan is designed specifically for senior citizens, it focuses on the types of foods that are important for preventing common ailments of older Americans like obesity and serious chronic illnesses.

Healthy Eating 101:

By following some of the tips listed, senior citizens can start a healthier lifestyle today:

  • Don’t skip meals. It is important to eat regularly in order to maintain normal metabolism and not become tempted to eat higher fat foods when food is consumed.
  • Eat a diet that is high in fiber. By eating foods like whole-grain breads, beans, vegetables, and fruits, you can lower your susceptibility to diabetes and heart disease.
  • Senior citizens especially should begin to adjust their diet to one that includes less calories and fat because the body will need less as it ages.
  • Calcium and Vitamin D are very important for nutrition and keeping bones strong. You can get this by either getting in at least three servings of dairy every day, or substituting these with soy-based beverages and proteins.
  • Senior citizens will have a harder time absorbing adequate amounts of the B12 vitamin. For this reason, it is important to eat cereals fortified with this nutrient or taking vitamin B12 supplements with meals.
  • Snack the smart way. Senior citizens will want to limit the amount of unhealthy snacking they do which involves foods high in calories and sugars. Instead, keep small portions of dried fruit, peanut butter, or crackers at hand to keep the appetite under control while remaining healthy.
  • Drink plenty of water. Although senior citizens often feel less thirsty then they used to, it is important to stay hydrated by either drinking water or water-based beverages like tea, coffee, soup, and skim milk.

Planning and Preparing Meals

 

Sometimes people find it hard to eat healthily because eating is often a social event which involves many people with different eating preferences and goals. While it is important to be able to enjoy a meal with family and friends, it is also important to maintain your own eating integrity by making sure everyone is on board with your personal healthy eating goals. Friends and family, as well as those providing elder care should facilitate healthy eating, not detour from it. The following tips address ways that senior citizens can maintain the healthy eating habits without sacrificing the social aspect of sharing a meal with others or learning to adjust to a lifestyle that involves eating with less people on a day-to-day basis.

  • Grocery shopping with others. This can be a fun and smart way to control the cost and quantity of food that you consume. If you don’t live with many people, this is a good way to split large-quantity items like potatoes and eggs which you may not be ableto use before expiration.
  • A time saving a smart way to eat healthy is cooking large quantities of food ahead of time and portioning for heating on later dates.
  • A quick way to prepare meals for yourself or for guests involves keeping frozen or canned fruits and vegetables on hand. Draining and/or rinsing canned foods is a good way to lower sodium or calories in foods that are kept in high sugar or high salt fluids.
  • Eating or preparing a meal shouldn’t always be a chore. Trying new recipes or eating outside can be a fun new twist on a meal with someone special.
  • Try to eat with people you enjoy to be around.
  • Some senior citizens have difficulty preparing meals, which is why it is important to become informed about home health care agencies or eldercare facilities that can aid in providing meals. The Eldercare Locator number is 1-800-677-1116.

Loss of Appetite or Desire to Eat

 

There are various reasons for why some senior citizens may not eat as well as they should or lose the desire to eat completely.

If you find that it is difficult to eat well, then it is best to speak with a healthcare provider or someone involved in your elder care about what can be done to help you eat better.

Some senior citizens are unable to eat well due to issues involving the condition of their teeth or issues with dentures. Checking with a dentist about physical pain that occurs when eating or other issues can help with these issues that lead to poorer eating habits.

When senior citizens lose family and friends or become depressed about events in their life, they may lose the desire to eat. In these instances, it is of the utmost importance that these individuals seek help from people they trust like their family, friends, church community, or those assisting with their elder care that will happily help them in finding ways to continue a healthy lifestyle and eating plan.

Some senior citizens complain that the flavor of foods change when they begin to take certain medications. While it is best to consult with a physician about issues surrounding medication, people can also take vitamin supplements with food that will help them stay healthy.

If you have someone who assists with your in home care, ask them to be vigilant about helping you eat healthy. Have them remind you to eat, and ask them to lend you a hand in preparing meals that are good for you.

Healthy Weight

Maintaining a healthy weight is important for being able to function in day-to-day life as well as stay mentally sharp. Senior citizens often lose or gain weigh as they age. If you are unsure about what weight you should maintain, consult your physician.

Health Risks Associated with Being Underweight

  • poor memory
  • compromised immunity
  • osteoporosis (weak bones)
  • decreases strength
  • hypothermia (lowered body temperature)
  • constipation

Health Risks Associated with Being Overweight

  • type 2 diabetes
  • high blood pressure
  • high cholesterol
  • heart disease
  • stroke (lack of oxygen transported to the brain)
  • some cancers
  • gallbladder disease

 

Because healthy weights will differ for everyone, it is important to verify with a physician whether it is healthy for you personally to lose or gain weight.

Staying Active

Participating in regular healthy amounts of physical activity can not only make you feel better, but it can make you less prone to diabetes, heart disease, and colon cancer. Staying active can be difficult for senior citizens, still it is an important part of a healthy lifestyle.

The following are some tips for maintaining a lifestyle that incorporates physical activity:

  • Know what amount of physical activity is appropriate for you. Everyone has different levels of activity that is safe for them, and while remaining active is important, always consult a health care provider about what is right for your lifestyle.
  • Take time to warm up, cool down, or take breaks when participating in a session of increased physical activity.
  • Take it slow. Always start slowly and build up to more intense levels of physical activities.
  • If you experience any pain, dizziness, or shortness of breath during exercise, stop the activity immediately.
  • Drink water.
  • Dress appropriately if you decide to exercise outdoors. Wear warmer clothes during the winter and wear lighter clothes during the summer while applying sunscreen or wearing sunglasses.
  • Wear the correct shoes for the activities that you participate in.

Types of Activity

 

Aerobic activities include activities that increase the heart rate and work the larger muscle groups. You may be able to speak a few words, but would not be able to carry on an entire conversation due to breathing patterns. Some examples of aerobics include:

  • brisk walking
  • water aerobics
  • tennis
  • house work
  • active play with children or pets
  • dancing

 

Begin incorporating small periods of this activity into your schedule during the week while slowly increasing the duration and frequency as time progresses. It is also important to incorporate different types of exercise that focus on balance and flexibility. Becoming used to a lifestyle with regular patterns of aerobic activity can reduce the effects of aging, control weight, lower risk of heart disease, improve flexibility, increase mood and energy, and expand social networks by meeting new people while doing various activities.

Strengthening activities involve the use of muscle groups against resistant forces like when lifting weights or doing yard work that involves lifting, digging, or pushing a lawn mower. This type of activity can keep muscles strong, reduce the need for a cane, reduce risk of bone injury, and help maintain a healthy weight.

Balance activities focus on muscles in specific areas of the body that encourage control as you move through space, reducing the likelihood of falls. This kind of activity could include walking heel to toe, standing on one foot, getting out of a sitting position without the use of the hands, and standing on the tip of your toes. Balance activities can help you stay steady on your feet and reduce the risk of fall and subsequent injury.

Flexibility activities increase the length of the muscles and can include stretching, yoga, and popular exercise programs like pilates. These activities can maintain the felxibility of joints, prevent stiffness, prevent injuries, and lower stress levels in general.

Weight-bearing activities require the muscles to work against gravity where the arms or legs bear the weight of the body. Activities like walking, tennis, and climbing stairs can build and maintain bone mass or reduce the risk of bone fractures.

Some activities incorporate multiple types of strengthening addressed above. What is important is that senior citizens find an enjoyable and do-able activity that will help them incorporate as many benefits as possible which will have far-reaching benefits to their health.

It’s Easy to Stay Healthy

A common misconception is that it takes an excessive amount of time and extra energy to maintain a healthy lifestyle. However, by just taking short walks for ten minutes a time or cleaning the house regularly can be practical ways to incorporate different physical activities into your daily schedule. And remember, staying healthy as a senior citizen will have increasing benefits as you continue to age.

Staying Motivated to Take Care of Yourself

Just because we age doesn’t mean that we are any less stressed by occurrences in life that may make us feel bad about ourselves or decrease our motivation to be good to ourselves. If anything, many of the challenges senior citizens face add stress.  Losing loved ones and friends or having trouble being independent with the added stressed of disease and functioning due to aging can cause depression or lifestyle changes that contribute to bad health. Here are some important tips for being good to yourself when you may not feel motivated due to circumstances out of your control:

  • Get plenty of sleep
  • Stay connected with family and friends
  • Join clubs or other social groups that you enjoy
  • Spend time with people that you enjoy
  • Volunteer at organizations in your community
  • Work a part-time job that isn’t too stressful or demanding
  • Watch a funny movie or find a way to laugh
  • Take up a hobby that you enjoy

 

Most importantly, senior citizens should remember that it is relatively easy and worth-while to maintain a healthy lifestyle as they age. Be sure to keep family, friends, and those involved in your elder care informed of your goals as they can help assist you. And remembering to eat healthy meals regularly, getting in physical activity, getting enough sleep, and being good to yourself are critical for maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

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Northern Nevada Medical Center Pain Management Center First Program in Nation Awarded Certification in Low Back Pain

Sparks, NV, April 4, 2013 – Northern Nevada Medical Center’s Pain Management Program recently earned The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval™ in Low Back Pain. The program is the first in the nation to receive this certification.

This certification recognizes NNMC’s dedication to continuous compliance with The Joint Commission’s state-of-the-art standards. To achieve this prestigious certification, the hospital underwent a rigorous on-site evaluation by The Joint Commission. NNMC earned certification by proving compliance with nationally developed standards including infection prevention and control, leadership and medication management.

The Pain Management Center is co-managed by NNMC and Nevada Advanced Pain Specialists and offers a multidisciplinary approach to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic pain.

“At the Pain Management Center, our goal is to return patients to a maximum level of functioning and independence by identifying the source pain and using advanced techniques to reduce the level of pain and suffering,” said Denis Patterson, DO, Medical Director of the Pain Management Center. “We are honored that The Joint Commission has recognized our program as a center of excellence.”

The Pain Management Center works with patients to identify the source of pain, which may be a specific disc, nerve root, joint or tendon. Physicians then use innovative image-guided techniques and therapies to target the precise area of the pain. 

“The Joint Commission certifications verify that NNMC’s Pain Management Center is truly a center of excellence for low back pain, and this is a major step toward maintaining excellence and continually improving the care we provide,” said Tiffany Meert, Chief Operating Officer, Northern Nevada Medical Center.

“In achieving Joint Commission certification, Northern Nevada Medical Center has demonstrated its commitment to the highest level of care for its low back pain patients,” said Jean Range , M.S., R.N., C.P.H.Q. executive director, Disease-Specific Care Certification, The Joint Commission. “Certification is a voluntary process, and I commend Northern Nevada Medical Center for successfully undertaking this challenge to elevate its standard of care and instill confidence in the community it serves.”

NNMC also has certifications in stroke, knee replacement, hip replacement and spine surgery by The Joint Commission. NNMC is also an Accredited Chest Pain Center by the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care. NNMC is the only hospital in the state with all of these distinctions.

For more information about the Pain Management Center , contact 775-284-8650

Northern Nevada Medical Center Pain Management Center First Program

Sparks, NV, April 4, 2013 – Northern Nevada Medical Center’s Pain Management Program recently earned The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval™ in Low Back Pain. The program is the first in the nation to receive this certification.

This certification recognizes NNMC’s dedication to continuous compliance with The Joint Commission’s state-of-the-art standards. To achieve this prestigious certification, the hospital underwent a rigorous on-site evaluation by The Joint Commission. NNMC earned certification by proving compliance with nationally developed standards including infection prevention and control, leadership and medication management.

The Pain Management Center is co-managed by NNMC and Nevada Advanced Pain Specialists and offers a multidisciplinary approach to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic pain.

“At the Pain Management Center, our goal is to return patients to a maximum level of functioning and independence by identifying the source pain and using advanced techniques to reduce the level of pain and suffering,” said Denis Patterson, DO, Medical Director of the Pain Management Center. “We are honored that The Joint Commission has recognized our program as a center of excellence.”

The Pain Management Center works with patients to identify the source of pain, which may be a specific disc, nerve root, joint or tendon. Physicians then use innovative image-guided techniques and therapies to target the precise area of the pain.

“The Joint Commission certifications verify that NNMC’s Pain Management Center is truly a center of excellence for low back pain, and this is a major step toward maintaining excellence and continually improving the care we provide,” said Tiffany Meert, Chief Operating Officer, Northern Nevada Medical Center.

“In achieving Joint Commission certification, Northern Nevada Medical Center has demonstrated its commitment to the highest level of care for its low back pain patients,” said Jean Range, M.S., R.N., C.P.H.Q. executive director, Disease-Specific Care Certification, The Joint Commission. “Certification is a voluntary process, and I commend Northern Nevada Medical Center for successfully undertaking this challenge to elevate its standard of care and instill confidence in the community it serves.”

NNMC also has certifications in stroke, knee replacement, hip replacement and spine surgery by The Joint Commission. NNMC is also an Accredited Chest Pain Center by the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care. NNMC is the only hospital in the state with all of these distinctions.

For more information about the Pain Management Center, contact 775-284-8650

CVS Caremark Emphasizes Commitment to Older Americans at Annual American Society on Aging Conference

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Company highlights the importance of medication adherence in helping seniors on their path to better health

CVS Caremark (NYSE:CVS) will highlight how medication adherence plays a vital role in helping older Americans on their path to better health at the 2013 Annual American Society on Aging Conference, which is being held in Chicago this week.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20090226/NE75914LOGO )

CVS Caremark, a Titanium Sponsor of the conference, will also be participating in a number of general sessions and panels and will highlight its efforts to ensure customers and patients receive quality care and guidance as they age. David Casey, the company’s Vice President of Workforce Strategies and Chief Diversity Officer, will open the March 12 General Session: Mysteries of Population Aging.

As a pharmacy innovation company, CVS Caremark is committed to developing new ways to lower costs and improve health. By advancing the understanding of medication adherence through research collaborations, the company is gathering important information about why some patients take their medications as prescribed and why others do not. CVS Caremark is also refining the ways it interacts with patients through proven programs, such as Pharmacy Advisor and Maintenance Choice, that help patients stay on their medications and improve health outcomes.

“People age 65 and older typically take two or three times as many medications as younger Americans,” said Casey. “As we reinvent pharmacy care, we will continue to be a trusted health care partner to all of our customers, but particularly to aging Americans who are more likely to have chronic conditions and require more guidance.”

CVS Caremark is not only committed to its older customers and patients, it is also committed to recruiting mature workers and supporting older colleagues who are already part of the company.

“At CVS Caremark, we believe talent is ageless. Our mature colleagues’ knowledge and experience are important assets to our company. They provide us with insight into the best ways to serve our mature customers and sometimes become mentors to their younger colleagues,” added Casey.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 4.7 percent of the nation’s workforce is age 60 and over. Currently, 6.9 percent of CVS Caremark’s workforce is age 60 and over, higher than the national rate. The number of CVS Caremark colleagues who are age 50 and over has grown from approximately 6 percent in 1990 to nearly 20 percent in 2013. To continue this upward trend, CVS Caremark is cultivating public and private partnerships at the local, state, and national level with the goal of recruiting more mature workers into all areas of its workforce.

About CVS Caremark

CVS Caremark is dedicated to helping people on their path to better health as the largest integrated pharmacy company in the United States. Through the company’s more than 7,400 CVS/pharmacy stores; its leading pharmacy benefit manager serving more than 60 million plan members; and its retail health clinic system, the largest in the nation with more than 600 MinuteClinic locations, it is a market leader in mail order, retail and specialty pharmacy, retail clinics, and Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans.  As a pharmacy innovation company with an unmatched breadth of capabilities, CVS Caremark continually strives to improve health and lower costs by developing new approaches such as its unique Pharmacy Advisor program that helps people with chronic diseases such as diabetes obtain and stay on their medications.  Find more information about how CVS Caremark is reinventing pharmacy for better health at info.cvscaremark.com.

Contacts:

Jeff Ventura
Corporate Communications
(401) 770-1990
Jeffrey.Ventura@cvscaremark.com

Renwon Offers Colorectal Cancer Home Screening Kits

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

To emphasize Renown Institute for Cancer’s commitment to quality cancer care and the importance of getting screened, Renown Health is offering a colorectal cancer home screening kit for only $15 ($5 savings) during the months of March and April. The $15 screening kit, Fecal Immunochemical Test (FIT), is a home screening for annual colon cancer detection.

 

Dr. John Gray and Dr. William Pfau created a fun, educational rap video on You Tube to raise awareness of the FIT Test and encourage patients to take the easy, at-home test which only requires “a swish and a flush.”

 

Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death in the US with more than 100,000 Americans being diagnosed each year. Despite the alarming statistics, if detected early though regular screenings, colorectal cancer is preventable.

 

Colon cancer has an 85 percent survival rate if caught early. It is estimated that as many as 30,000 lives could be saved each year through regular screenings and exams.

 

In 2008, the AmericanCollege of Gastroenterology (ACG) published updated guidelines for colorectal cancer screening. ACG recommends either a colonoscopy every 10 years or an annual FIT screening as the preferred test for colorectal cancer screenings starting at age 50. African Americans should begin screenings at age 45. Patients with a family history of colorectal cancer should speak with their doctor about a different screening schedule.

 

The new ACG guidelines list FIT as a preferred strategy because it has more extensive data than the guaiac-based Hemoccult SENSA test, and because fecal DNA testing is expensive.

 

Home Screening Kit – This screening detects blood in the stool often caused by cancers and polyps. The FIT Test detects blood more successfully than older and more widely used stool-screening tests.
Key patient benefits of the test include:

  • More convenient for patients because it is easy to prepare and complete in the privacy of your own home
  • Only one sample required, as opposed to three consecutive samples with the previous guaiac tests
  • Higher sensitivity resulting in fewer false readings
  • No dietary or medication restrictions required
  • No physician referral required

 

. To order a kit, visit renown.org/FITTest or call 775-982-6830.

 

About Renown Institute for Cancer

Renown Institute for Cancer offers fully integrated cancer services right here at home allowing patients and their families access to advanced treatment options. With three cancer physicians, patients experience coordinated care, appointments and treatments all at one location. For general inquiries, contact 775-982-6830 or visit www.renown.org.

Queen’s study shows psychotropic drug dispensing increases on entry to care homes

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 
Queen’s study shows psychotropic drug dispensing increases on entry to care homes
 

 

A study by Queen’s University Belfast has found that the dispensing of psychotropic drugs to older people in Northern Ireland increases on entry to care homes.

According to the study, due to be published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, antipsychotic drug dispensing in older people more than doubled from 8.2 per cent before entry to care homes to 18.6 per cent after entering care.

The study was carried out by researchers from Queen’s Centre for Public Health in the School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences.  It analysed prescribing data for over 250,000 people, aged 65 years and over living in Northern Ireland from 2008 to 2010, and looked at drug uptake within the older population during the transition from community to care.

The study revealed that psychotropic drug use was higher in care homes than the community, with 20.3 per cent of those in care homes dispensed an antipsychotic in January 2009, compared with 1.1 per cent of those in the community.

Lead researcher on the Queen’s study, Aideen Maguire, who is based in the Centre of Excellence for Public Health Northern Ireland said: “Although drug dispensing is high in older people in the community, we have found that it increases dramatically on entry to care. This study showed that the high uptake of psychotropic drugs observed in care homes in Northern Ireland cannot be explained by a continuation of drug use initiated in the community prior to entering care.

“With an ageing population globally it is important that we look at the reasons behind this type of increase following admission to care. Antipsychotic uptake in Northern Ireland is similar to that in the rest of the UK and Ireland, and this study highlights the need for routine medicines reviews especially during the transition into care.”

Other key findings of the study included:

·         Of the 250,617 people studied, 6,779 (2.7 per cent) experienced a transition into care during 2008-2010.

·         The psychotropic drugs prescribed to patients included in the study were being prescribed for the first time for many.

·         Six months after admission, 37.1 per cent of all new residents had received at least one prescription for a hypnotic drug, 30.2 per cent for an antipsychotic, and 24.5 per cent for an anxiolytic.

·         1.1 per cent of those living in the community were dispensed at least one prescription for an antipsychotic in January 2009, (7.3 per cent for a hypnotic, and 3.6 percent for an anxiolytic).

·         Hypnotic drug dispensing increased from 14.8 per cent to 26.3 per cent after entering care.

·         This study shows that use of psychotropic medication in a small proportion of residents of care homes was a continuation of a prescription that had been started before entry, but one in six individuals with no history of psychotropic drug use in the six months before entry had been exposed to at least one antipsychotic prescription within six months of entering care.

Professor Carmel Hughes from the School of Pharmacy at Queen’s added: “This is an important study of national and international relevance, as with an ageing population, quality of care for older people is an ongoing public health concern.

“The number of older people entering care across Ireland is predicted to increase in the next 10 years, and studies further predict a 69 per cent increase in the Irish population aged over 65 years from 2006-2021, and a 40 per cent increase in the those aged over 65 years in Northern Ireland in the same time frame.  With a globally ageing population, it is vitally important that we look at the reasons behind the increase in the prescription of psychotropic drugs in care homes.”

For further information on the Centre for Public Health and Centre of Excellence for Public Health Northern Ireland is available online at

http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/CentreforPublicHealth/

Ends.

For media enquiries please contact Claire O’Callaghan on +44 (0) 28 9097 5391 or 07814415451 or at c.ocallaghan@qub.ac.uk

Notes to Editors

  1. Aideen Maguire is available for interview.  Interview bids to Claire O’Callaghan on +44 (0) 28 9097 5391 or 07814415451 or at c.ocallaghan@qub.ac.uk
  2. A photograph of Aideen Maguire has been issued to picture desks and is available on request.
  3. Audio interview clips of Aideen Maguire and an online ‘WhatQneedtoknow’ video will be available at http://www.qub.ac.uk/home/ceao/Qtv/
  4. The full report is available for ‘early view’ at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jgs.12101/pdf
  5. Other studies have looked at drug uptake in care and in the community separately.

 

 

 

Pediatric Flatfoot – Cause for Alarm?

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Untreated Flat Feet in Children Can Result in Chronic Pain, Reduced Mobility

and an Increased Risk for Obesity

 

Parents keep a close eye on their growing children, watching for proper development and alert for any sign of a problem because small problems can have big implications. Surgeons at the Annual Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) this week are conferring with one another on Pediatric Flatfoot, a childhood condition that, if left untreated, can result in permanent deformity in adulthood. Flatfoot deformity makes mobility and exercise painful, increasing the risk of reduced cardiovascular health and obesity.

“Parents never want their child to undergo a surgical procedure,” says Mary Crawford, DPM, FACFAS, an Everett, Washington foot and ankle surgeon and conference presenter. “But uncorrected symptomatic flatfoot can lead to chronic pain and instability as the child ages into adulthood. Children will be on their feet for a long time to come. It’s vital to keep those feet healthy. A foot and ankle surgeon can help parents understand the options – surgical and non-surgical – for treating pediatric flatfoot.”

 

Not all children have symptoms, but others will complain of pain, tenderness or cramping in the foot, leg, and knee. Parents may notice an outward tilting of the heel, awkwardness or clumsiness in walking and difficulty with shoes. Pediatric flatfoot makes participating in activities more difficult, so parents should take note if their child is unable to keep up with playmates, tires easily or voluntarily withdraws from physical activities.

 

To diagnose a pediatric flatfoot, a foot and ankle surgeon examines the child’s foot in weight bearing and non-weight bearing positions, both in and out of shoes. The physician also notes how the child walks and evaluates the foot’s range of motion. In some cases, flat feet are associated with issues of the hip and knee, so the physician may examine those as well.

 

For further detailed analysis, the physician may order imaging tests such as x-ray, a CT scan, MRI or bone scan. Family history will be evaluated as well, since the presence of flatfoot disorder in the family increases the possibility of flatfoot in the child.

 

“There are different types of flatfoot deformities,” notes Crawford. “Thorough testing helps us pinpoint the causes of the flatfoot disorder and develop an appropriate treatment plan.”

 

Pediatric flatfoot can be divided into two categories, flexible and rigid. Flexible flatfoot is characterized by a normal arch when non-weight bearing, or sitting, and disappearance of the arch when standing.  There may or may not be symptoms. In the case of rigid flatfoot, however, the arch is stiff and flat when both sitting and standing. In most cases, children with rigid flatfoot display symptoms associated with the condition. In either case, flexible or rigid flatfoot, there are a variety of underlying reasons, requiring different treatments.

 

Babies often appear to have flat feet due to cramped positioning inside the womb, and the symptoms will abate with time. In other cases, the surgeon recommends stretching exercises or a soft brace for a short period. Children who do not exhibit symptoms typically do not require treatment, but will be monitored and reevaluated periodically by the foot and ankle surgeon.

 

For children who do exhibit symptoms, the physician may recommend physical therapy, shoe modifications, anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen to reduce pain and inflammation, or an orthotic device. This device fits inside the shoe and supports the structure of the foot. In some cases, surgery is the best alternative.

 

For more information on pediatric foot and ankle conditions or injuries, visit the ACFAS patient health education website, FootHealthFacts.org.

###

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of over 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons.  Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research and provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its consumer website, FootHealthFacts.org.

How to Care for an Elderly Person or Senior

October 11, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

How to Care for an Elderly Person or Senior
by: Starlet Nicole

It is not always easy caring for an elderly person. Their physical condition, health issues and their emotional state can present challenges for you, the caregiver. There are no doubts that caring for an elderly person is admirable, but it certainly comes with stress and at times can be overwhelming.

Far too many people feel guilty that they can not care for an elderly person on their own. Life presents far too many challenges and more often than not raising a family, paying into a mortgage and keeping food on the table can be challenging enough let alone adding to this caring for an elderly loved one. Although this can be challenging – it is not impossible. Preparing yourself and your family members for the transition is essential in order to make this work well.

Physical Considerations

Get informed about the physical needs of your loved one. Talk to the doctor and to anyone else who may have the wisdom and knowledge to help you care for the elderly member of your family. Know what to expect, what medications are required. Using services provided by a certified in-home caregiver from a professional agency can assist you in times that you need that extra help.

Keeping all important information in one file is important and this includes all medical information including test results, names and phone numbers of doctors, appointment dates, hospital cards, and insurance information. If your loved one is taking a lot of medications, make a chart to help keep track of what medication is to be taken and when.

Always be sure the home is safe. If your loved one uses a walker be sure throw rugs are secure, and there are no obstacles for them to trip over. Install safety railings should this help. If your loved one can get confused at times, it’s also a good safety precaution to have a baby gate positioned high enough in the door frame at staircases so that they can not fall down.

Emotional Considerations

Spending time caring for the elderly does not have to be all about taking care of their personal needs. Spend time asking them about their life. Everyone has stories to share about their life and some seniors have great experiences to share.

Teach an elderly person about the Internet. Many elderly people are nervous about computers and teaching them about all the amazing benefits of the Internet can spark new life in the person you are caring for.

The brain likes to stay active and no better way to do this than to play word games, crossword puzzles or even some board games such as Scrabble.

Always remember to be understanding because as we get older we tend to be very set in our ways and this means being stubborn at times. If the person you are caring for is being very stubborn and it is not a big issue, let it go. If the stubbornness is over something that is not negotiable it’s much easier to handle and you’ll have much less stress when you know to expect it.

When you have all the tools you need, it will make caring for the elderly much easier.

About The Author

Starlet is professional author for GC Nexus Group, Elderly Caregivers Agency help in finding professional caregivers throughout Montreal and Toronto in Canada. GC Nexus offers Live in Caregivers Canada, senior caregiver and elderly home care services for your parents and spouses by professionals.

http://www.gcnexus.com/elderly-care/
The author invites you to visit:
http://www.gcnexus.com

Fall Prevention Week!

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Fall Prevention Week Is Rapidly Approaching! “Don’t Fall Down! Fall Prevention 101 for Older Adults” Now Available as E-Book

The third week in September has been nationally recognized as “Fall Prevention Week” and we need your help to increase awareness of the growing public health concern of falls among our aging population!

Falls are the leading cause of accidental death and non-fatal injury for people over the age of 65. The greying of America is causing major concern among government agencies due to the financial and emotional costs to individuals, their families and society. In 2000, the average cost of a fall was over $28,000 (CDC, 2006). The good news is that up to 50% of falls can be prevented through increased awareness and behavior change.

“Don’t Fall Down! Fall Prevention 101 for Older Adults” explains situations that increase the risk of a fall and how a person can reduce that risk. Some factors can be changed and others must be accepted. The first step a person can do to prevent falls is become aware of things that contribute to instability and then make the necessary change when possible.

Balance is a complicated messenger system and this 70-page book offers scientifically-researched concepts in an easy to understand manner. The reader will gain a better understanding of what may be causing loss of balance, how to reduce the risk of a fall and where to go for help.

The index includes a “Help, I’ve Fallen and I CAN Get Up” demonstration, Fall Risk Medications List, Home Safety Checklist and a Senior Resource Directory.
Written in large print, this is a must read for older adults, loved ones, family members, caregivers, staff members, program planners, activity directors, nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, and doctors.

Knowledge is empowering. This easy to read book encourages a person to take responsibility his/her well-being in order to remain independent.

To request a review copy of this e-book, or to arrange an interview with the author, please contact:

Name: Kelly Ward, aka, “The Fall Prevention Lady”
E-mail: wardkelly@mac.com
Website: http://www.thefallpreventionlady.com
Tel: 916-821-5715

Free Screenings During Senior Fest

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General, Health and Home Care 

Hundreds of seniors will take advantage of free health screenings offered at Senior Fest 2012, Tuesday, Sept. 4 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Reno Town Mall. Last year, seniors lined up at the large tented area to participate in this once a year community outreach for tests offered by the health care team of professionals at Renown Health and Senior Care Plus.

Attendees, age 50 and older, can receive screenings regardless of their health insurance carrier. They include a Basic Metabolic Panel and Lipid Profile, Glycohemoglobin (Hemoglobin A1C) for known diabetics, blood pressure check and body mass index calculation. A pharmacist will also be available to review medications. Lab screenings will be offered from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

In addition to screenings, flu and pneumonia shots will be available at a low cost to general attendees. Medicare beneficiaries (Part B) and members of Senior Care Plus will receive the shots with no out-of-pocket cost.

Renown Health representatives will also be present to share important health information about specialized senior services, knee and hip joint replacement, cancer, heart services, Medical Group and Urgent Care and Cosmetic Laser & Skin Care.

For more information about the health screenings, contact Renown Wellness Resources at 775-982-5433.

About Hometown Health
Established in 1988, Hometown Health is the insurance division of Renown Health. Hometown Health is northern Nevada’s largest and most experienced health-insurance companies. Providing wide-ranging medical coverage and great service to members, Hometown Health represents a philosophy of health care that emphasizes active partnerships between members and physicians. Hometown Health values prevention as a key component of comprehensive care – reducing the risks of illness and helping to treat small problems before they can become more severe. Hometown Health offers a number of insurance products including HMO, PPO, HSA, Dental, Vision, and Senior Care Plus, northern Nevada’s first Medicare Advantage Plan. For more information, call 775-982-3000 or visit hometownhealth.com.

About Senior Fest
The 17th annual Senior Fest is the largest senior citizen outreach in northern Nevada. It offers informational booths featuring businesses and organizations that provide senior services in the Truckee Meadows community. Senior Fest is held at Reno Town Mall on the corner of Peckham Lane and South Virginia, across from the Reno Sparks Convention and Visitors Authority. Parking is free at both the mall and the Atlantis Casino parking lot. For more information, call 775-348-0717.

There’s No Place Like Home

September 1, 2012 by · Comments Off on There’s No Place Like Home
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Press-Media Releases 

There’s No Place Like Home
By Michael Clark

If you are on Medicare and have had a recent hospital stay, experts say there is about a 1-in-5 chance you will find yourself back in the hospital again within a month. Hospital readmissions are not only expensive they are hard on both patients and families. According to analysts, three-fourths of these readmissions are potentially avoidable.
Now, the Nevada Partnership for Value-driven Healthcare (NPV) has an initiative with an ultimate goal of reducing these hospital readmissions by at least 10%. The No Place Like Home Campaign is being implemented in Nevada by HealthInsight, the state’s Medicare Quality Improvement Organization.

Typically, problems begin when patients receive inadequate preparation for discharge from the hospital. The handover from the hospital to outpatient providers is poorly handled, and patients and their family caregivers are left to cope on their own with medical issues that they don’t understand. In fact, only about half of discharged patients follow up with their primary-care physicians after they leave the hospital, and those who don’t are much more likely to be readmitted than those who do see a doctor.
“Have we properly prepared the patient for a return home?” asks Deborah Huber, executive director of the non-profit organization HealthInsight, a prominent member of the NPV. “Poor communication is at the heart of the problem.”
Huber points out that too often people released from hospital care do not know when to go to their primary-care doctor, or which medications to take, or the costs involved. Making matters worse, there are no clear lines of authority. As a result, the system sets these individuals up to fail and creates a dangerous situation for patients, according to Brian Jack, an expert on hospital engineering.

In one study, for example, 78 percent of patients discharged from the ER did not understand their diagnosis, their ER treatment, home care instructions, or warnings signs of when to return to the hospital. Health care providers are partly responsible for this lack of comprehension.

IHI, a Boston-based nonprofit organization, advises hospitals and other institutions to use a patient-centered approach that looks at post-discharge care through a patient’s eyes. By doing “deep dives” into several patient histories, IHI says, and finding out why the patients were readmitted, it’s possible to understand where the entire process falls short and begin to fix it.

Another area that needs improvement has to do with what is called the transitions of care…do the health care providers receiving the patient know what the ones sending the patient home knows? “The patient gets stuck in the middle. They don’t know what to do,” Huber noted. And what about Advanced Planning…end of life care? Have patients and their families made these ultimate decisions? If not, these issues must be addressed. What if patients don’t want to go back to the hospital? Are they aware of what palliative care or hospice can do? “Medicare provides a good hospice benefit. The whole family can benefit from that.”

Here the goal is to make someone as comfortable as possible and give family members the support they need to help them through this difficult time. “These are the type of things I see every day with my home health patients, I see where patients would not have to return to acute if the goals set here could be obtained,” said Lucia Cleveland a home health occupational therapist.

HealthInsight’s goal is to reduce 30-day readmissions by 20% by October 2013. Finally, Huber observes “this is a community problem, not merely a hospital problem.” This community effort will produce sustainable and replicable strategies to achieve high-value health care for individuals in our communities and save potentially millions of dollars in healthcare costs.

“One way we support this statewide community effort is through a web-based campaign where providers, payers, and patients can pledge their support and become an active participant,” noted Jackie Buttaccio, HealthInsight’s Quality Improvement Manager. “The website is a one stop shop for all things readmissions with resources and tools that can be downloaded, and local success stories can be shared. “ The address is http://noplacelikehomenv.com

HealthInsight also supports this work through face to face workshops for providers to learn more about what they can change about their systems of care to keep patients safe from an avoidable hospital readmission.

Free Senior Help Fair

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

Free Senior Help Fair Provides Vital Information & Services

The Senior Help Fair is a collaborative event hosted by community-based organizations comprised of health care, senior service providers and government. The HELP Fair attendees will be treated to a variety of vendors, offering health and wellness screenings, health-related tips and information about local services from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thursday Sept. 6, 2012, on the campus of Christ Lutheran Church, located at 111 N. Torrey Pines Drive.

The Senior Help Fair is a one-stop destination for information about local services and organizations and is open to all ages. More than 50 agencies and companies will be on hand to provide information on community services for seniors. Community agencies will be on hand to help seniors connect with resources. Assistance programs that will be available include nutrition support, energy assistance, medication costs, affordable housing, legal services and transportation including the TAP taxicab assistance program. There will also be free health screenings for blood pressure, diabetes risk, vision, falls risk and dementia.

“This fair will help all seniors and those who care for them navigate the programs and services available to help people and to give voice to their concerns regarding services and resources,” said Senior Help Fair Organizing Committee Chair Jeff Klein. Individuals, who are 65 or over, should bring their identification and Medicare cards.
Along with the more than 50 agencies and companies offering information and services, free lunch will be served to the first 200 attendees, local singer Mark Miller will be providing entertainment and many door prizes will be offered on the hour.
The best time to think about aging is before the need arises. If an emergency happens, family members have to scramble to seek out options for care within a short time period, often not being able to take the time to make the best decision. “There are still a large number of people in the state who do not know what senior services are offered, or that these services even exist, so we will continue outreach efforts to the community,” said Commission on Aging member Lucy Peres “The goal is to raise awareness of health and safety related services in the state.”

The fair will also provide an opportunity for seniors to speak with their legislators and voice their opinions and concerns on issues that affect their daily lives.

When: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Thursday Sept. 6, 2012
Where: Campus of Christ Lutheran Church 111 N. Torrey Pines Drive
Information: Call Nevada Senior Services (702) 648-3425 www.nevadaseniorservices.org

Senior Care Plus Offers Free Screenings During Senior Fest

Senior Care Plus, a Medicare Advantage Plan from Hometown Health, will offer free lab screenings during Senior Fest. Senior Fest is Tuesday, Sept. 4 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Reno Town Mall.

Lab screenings will be offered from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Attendees, age 50 and older, can receive screenings regardless of their health insurance carrier. They include a Basic Metabolic Panel and Lipid Profile, Glycohemoglobin (Hemoglobin A1C) for known diabetics, blood pressure check and body mass index calculation. A pharmacist will also be available to review medications.

Senior Care Plus members can receive a free FIT (fecal immunochemical test) at-home cancer screening and a heel bone scan (100 screenings will be offered for women only).

In addition to screenings, flu and pneumonia shots will be available at a low cost to general attendees. Medicare beneficiaries (Part B) and members of Senior Care Plus will receive the shots with no out-of-pocket cost.

Renown Health representatives will also be present to share important health information about specialized senior services, knee and hip joint replacement, cancer, heart services, Medical Group and Urgent Care and Cosmetic Laser & Skin Care.

For more information about the health screenings, contact Renown Wellness Resources at 775-982-5433.

About Hometown Health
Established in 1988, Hometown Health is the insurance division of Renown Health. Hometown Health is northern Nevada’s largest and most experienced health-insurance companies. Providing wide-ranging medical coverage and great service to members, Hometown Health represents a philosophy of health care that emphasizes active partnerships between members and physicians. Hometown Health values prevention as a key component of comprehensive care – reducing the risks of illness and helping to treat small problems before they can become more severe. Hometown Health offers a number of insurance products including HMO, PPO, HSA, Dental, Vision, and Senior Care Plus, northern Nevada’s first Medicare Advantage Plan. For more information, call 775-982-3000 or visit hometownhealth.com.

About Senior Fest
The 16th annual Senior Fest is the largest senior citizen outreach in northern Nevada. It offers informational booths featuring businesses and organizations that provide senior services in the Truckee Meadows community. Senior Fest is held at Reno Town Mall on the corner of Peckham Lane and South Virginia, across from the Reno Sparks Convention and Visitors Authority. Parking is free at both the mall and the Atlantis Casino parking lot. For more information, call 775-348-0717.

Cataract Rates are on the Rise in Americans Age 40 and Older

August 21, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Cataract Rates are on the Rise in Americans Age 40 and Older

American Academy of Ophthalmology Offers Tips for Cataract Detection and Treatment

SAN FRANCISCO – August 16, 2012 – The incidence of cataracts in the U.S. has risen 19 percent since 2000, impacting nearly 25 million Americans age 40 and older.[i] In fact, more than half of all Americans will develop cataracts by age 80, according to Prevent Blindness America’s Vision Problems in the U.S. report. In response, the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart program is educating the public about cataract risk factors, detection and treatment options during Cataract Awareness Month.

Cataract is a clouding of the eye’s lens, which can make it more difficult to focus light onto the eye’s retina – the light-sensitive tissue that sends images to the brain. Cataracts, a natural part of aging, are the most common cause of vision loss in the U.S. They typically develop slowly, so symptoms may not be immediately apparent. Over time, cataracts can cause vision to become blurry, cloudy, dull, or dim, and can interfere with daily activities.

The good news is that cataracts are almost always treatable with cataract surgery. During cataract surgery, an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor with the training and certification to provide the full range of eye care and surgery – removes the eye’s cloudy natural lens and replaces it with a clear artificial lens implant called an intraocular lens (IOL). Cataract surgery is often performed as an outpatient procedure and does not require an overnight hospital stay. Cataract surgery is one of the safest types of surgery, and 90 percent of patients who have cataract surgery enjoy better vision afterward.[ii]

“If you notice vision changes, cataracts could be to blame and you might need more than a new pair of glasses,” said David F. Chang, M.D., a clinical correspondent for the American Academy of Ophthalmology and a clinical professor at the University of California, San Francisco. “If you do have a cataract, you should be reassured that it is a normal aging change and not an eye disease. Cataract surgery usually carries an excellent prognosis, and you should talk to your ophthalmologist about whether surgery should be done to restore your eyesight.”

As the aging population grows, it is increasingly important for seniors and their caregivers to understand cataract risks, symptoms, prevention, and treatment options. The American Academy of ophthalmology recommends the following tips to maintain healthy vision:
• Get a baseline exam by age 40. All adults should get a baseline eye exam by age 40 when early signs of eye disease and vision changes may start to occur. During this visit, your ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.) will advise you on how often to have follow-up exams.
• After age 65, schedule regular eye exams. Anyone age 65 and older should visit an ophthalmologist regularly to detect eye diseases and conditions like cataract early, and to monitor any vision loss. Seniors age 65 and older may qualify for an eye exam and up to 1 year of care at no out of pocket cost through EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of American Academy of Ophthalmology. See if you qualify at www.eyecareamerica.org.
• Know your risk factors for cataract. Diabetes, smoking, extensive UV exposure, serious eye injuries, steroid use, and a family history of cataract can increase your risk for developing a cataract.
• Reduce your risks to prevent or delay the onset of cataracts. Use sunglasses and hats to protect your eyes from UV damage. Don’t smoke. If you have diabetes, control your blood sugar carefully through diet, exercise and medications if needed.
• Talk to your ophthalmologist about your treatment options. Vision loss from cataracts can interfere with daily activities. Talk to your ophthalmologist about whether cataract surgery is right for you. When preparing for surgery, give your doctor your complete medical and eye health history, including a list of medications that you have taken. Some medications can cause the iris to move out of its normal position and may require your ophthalmologist to adjust his or her surgical technique.

For more information on cataract symptoms, risk factors, surgery, and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org.

About EyeSmart
The American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

Seniors Citizens are a high priority in Washoe County

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Seniors Citizens are a high priority in Washoe County

Washoe County is experiencing a rapid demographic shift because of the aging of the “baby boom” generation. Like every community in America, we are evaluating how to provide services to the most vulnerable seniors.
 After an April 2, 2012 presentation by Washoe County Senior Services WCSS), the Joint Meeting of the Board of County Commissioners, Reno City Council, Sparks City Council and Washoe County School District Board of Trustees requested that the Department prepare a report on the cost and benefit of increased funding.
 The Department offers both a $1.2 million and $2.4 million option.
 Please ask your elected officials, in-person, by letter or e-mail, and in testimony at public hearings to support the proposal. The following is a summary:

Washoe County, like all of the United States, is seeing the “Baby Boomers” turn 60 in unprecedented numbers. This demographic shift is having a dramatic impact on seniors, families and our community.
 The senior population is growing faster than any other segment of the Washoe County community; 25% are now over 55, with the age group 55-64 years absorbing 27.3% of all County population growth over the last decade.
Washoe County Senior Services (WCSS) is not able to meet the needs of the rapidly growing number of vulnerable seniors.
 Today, Washoe County Senior Services assists only 8% of the more than 71,000 County residents over the age of 60. We are forecast to have as many as 93,000 over 60 by 2016.
 The Washoe County Senior Center, 9th and Sutro, is 34 years old, and over half of its Meals on Wheels delivery vehicles are over 10 years old.
 In 1985, when voters approved the $.01 Senior Citizens ad valorem Fund in perpetuity, it was believed to be adequate for all future facility, program and service needs. Because of increasing costs, the addition of essential programs and above all, population growth, this is no longer true.
 Almost all Washoe County Senior Services programs have a waiting list.
Washoe County Senior Services helps “Bend the Curve” of health and long term care costs by keeping seniors active, involved and independent.
 Planning to prepare the community for an aging society; leverage new resources.
 Senior Centers operated in partnership with cities and GID that provide classes, activities and events; volunteer opportunities.
 Congregate Meals at 8 locations in senior centers and public housing.
 Outreach and early intervention programs to connect seniors to services as early as possible.
 “Help Line” – Aging and Disability Resource Center – provides information, advice and counseling about health and long term care.
 Social Services, including case management, nursing, Home Delivered Meals and in-home care for the most vulnerable.
 Senior Law for legal matters including advance directives, public benefits appeals, elder law, and housing counseling.
 DayBreak Adult Day is an alternate to nursing home care.
Seniors and their families need help managing the maze of services and choices; many seniors are not able to pay for the services they need
 Almost every Washoe County family will be faced with providing care for aging parents and relatives. Most are not prepared.
 In a 2006 Washoe County needs assessment, only 34% of all seniors said that they could afford to pay for their own care.
WCSS low cost supportive services reduce public expenses by keeping people healthier, longer, supporting independent living in their homes and by delaying or preventing institutionalization. The additional funding would provide services and reduce other costs:
 Congregate Meal sites and Senior Centers
• 20% of the 2,100 seniors report that it is their only meal of the day.
• Site managers, which were eliminated in previous budget cuts, would be restored for all meal sites.
• Provide clerical and social work support for senior centers.
 WCSS “Help Line” provides counseling on long term care and health care options, empowering seniors to make an informed choice on decisions that affect their entire family.
• Expert information, advice and counseling would be available to an additional 5,500 seniors and family members per year.
 Case management and visiting nurse
• An additional 350 seniors would receive medication management, help with medical professionals and an in-home nursing assessment.
• An additional 600 seniors would be assisted by a case manager to coordinate care and arrange for services.
• An additional 400 low-income seniors would get in-home services, such as home care, personal care and escorted transportation that are not available elsewhere.
 Home Delivered Meals provides 1/3 of the USDA Recommended Daily Allowance to homebound seniors, who cannot prepare their own meals.
• Today, 175 (37%) of WCSS current HDM case load need assistance in 2 or more Activities of Daily Living (ADLs – bathing, dressing, eating, toileting, etc.) and receive additional case management, nursing and in-home care. They have received services for at least one year.
• New funding would serve an additional 300 homebound seniors per year; provide an additional 70,000 meals per year, for a total of 180,000.
• Additional funding would help an additional 400 high risk clients
 Senior Law: Provide legal services to an additional 400 people.
 DayBreak Adult Day Health: An additional 10 low-income seniors will get services.
• The annual cost for a DayBreak client is $11,000. Nevada Medicaid Nursing Home cost for the same senior is about $59,000 per year; an annual savings of $48,000 per year, and total potential annual savings of $3.48 million.

Nevada Senior Guide Announces Arbors Memory Care Community Top Rating

August 10, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Nevada Senior Guide Announces Arbors Memory Care Community Top Rating

Nevada Senior Guide Announces Arbors Memory Care Community Receives State’s Top Rating in Annual Survey. Family owned memory care community in Nevada receives another “A” grade.
Sparks, NV, August 09, 2012 –(PR.com)– Family owned memory care community in Nevada receives another “A” grade

Arbors Memory Care Community has received another “A” grade from the State of Nevada Department of Health and Human Services.

This is the 9th year in a row the community in Sparks, which specializes in the care of people with Alzheimer’s and related dementias, has received the highest rating from the Health Division’s Bureau of Health Care Quality and Compliance.

Owned and operated by the Stutchman family, the Arbors has never been resurveyed to achieve the A grade. They have consistently received the highest rating on the first survey or inspection.

Some assisted living and memory care communities receive a lower grade on the first inspection and then must be resurveyed once any deficiencies have been corrected.

During the annual survey state inspectors show up unannounced and check on resident care, medication management, employee fingerprints and background checks, resident medical records, cleanliness of the building and fire safety.

Survey results may be viewed at http://www.health.nv.gov/Deficiencies_Qry.asp#agc_ and click on the AGC/AGZ link.

Each licensed community in the state is surveyed on an annual basis. Facilities then receive a grade between A and D. An A grade means the community is well run with minor administrative issues and no harm is likely to occur. A grade of D means serious harm has occurred or a condition or incident has resulted in death or serious harm and/or multiple administrative issues were cited.

“We are so incredibly proud of our continuous A grade,” said owner Gina Stutchman. “One of the many benefits to being family-owned is that all of the decisions regarding the quality of care are made right here in our building, not at corporate headquarters in another state.”

Stutchman also said the Arbors provides ongoing staff training that far surpasses the state requirements.

“Our training focuses on the fact that each person with memory loss is unique and is affected in a different way. Understanding the disease process and learning a variety of ways to communicate allows our caregivers to reduce anxiety and create a comfort zone for our residents and their families.”

Arbors Memory Care Community is a family-owned and operated residential community providing care for persons living with Alzheimer’s or other dementias.

The Arbors, located at 2121 E. Prater Way in Sparks, offers long term stays, as well as respite stays for caregivers needing a short-term care solution.

For more information, please contact Stephanie Hanna, Arbors Memory Care Community (775) 331-2229 or visit www.arborsmemorycare.com.

For more information about Nevada Senior Guide, please go to http://www.nvseniorguide.com

Nevada-Senior-Guide Laser Wellness PMA

August 10, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Las Vegas 

www.laserwellnesspma.com

We Believe in 3 Things…

Laser Wellness PMA believes in truly a three word motto:  Learn, Invest, Share We know that today is more important than ever for people to Learn about their health conditions, Learn about what natural options are out there, and to Learn how to think with a winning attitude towards health and life.  We believe that by Investing in your health you are taking responsibility for your health and not just relying on someone else alone.  It has been proven again and again that being an active partner in your health and wellness journey can make all the difference.  Most people have never really invested in their health before, they pay insurance, they supplement, they pay for medications, but they never really invest in their health and miss out on truly being responsible and given themselves the best quality of life possible.  We also believe in Sharing health and wellness with everyone you know.  Once you invest in LLLT, whether you are a professional or a consumer, Share it with every family member, friend, neighbor, and co-worker so they can get a glimpse of what LLLT can do for them…

Do You Believe In Health & Wellness?

 What is it that keeps our  Health in somewhat dismay?  As we age, we have been trained to think that taking medications, surgeries, pain, lack of energy, lack of mobility, memory and vision loss, are all just the way it is and “normal.”  The TRUTH is we have given up responsibility of our own health journey.  Who is Responsible for our health and our families, our Doctors? Our Government? Our Insurance Companies? FACTS are that we are living longer, but not healthier, we are living sicker, longer!  We have more disease, sickness, pain, and injury problems than ever, and we take more prescriptions and have more surgeries than ever, yet we seem to be unhealthier!  The US is near the bottom in Longevity and Life Expectancy out of all the industrialized nations on Earth!

Call for a FREE Information Packet with dvd AND for a FREE Consultation from our Specialist:  (605)791-2283 Direct

Low Level Laser Therapy Works!

Light Amplication by Stimulated (Oscillation) Emission of Radiation or “Laser” has continued to bring out new changes in just about every medical and consumer field there is.  “Why is Low Level Laser Therapy so effective and continues to show tremendous results thru research all over the world?”  The answer is simple, LLLT works at the cellular and atomic level.  It carries electrons back into the body, and it helps to Re-energize sick, injured, damaged cells and allows better permeability to take place once again…So what can LLLT do for you since it works at the cellular level? As we continue to do more research, to get more understanding of how to effectively use LLLT, we continue to understand that we have just begun to see the wonderful results that LLT can produce…LLLT and Qlaser is truly Tomorrow’s Health & Wellness Care Today….

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Medicine Disposal Program

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

www.paininthedrain.com

PAIN IN THE DRAIN

IN THE COMMUNITY!

Did You Know… …You can dispose of your expired and unused medicine at any Police Department in Clark County?
Drop Boxes are now located in the lobby of the Boulder City Police Department, the City of Henderson Police Department Substations, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department substations, the North Las Vegas Police Department substations and the Mesquite Plice Department substations.

Don’t Rush to Flush!  Dispose of your expired medicines properly!

Only public employees may access public manholes for maintenance or monitoring activities. Other, illegal discharges might result in:

  • Clogged or overflowing sewer lines
  • Disruption of wastewater treatment plant processes
  • Damage to sewer lines and laterals
  • Buildup of toxic gases in the lines
  • Harmful discharges into the environment

An example of an illegal discharge is a commercial vacuum truck dumping its contents of grease interceptors, sand/oil interceptors and septic tanks into the sewer system. Illegal dumping into public manholes is most likely to occur at night and away from major streets. If you see a potentially unauthorized discharge, please contact the Water Reclamation District at 702-668-8354.

Introducing F.O.G.G.

The Clark County Water Reclamation District and the Cities of Las Vegas, Henderson and North Las Vegas have teamed up to ask our residents to Just Can It! and help keep cooking fat, oils, grease and grit (FOGG) out of our community’s sewer systems. These agencies maintain extensive collection systems of several thousand miles of pipeline underneath the streets to deliver wastewater from homes, businesses and schools to the treatment facilities.
We call it wastewater, but it is not wasted at all. We reclaim every drop of this valuable resource by treating it to very high levels until suitable for reuse- for golf courses, soccer fields, industrial cooling and, most importantly, for return to Lake Mead and the Colorado River system for Return Flow Credits. In order to clean the water to the very high standards necessary, these agencies must keep the wastewater flowing through the pipelines to reach the plants for treatment.

F.O.G.G. FAQs

Q:  What is FOGG, and is it a problem? A:  FOGG is made up of fat, oil, grease, and grit, and it is a very BIG problem! FOGG does not mix with water because its components are insoluble and have a tendency to separate from a liquid solution. When fat, oil and grease are poured down the drain, they stick to the sewer pipe walls creating layers of buildup that restrict the wastewater flow. This problem requires pipes to be cleaned more frequently, causes pipes to be replaced sooner than expected, and causes blockages that can result in sewer overflows.

Q:  How does fat, oil, grease, and grit (FOGG) create a sewer blockage? A:  Fat, oil, grease, and grit in a warm, liquid form may appear to be harmless since they flow easily down the drain. However, as the liquid cools, the FOGG solidifies and floats to the top of the other liquid in the sewer pipes. The layer of FOGG sticks to the sewer pipes and over time, the flow of wastewater becomes restricted and can cause a backup or overflow. The gritty particles, including coffee grinds, eggshells, aquarium gravel, grain, rice, seeds, etc. get trapped in the greasy buildup, accelerating the problem rapidly.
Over time, FOGG accumulates in the sewer system in much the same way that cholesterol accumulates in our arteries. As FOGG builds in the pipes, wastewater becomes increasingly restricted. Suddenly, sometimes without warning, a sewer pipe backs up and overflows, similar to a heart attack. The result is a home flooded with sewage, or sewage overflowing in the street, where it flows – untreated – into area waterways.

Q:  What products contain fat, oil, grease, and grit (FOGG) A:  Fat, oil, grease and grit are natural by-products of the cooking and food preparation process. Common sources include food scraps, meat fats, cooking oils, lard, baked goods, salad dressings, sauces, marinades, dairy products, shortening, butter and margarine, coffee grinds, eggshells, grain, rice, seeds, etc. Anything put through the garbage disposal adds to the buildup.

Q:  What can I do to keep fat, oil, grease, and grit (FOGG) out of the sewer and help prevent a grease related sewer overflow from occurring in my house or on my street? A:  Everyone plays a role in preventing FOGG from damaging our sewer system. The following easy tips can help prevent a sewer overflow in your home or neighborhood.

  1. Fat, oil, grease, and grit should NEVER be poured down the sink. Sink drains and garbage disposals are not designed to handle these materials properly.
  2. Before washing, scrape and dry wipe pots, pans and dishes with paper towels and dispose of materials in the trash.
  3. Pour fat, oil, grease and grit into a disposable container, such as an empty glass jar or coffee can. Once the liquid has cooled and solidified, secure the lid and place the container in the trash.
  4. Disconnect, or at least minimize use of the garbage disposal to get rid of food scraps. The garbage disposal chops up food into small pieces, but can still cause a blockage in the pipe. Use sink strainers to catch food items, and then empty the strainer into the trash.

Q:  Why is it important to dispose of FOGG properly? A:  Sewer system maintenance in neighborhoods that experience sewer blockages and backups due to fat, oil, grease, and grit is expensive and can contribute to the amount that customers pay for sewer service. A sewer blockage or backup can also result in expensive repairs to the home.

Q:  What should I do if I experience a sewer blockage or overflow? A:  Call your sewer service provider at one of the following numbers:

  • Clark County Water Reclamation District: 702-434-6600
  • City of Las Vegas: 702-229-6594
  • City of Henderson: 702-267-2500
  • City of North Las Vegas: 702-633-1275

Pain in the Drain | Why Flushing is Bad

Why Flushing is a Bad Idea When you flush medication down your drain, it ends up at one of our treatment facilities. These ingredients can remain in the treated water when it is released into the water cycle. Handful of PillsWhen prescription or over-the-counter drugs are flushed down the sink or toilet, their chemical components may be added to the water supply. The presence of these substances in the environment is emerging as an important national and international issue. Although the concentration levels of these products in the environment is very low, research and monitoring are continuing worldwide.
Putting medications down the drain is not just a local concern. Increasingly, prescription and non-prescription medications, many of which are not effectively destroyed by sewage treatment plants, are finding their way into streams and drinking water supplies. A study conducted by the United States Geological Survey found that 80 percent of the 139 streams sampled across 30 states detected very low concentrations of chemicals commonly found in prescription drugs. While the concentration levels of these products are very low, they may be enough to cause adverse effects in the environment and to human health.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide The Bridge – Las Vegas

www.thebridgeatparadisevalley.com

The Bridge

The Bridge of Paradise ValleyRetirement when you want it. Assistance when you need it.Imagine living in a beautiful, peaceful environment, surrounded by friends and activities.

Enjoy an enriching retirement at The Bridge at Paradise Valley

Our community facilities are specifically designed to encourage seniors to live their retirement years as actively and as independently as possible. Assisted Living at The Bridge at Paradise Valley allows seniors to live carefree lifestyles – because we take care of the details! Our services include restaurant-style dining, housekeeping, and apartment maintenance. We are committed to making The Bridge at Paradise Valley a place you will love to call home right here in Las Vegas Nevada!

The Bridge at Paradise Valley features the finest in Assisted Living. With stunning surroundings, outstanding services and an abundance of amenities, our residents are proud to call The Bridge at Paradise Valley home. Independent Living combines community living with the privacy of your own apartment, and Assisted Living offers the same amenities in addition to personalized services. From a dynamic activities schedule to our hospitable staff, our goal is to promote an active, carefree lifestyle.

Our residents enjoy restaurant-style dining, housekeeping services, scheduled transportation, apartment  maintenance and a full calendar of recreational and wellness activities as part of a convenient,  month-to-month lease.  And, from live  entertainment to themed parties and local outings, our events are catered to seniors.

We welcome the opportunity to introduce you to our services  and to show you how The Bridge at Paradise Valley offers a rejuvenating retirement  lifestyle.

The Bridge at Paradise Valley is part of the Century Park family of senior living communities. Headquartered in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Century Park manages senior retirement properties located throughout the   United States.

Discover The Bridge at Paradise Valley

Life at The Bridge at Paradise Valley offers opportunities and advantages that seniors in the Las Vegas region have come to love and want to keep as part of their active lifestyle.

Las Vegas, Nevada, is more than just bright lights and luxury resorts. It is a great place to live. Located at the southern tip of the Sierra Nevadas, Las Vegas was founded by Mormon missionaries in 1902. World class shopping, dining, and entertainment are all easily accessible from The Bridge at Paradise Valley.

There are plenty of activities available to the Assisted Living residents at The Bridge at Paradise Valley. Some of the weekly choices include Bingo, card games, and Wii games. However, there is always time for relaxation, and The Bridge at Paradise Valley’s park-like grounds – which include a gazebo and a picnic area – are the perfect place for a leisurely visit with family or friends.

Senior Care Facility located in Las Vegas Nevada

Outstanding Retirement Services and Amenities

At The Bridge at Paradise Valley, you will discover a truly unique way to live.  We specialize in combining elegant amenities with the comforts of home.  Our outstanding services are offered in an inviting atmosphere where caring, professional staff lavish you with attention while respecting your individuality and privacy.

Facilities

  • Several apartment floor plans to choose from
  • Community dining room
  • Wellness center
  • Cozy lounge with fireplace
  • Beauty salon and barber shop
  • Gift shop
  • Ice cream parlor
  • Library

Services

  • Delicious restaurant-style dining three times each day planned by a registered dietician
  • Daily living assistance including bathing, dressing, and medication management
  • Transportation throughout the week
  • Housekeeping service

Activities

  • Wii games
  • Bingo
  • Restaurant outings
  • Exercise classes
  • Afternoon socials
  • Many other social, recreational, educational programs, and cultural events

Grounds Features

  • Landscaped courtyards with gazebo and picnic area
  • Beautifully maintained grounds perfect for walking

 

 

2205 E. Harmon
L.V. NV 89119
702-369-6964


Assisted living communities offer help with non-medical aspects of daily activities in an atmosphere of separate, private living apartments that encourage independence. In addition to providing meals, transportation for medical appointments, activities and pleasure trips, assisted living provides linens and laundry service, assistance with dressing and bathing, reminders regarding medication, and assistance with eating, transferring to and from a wheelchair, toileting, etc. This group setting also provides daily social activities and entertainment for the residents.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Silver Sky at Deer Springs – Las Vegas

www.silverskylasvegas.com 

NSG_FebMarApr_2016_Web-13

Silver Sky at Deer Springs

An Exceptional Retirement and Assisted Living Community for Nevada Seniors

Silver Sky at Deer Springs Assisted Living pulled out the stops to create a family-style Retirement and Assisted Living setting while providing services that reflect both quality and caring. We feel it’s so exceptional that it places us in a class of our own.

The Deer Springs staff takes pride in their jobs and provide quality services tailored made to meet your every need. They’ll take time to get to know you personally and to put a smile on your face too. It isn’t their intention to become part of your family but when they spend as much time with you as they do, it just happens.

The Deer Springs staff takes pride in their jobs and provide quality services tailored made to meet your every need. They’ll take time to get to know you personally and to put a smile on your face too. It isn’t their intention to become part of your family but when they spend as much time with you as they do, it just happens.

State of the Art Kitchen

Silver Sky at Deer Springs Assisted Living is bright, clean, and spacious. When friends and family visit they will enjoy your apartment home because of the attractiveness, details, freshness and personality built into the design. Each apartment comes equipped with a refrigerator/freezer and microwave oven. Our classic design and colors are suitable for all tastes and create a lot of compliments.

Outside your personal apartment at Silver Sky at Deer Springs Assisted Living you’ll find plenty of space to share and enjoy with family and friends. A brightly decorated reception area and lobby, library, living room, activity room and a delightful Bistro for beverages, snacks, ice cream and plenty of visiting await you.

Recreation Room

Knowing the importance of quality of life, Silver Sky at Deer Springs Assisted Living supports dignity, independence, choices, flexibility, and style for seniors who thrive on quality of life.

Silver Sky at Deer Springs Assisted Living serves the needs of all seniors in compliance with Fair Housing Laws and the general public seeking affordable housing. (Income restrictions apply).

Our Neighborhood

Our Apartments Are Centrally Located

A shopping center is only a block away and is home to many stores and shops including Wal-Mart, Costco, Stein Mart, Wells Fargo Bank, Bed Bath and Beyond as well as many great restaurants, and other shopping is close at hand.

Centennial Hills Hospital Med Center is just five and half miles away and Mountain View Medical Center is a short 7 miles away.

Services

Assisted Living Services

If and when you need a little extra help, we can assist you with the activities of daily living. These services are provided in the comfort of your apartment home without necessitating a need to move. Some of our services include: Personal laundry, daily housekeeping, medications, bathing, and dressing, transportation, hygiene, and nutrition.

Emergency Communication System

All apartments are connected to an emergency communication system that allows residents to reach our staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week, in case of emergency.

Transportation

We provide scheduled transportation for shopping trips, organized social and recreational activities, and medical and dental appointments.

Dining

The dining room is open, airy, and intimate yet comfortable and provides you with three nutritious meals daily.  Our Executive Chef’s at Silver Sky and at Deer Springs love to create fresh and flavorful meals with variety and nutrition and always with your health in mind. In fact, our menus are seasonal and reviewed by a Registered Dietician. Invited Guests and Family are always welcome to dine with you.

Our culinary team prepares over 200,000 meals annually and savors the opportunity to create your favorites! Theme dinners are offered throughout the year to celebrate special events such as Cinco De Mayo, St. Patrick’s Day, Thanksgiving, and the entire holiday season plus special luaus and so much more.

Veteran Information

Any wartime veteran with 90 days of active duty, one day beginning or ending during a period of war, is eligible to apply for the Aid & Attendance Improved Pension. A surviving spouse may also apply. The individual applying must qualify both medically and financially.

To qualify medically, a wartime veteran or surviving spouse must need the assistance of another person to perform daily tasks, such as eating, dressing or undressing, taking care of the needs of nature, etc. being blind or in a nursing home for mental or physical incapacity, or residing in an assisted living facility also qualifies.

Eligibility must be proven by filing the proper Veterans Application for Pension or Compensation. This application will require a copy of DD-214 or separation papers, medical evaluation from a physician, current medical issues, net worth limitations, and net income, along with out-of-pocket medical expenses.

To qualify financially, an applicant must have on average less than $80,000 in assets, excluding their home and vehicles.

You must still be income qualified as well as pass the other qualifiers to become a resident at Deer Springs Assisted Living.

FAQ’s

What’s Included in my Monthly Fees?

Monthly fees include all utilities (with the exception of phone and internet), breakfast, lunch and dinner. Also included are weekly housekeeping, bus transportation, and fun activity and wellness programs, concierge service, educational and cultural events and 24-hour staffing.

Do You Accept Veterans?

Yes we do.

How is behind Silver Sky? Are the communities stable places to live?               Yes, they are stable communities.

How is the food?

The food is great. If you’d like, stop by some time and try it out.

Is living at a Silver Sky Community fun?

Our residents think so. We have a slate of fun things to do and keep you active.

What’s the staff like at your communities?

We invite you to schedule an appointment to meet everyone.

Do you have two bedroom apartments?

Yes we do.

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Siena Hills – Henderson

www.sienahills.com

NSG_AugSeptOct2016_Web-21

Assisted Living Las Vegas

Siena Hills Assisted Living in Las Vegas offers Independent Living, Assisted Living, Memory Care and Alzheimer’s Care.  Our staff is available 24 hours a day. Life at Siena Hills is comparable to living in a fine resort, with many of the same lifestyle enhancing amenities.

Independent Living & Assisted Living.

At Siena Hills, we strive to meet the needs of each Resident by providing an individualized care program that maintains each Resident’s privacy and dignity. Our health care services    are provided 24 hours a day and change according to your personal needs.

Reputation, Experience & Leadership.

Siena Hills’ unparalleled reputation in the community is fostered by our Executive Director, Mary Pophal. Mary has nearly twenty years of leadership experience in assisted living and memory care. Our residents and families benefit from Mary’s vision and knowledge.

Siena Hills

Active Assisted Living & Memory Care Community

Located in Henderson at
2910 Horizon Ridge Pkwy
702-614-8733

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Atria Sutton – Las Vegas

www.atriasutton.com

NSG_FebMarApr_2013_Web24

Atria Sutton Terrace

Atria Seville Terrace,
Atria Sunlake Terrace
and Atria Sutton Terrace
Who Knew?Who knew senior living could provide me with so much independence?I moved into an Atria assisted living community. Now, I spend less time doing things I had to do more time doing the things I love. Hassle-free living in a fun and friendly environment – I couldn\’t ask for more. Experience the Atria lifestyle for yourself. Call today for a tour and be our guest for lunch.Call today to dine with us and tour our community.Atria Seville2000 N. Rampart
Las Vegas, NV 89128702-804-6800Atria Sunlake3250 S. Fort Apache Rd.
Las Vegas, NV 89117702- 256-6500Atria Sutton3185 E. Flamingo Rd.
Las Vegas, NV 89121702-436-9000

 

 

Among the Best Las Vegas Retirement Communities in Nevada

At Atria Sutton, you’ll find a charming, elegant Las Vegas retirement community with senior assisted living apartments and senior care personalized to meet your needs. Invite friends and family to celebrate special occasions in our festive common areas, or relax by the beautifully landscaped courtyards and grounds. Atria Sutton offers independent and assisted living options, and is just minutes from the bright lights of the Las Vegas, NV, strip. Convenient to nearby shopping, fine dining and three major hospitals, Atria independent retirement communities in Las Vegas are second to none.

Whether you are considering Las Vegas independent retirement communities or assisted senior living in Nevada, Atria Sutton is ready to serve your needs.

Services

  • A choice of floor plans
  • A full-time events director
  • An emergency call system in every apartment
  • Assistance with activities of daily living
  • Concierge
  • Delicious meals served restaurant-style daily
  • Medication assistance
  • Retreat/temporary stays
    Atria offers a respite (retreat) program for seniors who need assisted living services on a short-term basis. Atria Retreat permits seniors to test the waters of senior living. By allowing guests to stay for a short time in an Atria community, potential residents can decide if senior living is right for them. The retreat program is also an alternative to high-cost inpatient rehabilitation following an illness or surgery. Should a patient be ready to leave the hospital but not ready to go home, Atria offers the comforts of home and 24-hour assistance until they get back on their feet. All of our Retreat guests enjoy the same great amenities as our full-time residents, including delicious meals served daily, a full calendar of social activities, scheduled transportation service and more.
  • Scheduled local transportation
    Local scheduled transportation is available to residents for medical appointments, shopping, religious services and other desired local destinations.
  • Trained staff available 24 hours a day

Amenities

  • Cafe with complimentary snacks and beverages
  • Computers
    Our community provides computers with Internet access specifically for resident use. Staying in touch with family and friends and staying connected to the world is important to our residents, and we want to make it easy to shop online, research, play games and more.
  • Engage Life programming
    Explore our events programming, tailored to nurture the mind, body and spirit of every resident.
  • Pets welcome
    We recognize pets are important members of the family. That’s why our community allows them in residents’ apartments. Moving to a new home doesn’t have to mean leaving your furry friend behind – instead, they can enjoy the benefits of Atria with you.
  • Worship space

Nevada-Senior-Guide Atria Sunlake – Las Vegas

www.atriasunlake.com

NSG_FebMarApr_2013_Web24

Atria Sunlake Terrace

Atria Seville Terrace,
Atria Sunlake Terrace
and Atria Sutton Terrace

Who Knew?

Who knew senior living could provide me with so much independence?

I moved into an Atria assisted living community. Now, I spend less time doing things I had to do more time doing the things I love. Hassle-free living in a fun and friendly environment – I couldn\’t ask for more. Experience the Atria lifestyle for yourself. Call today for a tour and be our guest for lunch.

Call today to dine with us and tour our community.

Atria Seville2000 N. Rampart
Las Vegas, NV 89128702-804-6800

Atria Sunlake3250 S. Fort Apache Rd.
Las Vegas, NV 89117702-256-6500

Atria Sutton3185 E. Flamingo Rd.
Las Vegas, NV 89121702-436-9000

 

Discover Superior Senior and Assisted Living in Las Vegas, NV, at Atria Sunlake

Atria Sunlake is a charming assisted living community nestled in the heart of one of the most desirable neighborhoods in Las Vegas, Nevada. With a full social calendar and a 24-hour staff of caregivers, residents will find the support they need to participate in active and independent living. Atria Sunlake is conveniently located near the distinctive Sahara West Library, and is close to shopping, restaurants and places of worship that enable a more fulfilling retirement living experience.

Beautiful landscaping along with luxurious interiors create an elegant assisted living community. Our attentive care staff supplies exceptional 24-hour senior care, making Atria Sunlake superior to surrounding Nevada retirement living communities.

Services

  • A choice of floor plans
  • A full-time events director
  • An emergency call system in every apartment
  • Assistance with activities of daily living
  • Concierge
  • Delicious meals served restaurant-style daily
  • Medication assistance
  • Retreat/temporary stays
    Atria offers a respite (retreat) program for seniors who need assisted living services on a short-term basis. Atria Retreat permits seniors to test the waters of senior living. By allowing guests to stay for a short time in an Atria community, potential residents can decide if senior living is right for them. The retreat program is also an alternative to high-cost inpatient rehabilitation following an illness or surgery. Should a patient be ready to leave the hospital but not ready to go home, Atria offers the comforts of home and 24-hour assistance until they get back on their feet. All of our Retreat guests enjoy the same great amenities as our full-time residents, including delicious meals served daily, a full calendar of social activities, scheduled transportation service and more.
  • Scheduled local transportation
    Local scheduled transportation is available to residents for medical appointments, shopping, religious services and other desired local destinations.
  • Trained staff available 24 hours a day

Amenities

  • Cafe with complimentary snacks and beverages
  • Engage Life programming
    Explore our events programming, tailored to nurture the mind, body and spirit of every resident.
  • Pets welcome

Nevada-Senior-Guide Atria Seville – Las Vegas

www.atriaseville.com

NSG_FebMarApr_2013_Web24

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Find Exceptional Senior and Assisted Living in Las Vegas, NV, at Atria Seville

At Atria Seville, residents find a welcoming assisted living community nestled in a serene residential neighborhood. Take a relaxing walk in one of two landscaped courtyards or practice computer skills in the on-site business center. Atria Seville offers spectacular views of Nevada’s Spring Mountains and the Las Vegas skyline.

Atria Seville provides a uniquely sophisticated assisted living experience, complete with a variety of senior housing options, extraordinary senior care, delicious restaurant-style dining, and a dedicated 24-hour care staff. With quality service as our number one priority, Atria Seville provides an independent living environment far superior to other retirement living communities in Nevada.

Services

  • A choice of floor plans
  • A full-time events director
  • An emergency call system in every apartment
  • Assistance with activities of daily living
  • Concierge
  • Delicious meals served restaurant-style daily
  • Housekeeping and linen services
  • Medication assistance
  • Retreat/temporary stays
    Atria offers a respite (retreat) program for seniors who need assisted living services on a short-term basis. Atria Retreat permits seniors to test the waters of senior living. By allowing guests to stay for a short time in an Atria community, potential residents can decide if senior living is right for them. The retreat program is also an alternative to high-cost inpatient rehabilitation following an illness or surgery. Should a patient be ready to leave the hospital but not ready to go home, Atria offers the comforts of home and 24-hour assistance until they get back on their feet. All of our Retreat guests enjoy the same great amenities as our full-time residents, including delicious meals served daily, a full calendar of social activities, scheduled transportation service and more.
  • Scheduled local transportation
    Local scheduled transportation is available to residents for medical appointments, shopping, religious services and other desired local destinations.
  • Trained staff available 24 hours a day

Amenities

  • Cafe with complimentary snacks and beverages
  • Computers
    Our community provides computers with Internet access specifically for resident use. Staying in touch with family and friends and staying connected to the world is important to our residents, and we want to make it easy to shop online, research, play games and more.
  • Engage Life programming
    Explore our events programming, tailored to nurture the mind, body and spirit of every resident.
  • Fitness center
    We recognize the importance of your physical and emotional well-being. And we also know that regular exercise is key to good health. That’s why our community offers an in-house fitness center with exercise equipment designed with older people in mind.
  • Pets welcome
    We recognize pets are important members of the family. That’s why our community allows them in residents’ apartments. Moving to a new home doesn’t have to mean leaving your furry friend behind – instead, they can enjoy the benefits of Atria with you.
  • Worship space
     Religious services are offered in our community, and transportation may also be available to residents to any place of worship they choose.


 

Las Vegas Level of Care Directory

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
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Nevada Senior Guide: Level of Care Directory – LAS VEGAS

Definitions:

  • Retirement Community: Complete independent living with amenities such as transportation, daily scheduled activities, housekeeping, and full meals.
  • Assisted Living: Assistance is provided for daily activities such as dressing, bathing, grooming and medication management.
  • Memory Care: Specialized facility for residents suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease or any other form of dementia in a secure environment.
  • Category 1: Resident must be able to leave their bedroom area in 4 minutes or less with no assistance in case of fire or emergency.
  • Category 2: Resident must be able to leave their bedroom area in 4 minutes or less with assistance in case of fire or emergency.
  • Rehab: Skilled nursing services providing rehabilitation as prescribed by a doctor.
  • Respite: 24 hour care for anyone in need of assistance, including memory care for a short period of time. Usually 7 – 30 days.
  • Skilled Nursing Facility: Provides skilled nursing services under the supervision of licensed nurses.
  • Intermediate Care: Offers a level of care between an Assisted Living facility and a Skilled Nursing facility under the supervision of licensed nurses.
  • Long Term Acute Care: Offers a higher level of medical care and rehabilitation than is offered at a skilled nursing facility for long or short term stays.

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  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!