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mental health | Nevada Senior Guide

Change Up Your Routine – Healthy ways to reinvent yourself

July 24, 2014 by · Comments Off on Change Up Your Routine – Healthy ways to reinvent yourself
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Aging gracefully is as much about feeling good on the inside as feeling good on the outside. It’s never too late to make changes to reinvent yourself and maximize your mental and physical wellbeing.

Self-improvement is at the top of many women’s to-do lists, and doing so can take many forms. According to a recent survey by Post Great Grains Cereal, 73 percent of women said they’d reinvented themselves since they turned 40 by improving their health, finding a new passion or changing their career.

Eighty-three percent of survey participants (women, ages 40-plus) think the greatest obstacle to reaching their full potential is what they think of themselves, rather than what others think of them. Follow these tips to become your own best friend and take steps toward creating a happier, healthier you.

Give proper attention to your diet. A common form of reinvention is improving your eating habits. A balanced diet that promotes a healthy digestive system is an important step in creating a healthier you. Starting each day with a nutritious breakfast is one easy change. Fill your menu with nutrition you can see and wholesome ingredients, such as those in Great Grains Digestive Blend cereals, which have active cultures in addition to whole grains and natural fiber.

Take time to understand yourself. Digging deep to understand your true passions may help reveal a new, more fulfilling path in life, whether it be in the form of new hobbies or even a new career. If you’re not sure where to start, begin by making a running list of situations, which capture your attention, such as news articles or engaging conversations. Over time, look for patterns to emerge. Topics or themes rising to the top could signal a special interest you may have overlooked in the past.

Nurture valuable relationships. Knowing (and loving) yourself comes first, but having a strong support system is also important for overall wellbeing. While it’s important for women to surround themselves with people who will boost them up, that boost doesn’t always have to come from another woman. When they need a good laugh, 59 percent of women in the Great Grains survey said they turn to their significant other. Investing time to strengthen your personal connections improves not only the health of those relationships, but the effects of those relationships on your physical health, as well.

While charting a new path may seem daunting, focusing on your physical and mental health as you work to introduce change into your life can smooth the way to reinventing a better and brighter you.

For more information, visit www.greatgrains.com.

Drug interactions causing a significant impact on statin use

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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A new study has found that many people who stopped taking cholesterol-lowering statin drugs were also taking an average of three other drugs that interfered with the normal metabolism of the statins.

The other drugs can contribute to a common side effect of taking statins – muscle pain – and often led people to discontinue use of a medication that could otherwise help save their life, researchers learned.

The interactions of many drugs with statins have been known of for some time, researchers said, but are not being adequately managed by physicians and pharmacists, who could often choose different medications or adjust dosages to retain the value of statin drugs without causing this side effect.

The research, done as part of a survey of more than 10,000 current and former statin users, found that use of medications which interfere with statin metabolism almost doubles the chance that a person will discontinue statin use due to muscle pain.

The issue is of growing importance because statin drugs are some of the most widely used medications in the world, proven to lower LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, and decrease the risk of heart attacks, heart disease, strokes and death. About 20 million people in the U.S. now take statins, and new guidelines have just been issued to further expand the types of health conditions for which statins may be of benefit. Based on those guidelines, the number of statin users could increase to more than 30 million.

The findings were published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology by scientists from Oregon State University and four other universities or research institutes.

“We’ve known for some time of many medications that can interact with statins, but only now is it becoming clear that this is a significant contributor to the side effects, and often the reason some patients stop taking statins,” said Matt Ito, a professor in the OSU College of Pharmacy and president of the National Lipid Association, which funded this study.

“This issue is something physicians, pharmacists and patients all need to be more aware of,” Ito said. “There’s a lot we can do besides discontinue use of these valuable medications. You can change dosages, use drugs that don’t cause interactions, use different types of statins. Patients need to be proactive in understanding this issue and working with their health care providers to address it.”

Persons who have problems taking statins should discuss options with their physicians or pharmacists, Ito said, and not assume the drug has be to discontinued. A Medscape web site at http://reference.medscape.com/drug-interactionchecker also can help individuals learn more about possible interactions between statins and the full range of medications they may be taking.

Statins are usually well-tolerated, but in the recent survey, a muscle-related side effect was reported by 29 percent of participants. In former statin users, 62 percent of the people said that side effects, mostly muscle pain, were the reason they stopped taking the drugs.

There are many drugs that can interfere with statin metabolism, increase systemic exposure to the statin and raise the risk of this muscle pain, the researchers said in their report. This can include some common antibiotics, cardiovascular drugs, and others taken for treatment of cancer, mental health, HIV treatment and other conditions.

These interactions are not always adequately considered by physicians and pharmacists, however. One recent report found that as many as 20 percent of significant statin-drug interactions were missed in 64 pharmacies.

Besides drug interactions, statin side effects are also more common in women and associated with increasing age, history of cardiovascular disease, and some other conditions. Statin discontinuation has been associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and death.

About the OSU College of Pharmacy: The College of Pharmacy prepares students of today to be the pharmacy practitioners and pharmaceutical sciences researchers of tomorrow by contributing to improved health, advancing patient care and the discovery and understanding of medicines.

WestCare Foundation Announces Expanded Veterans Programs

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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WestCare Foundation Announces Expanded Veterans Programs

(Las Vegas) – WestCare, a community-based nonprofit providing responsive human services and behavioral health care programs for four decades, announced today that it has expanded its Veterans’ services.

WestCare, founded in Las Vegas 40 years ago, serves approximately 5,000 veterans throughout the United States annually.  America’s returning warriors often face health challenges including substance abuse and mental health disorders, identified as this generation’s “invisible wounds of war.”   Among them are post traumatic stress, brain injury, sexual trauma, anxiety and depression.  Episodes of homelessness, unemployment, and criminal justice involvement are not uncommon among our Veterans.

“These challenges present opportunities for community organizations, led by specially trained, qualified and informed staff, to assist with issues such as social isolation, domestic violence, reintegration and transition, and other problems a Veteran, as well as Veteran family members, may be experiencing,” said veteran and Director of Veteran Services, Dan Bernal. “WestCare is committed to helping Veterans and military family members live positive, productive and healthy lives.”

WestCare’s expanded programs are aimed at addressing a broad range of issues for Veterans and their families through services that  include: treatment for substance abuse and mental health disorders with gender or youth-specific services as appropriate, HIV/AIDS-specific programs, assistance to homelessness  including transitional shelters and permanent housing projects, family counseling, community reintegration, assistance to those who are justice involved, educational and vocational programs for both youth and adults, and case management.

From the top down, starting with WestCare’s President and Vietnam Veteran, Richard Steinberg, more than 10 percent of WestCare’s leadership and staff are Veterans and members of military families. The organization has a deep understanding of military culture at every level and in every program.  “Serving those who have served” is more than a slogan at WestCare.

Since the organization’s inception, Veterans have been welcomed into WestCare programs.  Today, the expanding reach of Veteran-specific programs is aimed at extending services to the men and women who deserve respect for their service, understanding of where they have been and opportunities for their future.

WestCare

WestCare, whose mission “uplifting of the human spirit,” was founded 40 years ago in Las Vegas.  Since its inception, it has grown to more than 100 locations in 16 U.S. States, the US Virgin Islands and the Pacific Islands headquartered in Guam.  The non-profit organization has a variety of programs available in each of the communities it serves.   For more information on the WestCare Foundation and its mission, visit www.WestCare.com.

VETERANS VILLAGE LAS VEGAS OFFERS EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Seeks Food Pantry and Water Donations; Open on July 4

 

WHAT:           Due to food and water shortage, Veterans Village, a temporary housing facility for vets that also offers a comprehensive roster of services to help vets heal and succeed – invites the community to donate bottled water and canned food items to provide relief to veterans and individuals in need.

 

Particularly during the extreme heat of the summer, Veterans Village is running low on supplies as they shelter vets and their families seeking respite from the heat.

                       

                        Veterans Village remains open on July 4 to shelter veterans, serve the community and  accept donations.

 

WHERE:         Veterans Village Las Vegas

                        1150 Las Vegas Blvd. South

                        Las Vegas, Nevada 89104

 

                       

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org.

Fitness For Senior Citizens by Thomas Shay

July 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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As people grow older, their fitness level goes down due partially to indifference and also due to the aging process. People in the age group of 60 – 80 come under this category.

Their problem relating to physical and mental health can be tackled in a planned and scientific manner. Fitness is affected not only by physical illness but also by mental stress. The problems are universal and similar if not identical, among all senior citizens, irrespective of social or financial standing.

When we talk of physical health it is mostly a matter of proper diet and exercise. A doctor will say “Take plenty of vegetables, fruits, milk with rice or wheat preparations” to vegetarians and will add meat, fish and poultry to non-vegetarians. He will also mention the proportion of each item.

The well to do can follow the doctor’s instructions meticulously, provided they have the inclination to do so on a permanent basis. That will keep them out of harm’s way. They can be free of stomach disorders and other related illness. The problem crops up for people who cannot afford what the doctor prescribes as diet. There is no solution in this case.

Light exercises are recommended for old people. Nothing will strain the aging parts of the body is allowed. The best form of exercise, for a senior citizen is a brisk or ordinary walk, according to his physical condition and strength, both in the morning and evening.

There will be a marked reluctance to do exercises regularly and it cannot be avoided. It will of course affect the fitness level. This goes for the diet also. Most aged people eat what they like but not well for their system and end up in a clinic.

So, it is a bit difficult task to keep themselves fit but the effort should be made by near and dear ones to enforce some sort of discipline at least in the matter of diet. But, there is a very different aspect for aged person losing fitness is mental trouble. It is mostly a feeling of being unwanted by the younger generation and consequent reluctance to take care of their health.

Old age homes though providing food, shelter and medical needs cannot help in this matter. Only love and affection from their children and other members can give solace in this problem. In fact in such a situation the senior citizens may remain physically fit also.

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Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Thomas_Shay

 

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!