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medicines | Nevada Senior Guide

Aging Is a Treatable Disease

May 22, 2016 by · Comments Off on Aging Is a Treatable Disease
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Live Healthy – Look Marvelous – Live Longer

There are actions you can, and should take today to dramatically improve your health, your appearance and your longevity. You can control 70% of the factors affecting your longevity; only 30% are controlled by genetics until very late in life when genetics become more controlling

Almost all of the effects of aging and the common diseases that come with aging are treatable, to at least some extent. The key is early detection and early treatment.

Our understanding of the aging process is advancing rapidly. Some scientists believe that the first immortal human may be living today.

In 1786, life expectancy was 24 years. Better diets and some medical innovations allowed it to double to 48 years in the next 100 years.

Modern medicine has now increased life expectancy to over 76 years. Future medicine promises to increase it to over 100 years during our lifetime.

“Over half the baby boomers here in America are going to see their hundredth birthday and beyond in excellent health.” says Dr. Ronald Klatz of the American Academy of Anti-Aging. “We’re looking at life spans for the baby boomers and the generation after the baby boomers of 120 to 150 years of age.”

The key to Live Healthy – Look Marvelous – Live Longer is to delay the diseases of aging so that when they do occur, it is very late in your life.

The causes of aging are finally being understood. There are actions you can take today to take advantage of the recent medical developments. Dr. Rudman ran a series of tests on aging people and demonstrated that the effects of aging could be slowed and even reversed. He concluded: “The overall deterioration of the body that comes with growing old is not inevitable.”

The Causes of Aging

Almost all life on earth blossoms with youth, until it has reproduced and passed its genes on to the next generation. After that, the flowers wilt and die, and we humans began to age. Yes, we begin to age while we are still in our 20’s.

We age because the products of our metabolism, I.e., the “ashes” from the oxidation processes that produce energy in our cells, accumulate faster then our endocrine system can remove them. This is because most of the cleansing hormones that surged through our youthful bodies begin to decrease as we begin to age. Some of these more critical hormones have decreased by about 10 to 30% as we enter our 30’s. The decreases become ever more dramatic as we enter successive decades of life. Most of our hormones have decreased by over 50% and some have been reduced to near zero as we enter our 70’s. So we age. Our muscles and bones weaken; our reaction time slows; we lose our agility; all combine to make us more susceptible to accidents. Our immune system weakens and makes us more susceptible to disease. And we die.

The Death Clock

Dr. Hayflick has shown that we have another cause of aging. He has shown that we have a built-in death date of about 120 years, if diseases or accidents do not get us earlier. The point at which our cells have divided a fixed number of times sets this death date. It has been termed the “Hayflick limit.”

Our cells divide to produce new cells to replace the old cells damaged by metabolic ash build-up, free radicals, toxins, and other wear and tear mechanisms. As the cells divide, the chromosomes split to provide chromosomes for the new cells. When the chromosomes split, they lose part of their telomeres – the genes at their ends that keep the chromosomes organized. After a certain number of splits, the telomeres wear away and become too short to keep the chromosome organized and therefore the cell dies without being able to replace itself.

You can think of telomeres as analogous to the plastic bands on the ends of shoelaces. Telomeres hold the important DNA code intact, preventing it from fraying as the molecules replicate over time.

Resetting the Death Clock

But tests over the past few years have shown that the “Hayflick limit” can be extended by the use of an enzyme that causes the “organizing genes” at the ends of the chromosomes (the telomeres) to re-grow. This enzyme is called telomerase.

Telomerase treatments on human cells in the laboratory have indicated that telomerase can make human cells immortal. Doctors and researchers involved in these treatments are reporting that it is their belief that death is not inevitable.

Telomerase is actually an enzyme (a catalytic protein) that is able to arrest or reverse the telomere shortening process. The body produces telomerase when we are embryos in the womb to accommodate the very rapid growth of the embryo. But, unfortunately our bodies do not produce telomerase after birth except possibly for the creation of sperm.

So for humans to extend life we must do two things: first, eliminate the oxidants and toxins in our foods and environment; and find a dietary or pharmaceutical method for increasing and preserving the length of our cells’ telomeres.

Promising Anti-Aging Research

There are many ongoing projects that promise to solve our problems of aging. One is from a team of South Korean scientists. They report that they have created a newly-synthesized molecule, named CGK733 that can make cells younger.

“All cells face an inevitable death as they age. On this path, cells became lethargic and in the end stop dividing but we witnessed that CGK733 can block the process,” Prof. Kim Tae-kook reported. He further stated: “We also found the synthetic compound can reverse aging, by revitalizing already-lethargic cells. Theoretically, this can give youth to the elderly via rejuvenating cells.”

Kim expects that the CGK733-empowered drugs that keep cells youthful far beyond their normal life span would be commercialized in less than 10 years.

Researchers at The Wistar Institute have defined a key target of an evolutionarily conserved protein that regulates the process of aging. The study provides fundamental knowledge about key mechanisms of aging that could point toward new anti-aging strategies and cancer therapies.

Aging saps our strength and ability to enjoy life, cripples us, and eventually kills us. Tens of millions die from age-related conditions each and every year. Comparatively few people know that degenerative aging can be slowed with diet and lifestyle choices, medicines and nutracuetials.

Comparatively few people are aware of the many serious scientific efforts, presently underway, aimed at understanding and intervening in the aging process – in order to one day reverse its effects.

Your objective should be to have a healthy life and continue to live long enough to take advantage of all the medical advances and technologies now in development.

Our health is determined by our genetics, our diets, and our past and current lifestyles. You can now optimize your current and future health by defining and taking medications, vitamins, and other supplements and treatments tailored to your specific health needs. The program to do this recognizes the validity of three basic themes:

  • The Future of Medicine is in Personal Tailoring
  • Preventative Medicine is Key
  • Aging is a Treatable Disease.

Your Anti-Aging Longevity Plan

It is strongly recommended that you get familiar with the latest anti-aging information and develop your personal Longevity Plan. The key to longer life is to detect any health issues as early as possible and take advantage of the available technology to address them. Time really is of the essence.

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Drug interactions causing a significant impact on statin use

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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A new study has found that many people who stopped taking cholesterol-lowering statin drugs were also taking an average of three other drugs that interfered with the normal metabolism of the statins.

The other drugs can contribute to a common side effect of taking statins – muscle pain – and often led people to discontinue use of a medication that could otherwise help save their life, researchers learned.

The interactions of many drugs with statins have been known of for some time, researchers said, but are not being adequately managed by physicians and pharmacists, who could often choose different medications or adjust dosages to retain the value of statin drugs without causing this side effect.

The research, done as part of a survey of more than 10,000 current and former statin users, found that use of medications which interfere with statin metabolism almost doubles the chance that a person will discontinue statin use due to muscle pain.

The issue is of growing importance because statin drugs are some of the most widely used medications in the world, proven to lower LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, and decrease the risk of heart attacks, heart disease, strokes and death. About 20 million people in the U.S. now take statins, and new guidelines have just been issued to further expand the types of health conditions for which statins may be of benefit. Based on those guidelines, the number of statin users could increase to more than 30 million.

The findings were published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology by scientists from Oregon State University and four other universities or research institutes.

“We’ve known for some time of many medications that can interact with statins, but only now is it becoming clear that this is a significant contributor to the side effects, and often the reason some patients stop taking statins,” said Matt Ito, a professor in the OSU College of Pharmacy and president of the National Lipid Association, which funded this study.

“This issue is something physicians, pharmacists and patients all need to be more aware of,” Ito said. “There’s a lot we can do besides discontinue use of these valuable medications. You can change dosages, use drugs that don’t cause interactions, use different types of statins. Patients need to be proactive in understanding this issue and working with their health care providers to address it.”

Persons who have problems taking statins should discuss options with their physicians or pharmacists, Ito said, and not assume the drug has be to discontinued. A Medscape web site at http://reference.medscape.com/drug-interactionchecker also can help individuals learn more about possible interactions between statins and the full range of medications they may be taking.

Statins are usually well-tolerated, but in the recent survey, a muscle-related side effect was reported by 29 percent of participants. In former statin users, 62 percent of the people said that side effects, mostly muscle pain, were the reason they stopped taking the drugs.

There are many drugs that can interfere with statin metabolism, increase systemic exposure to the statin and raise the risk of this muscle pain, the researchers said in their report. This can include some common antibiotics, cardiovascular drugs, and others taken for treatment of cancer, mental health, HIV treatment and other conditions.

These interactions are not always adequately considered by physicians and pharmacists, however. One recent report found that as many as 20 percent of significant statin-drug interactions were missed in 64 pharmacies.

Besides drug interactions, statin side effects are also more common in women and associated with increasing age, history of cardiovascular disease, and some other conditions. Statin discontinuation has been associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and death.

About the OSU College of Pharmacy: The College of Pharmacy prepares students of today to be the pharmacy practitioners and pharmaceutical sciences researchers of tomorrow by contributing to improved health, advancing patient care and the discovery and understanding of medicines.

Health Care for Senior Citizens – About Arthritis by KV Gopalakrishnan

August 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

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Once you cross the threshold of fifty years, it is best to be aware of some typical diseases which have the potential to diminish your enjoyment of everyday living. Arthritis is certainly one of the ailments that falls into this class. This article offers you, in a nutshell, information about the disease, as well as the lifestyle modifications, which might enable you to prevent it and address it if needed.

What is Arthritis?

Arthritis is typically the swelling and infection of one or more body joints, where a pair of bones meet. Arthritis develop when the cartilage, which protects a joint and enables it to move freely, gets affected. Since the cartilage facilitates in absorbing impact when stress is exerted on the joint like when you walk or jog, its damage affects movement of the joint. When the normal quantity of cartilage material diminishes, the bones may begin rubbing with each other, triggering discomfort, swelling (inflammation), and rigidity, resulting in Arthritis.

Causes for Arthritis

The damage to the cartilage and joint soreness can occur due to a variety of factors. This impairment to the cartilage can occur due to normal wear and tear of joints, a damaged bone, infection in the region caused by bacteria or virus, and in some cases due to an auto-immune condition wherein body immune system erroneously assaults healthy tissues. Generally Arthritis gets cured once the particular trigger goes away or is addressed. At times the disease does not get cured. When this occurs, it is called chronic Arthritis.

Signs and symptoms of Arthritis

The indicators of this illness include joint ache, joint inflammation, restricted movements of one’s joints, soreness on the skin close to a joint, stiffness especially in the early morning and warmth all-around a joint. An early on diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis is definitely a crucial factor in treating it and also preventing it from turning into acute.

Treatment options for Arthritis

The healthcare specialist treating Arthritis is referred to as a Rheumatologist. The comprehensive treatment solution of Arthritis consists primarily of life-style modifications, physical exercise program, and if needed medicines, dietary supplements and surgical procedure. Immediate therapy include things like, heating or cooling, Orthotics (splints) support, water treatment and massage therapy. The objective of treatment is usually to minimize suffering, enhance function, and prevent further harm to the joint. Nevertheless, in a few instances, the root cause can not be remedied.

Cure for Arthritis – Lifestyle changes

Life-style modifications are the favored treatment solution for Arthritis as well as other types of joint inflammation. Primarily, it is important to get rid of any excess weight to reduce the stress on the affected joints. Physical exercise may help alleviate stiffness, minimize suffering and fatigue, and boost muscle and bone strength. It is best to seek advice from your therapist to design a workout plan that may suit your needs.. Work out plans may also incorporate low impact aerobic activity, flexibility workouts and power training for muscular tissues. If necessary, the therapist can recommend usage of some unique devices to help you to drive, dress and do other everyday activities.

Other tips which can enable you to get relief include:

 

  • Having 8-10 hours of sleep,
  • Avoiding remaining in one position.
  • Avoiding extra pressure on joints and
  • Practicing yoga and meditation.

 

So far as nutrition is concerned, it is best to eat healthy diet which include:

 

  • Substantial amount of fruits and veggies,
  • Omega three rich foodstuff such as fish, soybeans and walnuts.
  • Complex carbohydrates with minimal salt, sugar and fat
  • Green tea is claimed to scale back inflammation and degradation of cartilage.

 

Prevention of Arthritis

For prevention of Arthritis, please take care to avoid strain or injury to joints and also to have timely cure of infections in the region of joints. It might be far better to stay away from jogging after you cross fifty years of age mainly because it can result in weakness to knee joints and lower back.. Swimming is an effective alternative for jogging.

The lifestyle adjustments and the dietary recommendations described in the section ‘Cure for arthritis – Lifestyle changes’ are equally relevant in preventing it.

The goal of this short article is to present you with basic information about Arthritis as well as emphasize the significance of lifestyle modifications for curing and preventing it. Having said that, you should invariably seek the advice of a healthcare professional to treat the ailment.

Senor Citizen Consultant

Retired from Government service and enjoying life.

My aim is to help senior citizens by giving useful tips to enable them to enjoy health, wealth and happiness.

http://enjoyafter50.com/ <-Visit this website for tips and tricks to make your retirement life happy and enjoyable.

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A Guide to Medications For Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

June 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Although modern medicines have many benefits for senior citizens in treatment of age-related disease, caution needs to be taken when using a combination of medicines. Medicine or “drugs” can refer to any substance you get with a prescription, any oral or topical substance used for pain relief, and dietary supplements. Any substance that has the potential to interact with other substances in the body can be considered in this category. To prevent mixing medicinal substances together that could be harmful, always let your doctor know what medications you take in addition to those prescribed. Senior citizens should keep a list of medications and doses that they take and bring it to every doctor’s appointment.

It is very important to practice safe habits with medication as many drugs can be lethal is taken in the wrong way. Senior citizens should use the following tips to ensure safe use of medication. Companions or caregivers should use these tips to help facilitate and encourage proper medication use.

Tips for when you are Prescribed Medications

When a doctor prescribes a new medication for specified symptoms, remember the following tips for how to proceed afterward:

 

  • Tell your doctor about all other medications you currently take,
  • Remind primary care physicians about allergies that you have or side effects that you experience from other types of medications.
  • Be sure that you understand exactly how all of your medications work and how to properly take them.

 

Here are some helpful questions to get this information:

 

  • What is the name of the medication?
  • Why am I taking it?
  • How many times a day should I take it?
  • Should I take this medication before, during, or after meals?
  • What does “as needed” mean?
  • When should I stop taking the medication?
  • If I forget to take the medication, what should I do?
  • What side effects can I expect?

 

You can also ask your pharmacist these questions and others to get more information about your medication. By having all of your medications filled at the same pharmacy, the pharmacy may be able to predict harmful interactions if all of your medications are kept on file. When getting a prescription filled at the pharmacy, keep these tips in mind:

 

  • Be sure that you can read and understand all directions and writing materials that accompany prescribed medication.
  • Check that you can open the container the medicine is in.
  • Let your pharmacist know if you have difficulty swallowing pills, so that you can get a liquid variety if available – Do not crush or chew medication meant to be swallowed.
  • Ask about the best way to store the medication.
  • Be sure that the label of the medication indicates that it is the correct medication you were prescribed and displays your name.

Tips for Taking Medications 

After filling a prescription for a medication that you received from your doctor, you should be sure that you follow directions for taking that medication. Here are some tips for safely taking a combination of medications:

 

  • Have a list of medications; include the doctor who prescribed it, the name of the medication, the reason you take it, and the directions for use.
  • Read and save all written information that comes with prescribed medication
  • Take your medication exactly in the way that it is meant to be taken.
  • Let your doctor know immediately if you experience any unexpected side effects from the medication.
  • Use charts, calendars, or weekly pillboxes to help you remember which medications to take on a daily basis.
  • Make sure companions or caregivers know when and how you are supposed to take your medication so that they can remind you.
  • Do not skip medication – if you have trouble affording medication, research programs that can aid in funding for needed medications. Medicare, a government program for senior citizens, may be a good place to start.
  • Avoid mixing alcohol and medication – alcohol can cause medications to not work correctly.
  • Take medication until it is finished or your doctor instructs you to stop.
  • Do not take medication prescribed to others.
  • Do not take medication in the dark to avoid making a mistake.
  • Check expiration dates on your pill bottles in case a medication should be replaced.
  • Do not leave your medication in the open where children or pets could get to them.

 

The Caring Space
http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space
We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

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Senior Citizens Assisted Living Options by Sean Lightfoot

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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A recent study on seniors has shown that independent senior citizens assisted  living is the #1 choice for them versus living with a loved one. Most people  feel that living with others would cause them to be a burden on them. As an  individual grows older, they begin to need the assistance of others more and  more.

Unlike a decade ago, seniors have become a part of the information age by  learning about computers and the latest gadgets. Due to this fact, there has be  a flux of new state-of-the-art senior facilities catering to computer savvy  seniors.

Many of the senior citizens that have just retired from jobs that required  them to work with computers prefer to continue to be around computers as they  have become accustomed. Senior citizens assisted living facilities that make a  point to stay up to date, helps those seniors feel right at home.

In recent years senior facilities have began to offer many different options  and services to their residents. So much so that these facilities are now  categorized into 3 major groups.

Nursing Homes – For those that are incapacitated and/or require supervised or  administered medicines. These facilities have full-time medical staff on hand in  case of emergencies.

Assisted Living – This type of facility caters to those that need assistance  with their daily routines such as cleaning, shopping, laundry and cooking.

Independent Living – Independent living is good for those that can live  totally independent and is still able to cook and clean. Some seniors start out  by moving to one of these facilities and relocate as their needs change later  on. The units are usually fully furnished apartments with full kitchens.

There are many more options available to seniors so it is highly advised that  one turns to a professional advisor to assist in seeking the facility and  services that are needed. There are professionals that offer these services free  of charge. They give you a list of facilities that can cater to your needs and  help with visiting and checking out each of them. They usually make money from  your insurance company of the facility that is chosen.

If you need help with researching Senior Citizen Assisted Living  [http://www.elderlyhelpandhomes.com/], visit www.elderlyhelpandhomes.com  [http://www.elderlyhelpandhomes.com/]. Learn about a FREE program that assists  in finding the services that you or your loved one may needs.

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Depression in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Depression is a medical condition that is characterized by feeling down,  depressed, or hopeless; low self-esteem; and loss of interest in things one used  to enjoy. Senior citizens are prone to life-altering changes that can lead one  to feel depressed. Dealing with the trials life throws at us such as, loss,  change, loneliness, or a chronic medical condition can be quite overwhelming.  Still, depression is not a “normal” part of aging. Like heart disease or  diabetes, depression is a medical condition and it can be treated with  medication and therapy. Treatment is effective at alleviating symptoms within a  few weeks in at least 80 percent of people.

It is important that senior citizens and those providing their elder care  understand the symptoms of depression. If you think you or someone you know may  be suffering from depression, identify your symptoms by using the checklist  provided below. Then, if necessary, seek assistance. For senior citizens, the  most frequently used resource is a family doctor. Bringing a trusted friend or  relative may help ease any anxiety when going to an appointment. Understand that  your doctor may suggest a checkup and begin treatment or refer you to a mental  health specialist.

Before you say, “I’m okay”….

Do you feel:

  • Anxious or “empty”
  • Guilty or useless
  • Agitated or irritable
  • Less interested in things you used to enjoy
  • Like no one loves you
  • Life is not worth living

Or if you are:

  • A change in sleeping habits
  • A change in eating habits
  • Persistent headaches, stomach aches, or pain

Remember that these  may be real symptoms of a real medical condition that can be effectively  treated. Talk to your doctor today. Though many senior citizens suffer from  depression, feeling depressed is not a normal part of aging.

 

Health and Wellness tips

There are many measures senior citizens can take to help relieve the symptoms  of depression. Those involved in the elder care of senior citizens experiencing  depression should encourage the senior to follow these tips and improve their  wellbeing.

Check your medications. Senior citizens often take many  medications. Some medications, including those for sleep, blood pressure, and  nervousness, may affect mood. Talk with your doctor about each of the  medications you are taking. Be sure to include all over-the-counter medicines,  vitamins, and herbal supplements to minimize the chances of having side  effects.

Limit alcohol consumption. Alcohol use can bring about  depression. And, when alcohol and drugs are combined, interactions that lead to  depression can occur.

Stay connected. Sometimes, senior citizens find it more difficult  to get out and stay connected with others. Still, talking with friends and  family members, getting a pet, or even finding a new interest or hobby can help  one through this tough time.  Get involved in activities you take pleasure  in, such as reading a good book, going to a ballgame or a taking a class in a  subject that interests to you.

Be active. Physical activity can improve physical and mental  wellbeing. Though some senior citizens believe they cannot exercise, there are  activities like walking, gardening, or working out (even if one is in a  wheelchair) that can be helpful. Make a goal of 30 minutes of activity 5 days a  week. If you have not taken part in physical activity in a while, be sure to  check with your doctor and get his OK before you begin.

Eat healthy and drink plenty of fluids. Choose healthy snacks  like fruits, vegetables, yogurt, or nuts to increase your nutrition and energy.  Also, try to eat well-balanced meals.  Some senior citizens suffer from  loss of appetite and weight loss; if you have experienced either of these,  consult your doctor.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects  caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for  families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking  employment.

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Senior Citizens Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, and Arthritis – Causes and Treatments By David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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“Arthritis” does not mean only that someone has stiff, aching joints. Many types of arthritis exist, each with its own symptoms and treatments. Most types are chronic, meaning that they can be a source of discomfort for an extended period of time. Arthritis can afflict joints almost anywhere in the body and may cause changes you can see and feel, including swelling, warmth, and redness in the joints. It can last for a short time but be very painful or continue for a long time with less pronounced results while still damaging the joints.

Arthritis is extremely common in the United States, especially among senior citizens. Still, there are many steps they and those providing care for the elderly can take to relieve the different types of arthritis. The most common types in this population are osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and gout.

Osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis in senior citizens and begins when cartilage, the type of tissue that pads joints, begins to wear away. This can eventually cause all the cartilage between bones to wear away, forming painful rubbing of bones against each other. This type of arthritis is most common in the hands, neck, lower back, knees, and hips.

Symptoms of OA can range from stiffness and mild pain that accompanies exercise or bending to severe pain in the joints even in times of physical rest. OA can also cause stiffness during times in which you haven’t used specific joints in a while, like when you’re on a long car ride, but this stiffness usually goes away when you move your joints again. OA can eventually lead to problems moving joints and sometimes to developing a disability if the areas affected are the back, knees, or hips.

Aging is often the greatest risk factor for developing OA. Other factors depend on the area of the body afflicted-for instance, OA in the hands or hips may be caused by genetic factors; OA in the knees may be caused by being overweight; and injuries or overuse of joints in the knees, hips, and hands may lead to OA.

Rheumatoid arthritis.

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) differs from OA in that it’s an autoimmune disease, meaning that your immune system attacks and damages the lining of a joint as if it were an injury or disease. RA leads to inflammation of the joints, which causes pain, stiffness and swelling, sometimes in multiple joints at once. It may be severe enough to prevent you from moving a certain joint. Senior citizens with RA may often experience fatigue or fever. You can develop RA at any age, and it’s more common in women.

RA can afflict almost any joint in the body and is often symmetrical, meaning that if you have RA in a specific joint on one side of your body, you probably experience RA in the same joint on the other side of your body. RA can damage not only joints, but also the heart, muscles, blood vessels, nervous system, and eyes.

Gout.

Senior citizens with gout experience the most severe pain relative to many other arthritis patients. An attack begins when uric acid crystals form in the connective tissue or joint spaces, leading to swelling, stiffness, redness, heat, and pain in the joint. Attacks often follow eating foods like shellfish, liver, dried beans, peas, anchovies, or gravy. Drinking alcohol, being overweight, and taking certain medications may worsen the symptoms. In senior citizens, using certain medications to lower blood pressure may also be a risk factor for a gout attack.

Gout is most common in the big toe, but it can occur in other joints such as the ankle, elbow, knee, wrist, hand, or other toes. Swelling may cause discoloration and tenderness due to skin stretching tightly around the joint. If you see a doctor during an attack, he or she may take a sample of fluid from the affected joint.

Other forms of arthritis.

Other forms include psoriatic arthritis  in patients who have psoriasis; ankylosing spondylitis, which mainly affects the spine; reactive arthritis, which occurs as a reaction to another illness in the body; and arthritis in the temporomandibular joint, the point at which the jaw attaches to the skull.

Arthritis Symptoms and Warning Signs.

Senior citizens and those providing their elder care should look out for the following symptoms as they may be indications of arthritis:

  • lasting joint pain
  • swelling in a joint
  • stiffness in a joint
  • tenderness or pain when touching a joint
  • difficulty in using or moving a joint normally
  • warmth and redness in a joint

 

Any of these symptoms lasting longer than two weeks should be addressed by a physician. If you experience a fever, feel physically ill, have a suddenly swollen joint, or have problems using a joint, a doctor should be contacted sooner. You will have to answer questions and go through a physical exam. Before suggesting treatment options, your doctor may want to run lab tests and take X-rays.

Arthritis Treatment.

Some common treatment options exist even though each type of arthritis is treatedsomewhat differently. Rest, exercise, eating a healthy diet, and becoming educated about the right way to use and protect the joints are key to minimizing the effects of arthritis. Proper shoes and a cane can minimize pain the feet, knees, and hips while walking, and some technology exists for helping open jars or bottles, turn doorknobs more easily, and otherwise improve quality of life in senior citizens with arthritis.

Additionally, some medications can lower the pain and swelling. Acetaminophen (in Tylenol) and some NSAIDs are sold over-the-counter and can ease pain. Other NSAIDs must be prescribed. It is important for senior citizens and those providing their in home care to pay attention to the warnings on both prescribed and over-the-counter drugs and to ask a doctor about how to properly and best use over-the-counter medicine to treat arthritis. The FDA also has information about many medications.

Some treatment options are specialized for individual types of arthritis.

Osteoarthritis Treatment.

There are medicines to help senior citizens with pain associated with OA, and rest and exercise may ease movement in the joints. Managing weight is also important. If one experiences OA in the knees, a doctor can provide shots in the knee joint, which can help to move it without as much pain. Surgery may also be an option to repair or replace damaged joints in senior citizens.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatments.

Treatment can diminish the pain and swelling associated with RA and cause joint damage to slow down or stop. One will feel better overall, and it will be easier to move around. On top of pain and anti-inflammatory medications, a doctor might prescribe DMARDs, which are anti-rheumatic drugs that can slow damage from RA. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, can minimize swelling while waiting for DMARDs to kick in. Additionally, biogenic response modifiers block the damage inflicted by the immune system and help people with mild to moderate RA when other treatments have failed to work properly.

Gout Treatment.

If you’ve gone through a gout attack, talk to a doctor to discuss possible causes and future prevention of attacks. Work together with your doctor and other elder care providers to plan and execute a plan for prevention. Commonly, NSAIDs or corticosteroids are recommended for an acute attack. This treatment diminishes swelling, allowing you to feel better fairly shortly after treatment. Usually, the attack fully stops within a few days. If one has experienced multiple attacks, a doctor may be able to prescribe medication to prevent further attacks.

Exercise can help Arthritis.

In addition to taking the proper medication and allowing your joints to rest, exercise can help senior citizens to stay in shape, maintain strong muscles, and control symptoms of arthritis. Daily exercise like walking or swimming keeps joints moving while lessening pain and strengthening the muscles around joints. Before starting any new exercise program, it is important to discuss options with your physician.

Three types of exercise are the best for senior citizens with arthritis:

  • Range-of-motion exercises reduce stiffness, improve flexibility, and keep joints moving. Activities like dancing fit into this category.
  • Strengthening exercises strengthen muscles, which improves support and protection to your joints. Weight training fits into this category.
  • Aerobic or endurance exercises improve health in the heart and arteries, prevent weight gain, improve how your body works overall, and may decrease swelling in some joints. Riding a bike fits into this category.

Other things to do to manage Arthritis.

 

On top of exercise and weight control, a number of other methods may help senior citizens ease the pain around joints. Applying heat or cold to joints, soaking in a warm tub, or swimming in a heated pool may help you feel better and move your joints more easily.

Surgery may be an option when damage has become disabling or when other treatment options have not adequately diminished pain. With surgery, joints can be repaired or replaced with artificial ones. Commonly, arthritic knees and hips are replaced.

Unproven remedies.

Many senior citizens with arthritis try treatments that have not been tested or proven to help. Some are harmful, like snake venom, while others are harmless yet unhelpful, like copper bracelets.

Here are a few ways to determine whether a treatment is unproven:

  • The remedy is said to work for all types of arthritis and other diseases
  • Scientific support is from only one research study
  • The label doesn’t include directions or warnings of use

Areas for further research.

 

Studies suggest that acupuncture could ease OA pain in some senior citizens. Dietary supplements such as glucosamine and chondroitin are also under investigation and may reduce OA pain. More research is needed to determine whether these types of treatments actually work to reduce symptoms and damage to joints.

Talk to your doctor and others involved in your elder care.

Try not to make light of your symptoms by telling yourself that joint pain or stiffness is simply caused by aging normally. Your doctor and other elder care providers can discuss possible treatment options with you to safely minimize your pain and stiffness and prevent more serious joint damage.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

Queen’s study shows psychotropic drug dispensing increases on entry to care homes

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 
Queen’s study shows psychotropic drug dispensing increases on entry to care homes
 

 

A study by Queen’s University Belfast has found that the dispensing of psychotropic drugs to older people in Northern Ireland increases on entry to care homes.

According to the study, due to be published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, antipsychotic drug dispensing in older people more than doubled from 8.2 per cent before entry to care homes to 18.6 per cent after entering care.

The study was carried out by researchers from Queen’s Centre for Public Health in the School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences.  It analysed prescribing data for over 250,000 people, aged 65 years and over living in Northern Ireland from 2008 to 2010, and looked at drug uptake within the older population during the transition from community to care.

The study revealed that psychotropic drug use was higher in care homes than the community, with 20.3 per cent of those in care homes dispensed an antipsychotic in January 2009, compared with 1.1 per cent of those in the community.

Lead researcher on the Queen’s study, Aideen Maguire, who is based in the Centre of Excellence for Public Health Northern Ireland said: “Although drug dispensing is high in older people in the community, we have found that it increases dramatically on entry to care. This study showed that the high uptake of psychotropic drugs observed in care homes in Northern Ireland cannot be explained by a continuation of drug use initiated in the community prior to entering care.

“With an ageing population globally it is important that we look at the reasons behind this type of increase following admission to care. Antipsychotic uptake in Northern Ireland is similar to that in the rest of the UK and Ireland, and this study highlights the need for routine medicines reviews especially during the transition into care.”

Other key findings of the study included:

·         Of the 250,617 people studied, 6,779 (2.7 per cent) experienced a transition into care during 2008-2010.

·         The psychotropic drugs prescribed to patients included in the study were being prescribed for the first time for many.

·         Six months after admission, 37.1 per cent of all new residents had received at least one prescription for a hypnotic drug, 30.2 per cent for an antipsychotic, and 24.5 per cent for an anxiolytic.

·         1.1 per cent of those living in the community were dispensed at least one prescription for an antipsychotic in January 2009, (7.3 per cent for a hypnotic, and 3.6 percent for an anxiolytic).

·         Hypnotic drug dispensing increased from 14.8 per cent to 26.3 per cent after entering care.

·         This study shows that use of psychotropic medication in a small proportion of residents of care homes was a continuation of a prescription that had been started before entry, but one in six individuals with no history of psychotropic drug use in the six months before entry had been exposed to at least one antipsychotic prescription within six months of entering care.

Professor Carmel Hughes from the School of Pharmacy at Queen’s added: “This is an important study of national and international relevance, as with an ageing population, quality of care for older people is an ongoing public health concern.

“The number of older people entering care across Ireland is predicted to increase in the next 10 years, and studies further predict a 69 per cent increase in the Irish population aged over 65 years from 2006-2021, and a 40 per cent increase in the those aged over 65 years in Northern Ireland in the same time frame.  With a globally ageing population, it is vitally important that we look at the reasons behind the increase in the prescription of psychotropic drugs in care homes.”

For further information on the Centre for Public Health and Centre of Excellence for Public Health Northern Ireland is available online at

http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/CentreforPublicHealth/

Ends.

For media enquiries please contact Claire O’Callaghan on +44 (0) 28 9097 5391 or 07814415451 or at c.ocallaghan@qub.ac.uk

Notes to Editors

  1. Aideen Maguire is available for interview.  Interview bids to Claire O’Callaghan on +44 (0) 28 9097 5391 or 07814415451 or at c.ocallaghan@qub.ac.uk
  2. A photograph of Aideen Maguire has been issued to picture desks and is available on request.
  3. Audio interview clips of Aideen Maguire and an online ‘WhatQneedtoknow’ video will be available at http://www.qub.ac.uk/home/ceao/Qtv/
  4. The full report is available for ‘early view’ at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jgs.12101/pdf
  5. Other studies have looked at drug uptake in care and in the community separately.

 

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Nevada Aging and Disability Services Division

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

http://www.nvaging.net/

The Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD) in the State of Nevada, Department of Health and Human Services, represents Nevadans aged 60 years and older and those with disabilities.

Mission Statement The Aging and Disability Services Division provides leadership and advocacy in the planning, development and delivery of a high quality, comprehensive support service system across the lifespan. This allows all of Nevada’s elders, adults and children with disabilities or special health care needs to live independent, meaningful, and dignified lives in the most integrated setting appropriate to their needs. Developmental Services

State of Nevada Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD)

Programs/Services

 

Advocate for Elders

Advocacy, assistance, information and referral to frail seniors, who are 60 years of age or older, primarily homebound and living in the community, and their caregivers.

Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs)

Provides citizen-centered “one-stop” entry points into the long-term support system. Serves individuals in need of long-term support, caregivers, and those planning for future long-term support needs.

Assisted Living (AL) Waiver

Assisted living supportive services to eligible individuals in a residential facility as an alternative to nursing home placement.

 

Community Options Program for the Elderly (COPE)

Non-medical services to older persons to help them maintain independence in their own homes as an alternative to nursing home placement. Similar to the HCBW Program.

 

Disability Rx (External link) Assistance with the cost of prescription medicines to qualified individuals with disabilities.

 

Disability Services (External link)The Office of Disability Services provides resources at the community level which promote equal opportunity and life choices for people with disabilities through which they may positively contribute to Nevada.

Elder Protective Services (EPS)

For persons 60 years old and older who may experience abuse, neglect, exploitation, or isolation.

 

Grants

Information for current and/or prospective grantees.

 

Home and Community Based Waiver (HCBW formerly CHIP)

Non-medical services to older persons to help them maintain independence in their own homes as an alternative to nursing home placement.

 

Homemaker Program

General housekeeping, limited meal preparation, shopping, laundering, errands, standby assistance with bathing, and home management services.

 

IDEA Part C Office

Provides oversight of Part C (early intervention services) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Addresses issues and problems faced by residents in long term care facilities, which includes residential facilities for groups.

 

Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)

The goal of the SMP program is to empower seniors to prevent Medicare/health care fraud through outreach and education.

 

Senior Rx

Nevada’s plan to provide Nevada seniors relief from the high cost of prescription medicine.

 

Senior Tax Assistance/Rent Rebate Program

This program is no longer available.

 

State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP)

Medicare Counseling Information

Counseling and assistance to Medicare Beneficiaries in Nevada, utilizing a statewide network of volunteers.

 

Taxi Assistance Program (TAP)

Discounted taxicab fares to seniors and persons with disabilities in Clark County. (Washoe County also has a program of this type.

 

 

Waiver for the Elderly in Adult Residential Care (WEARC)

Non-medical services in a group care setting to offer individuals a less expensive alternative of supervised care in a residential setting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Medicine Disposal Program

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

www.paininthedrain.com

PAIN IN THE DRAIN

IN THE COMMUNITY!

Did You Know… …You can dispose of your expired and unused medicine at any Police Department in Clark County?
Drop Boxes are now located in the lobby of the Boulder City Police Department, the City of Henderson Police Department Substations, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department substations, the North Las Vegas Police Department substations and the Mesquite Plice Department substations.

Don’t Rush to Flush!  Dispose of your expired medicines properly!

Only public employees may access public manholes for maintenance or monitoring activities. Other, illegal discharges might result in:

  • Clogged or overflowing sewer lines
  • Disruption of wastewater treatment plant processes
  • Damage to sewer lines and laterals
  • Buildup of toxic gases in the lines
  • Harmful discharges into the environment

An example of an illegal discharge is a commercial vacuum truck dumping its contents of grease interceptors, sand/oil interceptors and septic tanks into the sewer system. Illegal dumping into public manholes is most likely to occur at night and away from major streets. If you see a potentially unauthorized discharge, please contact the Water Reclamation District at 702-668-8354.

Introducing F.O.G.G.

The Clark County Water Reclamation District and the Cities of Las Vegas, Henderson and North Las Vegas have teamed up to ask our residents to Just Can It! and help keep cooking fat, oils, grease and grit (FOGG) out of our community’s sewer systems. These agencies maintain extensive collection systems of several thousand miles of pipeline underneath the streets to deliver wastewater from homes, businesses and schools to the treatment facilities.
We call it wastewater, but it is not wasted at all. We reclaim every drop of this valuable resource by treating it to very high levels until suitable for reuse- for golf courses, soccer fields, industrial cooling and, most importantly, for return to Lake Mead and the Colorado River system for Return Flow Credits. In order to clean the water to the very high standards necessary, these agencies must keep the wastewater flowing through the pipelines to reach the plants for treatment.

F.O.G.G. FAQs

Q:  What is FOGG, and is it a problem? A:  FOGG is made up of fat, oil, grease, and grit, and it is a very BIG problem! FOGG does not mix with water because its components are insoluble and have a tendency to separate from a liquid solution. When fat, oil and grease are poured down the drain, they stick to the sewer pipe walls creating layers of buildup that restrict the wastewater flow. This problem requires pipes to be cleaned more frequently, causes pipes to be replaced sooner than expected, and causes blockages that can result in sewer overflows.

Q:  How does fat, oil, grease, and grit (FOGG) create a sewer blockage? A:  Fat, oil, grease, and grit in a warm, liquid form may appear to be harmless since they flow easily down the drain. However, as the liquid cools, the FOGG solidifies and floats to the top of the other liquid in the sewer pipes. The layer of FOGG sticks to the sewer pipes and over time, the flow of wastewater becomes restricted and can cause a backup or overflow. The gritty particles, including coffee grinds, eggshells, aquarium gravel, grain, rice, seeds, etc. get trapped in the greasy buildup, accelerating the problem rapidly.
Over time, FOGG accumulates in the sewer system in much the same way that cholesterol accumulates in our arteries. As FOGG builds in the pipes, wastewater becomes increasingly restricted. Suddenly, sometimes without warning, a sewer pipe backs up and overflows, similar to a heart attack. The result is a home flooded with sewage, or sewage overflowing in the street, where it flows – untreated – into area waterways.

Q:  What products contain fat, oil, grease, and grit (FOGG) A:  Fat, oil, grease and grit are natural by-products of the cooking and food preparation process. Common sources include food scraps, meat fats, cooking oils, lard, baked goods, salad dressings, sauces, marinades, dairy products, shortening, butter and margarine, coffee grinds, eggshells, grain, rice, seeds, etc. Anything put through the garbage disposal adds to the buildup.

Q:  What can I do to keep fat, oil, grease, and grit (FOGG) out of the sewer and help prevent a grease related sewer overflow from occurring in my house or on my street? A:  Everyone plays a role in preventing FOGG from damaging our sewer system. The following easy tips can help prevent a sewer overflow in your home or neighborhood.

  1. Fat, oil, grease, and grit should NEVER be poured down the sink. Sink drains and garbage disposals are not designed to handle these materials properly.
  2. Before washing, scrape and dry wipe pots, pans and dishes with paper towels and dispose of materials in the trash.
  3. Pour fat, oil, grease and grit into a disposable container, such as an empty glass jar or coffee can. Once the liquid has cooled and solidified, secure the lid and place the container in the trash.
  4. Disconnect, or at least minimize use of the garbage disposal to get rid of food scraps. The garbage disposal chops up food into small pieces, but can still cause a blockage in the pipe. Use sink strainers to catch food items, and then empty the strainer into the trash.

Q:  Why is it important to dispose of FOGG properly? A:  Sewer system maintenance in neighborhoods that experience sewer blockages and backups due to fat, oil, grease, and grit is expensive and can contribute to the amount that customers pay for sewer service. A sewer blockage or backup can also result in expensive repairs to the home.

Q:  What should I do if I experience a sewer blockage or overflow? A:  Call your sewer service provider at one of the following numbers:

  • Clark County Water Reclamation District: 702-434-6600
  • City of Las Vegas: 702-229-6594
  • City of Henderson: 702-267-2500
  • City of North Las Vegas: 702-633-1275

Pain in the Drain | Why Flushing is Bad

Why Flushing is a Bad Idea When you flush medication down your drain, it ends up at one of our treatment facilities. These ingredients can remain in the treated water when it is released into the water cycle. Handful of PillsWhen prescription or over-the-counter drugs are flushed down the sink or toilet, their chemical components may be added to the water supply. The presence of these substances in the environment is emerging as an important national and international issue. Although the concentration levels of these products in the environment is very low, research and monitoring are continuing worldwide.
Putting medications down the drain is not just a local concern. Increasingly, prescription and non-prescription medications, many of which are not effectively destroyed by sewage treatment plants, are finding their way into streams and drinking water supplies. A study conducted by the United States Geological Survey found that 80 percent of the 139 streams sampled across 30 states detected very low concentrations of chemicals commonly found in prescription drugs. While the concentration levels of these products are very low, they may be enough to cause adverse effects in the environment and to human health.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!