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New research: Cranberry concentrate reduces risk of urinary tract infections in elderly

January 22, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
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New research [1] published in the American Journal of Geriatrics shows that over 25% of bladder infections (cystitis) can be reduced with the regular use of cranberry concentrate supplements in vulnerable older people in nursing homes at high risk of urinary tract infections. Over 20% of these high-risk elderly did not develop any UTI’s at all when taking the cranberry capsule. The Public Health and Primary Care (PHEG) department of the Leiden University Medical Center conducted the one-year study in 21 Dutch nursing homes in cooperation with the supplier of cranberry concentrate Springfield Nutraceuticals.

It’s estimated that half of all women in the UK will have a UTI at least once in their life [2] with nearly 50% of vulnerable elderly people regularly suffering from UTI’s [1]. As many as 30% of all infections occurring in nursing homes in the UK are urinary tract infections [1]. The importance of preventing infections in nursing homes is paramount, many residents have fragile health and for them, an infection can have serious consequences. Furthermore, resistance of bacteria commonly found to cause urinary tract infections is becoming more frequent so antibiotic therapy is not always a solution.

Effect of Cranberries

In the one-year study, 928 people with an average age of 85 years participated [1]. During the study, cranberry capsules with a specific composition were used and compared with a placebo. The preventative effect of cranberries on urinary tract infection has been known for many years. “The Indians already knew the medicinal properties of these berries”, says Monique Caljouw PhD (PHEG). “Among other particles, these berries contain the so-called PAC-particles that prevent the adhesion of infection-causing bacteria in the bladder wall,” Prof. Dr. Jacobijn Gussekloo (PHEG) explains.

The benefits of taking other types of cranberry products is often disputed. Many people drink cranberry juice when they have cystitis. Cranberry juice has a sour taste and patients – especially the elderly – often fail to drink a glass twice a day, for an extended period. Using sweetened juice for a long period of time is not desirable because of the high levels of sugar used in most cranberry juices to mask the sour taste. Caljouw and Gussekloo found the use of the cranberry supplement an effective method to prevent urinary tract infections. Other prevention methods are less appropriate. “Vitamin C does not seem to work and cranberry juice has its disadvantages. The administration of a low dose of antibiotics causes resistance.” “Cranberry capsules are therefore appropriate,” says PhD Caljouw.

In this study the cranberry supplement used contains the whole cranberry: skin, seeds, pulp, juice and fiber which previous research has shown is preferable to those which do not contain the whole fruit. It also has a patented manufacturing process that provides a bioactive protection to all parts of the cranberry avoiding destruction by gastric acid.

Danger of Antibiotic Resistance

Because of excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics, an increasing number of… continue reading here:  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/271491.php

Senior Citizen Assisted Living Can Help Baby Boomers Keep Their Independence by Susan Elizabeth

August 2, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Elderly-Couple-Walks-Retirement

Reaching your golden years is a great accomplishment. It is in fact one of the best things about living in the times that we do. There are so many opportunities and activities available now that did not exist previously, that it is almost impossible to take advantage of them all.

Senior citizen assisted living is one of those ideas that has come of age in a time when there are more people than ever who are retiring. The baby boomer group is the largest demographic group on the planet and many of them are reaching retirement age right now.

This has created a need for all manners of senior retirement arrangements that range all the way from complete and total care, kind of like the nursing homes used to be, through senior assisted living facilities which help seniors maintain all the independence they can for as long as is possible, to active adult retirement communities where often the primary focus is one golf or some other sport.

This range of choices is absolutely unprecedented in our society. Not only that, but with the touch of a few buttons on the computer keyboard, the internet springs to life and brings you tons of information about all these various living arrangements so you can decide exactly what kind of facility you need.

Assisted living facilities do a great job of tailoring specific service plans for their residents. This means that each person gets the care they need on an individual planned out basis. The goal is to not change the senior person’s lifetime of habits or lifestyle but still make it possible for them to receive the care they need to live a great and fulfilling life.

There are many of these facilities in many locations and each of them is a little different in what they have to offer their residents. The types and levels of services offered can be quite different one state to another, and because the industry is overseen more by the individual states rather than the federal government, it is important to make sure that the kind of care you need is available in an assisted living facility in the state that you are thinking of living in.

It is not that any of the care is worse in some states than in others, it’s just that the laws and regulations are a bit different. But as fare as getting the help you might need when you are living in a senior citizen assisted living community, all of them deliver exactly what you need. And not more than you need.

The goal is always is keep the most amount of independence possible and in the retirement community world, the assisted living facilities do the best job overall of juggling between providing care and maintaining independence.

Susan is a full fledged baby boomer and avid internet researcher who writes about active retirement communities and other baby boomer topics on her site at www.second50years.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Susan_Elizabeth

Choosing A Nursing Home For Your Parents

July 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

nursing-home-abuse

CHOOSING A NURSING HOME FOR YOUR PARENT

So many of the most important decisions we make in life are made when we are least prepared to make them.   So it is, when the time comes to choose whether, or which nursing home facility in which to place an aging parent.  It’s estimated that 60% of nursing home admissions are made from a hospital, rather than from a home, or an assisted living facility.  Your loved one may have suffered a broken a hip or a stroke, or may be suffering from dementia.  The time constraints in this type of situation press care givers to make a quick decision regarding care of their love one, without the luxury of investigation and due diligence that such a decision deserves.

We will attempt in this post, to review resources which are available to help you make a decision of this kind, whether the situation is a hurried one or not.  Making such a decision depends, in large measure, on the condition of the parent and what types of care or treatment will be required for their individual circumstances.  It will largely depend on whether they are injured due to a broken hip, or other disabling condition, suffering from Alzheimer’s or other form of dementia, or other conditions.

There is a growing amount of information available online to assist in this process.  At the federal government level, there are many resources to assist.  The website, http://www.eldercare.gov/eldercare.NET/Public/index.aspx is a good place to begin.  You can either search by location or by topic to find resources available in your state or city.  There are a large number of resources listed on this site which address many of the concerns and problems faced by care givers to our aging populations.

Additionally, to assist with evaluating potential nursing homes, a publication called, Your Guide to Choosing a Nursing Home, (http://www.medicare.gov/pubs/pdf/02174.pdf)  presents a fairly complete outline of considerations when attempting to evaluate a place for an aging parent.   Subjects such as “Choosing the Type of Care You Need” to “Steps to Choosing a Nursing Home” are included.  The Nursing Home Checklist (http://www.medicare.gov/nursing/checklist.asp) will also provide many ideas for evaluating and screening potential facilities.

The federal government also funds state level Ombudsmen to assist in these matters.  The National Long-Term Care Ombudsman Resource Center website (http://www.aging.state.nv.us/) will allow you to find these resources in your state.  For Nevada, that contact information can be found here. (http://www.aging.state.nv.us/)  The Las Vegas office of the Ombudsman can be called at (702) 486-3545.  Concerns ranging from finding an appropriate care facility to reporting cases of elder abuse can be directed to the State Ombudsman’s office.

Among non-government agencies, there are many advocacy groups that can also provide assistance.  The Consumer Voice provides a Guide to Choosing a Nursing Home .

http://www.theconsumervoice.org/sites/default/files/advocate/A-Consumer-Guide-To-Choosing-A-Nursing-Home.pdf ) This organization also provides private ombudsman services to families and residents of nursing facilities.  Another privately funded website provides a registry and grading of nursing homes is http://www.memberofthefamily.net/.  This site provides listings of Medicare and Medicaid certified nursing homes and grades various aspects of the operations of the nursing home.

Beyond these and other resources that you may uncover in your search for a nursing home, many of the considerations you may want or need to consider have to do with costs.  Medicare will only pay for medically necessary care in a nursing home.  It will not pay for non-medical everyday assistance with normal living.  If your loved one needs assistance with walking or eating, these things are not covered.  Most nursing home costs are paid out of personal savings, social security benefits, Long Term Care (LTC)  insurance benefits, or Medicaid if the patient qualifies.  Nursing home costs are estimated to average $200 per day for patients, and this doesn’t include cost for treatment needed for additional services, such as dementia care, for example.  Long Term Care insurance must be purchased and in force, prior to your loved one’s need for services.

Once you’ve done the initial research, nothing replaces visiting the facility and seeing for yourself.  Visit often and at various unexpected times, to be sure that the facility is the type of environment you would want your parent or loved one to be exposed to.  Considerations include turnover rate of personnel in the home.  Does the home offer “consistent assignment” which means do nurses and aids treat the same patients on most of their shifts.  Consistency and familiarity are important considerations for your loved one.  Relationships built between patient and nursing home staff can provide a measure of security for your loved one.  If a home employs a high number of temporary workers, or turnover is high, that consistency can be lost.

Four items to think about in any nursing home placement include, how convenient is the home to all family members, quality of care for chronic conditions including dementia and/or physical disability, supportive environment for the potential resident, and do costs fall within an affordable range.  And once this decision is made and your parent or grandparent is now in such a facility, keeping an eye open for negligence or even abuse is important.  Unfortunately, this is a growing problem as our population ages and requires higher levels of care.  So if such a thing should happen to your loved one, the services of a trusted attorney may be required.  Our firm does provide such services, and more information can be found here.  (http://www.richardharrislaw.com/personal-injury/nevada-nursing-home-abuse-lawyer.php)

Additional resources:

http://www.medicare.gov/pubs/pdf/02174.pdf

http://www.medicare.gov/nursing/checklist.asp

http://www.theconsumervoice.org/sites/default/files/advocate/A-Consumer-Guide-To-Choosing-A-Nursing-Home.pdf

http://www.memberofthefamily.net/

http://www.eldercare.gov/Eldercare.NET/Public/Index.aspx

http://www.ltcombudsman.org/

http://health.usnews.com/health-news/best-nursing-homes/articles/2013/02/26/how-to-choose-a-nursing-home

http://guides.wsj.com/health/elder-care/how-to-choose-a-nursing-home/

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/20/health/20patient.html?ref=health&_r=0

http://www.richardharrislaw.com/personal-injury/nevada-nursing-home-abuse-lawyer.php

 

 

Quality of Nation’s Nursing Homes Improving under Five-Star Quality Rating System

July 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Quality of Nation’s Nursing Homes Improving under Five-Star Quality Rating System

Three States Lagging, Study Finds

DURHAM, NCThe quality of nursing homes has improved in most states and in the District of Columbia since the 2008 implementation of the Five-Star Quality Rating System by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), an Abt Associates’ analysis finds.

The study shows that between 2009 and 2011, the percentage of nursing homes with an overall five-star rating, or much better than average quality, increased in all but three states and the proportion with a one-star rating, or much below average quality, dropped as well. There are more than 15,500 nursing homes in the country, and all of them are rated with between one and five stars.

“Between 2009 and 2011, the percentage of nursing homes with a four- or five-star rating grew in every state except for Hawaii, Montana, and Idaho,” said Alan White, Ph.D., a principal associate at Abt Associates who worked with CMS to develop the rating system. “While we don’t know the extent to which the existence of the rating system itself has led to this improvement, most nursing home operators pay close attention to their ratings and seem to be motivated to improve them. Some use their ratings as part of their marketing efforts, branding their facilities as ‘five-star’ nursing homes.”

White said the Five-Star Quality Rating System was created to help consumers, their families, and caregivers more easily compare nursing homes when visiting CMS’s Nursing Home Compare website.  There they can learn about a facility’s overall performance rating and how it performs in three separate domains—health inspection surveys, staffing, and quality measures. The ratings are updated monthly.

While there has been an 8% increase in four-and five-star facilities in overall performance nationwide between 2009 and 2011, five states stand out as experiencing the greatest change in their proportion of nursing homes with a four- and five-star overall rating. These are Delaware, Tennessee, Georgia, Oregon and Indiana. The percentage of Delaware’s five-star facilities jumped by nearly 23%; Tennessee’s by about 16%; Georgia’s by nearly 15%; and Oregon’s and Indiana’s each by about 14%.

In addition to overall performance, the study provides state ratings in each of the performance domains. Health inspection ratings are drawn from standard and complaint surveys over three years, White said, explaining that nursing homes are inspected every 12 months on average to ensure they are following state and federal regulations.

“The inspection surveys provide a comprehensive assessment of the nursing home, examining such areas as kitchen/food service, medication management, proper skin care, and the safety, functionality, cleanliness and comfort of the environment.” White said.  “If an inspection team finds that a nursing home doesn’t meet a specific standard, it issues a deficiency citation, and the health inspection rating is based on the number and severity of deficiencies cited by surveyors.”

The staffing rating, said White, is based on the number of hours of care on average provided to each resident each day by nursing staff.  “The ratings consider differences in how sick the nursing home residents are in each nursing home, since that makes a difference in how many staff members are needed.”

The quality measures rating is an assessment of nine different physical and clinical measures for nursing home residents that indicates how well nursing homes perform on important dimensions of care related to each resident’s functioning and health status.

While the Five-Star Quality Rating System can help consumers, their families and caregivers compare nursing homes more easily, White cautioned that it cannot address all of the considerations that go into deciding which nursing home is best for a particular individual. “The rating system is an excellent tool but it should be used in combination with other sources of information, including an onsite visit, in making nursing home placement decisions,” he said.

If you would like to interview Dr. Alan White, please contact Sandy Cogan at (301) 347-5913 or (202) 617-0123 or sandy_cogan@abtassoc.com.

About Abt Associates

Abt Associates is a mission-driven, global leader in research and program implementation in the fields of health, social and environmental policy, and international development. Known for its rigorous approach to solving complex challenges, Abt Associates is regularly ranked as one of the top 20 global research firms and one of the top 40 international development innovators.  The company has multiple offices in the U.S. and program offices in more than 40 countries. www.abtassociates.com

CONTACT:

Sandy Cogan

Sandy_Cogan@abtassoc.com

301-347-5913

Senior Citizen Housing Choices Are Ready For Today’s Baby Boomer Retirees by Susan Elizabeth

July 3, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

When it comes time to retire from work, there are some significant choices that you will need to make. One of them is whether you will continue to get up at the same time in the morning as when you had to go to work. Most people opt to not get up as early, but some still like doing that because it is such a habit.

Another choice is about where you want to live after retirement. It isn’t like anyone is saying you have to leave your house if you don’t want to, but many people think that finding an alternative kind of senior citizen housing is more appropriate than where they currently live.

There are so many baby boomers who are retiring right now, that there has been kind of a boom in the amount of places available for seniors to live in. There are a great amount of active retirement communities and assisted living facilities and even more and more nursing homes for people who need a lot of extra help.

But as far as where you are supposed to live, that is something that is completely up to the individual. And that kind of choice is one of the big characteristics of baby boomers; expecting to have a large amount of choice over their lives. That idea of being in charge of your own life certainly has not changed appreciably in any way since back when the boomers were in college.

In general, there are three choices in senior housing. These are identified by the amount of extra nursing and personal care that the residents require throughout the day. The active senior communities are where the folks live who need the least amount of extra personal care during the day. These are often based around sports like golf or tennis and have very active people living there.

The nursing home setups are where the people live who need the most extra assistance. These are staffed by nurses and doctors 24 hours a day and the people who live there need the most amount of extra care during the day.

In the middle are the assisted living facilities where people who need just a small amount of extra personal or nursing care live. This can be a place like a senior apartment complex or an entire community full of small homes where the residents live.

But no matter what amount of extra assistance a person needs after retirement, the internet can certainly help you find the best senior citizen housing option for you and your particular situation.

Susan is a full fledged baby boomer and avid internet researcher who writes about senior retirement communities and other baby boomer topics on her site at www.second50years.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Susan_Elizabeth

 

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

At a time when thousands of Baby Boomers are reaching the age of 65 every day, the issues of senior rights, elder laws, and anti-ageism have never been more important, more volatile, or more questioned. After all, this is the generation that was ready to take down the establishment fifty years ago, and they haven’t lost any of their desire to change the world for the better. And, they have the numbers to do it. Here are our 100 top blogs for seniors dealing with senior rights, law & policy, and anti-ageism.

Boomers Against The Law

  1. Elder Law Plus: lawyer Evan H. Farr blogs about topics concerning elder law, including probate strategies and parental care.
  2. Michigan Elder Law Blog: the attorneys at Barsch & Joswick provide seniors and their loved ones with sage advice on a variety of Elder law issues.
  3. Everything Elder Law: Evan Farr is back at it again, this time focusing on Elder Law news, concepts, and innovations from around the country.
  4. Massachusetts Estate and Elder Law Blog: lawyer and blogger Stephanie Konarski gives tips on estate planning and other elder law topics.
  5. New York Elder Law Attorney Blog: your source for elder law news and comment in New York, this blog analyzes nursing home legislation and elder care costs.
  6. Elder Law Prof. Blog: Elder Law professor Kim Dayton authors a really nice blog that covers a wide range of Elder law issues, from Supreme Court cases to seminars.
  7. The Pop Tort: can a consumer advocates blog dealing with civil justice be cute? This blog proves it can, complete with an adorable “Pop Tort” logo, even while exploring such issues as Medicare and Medicaid lawsuits, nursing home scams, and medical malpractice against the elderly, among other legal issues.
  8. Supportive Senior Solutions: this blog from a geriatric care management practice in New York covers issues related to geriatric care, caregiving, and healthcare laws for the elderly and infirm.
  9. Aging Beats the Alternative: elder care specialist Lorie Ebers uses her blog to talk about overcoming the challenges of aging, caring for aging parents, and the less talked about side of elder law: Boomer divorce.
  10. Elder Law Blog: lawyer Ronald C. Morton’s elder law blog is full of sage advice for seniors looking how to tap into Veteran’s benefits, how to plan for their golden years, and more.
  11. The Best Elder Law Blog: published by the attorneys at Lamson & Cutner, this blog discusses elder law cases, the Affordable Care Act, and same-sex marriage.
  12. Elder Law Tips and News: the lawyers at Cooper, Adel & Associates bring you posts on living trusts, aging issues, and general estate planning.
  13. The Connecticut Elder Law Blog: lawyer Michael Keenan provides his readers with estate planning tips, elder fraud, and Medicare rules.
  14. The Teddy Bear Lawyers: attorney Rick Law gives readers a great resource for Elder Law in the Chicagoland area. Find articles on protecting vulnerable seniors and financial planning.
  15. Oregon Elder Law: attorney Orrin Onken blogs on elder law, estate planning, and probate proceedings in plain, easy to understand language.
  16. Florida Elder Law and Estate Blog: this informative blog includes great articles on VA benefits, estate planning, and trusts.
  17. Golden Law Center: written by attorney Sasha Golden, the Golden Law Center blog discusses elder law, special needs planning, guardianship, wills and trusts, and estate administration.
  18. Kraft Elder Law: attorney Robert Kraft blogs about Medicaid, Medicare, wills, trusts, probate, veterans benefits, and other elder law topics.
  19. Pennsylvania Law Blog: this elder law blog by the attorneys at the law offices of Shober & Rock discusses Medicaid, taxes, Veterans, banks, and annuities.
  20. Long Beach Elder Law Blog: this blog focuses on elder abuse, estate protection, the Cal MediConnect program, and reform of health law.
  21. Houston Elder Law Blog: the folks at Wright Abshire Attorneys blog about care planning, estate planning, Medicaid Planning, Probate & Estate Administration, and and Veteran’s Benefits.
  22. Hauptman Law Blog: readers of this blog can learn more about elder, estate, and special needs law. Includes articles on the Medicare Settlement and VA Aid.
  23. Fulkerson Elder Law Blog: the function of this elder law blog is for the firm to respond to common questions clients have about elder law and review developments in the law impacting elder law and estate planning.
  24. CMLP Estate Planning and Elder Law Blog: readers can look forward to reviewing articles on simplifying their estate plan and elder law news items of note.
  25. Massachusetts Estate Planning and Probate Blog: attorney Matthew Karr keeps readers up to date on estate planning and probate news and information.
  26. Marshall Elder and Estate Planning Blog: the author of this elder law blog has over 30 years experience in estate planning, special needs planning, and estates.
  27. Hartford, CT Elder Law Blog: the attorney’s at Ruggiero Ziogas & Allaire discuss estate planning, care planning, Medicaid, Veteran’s Benefits, and Probate.
  28. El Paso Elder Law Blog: the law firm of Stephanie Townsend Allala and Associates blogs on estate planning, guardianships, Medicaid Planning, Nursing Home Abuse, and Trust & Probate.
  29. Miami Probate Law Blog: the folks at the Byrant law firm keep readers up-to-date on estate administration, probate court, estate litigation, and the nuisances of will and trust disputes.
  30. Elder Law News: attorney Brian A. Raphan is based in New York City and specializes in Wills, Estates, Trusts, and Elder Care issues. His blog is full of great resources.
  31. Aging & Law in West Virginia: this blog contains news in law and aging in West Virginia, written by the West Virginia Senior Legal Aid organization.
  32. Florida Elder Law and Estate Planning: this Florida Certified Elder Law attorney provides in depth insights and news to help Floridians protect themselves and preserve their assets.
  33. Family Law Blog Maryland: while this blog looks at all matters pertaining to Family Law, elder law sneaks in as a prevalent theme in many of the cases discussed. They look at legal matters like when divorce and retirement coincide, or when grandparents wish to take custody of their grandchildren.
  34. Phoenix AZ Family Law Blog: looking at issues older couples face in Arizona, this family law blog explores the specific challenges elders face in divorces and custody battles, complete with the latest policy changes and laws.
  35. Otherspoon: hospice volunteer and blogger Ann Neumann talks about care-giving and the realities, politics, and senior rights involved in death and dying.

Seniors Talk Policy And Politics

  1. Aging in Place: this blog is concerned with seniors who are dealing with shrinking benefits and increasing costs—seniors find answers on how to protect themselves.
  2. Estate in Denial: providing news, analysis, and commentary on abusive practices occurring in probate courts. Features original perspective and direct communication.
  3. Florida Estate Planning Lawyer Blog: this blog covers estate planning legal issues, cases of interest, and news with a focus on Florida elder law.
  4. McGuire Woods: the people at McGuire Woods author this great blog on long term care legal issues, including timely news, articles, and white papers.
  5. Illinois Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: published by the law office of Wilson & Wilson, this blog covers asset protection, banking, estate planning, and trusts.
  6. Illinois Nursing Home Abuse Blog: covers Illinois nursing home law, including Supreme Court cases and other information relating to residents and family members.
  7. Law Office of Donald D. Vanarelli Blog: provides readers in New Jersey with information on elder law, estate and special needs planning, and mediation services.
  8. Maryland Nursing Home Lawyer Blog: this blog offers insight on nursing home abuse reports, legislation, and legal opinions of elder law in Maryland.
  9. Massachusetts Estate Planning, Probate & Elder Law: elder law attorney Brian Barreira writes on legal issues involving death, taxes, special needs, and long-term elder care.
  10. New Jersey Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: blog posts explore life and death in New Jersey from a perspective of estate planning, elder law, taxation, probate, and estate administration.
  11. Medina Law Group: postings provide readers with advice on estate planning and management, estate taxes, elder law, and VA benefits.
  12. North Carolina Wills and Trusts: this blog provides readers with estate planning and elder law news with a North Carolina focus.
  13. California Nursing Home Abuse Law Blog: covers nursing home abuse, elder law abuse, and features many quality articles relating to California elder law.
  14. Nursing Home Law Blog: this well written blog discusses elder issues, legislation, legal news, protections of elder rights, and helpful health tips.
  15. PA Elder Estate and Fiduciary Law Blog: focuses on elder law, long-term care, end-of-life and health care surrogate decision-making, and estate planning.
  16. Patti’s Blog: find information about this lawyer’s practice, which concentrates on advocacy for seniors. She shares personal interests and her passions.
  17. Pennsylvania Nursing Home Abuse Lawyer Blog: this blog discusses nursing home abuse laws, cases, and news items from Pennsylvania.
  18. Barbara Cashman Blog: Barbara blogs about elder law and policy issues, and often hosts guest bloggers to share their insights on elder law and news.
  19. NJ Elder Law: lawyer Kenneth Vercammen blogs about topics related to estate planning and elder law. He was once awarded the NJ State Bar Municipal Court Practitioner of the Year.
  20. The Senior Sentinel: a blog compiling news and information for Baby Boomers, the Senior Sentinel concentrates on the intersection of ageism and public policy both nationally and world-wide.
  21. Elder Consult: this geriatric medicine blog not only covers Alzheimers, dementia, financial decision making, and medications, it also discusses related legal issues such as elder financial abuse.
  22. Grey Pride: a UK blog by the Anchor Digital Marketing team is dedicated to keeping older people at the top of the political agenda and petitioning the government to create a Minister for Older People to ensure their needs are met.
  23. Over 65 Blog: project organizers from Harvard, Yale, and The Hastings Center host this blog for “seniors seeking solutions for health care and security, mainly looking at health care system reforms, elder law policies and practices, and how seniors can achieve a stronger role in the future of health care.
  24. Reaping Hope Blog: a blog from an NGO in Nepal promoting dignified aging and elder rights, Reaping Hope explores elder abuse and elder oppression while actively helping elderly people claim their rights and challenge discrimination.

Age Against The Machine: Anti-Ageism

  1. Ageist Beauty: the musings, product reviews, and random thoughts of a woman who is fighting against her age.
  2. Everyday Ageism Project: this blog aims to capture people’s everyday experiences dealing with ageism. The author has discovered that ageism is the most commonly experienced form of prejudice.
  3. The Lonely Gerontologist: professor Kelly Yokum blogs about all things aging—including aging stereotypes and other aging topics that come to mind.
  4. My Elder Advocate: this blog provides comprehensive coverage of ageism, the dangers of nursing homes, elder abuse, and elder care.
  5. The Roaming Boomers: David and Carol are great examples of a couple who doesn’t let age get in the way of living life to the fullest.
  6. The Gypsy Nester: Veronica and David show readers how to rock the empty nest and get the most out of life as you age.
  7. Changing Aging: this multi-blog platform challenges conventional views on aging. The authors believe aging is a strength, rich in developmental potential and growth.
  8. The Elders: founded by Nelson Mandela in 2007, the Elders is a group of seniors committed to addressing global challenges, including child marriage and climate change.
  9. Beauty and Wisdom: the blog of photographer Robbie Kaye, who traveled to salons throughout the US to photograph and interview women in their 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s and discovered that beauty is ageless.
  10. Advanced Style: don’t tell these women they are too old to model hip and alluring fashions. This blog teaches women how to dress to impress and that age is only a number.
  11. RL TV: the only cable network and online destination for folks 50+, features a nice blog that provides tips on elder issues and promotes active living.
  12. The 70-Something Blog: blogger Judy informs readers how to live a full and engaging life as she chronicles her journey of aging.
  13. Retirement is Work: newly retired librarian and blogger resolves to post one good thing about retirement every day for a year, but along the way struggles with senior rights and anti-ageism.
  14. Yo Is This Ageist?: a humorous blog by Ashton Applewhite dedicated to determining whether age-related remarks are offensive, “challenging the stereotypes that segregate us by age.”
  15. This Chair Rocks: a smart and sassy blog by Ashton Applewhite that challenges the ideas of ageism with humor and snark. All stereotypes and insensitive remarks are grounds for brilliant blog posts.
  16. Senior Planet: “aging with attitude” is the tagline of this blog community of older adults using technology to connect with each other and take on the issues of ageism and senior rights.
  17. Changing Aging: a blog founded by Dr. Bill Thomas to promote “a radical reinterpretation of longevity” which focuses on anti-ageism and senior rights, as well as getting the most out of a long life.
  18. Time Goes By: Ronni Bennett takes on aging, ageism and related issues with humor, exploring the truth of “what it’s really like to get old.” She starts by rejecting the “cutesy” terms for old people – they’re called “elders” around here!
  19. The Magic of Middle-Aged Women: author Daniel Even Weiss – a man – blogs on the theme of his latest book, The Magic of Middle-Aged Women, where he challenges the prevailing ageist idea that women don’t get better as they age. They do.
  20. Advanced Style: Ari Seth Cohen, a young-ish photographer, roams the New York City streets photographing stylish and creative elders. Here, art challenges the paradigm that age and beauty can’t co-exist.
  21. The New Old Age: the New York Times blog on aging takes advantage of the newspaper’s top writers to explore the unprecedented intergenerational challenge of the Baby Boomers.
  22. The Little Old Lady Stays Put (or doesn’t): explores the “lives, lifestyles and issues of interesting older people,” touching on the issues surrounding ageism, elder rights, living with dementia, and overcoming the struggles of aging with strength and good humor.
  23. Naked at Our Age: advocate of ageless sexuality, Joan Price, talks about sex and aging, taking on Senior Rights subjects like safer sex for seniors while providing helpful tips.
  24. Aging & Work at Boston College: scholars, academics, and researchers share their findings on ageism in the workplace and the challenges aging workers face in this PhD-heavy blog by The Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College.
  25. Ethnic Elders: this newsy blog by New America Media examines the Senior Rights issues and Elder Law of minority groups such as age discrimination, lawsuits related to Social Security, and elder healthcare reform.
  26. The Everyday Ageism Project: blending blogging and research, this site’s goal is to capture the experience of age discrimination. The forum is full of people sharing their experiences in a supportive environment.
  27. Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens Blog: the Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens sub-blog offers wide ranging posts on issues including senior rights and ageism – with its signature left-wing perspective.
  28. Clinical Geriatrics: created as more of a peer-reviewed clinical journal by the American Geriatrics Society, some of the top scholars in geriatrics converge on this blog to discuss geriatric health and wellness issues, which often cross over into legal and anti-ageism issues.
  29. Age Action Alliance: this organization brings together a network of 300 organizations and individuals committed to helping older people. Its blog is dedicated to improving older people’s lives through advocating against ageism, particularly in Britain.
  30. Manitoba Senior Centres: this Canadian blog covers the rampant ageism in Canada and promotes world elder abuse awareness. It also has a list of resources for older adults.
  31. Fierce with Age: defying ageism goes mainstream at this blog, created by veteran journalist Dr. Carol Orsborn. Having written about the Boomer generation for major newspapers and blogged for the Huffington Post and NPR’s Next Avenue, Orsborn is well equipped to take on the spiritual and policy hurdles of aging.
  32. Live Better Boomer!: a Philadelphia-based blog, by social worker Tiffany Matthews, devoted to helping educate and empower Boomers advocate for their own improved healthcare.
  33. Third Age: billed as “health for Boomers and beyond,” Third Age offers relatively fluffy fare, like “Change your Mood with Color,” to the legal issues surrounding Boomer divorce and care-giving.
  34. The Old Gunhand: one facet of senior citizen rights you don’t see every day is elder gun advocates. This website not only tells you the best types of guns for elderly wielders, it also goes into gun policy and senior self-defense.
  35. Age Discrimination Info: a simple name for a one-stop source of statistics and information on age discrimination, including legislation, cases, news, publications, events and training. The perfect resource for the activist.
  36. Age UK: the largest organization in the United Kingdom for working with and for older people, this website has an entire section dedicated to age discrimination and ageism.
  37. National Youth Rights Association: not just for youngsters, the National Youth Rights Association combats ageism in all its forms. In fact, they probably wouldn’t appreciate being called “youngsters.”
  38. Disability and Representation: a blog by writer, photographer and activist Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg that discusses (and tries to change the discourse about) disability rights and ageism, along with autism.
  39. Over 50: Career coaching and workshops for the over-50 crowd, this blog doesn’t stop at finding a job. This site explores Baby Boomer activism in and out of the workplace.
  40. Activist Post: while this blog deals with many topics requiring advocacy, they often include issues that regard Senior Rights, Elder Law and anti-ageism.
  41. California Booming: an informational blog dedicated to California Baby Boomers, this blog covers everything from sex, to diet, to politics of the Boomer generation, including issues concerning senior rights and ageism in the workplace.

Respecting The Rights Of Senior Citizens – 4 Factors To Pick The Right Care Facility For The Elderly by Abhishek Agarwal

June 4, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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There is no formal ‘Senior Citizens Bill of Rights’, but as individuals, senior citizens are entitled to their rights. However, the senior citizens have little energy left in them in their old age to fight for their rights and therefore, it is the duty of the children to see that their elderly parents are getting what they are rightfully entitled to.

Every right must be claimed to be deemed as a right. There are laws in existence for the running of nursing homes for the elderly and retirement communities. Even if your elderly mom or dad is in an assisted care facility, there are certain laws that are fundamental and expected to be followed by these care facilities too. It is your duty as a caregiver to see that they are following the laws and living up to the expectations.

There are some factors that you must verify before selecting a facility for your elderly parents:

– Ensure that the facility will provide the basic cleanliness and safety. Check out the evacuation plans in place, in case of an emergency situation. Verify whether the evacuation plan is a workable one, considering the fact that the facility may be full of elderly and invalids who may be slow in moving out of the building in case of a fire. Find out if there is emergency power available to operate the automatic doors and elevators so that everyone can get out safely.

– If food is provided by the facility, ensure that meals will be provided three times a day. The meals should be healthy and the food should be delivered to the room if your parent is disabled or injured. There should be some variety in the diet and since there is a separate charge for the food, it is not wrong to expect some quality and variety in the food.

– If your parent has moved to an assisted care facility, they have every right to live as they wish in that apartment, since they have paid for it. However, they have to observe certain restrictions because they are living in a community setting. They should be able to live without any interference from the staff of the facility and have the freedom to select the décor of the apartment or have family and friends to visit.

– Another fundamental right of a senior citizen is to be treated with compassion, respect and dignity. Although this is not a tangible right, how the staff at the facility treats the elderly is an important aspect in the selection of a facility for your parents. The staff of the facility must be respectful and pleasant in their dealings with your parents. If your parent complains of any emotional or verbal abuse, you must investigate and hold the facility accountable for it.

As a primary caregiver, responsible for the well being of your elderly parents, you have the right to remind the assisted care facility of their responsibilities. Ensure that your parents are getting the service and care that they paid for and that they are comfortable in their living quarters and enjoying their stay there.

Abhishek successfully runs an Old Age Home and he has got some great Eldercare Secrets up his sleeves! Download his FREE 80 Page Ebook, “How To Take Great Care Of Elders” from his website http://www.Senior-Guides.com/560/index.htm. Only limited Free Copies available.

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Senior Citizen Assisted Living Facilities by David Crumrine

May 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Assisted living is an alternative living arrangement for senior citizens requiring moderate elder care, including help with activities like eating, getting dressed, bathing, and using the bathroom as opposed to the more intensive care provided in nursing homes. This type of care serves as an intermediate between in home care for the elderly and the elder care provided by a nursing home. Facilities for this type of living may be in connection with retirement communities, nursing homes, home health care agencies, or complexes for senior citizens, or they may be separate facilities. This type of elder care is known by many names, such as residential care, board and care, congregate care, and personal care.

Assisted Living Facilities

When looking for an assisted living facility, you can usually expect to have your own room or apartment, provided meals, a staff of caregivers for support, and some or all of the following services:

  • housekeeping and laundry
  • security
  • recreational activities and exercise
  • transportation
  • guidance and monitoring of health care
  • reminders about or help taking medication
  • support with dressing, bathing, and eating

Choosing the Right Assisted Living Community

 

With these ideas in mind, it is important to choose the right facility for you. Each facility may have different ideologies of caring for the elderly, so not every facility may be a match for the kind of care and services you are looking for. When searching for elder care in an assisted living facility, there are a number of ways to determine whether a certain place will provide you with the comfort, security, and level of care you need:

  • Think about your future needs and determine whether the facility can provide the right kind of care for those needs.
  • Figure out whether the facility is near family, friends, and shopping centers or other businesses you’d like to walk to.
  • Are there admission and retention policies that do not allow people with severe cognitive impairments or physical disabilities to live there?
  • Is there a written statement of the philosophy of elder care of the facility, and do you agree with it?
  • Make more than one trip to each facility you are considering, sometimes unannounced.
  • Try to make some of those trips during mealtimes to check out the quality of food and service to the residents.
  • Take note of interactions between residents and those providing the elder care.
  • Ask whether each facility offers social, recreational, and spiritual activities based on your interests.
  • Talk to residents.
  • Find out what kind of training caregivers receive and how often they are trained.
  • Review state licensing reports.

Researching Assisted Living Centers

 

If you have concerns after performing some of the preceding suggestions-or if you would simply like to be thorough in your search-you may also wish to consider the following:

  • Call your state’s long-term care ombudsman as well as the local Better Business Bureau to ask about recently issued complaints against the facilities you are considering.
  • If a facility is connected to a nursing home or home health care agency, you may want to find out more its counterpart. You can find information about nursing homes on the Medicare website (www.medicare.gov/nhcompare/home.asp).

Assisted Living Financial Considerations for Seniors

 

Another aspect of assisted living facilities to consider is cost. Assisted living is generally less expensive than nursing home care, but more expensive the in home care for the elderly. The usual range is anywhere from $10,000 per year to over $50,000 per year, so it is important to know what you can afford and how much each facility costs. Another thing to know is that there may be fees not included in the basic rate. It will be helpful to figure out how much extra you will have to pay to live in a certain home.

Insurance may help cover some of these costs, but usually charges are covered primarily by the senior citizens who decide to live in these residences or family members responsible for their elder care. Some facilities also offer financial assistance programs, which you may want to inquire about.

Medicare does not cover the costs of these residences or the elder care provided there. Medicaid-the joint federal and state program that helps senior citizens and people with disabilities pay for health care when they are unable to afford it-may cover the service component of assisted living in certain states.

It is important to consider the different options in elder care. If cost is a concern, it may be helpful to consider in home care for senior citizens. This type of elder care may provide sufficient care for your needs in the comfort of your own home. If the degree of elder care provided by in home care or an assisted living facility does not meet your needs, consider a nursing home.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

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Senior Citizens Assisted Living Options by Sean Lightfoot

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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A recent study on seniors has shown that independent senior citizens assisted  living is the #1 choice for them versus living with a loved one. Most people  feel that living with others would cause them to be a burden on them. As an  individual grows older, they begin to need the assistance of others more and  more.

Unlike a decade ago, seniors have become a part of the information age by  learning about computers and the latest gadgets. Due to this fact, there has be  a flux of new state-of-the-art senior facilities catering to computer savvy  seniors.

Many of the senior citizens that have just retired from jobs that required  them to work with computers prefer to continue to be around computers as they  have become accustomed. Senior citizens assisted living facilities that make a  point to stay up to date, helps those seniors feel right at home.

In recent years senior facilities have began to offer many different options  and services to their residents. So much so that these facilities are now  categorized into 3 major groups.

Nursing Homes – For those that are incapacitated and/or require supervised or  administered medicines. These facilities have full-time medical staff on hand in  case of emergencies.

Assisted Living – This type of facility caters to those that need assistance  with their daily routines such as cleaning, shopping, laundry and cooking.

Independent Living – Independent living is good for those that can live  totally independent and is still able to cook and clean. Some seniors start out  by moving to one of these facilities and relocate as their needs change later  on. The units are usually fully furnished apartments with full kitchens.

There are many more options available to seniors so it is highly advised that  one turns to a professional advisor to assist in seeking the facility and  services that are needed. There are professionals that offer these services free  of charge. They give you a list of facilities that can cater to your needs and  help with visiting and checking out each of them. They usually make money from  your insurance company of the facility that is chosen.

If you need help with researching Senior Citizen Assisted Living  [http://www.elderlyhelpandhomes.com/], visit www.elderlyhelpandhomes.com  [http://www.elderlyhelpandhomes.com/]. Learn about a FREE program that assists  in finding the services that you or your loved one may needs.

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Take Better Care of Yourself in 2013-and do it sitting down!

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Most healthcare professionals would agree that taking better care of yourself in the New Year is one of the best resolutions one could make. Resolving to routinely exercise is one of the best ways to accomplish that—even for people living with limited mobility. And to help get that exercise, The SCOOTER Store, along with Mary Ann Wilson, RN, founder, executive director and host of the PBS TV show, Sit and Be Fit™, have put together a complimentary, 32-page booklet with a series of exercises. This booklet includes full-color illustrations for exercises covering most every area of the body—from neck to core muscles and down to your toes.

“Exercise is one of the greatest gifts you can give yourself,” according to Wilson. “No matter what your age or fitness level, exercise will enhance your life in many ways,” Wilson added. “Besides being good for your body, exercise has been found to improve your mood and brain fitness.”
“This booklet is yet another way we show our commitment to keeping Americans with limited mobility more active and independent,” said Michael Clark, Chief Administrative Officer for The SCOOTER Store. “We are very pleased to have worked with Mary Ann Wilson and the Sit and Be Fit™ team to make this instructional booklet available.”
For a complimentary copy and resolve to take better care of yourself in 2013, visit www.exercisebooklet.com
About The SCOOTER Store
Since 1991, The SCOOTER Store has helped provide freedom and independence to more people with limited mobility than any other company in the nation. The company primarily offers power mobility equipment, including power wheelchairs and scooters, lifts, ramps and accessories in 48 states. Using this equipment provides today’s seniors an alternative to living in nursing homes or other care facilities. The company’s goal is to create an opportunity for every American senior to live their entire life safely and confidently at home. The company is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Health Care.
About Sit and Be Fit
Sit and Be Fit with Mary Ann Wilson, RN is currently celebrating its 26th year on public television. The popular series airs on 369 PBS stations, and is broadcast to over 82 million households. The exercise program is recognized by the National Council on Aging (NCOA) as a “Best Practice” program in health promotion and aging.

CONTACT: Tim Zipp, The SCOOTER Store, +1-830-627-4444, tzipp@thescooterstore.com

ElderCarelink.com launches contest to reward family caregivers

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

ElderCarelink.com is hosting the “Share Why You Care” contest that asks caregivers to share stories about their caregiving experiences. Readers vote for their favorite caregiver to win a free spa day and in-home care of their loved one for a day.

January 7, 2013 (VOCUS) Foster City, Calif. – – ElderCareLink.com, a one-stop elder care resource, is hosting a contest this January specifically for caregivers. The “Share Why You Care” contest is designed to give a voice to the approximately 76 million unpaid family caregivers in the U.S. From January 7, 2013 to February 1, 2013 the site encourages these dedicated individuals to share their stories, struggles and memories.

As the first wave of the Baby Boomer generation prepares for retirement, many are finding themselves in caregiving positions because their parents are living longer than ever before. In some cases, plans for a leisurely retirement have been put on hold have so they can be available 24 hours a day, seven days a week for aging loved ones.

“It can be exhausting being responsible for someone else all the time,” explained Vicki DeLuca, spokesperson for ElderCareLink.com. “We want our users and caregivers to know they are appreciated for all they do.”

Caregivers may submit an essay of 300 words or less describing why or how they became a caregiver and what caregiving means to them. Optionally, users may also submit a photo of themselves and those they have cared for. Essay submissions are entered automatically into the competition for a chance to win weekly $50 prizes and the submission with the most votes will be awarded the grand prize of a free spa day and in-home care of their loved one, worth $350.

“Caregivers aren’t always appreciated for all the work they do,” continued DeLuca. “The real value of the ‘Share Why You Care’ contest is that their voices can be heard.”

To see the entries or enter the contest, please visit the contest homepage and follow ElderCareLink.com on Twitter and Facebook.

About ElderCareLink.com
ElderCarelink.com, a one-stop elder care resource, provides a community of support, advice, and caregiving resources for families in need of elder care. To date, ElderCarelink has provided information and assistance to more than one million families nationwide with finding in-home care, assisted living, nursing homes, adult day care, private duty nursing, and care management services. ElderCareLink.com is owned and operated by QuinStreet, Inc. (NASDAQ: QNST), one of the largest Internet marketing and media companies in the world. QuinStreet is committed to providing consumers and businesses with the information they need to research, find and select the products, services and brands that meet their needs. The company is a leader in visitor-friendly marketing practices. For more information, please visit QuinStreet.com

Socks For Seniors

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Socks for Seniors is an annual community service project through which we organize collecting NEW socks to be distributed to elderly in local area nursing homes around the holidays.

 

The program begins with Make A Difference Day Saturday October27 – The Official Kick-off of the 2012 Socks For Seniors Campaign and runs thru Christmas.

 

We are looking for local area coordinators near Henderson to help with collecting socks this year.

 

There are two major ways that you could help us-

 

1. Help us promote Socks For Seniors. We are available for interviews. Media support in 2011 helped us grow the program into over 250 cities coast to coast. Complete information is available on our website about the program which my wife and I started 11 years ago. It is 100% volunteer based. We neither take or make money from it. We do not collect money, we collect SOCKS!

 

If you could schedule a time for an interview to help promote Socks For Seniors near Henderson please visit this link:

 

http://www.socksforseniors.com/media.html

 

In 2011 we did hundreds of media interviews. This form will help us keep everything organized so (hopefully) nothing falls thru the cracks!

 

2. Host a Sock Drive. It all starts with 1 person, 1 box, 1 location. It’s easy…and all the socks stay in the local Henderson area! If you have a nursing home, assisted living center or other senior community in mind for distribution – GREAT! If not,we will help connect you with a local senior community for distributing the socks at the end of the sock drive.

 

If you can decorate a box and find a location or locations for boxes – that’s all there is to it. Then together we can promote the sock drive.

 

To collect Socks For Seniors – please sign up atthis link:

 

http://www.socksforseniors.com/register.html

 

Then we can stay in touch with you during the campaign with updates and answering any questions you may have. You will also receive an email with signs and logos for the drive and otherinformation.

 

A BIG THANKS for reading this about Socks For Seniors. I wanted to get it out before everyone gets busy and begins thinking about the Holidays – which always seems to happen right after Halloween.

 

If I can answer any questions – please just reply to this email. If you can help us promote the program or collect socks please click a link above and you will be taken to the sign form.

 

Thanks again!

 

Jamie
Socks for Seniors
www.socksforseniors.com

 

Choosing Senior Care Services (Nevada Senior Guide)

September 27, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As our loved ones begin to age, we have to wonder if they need elderly care services. How does one determine if your parents need to live in a nursing home, if they require in home healthcare, or if you’ll be able to take care of them yourself? The elderly have many more options today than they once did. Not everyone needs constant care, but sometimes it’s difficult to figure out the best option. Most seniors won’t admit they need help, so it’s up to you to look for certain cues to figure out what is best for them.

If your loved ones want to keep their independence and don’t have dangerous health issues, consider independent living communities. They will have their own apartments and will be living with others their age. This is a wonderful option for healthy seniors who may be looking to get involved in activities and want additional company. They won’t feel like you’re leaving them in a nursing home. Instead, they will be part of a social community.

Assisted living is the best choice for those who are beginning to have trouble with daily tasks and have less severe health problems. If you notice that the house is not always clean, they forget to do laundry or take medication, or they can’t cook their own meals, these are your cues for assisted living or home aides. If you move them into an assisted living home, they will receive help with grooming, bathing, and meal preparations. If your parents want to remain at home, you can have healthcare aides provide similar tasks.

The final option are nursing homes and facilities. Nursing homes are good for seniors who need 24-hour care. It is the best choice for people who have debilitating illnesses, such as dementia and Alzheimer’s. Nurses will be on staff all the time to help your parents with daily activities. This also happens to be the most expensive choice, but sometimes you have no other option. Your parents need help and you cannot give them the proper care they need. If you’re unsure, speak with your parents’ doctors to find out if nursing homes are the best solution.

Before you make a decision, talk about elderly care services with your parents. Don’t just ship them off one day and expect them to be okay with it. Sometimes you will have to take matters into your own hands, but explain to them that you only have their best interest at heart and this is for their benefit.

SeniorComfortGuide.com is an online assisted living directory featuring a number of resources for elderly care services in Ohio.

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The Difference Between Assisted Living and Nursing Homes (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
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Overview of Assisted Living

Assisted Living, sometimes called Personal Care, is a type of care that supports individuals with their basic Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), including bathing, dressing, preparing meals, and, in some cases, medication assistance or reminders. Residents of Assisted Living communities, whether stand-alone or part of Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC), benefit from the community’s planned social, educational and recreational programs, as well as the daily opportunities for socialization with peers. Three daily meals are generally provided.

Assisted Living housing tends to be more intimate, offering an enhanced home-like atmosphere. Apartments are generally studio or one-bedroom, with kitchenettes. Safety features such as call systems and handrails are standard.

Paying for Assisted Living

Assisted Living can be paid for from private funds or with a mixture of private funds and long-term care insurance. Supplemental private insurance will not pay for Assisted Living.

Overview of Nursing Care

Often called skilled nursing and rehab centers or nursing homes, Nursing Care communities offer both long-term skilled nursing care and short-term skilled nursing and rehabilitation services. While supporting individuals with their basic Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), including bathing, dressing, preparing meals, these communities also provide complex medical care in which the services of licensed nurses and therapists (physical, occupational, nutritional and speech) are utilized. These services are often utilized by individuals requiring short-term medical support after an injury, surgery or illness-related hospital stay. Nursing Care communities generally have 24-hour licensed care staffing.

Nursing Care housing is generally a private suite or shared accommodations. Well-designed communities enhance recovery and healing with planned social, educational and recuperative programs, as well as with an emphasis on home-like comforts.

Paying for Nursing Care

Reimbursement for Nursing Care community patients and residents depends largely on length of stay. Different funding sources kick in at different intervals. Short-term rehabilitation stays are often covered by Medicare and/or private insurance, including long-term care insurance. (Certain criteria in terms of length of hospital stay and care requirements while in the Nursing Care community have to be met to receive Medicare payments and it is worthwhile to discuss these with a discharge coordinator at the hospital.) For long-term care residents, private funds, Medicaid, and long-term care insurance are the typical methods of payment.

To learn more about Senior Living options, visit this website: www.areyourparentsthriving.com

Watermark Retirement Communities

Denise Barnes is the Electronic Communication Specialist at Watermark Retirement Communities in Tucson, AZ.

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Senior Living Services: Caring for the Elderly and Easing the Pressure Off the Sandwich Generation (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
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Today, this rapidly expanding population is probably the largest it has ever been. Traditionally, women are a disproportionately large percentage of the caregivers. According, to “The Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Takes On Alzheimer’s,” women account for 65% of the Alzheimer’s population and up to three-fifths of Alzheimer patient caregivers.

The term “sandwich generation” was coined by Dorothy Miller in 1981 and refers to the group of adults whose dependents include both their own children and their aging parents.

Frequently adults, especially women, are caring for their elderly parents while simultaneously raising tweens and teenagers. Pulled in two opposite directions, it may often seem overwhelming and as though both parents and children are not getting what they need. Thus, many caregivers eventually seek out either a home health aide or senior care facility as their loved ones’ needs become more than they are equipped to handle.

Home health agencies partner an aide with an elderly patient. Home healthcare is ideal for clients who want to keep either themselves or their loved ones at home with family. Depending on a patient’s needs, the aide may be required to work either during the day or night, or live with the client for 5-6 days at a time. These aides may offer both companionship as well as custodial and medical care, helping with personal hygiene, daily medications, meals, etc. In home healthcare is minimally disruptive to a patient’s routine, allowing him or her to remain in an environment in which she is familiar. This service allows the elderly to either maintain their own residences or continue living with their families, which may actually preserve their mental and emotional health. Dementia patients, for example, benefit from a consistent environment as it helps stave off the disease’s progression. Medicare generally only pays for a small portion of home healthcare; the rest of the cost is covered by private insurance and funds.

Senior assisted living facilities allow residents to maintain some independence within a controlled environment. Seniors may bring their own furniture and other mementos from home. Generally these residences consist of little apartments that are outfitted with kitchenettes, an environment that enables residents to host family and friends in a more private setting. Main meals are generally served at set times in a large dining area and more individual care is available to those who need it. Certain senior assisted living facilities are authorized to dispense medication or reminders to take medication.

Assisted living centers also offer outings and other day trips for seniors who are able to participate. Senior assisted living is a compromise between a nursing home, which has more comprehensive medical care, and living completely autonomously. Although assisted living is normally paid from private funds and assets, certain long term insurance policies will cover licensed assisted living facilities. A few states offer Medicaid funds and waivers to help foot the bill. Assisted living is regulated by the state, so policies and practices vary.

Nursing homes offer the most extensive care, providing full custodial and medical care. For the elderly who require consistent, round the clock medical attention, this choice can be a viable option. Nursing homes provide occupational and physical therapy. Some nursing homes also offer physical rehabilitation programs, which are required after a major procedures, such as hip surgery. For sufferers of advanced dementia, nursing homes provide the round-the-clock care and attention they require.

Although nursing homes cost more due to the level of care they provide, they are also more frequently covered by Medicaid and Medicare. Some nursing home facilities have the air of a hospital and are run like one. Others try to be less austere and more homey and offer many of the same amenities as assisted living facilities.

Choosing the right solution to meet the needs of the elderly is a laborious process that requires individual case-by-case assessment. At home care, assisted living centers, and nursing homes all have their strengths and weaknesses. Each serves a dual purpose: to care for an aging population and ease the burden for familial caretakers. These services provide patients and their families with peace of mind.

www.KennethRozenberg.com operates the Centers for Specialty Care Group, a collection of prominent healthcare organizations offering short- and long-term care, as well as home health services. Learn more at www.KennethRozenberg.com.

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Nevada-Senior-Guide Life Care Centers of America – Las Vegas

http://www.lcca.com/

NSG_AugSeptOct2016_Web-12

About Life Care

Your family is special with its deep bonds and unique relationships. Facing a dramatic change – such as moving a loved one into assisted living or a nursing home – is an unsettling prospect for most people. Life Care Centers have helped families for decades to work through the difficult decisions about how best to care for their loved ones. We understand how trying it is to choose nursing home care for your loved one, and how most struggling caretakers feel there is no other choice.

That’s why we’re here.

We want those special members of your family to become equally special members of ours. We want to relieve the anxiety and frustration you may be experiencing by providing a nursing home community of constant support, attention and personalized care. Above all, we want to serve each person entrusted to us with compassion, dignity, purpose and respect.

That’s not just our goal. It’s our privilege.

Services

At Life Care Centers of America, we take elderly care very seriously. That’s why we offer residents a wide range of living arrangements and amenities, services and care. From home assisted living to retirement living to nursing homes – and even campuses that offer all three in a continuum of care – Life Care has the experience, expertise, and dedication to provide a full scope of specialty services.

Whether your needs include Alzheimer’s care, in-home nursing care, rehabilitation or recovery help, or any of a number of other specialty services, Life Care will be there, with all the support, education, and commitment you and your loved one need.

Rehabilitation

Life can deliver some unexpected twists: accidents, sudden illnesses or emergency surgeries can happen when you least expect them. And in the aftermath of such events, your energy is focused primarily on recovery—trying to also find the best available resources for help can be pretty challenging.

At Life Care, we understand the intense desire to recuperate and get back to normal as quickly as possible. But serious illness or trauma can sometimes force you to relearn even basic functions. The struggle to regain those lost capabilities while still recovering is frustrating and often overwhelming.

That’s when our teams of experts can make an overwhelming difference. Our skilled therapy services can hasten your recovery, help return lost skills and bring back strength and mobility. Our caring professionals work tirelessly with our residents not only in physical areas, but also by constantly supporting and encouraging them emotionally.

We believe our residents are the extraordinary people who refuse to allow temporary setbacks or disabilities to affect them permanently. Their determination and effort become invaluable tools in the rehabilitation process.

And it is our greatest privilege to partner with them—or you, or your loved one—during recovery … and become your strongest advocates in the road to reclaiming total wellness.

Life Care Centers of America

The sun setting is no less beautiful that the sun rising.

Imagine living in a beautiful, peaceful environment, surrounded by friends and activities.

Caring for Life…
Since 1970, Life Care Centers of America has been providing unequaled nursing care and assisted living service. Our continuum of care campuses give our residents an individual care plan through various levels of care. But it\’s our commitment to quality and professionalism that makes us second to none.

2325 E. Harmon
Las Vegas, NV 89119
702-798-7990

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!