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Unprotected Heroes Vests Save K-9s Lives as They Protect and Serve Communities

July 24, 2014 by · Comments Off on Unprotected Heroes Vests Save K-9s Lives as They Protect and Serve Communities
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A German Shepherd named Kilo was shot multiple times during a gun battle in Florida between police and a man suspected of shooting at officers earlier in the night. Fortunately for Kilo, he was wearing a protective vest, which saved his life. Unfortunately, thousands of other K-9s officers across the country perform their duties without proper protective wear, putting them in harm’s way.

Bullet and stab protective vests cost around $1,000 each and many departments simply do not have the means to outfit their dogs. PetArmor®, known for its products that protect pets from fleas and ticks, is helping to ensure more K-9s are protected while in the line of duty. Through a yearlong partnership with Vested Interest in K-9s, PetArmor® is providing funding for bullet and stab protective vests for law enforcement teams throughout the United States.

“These dogs are out 30 feet in front of us and need these vests,” said Officer Vinnie Curcio, with the Jupiter, Fla., Police Department, which is one of the police departments benefiting from the donation. “They’re leading us into dark, wooded areas after some of the most violent people.”

Police forces in most major cities use police dogs to track criminals, sniff out illegal materials, search buildings, and do other jobs human police officers can’t do as well as a dog can. Additionally, their sense of smell is tens of thousands of times more sensitive than that of humans, making them ideal for their duties.

Beyond their sense of smell, successful police dogs have exceptional intelligence and strength. Most police dogs are male, and are frequently left unneutered so that they maintain their natural aggression. This aggression must be kept in check with thorough and rigorous training.

The most popular breeds used as police dogs are German Shepherds, Belgian Malinois, Dutch Shepherds, and occasionally mixes of these breeds. Other breeds used include Bloodhounds for detection and scent work, and Labrador Retrievers for narcotics and explosives detection.

“Police K-9 units provide an invaluable service to their community and deserve the same kind of protection as their human counterparts,” said Sandy Marcal, founder of Vested Interest in K-9s, Inc.  “Thanks to PetArmor®, many more police dogs will be protected from harm while they protect their neighborhoods and towns.”

For more information on PetArmor® product offerings, visit www.petarmor.com. Additional information on Vested Interest in K-9s, Inc. can be found on their website, www.vik9s.org/.

Unprotected Heroes Vests Save K-9s Lives as They Protect and Serve Communities

January 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

11734(Family Features) A German Shepherd named Kilo was shot multiple times during a gun battle in Florida between police and a man suspected of shooting at officers earlier in the night. Fortunately for Kilo, he was wearing a protective vest, which saved his life. Unfortunately, thousands of other K-9s officers across the country perform their duties without proper protective wear, putting them in harm’s way.

 

Bullet and stab protective vests cost around $1,000 each and many departments simply do not have the means to outfit their dogs. PetArmor®, known for its products that protect pets from fleas and ticks, is helping to ensure more K-9s are protected while in the line of duty. Through a yearlong partnership with Vested Interest in K-9s, PetArmor® is providing funding for bullet and stab protective vests for law enforcement teams throughout the United States.

 

“These dogs are out 30 feet in front of us and need these vests,” said Officer Vinnie Curcio, with the Jupiter, Fla., Police Department, which is one of the police departments benefiting from the donation. “They’re leading us into dark, wooded areas after some of the most violent people.”

 

Police forces in most major cities use police dogs to track criminals, sniff out illegal materials, search buildings, and do other jobs human police officers can’t do as well as a dog can. Additionally, their sense of smell is tens of thousands of times more sensitive than that of humans, making them ideal for their duties.

 

Beyond their sense of smell, successful police dogs have exceptional intelligence and strength. Most police dogs are male, and are frequently left unneutered so that they maintain their natural aggression. This aggression must be kept in check with thorough and rigorous training.

 

The most popular breeds used as police dogs are German Shepherds, Belgian Malinois, Dutch Shepherds, and occasionally mixes of these breeds. Other breeds used include Bloodhounds for detection and scent work, and Labrador Retrievers for narcotics and explosives detection.

 

“Police K-9 units provide an invaluable service to their community and deserve the same kind of protection as their human counterparts,” said Sandy Marcal, founder of Vested Interest in K-9s, Inc.  “Thanks to PetArmor®, many more police dogs will be protected from harm while they protect their neighborhoods and towns.”

 

For more information on PetArmor® product offerings, visit www.petarmor.com. Additional information on Vested Interest in K-9s, Inc. can be found on their website, www.vik9s.org/.

U.S. Veterans Honored by Encore.org’s 2013 Purpose Prize

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Seven Awards for People Over Age 60 Solving the World’s Toughest Social Problems

The Purpose Prize has become a “MacArthur genius award for people who develop a second career as social service entrepreneurs.” – The New York Times.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy organizes a network of volunteers across the country to teach disabled veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan how to combat stress — through fly-fishing.

A public relations executive helps wounded warriors find and renovate foreclosed homes – and transforms lives and neighborhoods in the process.

These are two of the seven winners of the 2013 Purpose Prize, awarded by Encore.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who translate decades of skill and experience into “second acts” that contribute to society’s greater good.

Now in its eighth year, The Purpose Prize is the nation’s only large-scale investment in people over 60 who are combining their passion and experience for the social good. Created in 2005 by Encore.org, the prize is aimed at those with the passion to make change and the wisdom to know how to do it, showcasing the value of experience and disproving the notion that innovation is solely the province of the young.

Two winners will receive $100,000 each and five winners will receive $25,000 each.

This year’s winners:

* Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. ($100,000 winner of The Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra)

* Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron taps into her own experience as a cancer survivor to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. ($100,000)

* Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing emotional wounds through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. ($25,000)

* Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
Fennelly runs a unique summer camp behind bars that is transforming federal prisoners into involved parents. ($25,000)

* Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
Huttinger’s project is on a path to eradicate human schistosomiasis, a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. ($25,000)

* Reverend Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. ($25,000)

* Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
Young’s rise from immigrant nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. ($25,000)

The Purpose Prize winners will be honored on December 5, 2013, at an awards ceremony in Sausalito, Ca. NBC’s Jane Pauley will emcee the event for hundreds of Encore leaders and the Purpose Prize winners.

Twenty-one judges – leaders in business, politics, journalism and the nonprofit sector – chose the seven winners from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees. Judges include Sherry Lansing, former CEO of Paramount; David Bornstein, author and New York Times columnist; Eric Liu, writer and founder of CitizenUniversity; and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, The Purpose Prize is a program of Encore.org, which aims to engage millions of boomers in encore careers combining personal meaning, continued income and social impact in the second half of life.

This year, Symetra is sponsoring the $100,000 Purpose Prize for Future Promise, which recognizes an individual whose approach for helping society has the potential to grow steadily over the next five years. The company plans to sponsor another Purpose Prize for Future Promise in 2014.

“While Purpose Prize winners are helping to solve a wide range of pressing social problems, they have one thing in common,” said Marc Freedman, CEO and founder of Encore.org and author of The Big Shift (PublicAffairs Books). “They – and millions of others in encore careers – are turning personal passions and decades of experience into invaluable contributions across sectors, continents and generations, often through entrepreneurship.”

Short summaries for all winners follow. Photos are attached. Longer bios and higher resolution photos are available.

Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas, winner of this year’s Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra, rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. Following a 35-year-career as a fundraising and marketing dynamo, she became the director of communications at Purple Heart Homes in 2008 in an effort to provide greater services for veterans who have service-connected disabilities. In just three years, Thomas helped take the fledgling nonprofit to new heights. She has raised millions for Purple Heart Homes in financial contributions and material donations. Revenue shot up 600% in her first year with the startup. She’s developed an innovative program that matches veterans with foreclosed homes donated by banks, then raises the funds to renovate a home for the individual veteran’s needs. It’s a win-win for all generations—and communities too. It helps veterans to grow assets, towns to recoup lost taxes and neighborhoods that have struggled with foreclosures to stabilize.

Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron is an award-winning journalist with more than 42 years in television broadcasting. She tapped into her own experience as a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. To focus on the plight of low-income Latinos fighting the disease, Duron founded Latinas Contra Cancer (Latinas Against Cancer), an organization committed to educating, supporting and providing essential services to low-income Spanish speakers often overlooked by the health care system. Latinas Contra Cancer has offered a range of programs that have taught more than 3,000 men, women and teens about the disease, resulting in more than 300 preventative cancer screenings. The group has provided psychological and social support to over 100 patients per year. However, the call to action Duron answered has had an impact far beyond the Bay Area. Her passionate commitment is helping Latino communities across the U.S. gain access to cancer support, information and treatment. Her great empathy for cancer patients has made her utterly clear on her bigger purpose in the second stage of life.

Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing the emotional wounds of battle through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. A cancer survivor and war veteran himself, Nicholson was impressed by the fortitude of disabled veterans at the Walter Reed military hospital, where he was treated for prostate cancer in 2005. It spurred him to found Project Healing Waters, a program dedicated to helping disabled soldiers and veterans recover from the trying aftermath of war through the sport of fly-fishing. One-on-one connections have been key to Project Healing Waters’ approach since the beginning. Nicholson knew there were fly-fishing groups and facilities all over the country. His innovation was to convince them to start, manage and lead fly-fishing instruction and outings with veterans through military and Veterans Administration facilities. The quiet bonds forged over fishing lines began to transform lives. Again and again Nicholson heard from family members who said their loved ones had returned from war withdrawn, angry, and difficult to be around. But after fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters, they’ve become happier, more open and engaged. Project Healing Waters works closely with VA Recreational and Occupational therapies to identify those who would most benefit from the program. Many are in wheelchairs or using prosthetics. A few are blind. Participants reflect of full spectrum of disabled veterans and include all ages, genders, ethnicities and disabilities. Nicholson says the impact “goes well beyond the mechanics of fly-fishing.”

Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
A lifelong social activist who ran homeless shelters in the District of Columbia for 17 years, Carol Fennelly abandoned her plans to retire in 1998 when she learned that D.C. inmates had been transferred to Youngstown, OH. One woman made 10-hour round-trip drives twice a week to visit her son. Moved to answer a social need, Fennelly thought about opening a hospitality house in Youngstown for family members visiting inmates. She soon learned that while 93% of the federal inmate population is male, in sheer numbers there are more programs for mothers in prison than there are for fathers. She decided she had what it took to change things. “I had spent years organizing, dealing with government, making change happen, and that emboldened me to think I could go into prisons and start all these radical programs,” Fennelly says. So she launched an encore career with Hope House, an innovative organization that helps prison inmates stay in regular contact with their children. In the past 14 years, Hope House has hosted 200 video teleconferences, 18,000 personalized book readings by fathers and 31 week-long summer camps, which allow kids to spend time with their fathers free of the usual restrictions that come with visitor hours and family chaperones. California recently decided to implement the Hope House model in its 33 state prisons. Prisons in Texas, Idaho and New Hampshire may follow. In 2013 Fennelly was honored at the White House as a Champion of Change.

Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
International public health expert Elizabeth Huttinger spotted a big idea in shrimp, and launched an encore career that could eradicate a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. Huttinger’s project – founded in 2006 – is targeting human schistosomiasis, an infectious parasite carried by river snails. Understanding that the population of prawns that eat those snails had precipitously declined, Huttinger, 63, has devoted her encore career to restoring the prawn population in the SenegalRiver Basin. Projet Crevette’s mission is multifaceted: the restoration of the prawn population diminishes the spread of schisto, provides new economic opportunities to afflicted communities and heals families infected by the disease. Today, Projet Crevette is a prawn-farming microenterprise, operated by locals at public watering holes. It has brought social innovation, new microbusinesses, environmental restoration and improved health to communities. Huttinger is confident Projet Crevette will meet its bold goal to fully restore the indigenous prawn population—and improve countless lives in the process.

Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Reverend Violet Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. After 14 years as parish pastor trained in psychotherapy, Little left behind her traditional congregation to create a religious refuge for the homeless on the streets of the city, which became the “WelcomeChurch.” The church relies mostly on word of mouth, and services can pop up in a city park or on a sidewalk. No questions are asked, and everyone is welcome. The WelcomeChurch coordinates medical services through local universities, helps people get into rehab or jobs, and offers educational services to the public on the causes of homelessness. Little estimates 40 percent of her congregants have moved off the streets into permanent housing and the WelcomeChurch celebrates each and every one of them, many of whom stay connected with Little through their transition. Little’s congregation has grown to include hundreds of homeless as well as non-homeless volunteers in the EvangelicalLutheranChurch in America.

Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
An immigrant from the West Indies who built a meaningful life on meager income, Young’s gritty rise from nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. She’s encouraged thousands to stand up for their right to earn a living wage, and counsels and trains others to become leaders themselves. In 2004, Young began building a movement to legislate a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in New YorkState, which would make overtime, paid time off and rest days mandatory. In 2009, when she heard then Governor David Patterson say on the radio that he’d sign the bill if it made it to his desk, she put on a full court press, becoming the engine behind passage of the law in 2010. The law is the first of its kind in the country, but Young is committed to making sure it isn’t the last. She’s now a key player in the NDWA’s expansion from 11 to 44 affiliated organizations with 15,000 members, up from 5,000 in 2007. Young’s passion for serving her community has only just begun.

Read More About Encore’s Purpose Prize at www.encore.org/prize.

About Encore.org

Encore.org is a national nonprofit that promotes the idea that people in their second acts have the talent and experience to solve some of society’s greatest problems.

About The Atlantic Philanthropies

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. In keeping with the Giving While Living philosophy of founder Charles “Chuck” Feeney, The Atlantic Philanthropies believes in making large investments to capitalize on significant opportunities to solve urgent problems now, so they are less likely to become larger, more entrenched and more expensive challenges later. The Atlantic Philanthropies also seeks to encourage others of significant wealth to engage in major philanthropic pursuits in their lifetime.

About The John Templeton Foundation

The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, supporting research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.

About Symetra

Symetra Financial Corporation (NYSE: SYA) is a diversified financial services company based in Bellevue, Wash. In business since 1957, Symetra provides employee benefits, annuities and life insurance through a national network of benefit consultants, financial institutions, and independent agents and advisors.

 

CONTACT: Sara Ying Rounsaville, srounsaville@encore.org, 415-952-5121, or Russ Mitchell, rmitchell@encore.org, 510-969-0801

“Aging in Place” is the focus of a multi-platform report by the PBS NEWSHOUR

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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“Aging in Place” is the focus of a multi-platform report by the PBS NEWSHOUR

Report is the latest in TAKING CARE: a 6-part series the challenges of long-term care

 NewsHour Online offers tips for seniors, profiles a pilot program in Baltimore, and shares personal stories

As Americans live longer, more-productive lives, many seniors are seeking ways to “Age in Place” – to grow old in their own homes rather than move in with family or to traditional retirement facilities.  As part of its ongoing reporting on the challenges of aging and long-term care, Ray Suarez reports from Boston on a non-profit membership organization that helps seniors grow old in their own homes.  The broadcast report airs Thursday, August 08, 2013 on the PBS NEWSHOUR (check local listings.)

The group, Beacon Hill Village, was founded by Susan McWhinney-Morse and 10 of her friends and neighbors who wanted to find a way to grow old in their homes without having to depend on their children for help.  For an annual membership fee, the group offers transportation, social events, and other low-cost services for seniors. The organization has become a model for the nation – there are now over 100 villages across the country and over 200 in development.

Produced with support from The SCAN Foundation, the report is the second in TAKING CARE: a 6-part series on long-term care that will continue throughout the year with reports that show the magnitude of the problem, the challenges faced by individuals and governments, and some of the models for change being tested.

PBS NEWSHOUR’s reporting on “Aging in Place” continues online:

  • 7 simple repairs to help seniors safely age in place  and an opportunity to share your own tips;
  • a “quilt” of photos and anecdotes of living alone, submitted by seniors and their relatives;
  •  an extended interview with one of the founders of Beacon Hill Village;
  • And on Friday –a video showing the work of CAPABLE, a Johns Hopkins-run, Baltimore-located organization that fixes up homes to increase mobility and function.

The SCAN Foundation is an independent, non-profit public charity devoted to advancing a world where all of us can age with dignity, independence, and choice.

PBS NEWSHOUR is seen by over 5 million weekly viewers and is also available online, via public radio in select markets and via podcast. The program is produced with WETA Washington, D.C., and in association with WNET.org in New York. Major corporate funding for the PBS NEWSHOUR is provided by BAE Systems and BNSF Railway with additional support from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and public television viewers. www.pbs.org/newshour

Diet Management For Senior Citizens by Jane Kim

September 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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As people grow older, they become less active, especially after retirement from an active job. Food is required to maintain the health and state of the body, as in younger age groups, but less energy is needed. Senior citizens can maintain their health by following tips:

– Many elderly women and some men suffer from a condition called osteoporosis, which is result of gradual loss calcium and other minerals from the skeleton. Bones become brittle, may break easily, and are painful.

– To help prevent this problem everyone, but especially women, should have plenty of calcium and vitamin D in their diet when younger, and take regular exercise. There is evidence that taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) at, and for few years after, menopause can help prevent osteoporosis in women.

– The size of meals should decrease as people become less active, but the quality should not. There is no need for elderly to eat soft or smooth foods only, unless they have a digestive disorder which makes this necessary; they can still enjoy crisps, crunchy; and hard foods, even if they wear dentures, providing that the dentures fit into the gums properly.

– It may be necessary to increase the intake of fiber to avoid constipation, which is common disorder in this age group. Many elderly people resort to using laxatives to prevent or ease constipation. This is undesirable and usually unnecessary if the diet contains sufficient fiber.

– A reduced income may mean that it is not possible to eat much meat or other protein foods, and this poses problems to many senior citizens. Pulses and cereals can be eaten as cheaper alternatives to meat and other and other animal protein foods, or to supplement them.

– Mobility problems may also influence where foods is purchased and how often, and the elderly may require help from the social services department or from willing neighbors.

– The loss of a partner may also affect the motivation to cook and eat well, and this often leads to poor health among the elderly.

– Senior citizen’s luncheon clubs are run by many religious organizations and charities to enable the elderly to meet in social atmosphere, and enjoy a meal together. This is good for their quality of life and happiness. And provide the chance to enjoy a cooked meal which they may not have at home. The meals are usually subsidized.

– Meals on wheels are provided in many areas, and offer daily social contact for elderly people, as well as a regular hot meal. In some areas, people now receive a weekly delivery of frozen meals which they reheat in microwave oven. This saves costs, but limits the important social contact.

Jane Kim writes for Society50 social networking website. You can visit Health and Diet Club of Society50 to ask your questions or just to get advise on any body and health related issue.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jane_Kim

New Interview with I.C.E. Keytag Inventor Tom Force Reveals What Inspired Him To Create The Potentially Life Saving I.C.E. (In Case of Emergency) Keytag

July 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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New Interview with I.C.E. Keytag Inventor Tom Force Reveals What Inspired Him To Create The Potentially Life Saving I.C.E. (In Case of Emergency) Keytag

SOUTHLAKE, Texas, July 9, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Tom Force, inventor of the I.C.E. (In Case of Emergency) Keytag was recently interviewed by Mike Taylor, Sr. Editor at Newswire.  Tom reveals how the tragic events surrounding his mother’s death spurred him to create a potentially life-saving product, the I.C.E. Keytag.

Tom’s mother lived in a seniors’ complex in apparently good health. In January 2010 she was rushed to the hospital after neighbors found her unconscious. She had suffered an aneurysm and several hours later slipped into a fatal coma.

The national average time from accident to notification of next of kin is 6 hours. In Tom’s case, it was 7.

Tom regrets those lost hours with her and said, “Having those few hours with her would have been priceless.”

Tom said the I.C.E. Keytag “was the result of the way things played out with my own Mom.”

Tom created the I.C.E. (In Case of Emergency) Keytag as a way to put emergency contact information literally into the hands of an emergency responder. In case of an auto accident, their first action is to turn off the ignition. The over-sized tag on the key-ring carries emergency I.C.E. labeling, alerting authorities whom to call. The company also provides a critical emergency medical form for the glove compartment. This info could potentially help to save a life.

The I.C.E. Keytag, with its prominent “I.C.E.” logo, has other applications. Tom said, “One of these on your backpack, bike, in your sneaker laces or on golf bag could help to save your life.”

Tom is proud of this American made product and has partnered with businesses and non-profits in 30 states to facilitate widespread distribution. Custom designs allow businesses or charities to promote their cause.

Stephanie Miller, independent I.C.E. Keytag representative, said, “My clients love them. They are giving their customer base something that helps them in a time of need.” She added, “They provide peace of mind. You can’t get any better.”

Tom’s veteran-owned company gave away “We Will Never Forget” I.C.E. Keytags at the local 9-11 observance. “We let people throw money into the hat and raised $2,600 for their cause. This will stay on their key-ring, and they always WILL remember,” said Tom.

To learn more about Tom Force and ICE Key Tags visit www.icekeytag.com

Contact:  Tom Force – 888-901-2477

Know How Senior Citizens Become Targets for Fraud by Diana R Beam

July 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Although you and I can’t imagine cheating anyone- especially a sweet-natured senior citizen- thousands of other people can. In fact, they make a career of lurking in the shadows, waiting to the win the trust of your aging mother, beloved grandfather or isolated, elderly neighbor.

According to the National Crime Prevention Council, 56 to 80 percent of fraudulent telemarketers intentionally dial senior citizen’s telephone numbers. This is appalling information, of course. But this statistic hopefully has your full attention. To protect the aging loved ones in your family, you must commit yourself to two goals: one, to consistently stay abreast of fraud and scams directed toward the elderly; and two, make sure to educate your aging loved one about the do’s and don’ts of telephone communication, email responses, door-to-door sales visits and how to safely dispose of important personal information or documents that are no longer necessary to keep.

Aging seniors are often easy targets for criminals because:

  • The senior may be confused easily during telephone contact, either by dementia or hearing impairment.
  • The caller is a smooth talker who wins the trust of the vulnerable lady who lives alone.
  • If the dishonest telemarketer speaks sternly, demanding perhaps, that she absolutely must provide personal information, elderly seniors may feel intimidated, stressed and confused. More often than not, fraud has again been accomplished by the time the phone call ends. The senior may be unsure of how to judge if the call is legitimate, so the more pressured she feels; the more likely she is to give the demanded information.
  • The con artist telemarketer strikes up a conversation and asks many questions which not only builds a trusting relationship for a later con but also, the senior has unknowingly provided personal information to a potentially dangerous stranger. “You sound lonely today, Mrs. Smith. Does your family live in your neighborhood? What day does your daughter stop by? And that’s the only time you see other people? Just on that day? Well no wonder you sound a bit depressed.” You get the picture. By the end of many conversations, seniors have unknowingly placed themselves in danger not only for identity theft but also for burglary or worse.

 

Identity theft is rampant in our country and every person of every age is a potential victim. Keep in mind, though, that career thieves scope out particular trash cans- especially those of aging seniors. They wait for innocent victims to carelessly toss banking information, social security numbers, etc. in the trash can. So make a list of don’t-throw-away documents and tape it to your loved one’s fridge, to help her remember what to keep. Then periodically collect documents that are no longer needed and safely shred the information.

Helping aging loved ones can be a challenge because they can unwittingly become the targets of unscrupulous con artists that neither they, nor you, see coming. Your best defense is a proactive offense- starting with awareness.

Checking on aging loved ones every day to be sure they are safe is a challenge, however, you don’t have to go it alone. You have a valuable resource in Diana Beam, founder and owner of Keeping in Touch Solutions. Diana has ways to help your aging loved ones continue to live independently and safely in their own homes as long as possible while giving family comfort and peace of mind. Learn more at http://www.KeepinginTouchSolutions.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diana_R_Beam

A Senior Citizen Community For The Perfect Retirement by Susan Elizabeth

July 2, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Many times when people think about retiring from the world of the working, they are left wondering what their options are. For some, what really works out the best for them is o live with one of their children. This is not as common as it used to be, but is still a popular option.

For others, the best choice might be to consider moving to a senior citizen community. There are few kinds of these and most of the difference depends on what you like to do after you retire and move there.

Most of these retirement communities require that you buy a property there. In some there are standalone houses and in others, condos or apartments. But for the most part it is like buying a home anywhere, you need to deal with an agent onsite and have a closing and that kind of legal stuff.

Often, this transaction can be taken care of right there onsite. And some of the communities even have their own financing options through a lender so that once you sign up, the details of the buying the property are taken care of all at once.

They are not all like this, of course, but the days of consolidation are here and sometimes it is just so much easier to deal with one or two people rather than having to go trekking all around town to put all the parts of a deal together.

Some retirement communities feature their activities very heavily. And often these are participant sports like horseback riding or golf or tennis. There is no reason why you have to be interested in those particular things in order to have a residence there. It’s just that if the entire community is centered around that one idea, then you might feel out of place sometimes if that one idea is of no interest to you at all.

Many times, the senior retirement facilities are places that feature very little activity and in these cases living there is a lot like living anywhere else. Neighbors around you all interested in different things in their lives and going to the community center for special events every once in a while.

The big difference, though is that by choosing to live in senior community, you are pretty much limiting your choice of neighbors by age group. And if it suits you that all your neighbors are going to be of retirement age, then a senior citizen community might be the perfect place for you to spend your retirement years.

Susan is a full fledged baby boomer and avid internet researcher who writes about senior retirement communities and other baby boomer topics on her site at www.second50years.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Susan_Elizabeth

 

Senior Citizen Medical Alert Systems and Fall Detectors by Angelo Losavio

July 1, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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If you are looking for a medical alert system to protect an elderly loved one, be sure to do your homework.  There are a lot of companies out there that offer personal emergency response systems with a number of features and benefits that are very useful and others with serious limitations.  For example medical alert phones may be a practical solution for your elderly loved one if they are comfortable with the technology and you believe that they are not in a great risk of falling in becoming incapacitated. A medical alert phone is more or less a wireless phone that you can program with an auto dial feature.  It allows the user to carry the telephone around and be able to present auto dial button and be connected with friends, relatives or emergency response professionals but it does require them to be able to access the telephone, operate the telephone and communicate with the person that they’re calling.

The trouble with these medical alert phones is that in the event of a sudden illness, fainting or slip and fall the elderly user may not be able to find, use or even remember that they have the phone.  On the plus side, these systems are cheaper than medical monitoring systems as there is no monthly monitoring service to pay for.  By getting your senior citizen a reliable mobile phone and preprogramming personal contact numbers into autodial you pretty much accomplish the same effect. We’re not knocking these phones we just want to point out that while they give the user access to a telephone service remotely the system is only as strong as its weakest link.

When an elderly person falls chances are they are going to be disoriented.  If they are too confused to find and operate a remote medical alert phones they will not be able to use this system to summon help.

A more practical solution is a medical alert system that can be activated using a pushbutton that is worn around the neck as a pendant or on the wrist like a watch. These medical alarm systems will allow your parent to maintain an independent lifestyle because you’ll have the peace of mind of knowing that they can get help simply by pushing a button.

A typical medical alert system has a transmitter which is worn by the user and receiver located somewhere in the house.  The range on these devices generally will cover the interior of an average home but they will not provide any protection once you go outside their radio range. Some systems will alert the monitoring station when the signal is lost in the call will be placed to the home to determine if everything is all right.

The basic system operates under the scenario that the elderly person falls and is unable to get up to reach a phone to call for help. By pushing the panic button on the pendant or wristwatch transmitter a coal box is activated in the house which connects the caller to the monitoring station. The monitoring agent speaks with the user to determine how to best help remedy the situation. If the user is coherent and able to give instructions to the monitoring station those instructions will typically be followed. If the caller can’t be reached or understood, the monitoring station will then follow a predetermined emergency call protocol which may include calling 911 responders, relatives, friends and next-door neighbors.

The worst-case scenario is that an elderly person falls and becomes unconscious, or they suffer a stroke. In this state they are unable to push a panic button. That’s where an auto fall detector can be the difference between life and death.  A senior monitoring system with a fall-alert feature should, in theory, create an alarm at the monitoring station which will prompt an operator to contact the user to see if everything is all right.

Other more elaborate monitoring systems can actually provide richer detail and true fault detection. Sometimes when people fall they don’t fold face down and make a loud thump on the ground.  Sometimes they simply slumped down slowly to the floor or chair.  Most fall detection systems are only activated if the device is violently jarred. A more subtle and advanced system will be able to detect the positioning and inactivity as well as changes in body functions to alert the monitoring station.

These more advanced monitoring systems that are able to monitor heart rate, skin temperature and mobility are slightly more expensive but offer much more protection. The downside is that the device that monitors bodily functions must be worn around the chest and some users may find this too invasive.

There are no simple solutions to providing total safety to a senior citizen living at home.  All medical monitoring and emergency response systems for aging people have their pluses and minuses.  A system that may be right for your grandmother may not work for your grandfather. It’s important that you study the features and benefits of all the top brands to decide which features you can live with and which ones are not worth paying for.

If you’ve had personal experience with a monitoring service that you’d like to recommend or suggest that we take a critical look at please get in touch by leaving a comment below.

Lifestation – Senior Monitoring Service

myHalo – Medical Monitoring – True Fall Detection and Medical Monitor

VRI Medical Alert Systems

Freedom Alert – Medical Alert Phone

Wellcore Personal Emergency Response

Philips Lifeline with AutoAlert

Brickhouse Alert Fall Detection Device

Response Link Medical Alert

Life Guardian Medical Alarm System

Connect America Medical Alert

Find support and discover how you can give your elderly loved one the care they deserve – without burning out or going broke – by visiting ElderKind.com. This site will help make caring for that special senior citizen less stressful. Get fast, free and easy access to elder care resources at ElderKind.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Angelo_Losavio

 

Senior Citizens Vs Crime by Victor C Swindell

June 13, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

What can we say about Senior Citizens?

  • They are Old!
  • They are Slow!
  • They have money!
  • They have nice expensive stuff!
  • They make easy targets to rob and beat up.
  • And almost no one seems to care.

 

Lately, you many have seen various news stories where senior citizens were a target of crime. In one of the latest stories in 2012 a WWII veteran was attacked, beaten, and car-jacked during daylight at a busy Detroit gas station and he had to crawl across a concrete parking lot to get help. If this wasn’t tragic enough there were lots of people who walked and drove pass him during this ordeal. What a shame! If you have seen the TV Show WHAT WOULD YOU DO, you know that we have a society of people who choose not to get involved, or treat a crime in progress like watching a reality television show. Some would say that this is a sign of the modern times, but it has happened before. During the same war in which this soldier fought a government decided to lie, round-up and exterminate some of its citizens, while other citizens turned a blind eye and did nothing. So history would prove that, many citizen chose not to get involved. We all hope that when we are in danger that others would come to assist us. Don’t necessarily count on it. The first line of defense in your life is YOU.

7 Things Senior Citizens Can Do

  1. Have a crime preventions specialist or local police give your residence a home security survey. They can tell you of things you can do to decrease you chances of being targeted.
  1. If you are returning home, look around of suspicious-looking strangers, have your key ready. If someone is home, alert them that you are coming home and to keep watch out for you. Don’t linger at the door. If you see someone near your house, go to your neighbor’s house and pretend to be a visitor, and it would be a good time to call the police.
  1. Establish a light up and lock-up routine to make sure all your doors and windows are locked. Be sure to close your drapes and pull down shades when you are retiring for the night.
  1. Jesus sent his disciples out two-by-two. This is an example you should adopt if possible. Whenever you need to go shopping or on an excursion that take you away from home, try to take a friend or relative with you.
  1. Try to vary your routines, you don’t know who is watching you and trying to figure when you are not going to be home.
  1. When parking, Try to park as close to your destination. Younger people should park a little further out to save spaces for elderly people.
  1. Be mindful of strangers, not all of them are really trying to help you- TRUST YOUR GUT!

 

Victor Swindell is a freelance writer of informational blogs on self defense and security countermeasures. PepperEyes.com is dedicated to providing you with the best and most affordable personal protection products on the market to meet your security needs. We believe that in today’s society being equipped mentally and physically is no longer an option.

visit http://www.peppereyes.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Victor_C_Swindell

 

TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

 

Terry Murphy, a longtime local businesswoman and community leader who is president of Strategic Solutions and serves as president of Downtown Las Vegas Alliance, is the SHARE Humanitarian for the month of May for her volunteering efforts with Veterans Village, The Rape Crisis Center and the Variety Early Leaning Center Lorenzi Campus.TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

Murphy also serves as Honorary Consul for the Republic of Ireland and as a board member of The Smith Center for the Performing Arts.

 

Each month, SHARE honors those in the community who give without hesitation to help others in need. Murphy was selected for this honor from the more than 1,500 SHARE volunteers in Southern Nevada.

SHARE is involved with raising funds for various social causes including housing assistance and neighborhood support service programs.

 

About SHARE:

SHARE is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1994 by business executives dedicated to providing affordable housing for individuals in need. During its nearly 20 year history, the organization has served hundreds of families, seniors, veterans and those with physical challenges or terminal illnesses. sharelasvegas.org

 

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org

 

About The Rape Crisis Center:

The Rape Crisis Center (RCC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1974 by Florence McClure and Sandra Petta as the Community Action Against Rape (CAAR) with the goal of helping those in Clark County heal from the trauma of sexual violence. Today, The Rape Crisis Center operates a 24/7 crisis hot line for sexual assault victims and provides counseling, advocacy and support to help victims begin the healing process and navigate the legal system. The RCC is also committed to the prevention of sexual assault through educational programs and community outreach. To assist victims to become survivors, the organization depends on a core base of dedicated volunteers and staff. These individuals are empathetic and enthusiastic people who give their time, energy, and personal sacrifice to continue to serve Clark County’s victims of sexual violence. This service is provided through face-to-face and over-the- phone intervention with newly victimized individuals.The Rape Crisis Center hotline number is 888-366-1640.  For more information, visit www.therapecrisiscenter.org.

 

Top 10 steps to prepare for a remodel

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Top 10 steps to prepare for a remodel

NARI offers tips in honor of National Home Improvement Month.

  

Des Plaines, Illinois, May 8, 2013—In honor of National Home Improvement Month this May, the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) advises homeowners of the 10 most important steps to take before the remodeling project starts.

“The planning and researching phases of a project are the most critical steps in the remodeling process,” says NARI National President Art Donnelly, MCR, CKBR, Legacy Builders & Remodelers Corp., based in Mount Sinai, N.Y. “The more knowledgeable and prepared a homeowner is, the more they protect themselves.”

What can a homeowner do to prepare for a remodel? NARI provides a top 10 list of steps homeowners should take before breaking ground on their next remodel.

  1. Research your project. Taking time to research projects on the Internet and NARI.org will provide a good sense of what is involved such as price, scope of work, return on investment and new product/material options. Also, research property values in your neighborhood to make sure your project is in line with other homes in the area.
  2. Plan project around the long-term. How long do you plan to stay in your home? How might your family structure change over time? Life can change quickly—these questions should be answered early on to ensure your project will fit your lifestyle long after it’s complete.
  3. Set your budget. Deciding on a realistic budget and arranging finances to support your project are essential. This number needs to include everything—the project, products, contingencies, etc. Don’t be afraid to share this with your remodeler; professionals are respectful of a client’s budget and will create a plan around it, not over it.
  4. Use advanced search for professionals. The online world makes it easy to gather information about strangers. Ask friends, family and neighbors for referrals and then spend time researching that person online. Professional remodelers take their reputation seriously and hold credentials beyond licensing, such as certifications, memberships in trade associations and additional training. Look for examples of press coverage or involvement in industry presentations or events. Check online reviews and social media to see how they interact with past clients and peers.
  5. Ask the right questions. Time and cost are important, but getting the right information requires the right questions. Ask your professional remodeler about his educational background, training, specialties or past issues with clients. Ask about how the remodeling process will work.
  6. Verify your remodeler. Don’t take their word for it. Check the information given to you such as references, license numbers, insurance information and certifications by calling providers to verify. Request a visit to an active client’s jobsite. Make it known that you are checking on him—a true professional considers that as a positive sign to working with a homeowner.
  7. Review contracts word-by-word. A remodeling contract protects you and your remodeler. Homeowners should review this carefully. Professional remodelers have done this before, and know what should go in a contract. Homeowners are not as familiar with remodeling and should ask about terms if they don’t understand. Pay attention to details about change orders, payment, additional fees, timeline and responsibilities. If it’s not in the contract, it doesn’t exist.  
  8. Keep design in mind. Your design guides the entire project. Think about what you dislike about your current space and the intended use of the new space. Use Websites such as Pinterest.com and Houzz.com to gather design ideas. Make sure you can articulate specifically what you like about that design when talking to your designer. Professionals don’t recreate a photo—they incorporate accessibility, functionality, ease of modification, style and value into your design.
  9. Make your selections. Deciding on products and materials is a larger process than most imagine. With so many options to choose from, product selections are one of the primary reasons for project timelines to get extended. Base decisions on quality, function, price, style and availability. Include selections in the contract to lock down pricing and keep your budget intact.
  10. Create a communication plan. A common downfall in remodeling is lack of communication between homeowners and remodelers. Your remodeler should lay out a communication plan at the beginning of the project. If not, ask them to do so. This plan should clarify roles of everyone involved, communication methods, availability, and frequency of communication that is expected.

As an industry that struggles with a persistent negative perception of remodeling contractors, these tips serve both the industry and consumers in elevating real professionals from the pack.

The first step to hiring a professional is through NARI, whose members are vetted and approved by industry peers to ensure they live up to the professional standards that NARI sets. “NARI members are proud of their affiliation and commitment to professionalism, and it’s a reputation they work hard to protect,” Donnelly says.

Consumers may visit www.NARI.org to find a qualified professional who is a member of NARI or call NARI National at (847) 298-9200 and request a free copy of NARI’s brochure, “How to Select a Remodeling Professional.”

Click here to see an online version of this press release.

EDITOR’S NOTE: NARI can provide hi-res digital photos of award-winning projects to accompany your story. Contact NARI with your photo request at marketing@nari.org or ask for Morgan Zenner at (847) 298-9200.

# # #

About NARI: The National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) is the only trade association dedicated solely to the remodeling industry.  The Association, which represents member companies nationwide—comprised of 63,000 remodeling contractors— is “The Voice of the Remodeling Industry.”™ To learn more about membership, visit www.NARI.org or contact national headquarters, based in Des Plaines, Ill., at (847) 298-9200.

Where Can You Find Employment For Senior Citizens? by Raymond Angus

May 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Are you trying to locate employment for senior citizens? Is it for yourself?  Has the staggering economy scared you?

Are your carefully laid plans for a pleasant tour, although perhaps not  royal, through your golden years seem to be stalling? Will employment for senior  citizens be the answer to your dilemma?

You are not alone? The same feeling is infecting your senior citizen neighbor  next door, your sixty year old friend down at the retirement center, your old  buddy in the bowling league and your aging sister in Buffalo.

The truth is, you have options! We all do. Too often, we seniors tend to feel  betrayed by our government and left to fend for ourselves at the mercy of an  indifferent panicking society. Scrub away those thoughts!

You are no different than the forty old accountant that was cut loose by his  business firm, or the thirty five year old new car salesman who is left to his  own devices. You are just older than them, but you have a lot more going for you  than they do. Most of their experiences and trained talents and skills are still  down the road in front of them. Yours are spread out in a panorama behind  you.

Look back at your life. Now is the best of times for you to make the things  you have learned over the years put you up in front of the growing crowd of  employment seekers. If you were to write down all you have experienced, dealt  with, learned from, overcame, and grown from, it would fill an entire library  shelf.

Do you think that from all of this knowledge and living you can find some  things that would increase the performance and productivity of an employers  business.

Do you realize that the sum of all your hands on training and acquired  talents and skills would be of great value to some employer?

There are wheelbarrow loads of gold nuggets kicking around in your head, my  friend. Grab hold of a few of them and transform them into that perfect job you  are now dreaming about.

It is not as hard to accomplish this as you may think!

Here is a valuable gem of knowledge and fact that should stir up the juices  inside of you.

Most vacant employment positions are not even advertised! Whoa! What does  this tell you?

There is no competition for these jobs outside of word of mouth. Why? There  are many reasons why this is so.

Maybe the job has not been defined by the manager yet, he knows that the need  exists but what will he call it? You can step in and give him a definition. Do  some advance homework.

A harried business owner is overworked and wishing for a fairy godmother to  wave her wand and provide the perfect assistant. Check out the company and tell  him how much easier you can make his life, and earn him more profit as a  byproduct.

You read an item in the newspaper, or saw it on the TV news, about a business  making substantial growth spurts. That is your cue!

Call the company and inform them all the things you can do for them, and let  them know you will be stopping by tomorrow, would he or she have time to spend a  few moments with you.

Where can you look for employment for senior citizens? In your own head! Take  advantage of your own experience and skills.

There are jobs out there waiting for you. Be creative and bold. It will  happen!

Raymond Angus is the author of http://www.TheSeniorsLife.com. He writes about how fellow  seniors find work in today’s economy. Do you want to know where the seniors’  jobs are and how to get one? Go to http://www.TheSeniorsLife.com and click on  employment/jobs/retirees.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Raymond_Angus

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3637213

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!