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Red Cross Blood Products Prolong Life of Two-Year-Old Las Vegan

December 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Two-year-old Sawyer Balonek of Las Vegas has been diagnosed with Bruton Agammaglobulinemia, an inherited immunodeficiency disease.  He has to have an infusion of immunoglobulin every four weeks from plasma extracted from blood given by volunteer donors.

 

The blood products needed by Sawyer are provided by the American Red Cross.  The Red Cross is the predominant blood supplier in Las Vegas and has held several blood drives in Sawyer’s honor to help make sure he gets the blood products he needs.  Sawyer’s parents agree that Sawyer is alive today because of the excellent medical care he has received and the blood products provided by the Red Cross.

 

In 2010 a group of local hospitals invited the Red Cross to bid for the contract to supply blood in southern Nevada.  The Red Cross won the contract, supplanting United Blood Services (UBS) as the provider of blood products for nine of the 14 hospitals in Las Vegas.  In order to meet the demand, the Red Cross strives to collect almost 900 units per week.

 

According to Julia Wulf, chief executive  officer of the American Red Cross Blood Service Region, “It is very challenging for us to collect enough blood in Las Vegas to meet the needs of the southern Nevada hospitals we serve.  We need more donors and we need businesses, churches and other organizations to sponsor blood drives here.”

 

To make an appointment to donate blood, call 1-800-RED CROSS or visit redcrossblood.org.

 

For more information about scheduling a blood drive call (702) 522-3998.

 

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About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

U.S. Veterans Honored by Encore.org’s 2013 Purpose Prize

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Seven Awards for People Over Age 60 Solving the World’s Toughest Social Problems

The Purpose Prize has become a “MacArthur genius award for people who develop a second career as social service entrepreneurs.” – The New York Times.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy organizes a network of volunteers across the country to teach disabled veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan how to combat stress — through fly-fishing.

A public relations executive helps wounded warriors find and renovate foreclosed homes – and transforms lives and neighborhoods in the process.

These are two of the seven winners of the 2013 Purpose Prize, awarded by Encore.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who translate decades of skill and experience into “second acts” that contribute to society’s greater good.

Now in its eighth year, The Purpose Prize is the nation’s only large-scale investment in people over 60 who are combining their passion and experience for the social good. Created in 2005 by Encore.org, the prize is aimed at those with the passion to make change and the wisdom to know how to do it, showcasing the value of experience and disproving the notion that innovation is solely the province of the young.

Two winners will receive $100,000 each and five winners will receive $25,000 each.

This year’s winners:

* Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. ($100,000 winner of The Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra)

* Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron taps into her own experience as a cancer survivor to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. ($100,000)

* Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing emotional wounds through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. ($25,000)

* Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
Fennelly runs a unique summer camp behind bars that is transforming federal prisoners into involved parents. ($25,000)

* Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
Huttinger’s project is on a path to eradicate human schistosomiasis, a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. ($25,000)

* Reverend Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. ($25,000)

* Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
Young’s rise from immigrant nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. ($25,000)

The Purpose Prize winners will be honored on December 5, 2013, at an awards ceremony in Sausalito, Ca. NBC’s Jane Pauley will emcee the event for hundreds of Encore leaders and the Purpose Prize winners.

Twenty-one judges – leaders in business, politics, journalism and the nonprofit sector – chose the seven winners from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees. Judges include Sherry Lansing, former CEO of Paramount; David Bornstein, author and New York Times columnist; Eric Liu, writer and founder of CitizenUniversity; and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, The Purpose Prize is a program of Encore.org, which aims to engage millions of boomers in encore careers combining personal meaning, continued income and social impact in the second half of life.

This year, Symetra is sponsoring the $100,000 Purpose Prize for Future Promise, which recognizes an individual whose approach for helping society has the potential to grow steadily over the next five years. The company plans to sponsor another Purpose Prize for Future Promise in 2014.

“While Purpose Prize winners are helping to solve a wide range of pressing social problems, they have one thing in common,” said Marc Freedman, CEO and founder of Encore.org and author of The Big Shift (PublicAffairs Books). “They – and millions of others in encore careers – are turning personal passions and decades of experience into invaluable contributions across sectors, continents and generations, often through entrepreneurship.”

Short summaries for all winners follow. Photos are attached. Longer bios and higher resolution photos are available.

Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas, winner of this year’s Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra, rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. Following a 35-year-career as a fundraising and marketing dynamo, she became the director of communications at Purple Heart Homes in 2008 in an effort to provide greater services for veterans who have service-connected disabilities. In just three years, Thomas helped take the fledgling nonprofit to new heights. She has raised millions for Purple Heart Homes in financial contributions and material donations. Revenue shot up 600% in her first year with the startup. She’s developed an innovative program that matches veterans with foreclosed homes donated by banks, then raises the funds to renovate a home for the individual veteran’s needs. It’s a win-win for all generations—and communities too. It helps veterans to grow assets, towns to recoup lost taxes and neighborhoods that have struggled with foreclosures to stabilize.

Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron is an award-winning journalist with more than 42 years in television broadcasting. She tapped into her own experience as a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. To focus on the plight of low-income Latinos fighting the disease, Duron founded Latinas Contra Cancer (Latinas Against Cancer), an organization committed to educating, supporting and providing essential services to low-income Spanish speakers often overlooked by the health care system. Latinas Contra Cancer has offered a range of programs that have taught more than 3,000 men, women and teens about the disease, resulting in more than 300 preventative cancer screenings. The group has provided psychological and social support to over 100 patients per year. However, the call to action Duron answered has had an impact far beyond the Bay Area. Her passionate commitment is helping Latino communities across the U.S. gain access to cancer support, information and treatment. Her great empathy for cancer patients has made her utterly clear on her bigger purpose in the second stage of life.

Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing the emotional wounds of battle through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. A cancer survivor and war veteran himself, Nicholson was impressed by the fortitude of disabled veterans at the Walter Reed military hospital, where he was treated for prostate cancer in 2005. It spurred him to found Project Healing Waters, a program dedicated to helping disabled soldiers and veterans recover from the trying aftermath of war through the sport of fly-fishing. One-on-one connections have been key to Project Healing Waters’ approach since the beginning. Nicholson knew there were fly-fishing groups and facilities all over the country. His innovation was to convince them to start, manage and lead fly-fishing instruction and outings with veterans through military and Veterans Administration facilities. The quiet bonds forged over fishing lines began to transform lives. Again and again Nicholson heard from family members who said their loved ones had returned from war withdrawn, angry, and difficult to be around. But after fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters, they’ve become happier, more open and engaged. Project Healing Waters works closely with VA Recreational and Occupational therapies to identify those who would most benefit from the program. Many are in wheelchairs or using prosthetics. A few are blind. Participants reflect of full spectrum of disabled veterans and include all ages, genders, ethnicities and disabilities. Nicholson says the impact “goes well beyond the mechanics of fly-fishing.”

Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
A lifelong social activist who ran homeless shelters in the District of Columbia for 17 years, Carol Fennelly abandoned her plans to retire in 1998 when she learned that D.C. inmates had been transferred to Youngstown, OH. One woman made 10-hour round-trip drives twice a week to visit her son. Moved to answer a social need, Fennelly thought about opening a hospitality house in Youngstown for family members visiting inmates. She soon learned that while 93% of the federal inmate population is male, in sheer numbers there are more programs for mothers in prison than there are for fathers. She decided she had what it took to change things. “I had spent years organizing, dealing with government, making change happen, and that emboldened me to think I could go into prisons and start all these radical programs,” Fennelly says. So she launched an encore career with Hope House, an innovative organization that helps prison inmates stay in regular contact with their children. In the past 14 years, Hope House has hosted 200 video teleconferences, 18,000 personalized book readings by fathers and 31 week-long summer camps, which allow kids to spend time with their fathers free of the usual restrictions that come with visitor hours and family chaperones. California recently decided to implement the Hope House model in its 33 state prisons. Prisons in Texas, Idaho and New Hampshire may follow. In 2013 Fennelly was honored at the White House as a Champion of Change.

Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
International public health expert Elizabeth Huttinger spotted a big idea in shrimp, and launched an encore career that could eradicate a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. Huttinger’s project – founded in 2006 – is targeting human schistosomiasis, an infectious parasite carried by river snails. Understanding that the population of prawns that eat those snails had precipitously declined, Huttinger, 63, has devoted her encore career to restoring the prawn population in the SenegalRiver Basin. Projet Crevette’s mission is multifaceted: the restoration of the prawn population diminishes the spread of schisto, provides new economic opportunities to afflicted communities and heals families infected by the disease. Today, Projet Crevette is a prawn-farming microenterprise, operated by locals at public watering holes. It has brought social innovation, new microbusinesses, environmental restoration and improved health to communities. Huttinger is confident Projet Crevette will meet its bold goal to fully restore the indigenous prawn population—and improve countless lives in the process.

Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Reverend Violet Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. After 14 years as parish pastor trained in psychotherapy, Little left behind her traditional congregation to create a religious refuge for the homeless on the streets of the city, which became the “WelcomeChurch.” The church relies mostly on word of mouth, and services can pop up in a city park or on a sidewalk. No questions are asked, and everyone is welcome. The WelcomeChurch coordinates medical services through local universities, helps people get into rehab or jobs, and offers educational services to the public on the causes of homelessness. Little estimates 40 percent of her congregants have moved off the streets into permanent housing and the WelcomeChurch celebrates each and every one of them, many of whom stay connected with Little through their transition. Little’s congregation has grown to include hundreds of homeless as well as non-homeless volunteers in the EvangelicalLutheranChurch in America.

Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
An immigrant from the West Indies who built a meaningful life on meager income, Young’s gritty rise from nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. She’s encouraged thousands to stand up for their right to earn a living wage, and counsels and trains others to become leaders themselves. In 2004, Young began building a movement to legislate a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in New YorkState, which would make overtime, paid time off and rest days mandatory. In 2009, when she heard then Governor David Patterson say on the radio that he’d sign the bill if it made it to his desk, she put on a full court press, becoming the engine behind passage of the law in 2010. The law is the first of its kind in the country, but Young is committed to making sure it isn’t the last. She’s now a key player in the NDWA’s expansion from 11 to 44 affiliated organizations with 15,000 members, up from 5,000 in 2007. Young’s passion for serving her community has only just begun.

Read More About Encore’s Purpose Prize at www.encore.org/prize.

About Encore.org

Encore.org is a national nonprofit that promotes the idea that people in their second acts have the talent and experience to solve some of society’s greatest problems.

About The Atlantic Philanthropies

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. In keeping with the Giving While Living philosophy of founder Charles “Chuck” Feeney, The Atlantic Philanthropies believes in making large investments to capitalize on significant opportunities to solve urgent problems now, so they are less likely to become larger, more entrenched and more expensive challenges later. The Atlantic Philanthropies also seeks to encourage others of significant wealth to engage in major philanthropic pursuits in their lifetime.

About The John Templeton Foundation

The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, supporting research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.

About Symetra

Symetra Financial Corporation (NYSE: SYA) is a diversified financial services company based in Bellevue, Wash. In business since 1957, Symetra provides employee benefits, annuities and life insurance through a national network of benefit consultants, financial institutions, and independent agents and advisors.

 

CONTACT: Sara Ying Rounsaville, srounsaville@encore.org, 415-952-5121, or Russ Mitchell, rmitchell@encore.org, 510-969-0801

Keepsakes, Family Heirlooms Passed Down More Effectively with New Legacy Builder Tool Chest from LegacyStories.org

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Allianz American Legacy Studies researchers asked a group of Baby Boomers and their parents to rank on a scale of 1-10 (10 being most) what was more important to them when it comes to passing down an inheritance: values and life lessons or financial assets.

Perhaps not so surprisingly, the results showed that passing down values were over seven times more important than passing down valuables.

Yet only a small fraction of these three generations has made any provisions, mostly due to lack of awareness, education and the tools to do the job properly.

In addition to values and life lessons, a lot more should be included when building and passing down a legacy. Keepsakes and awards often represent defining moments and milestone events and can become family heirlooms when the stories behind their acquisitions are documented.

Identifying people in a select group of vintage family photos is one the best ways to document personal history, as some of the people in the old photos might as well be strangers to grandchildren. Those who grew up in the 20th century were first generations to record special events and moments.

Today’s digital technology offers a chance to pass down a purposeful legacy that will survive the ravages of time, and the experts at LegacyStories.org have developed an innovative Legacy Builder Tool Chest to help.

Consisting of fourteen drawers, each “toolkit” focuses on a specific legacy topic with interactive how-to guidebooks, downloadable forms, video tutorials and lots of helpful resources.

Toolkit topics include “Life Lessons and Values“, “Keepsakes & Heirlooms”, “Vintage Legacy Photos”, and one titled “Loved Ones in Care” to help caregivers build a legacy for victims of Alzheimer’s, people in hospice care, or seniors living in assisted or skilled nursing facilities.

“Since passing down life lessons and values is the highest priority, we provide members the ‘Life Lessons and Values’ toolkit at no cost,” says Tom Cormier, co-founder of LegacyStories.org. “Membership in LegacyStories.org is also free so there are no obstacles to prevent anyone from securing an honored place in family history. They just need to take action before regretting it.”

The Legacy Builder Tool Chest is also being recommended by financial advisors, estate planners and elder law attorneys as a means to engage with their clients in a purposeful way.

Content for the individual toolkits is contributed by top legacy experts including members of The International Assoc. of StoryKeepers (I-ASK) and the Association of Personal Historians (APH).

Our goal is to help people establish themselves as “effective elders” while they are alive, and to become “awesome ancestors” when they pass on,” Cormier states. “Our grandchildren and descendants will one day have an interest in learning about their family history. Because so few people will take the time to document their personal history, those who do will live on forever as their descendants’ go-to awesome ancestor.”

Contact info:
Tom Cormier — Co-founder
Phone: 423-295-5904
Email
Website: www.legacystories.org

Read more news from LegacyStories.org

Senior Citizen Travel – Baby Boomer Adventure Made Simple by Susan Elizabeth

October 1, 2013 by · Comments Off on Senior Citizen Travel – Baby Boomer Adventure Made Simple by Susan Elizabeth
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Expert Author Susan Elizabeth

Many people think that when they get to the age of retirement that their opportunity for adventure is over. But the baby boomer generation is an entirely different breed of retiree. They are one of the groups that has made senior citizen travel such a huge and growing ever bigger segment of the travel industry.

There are in fact, probably more travel companies now who specialize in taking older travelers on travel adventures than have ever been in existence before. Part of the reason for this is that there are so many baby boomers; and so many baby boomers who think young, act young and live young.

And part of it is because so many of the baby boomer generation have a little bit of extra money to spend on taking cool trips.

One of the growing sub segments of the travel industry, specifically in the senior travel part is genealogical travel. This is where people want to go back to the country of their family origin to see what life is like back there. Although, this kind of travel focuses on foreign destinations, there are plenty of travel opportunities in the genealogical sector that will allow you to travel to the parts of the US where your family was originally from.

Maybe this is so popular because so many baby boomers were so independently minded growing up that they moved away from their family home, and maybe just because many of the parents and grandparents of the people who are boomers came from other countries. Either way, this is a big deal in travel and if it is something you are interested in, you can easily find all sorts of travel agencies who can help you out with a genealogical travel tour to investigate your own roots.

Another kind of travel that is very popular with baby boomer folks is small group travel. Often in regular travel tours, especially the tour packages, there are as many as a hundred people in the same tour group. And if you are not on a cruise, this is way too many.

The tour companies do this to cut down on the amount of overhead they have to pay the tour guides and the hotels. You will still have to pay whatever fees they charge but you will not get the same amount of personal attention that you would in a small group tour situation. Make sure you check out the tour group size before you book your tour.

Senior citizen travel is alive and well and isn’t going anywhere. As a baby boomer traveler, you can find as many travel opportunities online as you can search for. And more just keep appearing each and every day.

Susan is a full fledged baby boomer and avid internet researcher who writes about baby boomer travel and other senior topics on her site at www.second50years.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Susan_Elizabeth

How to Take Care of a Senior Citizen in the Family – Some Do’s and Don’ts by Ruma Sen

September 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Expert Author Ruma Sen

Although the idea may sound quaint to some, having a senior citizen in your home is something unavoidable. Yes, it is burdensome. Yes, it means having frayed nerves. Yes, it means sacrificing your privacy. Yes, you should not expect any pay-back from your elderly parents…this is their time in the sun.

From the outset,let me explain, that there is no one who will understand the problems faced by the family when an elderly person is a permanent resident, unless he/she too is in a similar position. Elders grow even older, and with increasing age comes unexpected blows, in the form of health issues, visits to doctors, and mounting medical bills. Realize that no one from the extended family or even the closer family members will be there to pitch in. It’s a fact of life….no one wants to INVITE trouble!

Most articles on Senior Citizen care lay stress on the fact that it is an honourable task that you have undertaken, to look after an old person. Few go on to explain what measures you can take to avoid those inevitable moments of depression, craziness, and having the blues, whilst you’re at the job.

Being a seasoned caretaker of a permanent live-in elderly in-law for the past two decades, I can only say this: forget your Ego, forget your cravings for instant happiness and impulsive actions. Look at the long term benefits only. Do you really want to ignore an old person’s problems by staying away and pretending to have fun? In that case, you are only playing with fire. With their lack of presence of mind, the family elder may either leave the house premises, and roam unattended, or leave the gas or geyser on, leading to gravely dangerous situations.

Be kind to the elderly, even though it may raise your hackles at times. Remember, their insensitivity and memory losses are something beyond their understanding or intention. Sometimes, the elderly get violent…handle the situation appropriately. Nowadays there are n number of forums, support groups etc who cater to specific problems involved in caring for the elderly.

Here are some pointers to follow at home, in the event of having an elderly person to take care of.

 

  1. Do keep your house well-ventilated, clean and dust-free.
  2. Try keeping the bathrooms of the elderly clean and DRY, to avoid cases of slipping.
  3. Provide ample reading material and interesting things to do, customized to suit the individual.
  4. Music is a great mood elevator; keep music of their generation easily accessible, with simple to operate music systems.
  5. Constant reminders are needed for the elderly; sometimes they react negatively to such instructions. Be prepared to face bouts of anger.
  6. Keep a doctor’s number, an ambulance number handy.
  7. Inform all the people living around your house about the elderly relative you are looking after. This will help avoid situations in which you will feel flustered.
  8. Keep all medicines out of their reach, and administer medicine in your presence.
  9. Employ a part-time help at home in cases where you feel helpless.
  10. Try to involve them in family outings and fun.
  11. Make them feel respected, loved and wanted. This is an uphill task, as the next generation has no patience to communicate with the elderly.
  12. Keep all the financial support ready. This may be in the form of medical insurance, pensions, savings and other schemes. One never knows when an emergency situation requiring a sudden lumpsum of money may arise.
  13. Make them carry some form of an identity on their person if they happen to be going out for a walk, by themselves.

 

Lastly, do pay attention to their diet.

It finally does not matter whether the senior citizen you are looking after happens to be an in-law or your own parent. In both cases, remember you are dealing with aging problems, and this is not an easy task. It calls for a lot of patience on your part. And when I say Patience, I mean patience! Try not to shout and express your feelings of disgust, anger, and rage: even though these might feelings may be uppermost on your mind.

Balance your own life out by reading, meditation, having friends over, or going out for a break. A strong family bond will ensure that the stressful moments will be counterbalanced with relaxed ones. Lastly, always boost yourself up by reminding yourself that the present situation could have been worse!

This article is an original one. The contents have been garnered from various sources, online, books and real life experiences. In case the reader wishes to add any new dimension to this, I would welcome it.
http://rumasen77.wordpress.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ruma_Sen

Columbus Travel Insurance For Senior Citizens by Lee Jacksonlee

September 4, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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perfect-travel-insurance-product

Majority of the senior citizens nowadays opt for insurance whenever they plan for any trips, especially when traveling abroad. It does not matter whether they are experienced travelers or have been waiting for the journey of a lifetime, they would still want to have a safe and enjoyable trip. Moreover, senior citizens and the rest of the people would like to travel with a peaceful mind, knowing that any misfortunes along the way would be well taken care of with minimum distractions.

As a matter of fact, most senior citizens are covered with health insurance at home. So it makes it even more sensible to be safely protected with travel insurance while they are away from home. Where health is concerned, irregardless of how fit and healthy you are, you cannot afford to take the risk of not being insured. The reason being, in the event of any sicknesses or accidents, the medical expenses incurred will be very costly, especially if require hospitalization.

Depending on your destination, less developed countries with unfamiliar and perhaps unhygienic food may be hazardous to health, what more with poor quality drinking water…! The climate may also be another factor contributing to health problems, especially when there is a drastic change in temperature. Besides the issue of health, there are other types of mishaps too, such as flight cancellation, lost luggage or personal belongings, delayed flights, thefts and even accidents.

There are many insurance agencies available online with competitive prices. Some rates provided are more lucrative and affordable than the others so it is wise to scout around for better deals. In fact, there is a variety of comprehensive coverage specially catered to meet the requirements and demands of consumers, namely backpacker and adventure travel insurance, pre-existing medical insurance, business insurance, single and group insurance.

Generally, a customer oriented company will pride themselves on providing quick, efficient and hassle-free service. So go ahead and enjoy your golden years by seeing the world. Travel extensively but do it only under the protection of insurance. Ensure to obtain an adequate coverage to give you and your loved ones peace of mind. Then you can “stop worrying about the potholes in the road and celebrate the journey”… as quoted by Fitzhugh Mullan.

So if your parents want enjoy their vocation with good memories, seek travel insurance from Columbus travel insurance. By doing so, you are not just securing your trip from any unforeseen events but also for a surely wonderful vacation with affordable best travel insurance

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lee_Jacksonlee

A Comprehensive Look At Senior Citizens Travel by Bruce A. Hoover

August 22, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Expert Author Bruce A. Hoover

Travel is becoming popular among many groups of people. Children are traveling more with their parents, teens are traveling more in groups and people who thought they could not afford to travel are traveling more now because of the availability of so many deals! Senior citizens travel too and today, they are traveling more than ever!

In the past, only seniors who had a substantial retirement savings were able to travel. Today, there are so many deals and opportunities for cheap, quality travel that anyone, including seniors on a budget can see the world without going broke!

Some destinations are cheaper than others such as the Caribbean, Mexico and some countries in Europe. Of course, there are many places to see in your own backyard and The United States and Canada are no exception where deals are concerned. Just like there are cheaper destinations, there are also cheaper methods of travel. Cruising is a great way to see many different parts of the world at a low price and all-inclusive Caribbean vacations are great deals as well.

If you are a senior looking for a great travel deal, there are many things you can do to maximize your chances of finding the best deal. First, ask around. You never know what you might find out from friends and family members who have traveled recently. Do a thorough internet search and sign up for travel deal newsletters that allow you to be among the first to find out about deals. Start looking for your trip and book your trip as early as possible in order to get the best savings.

If you put the proper amount of time and effort into your search, you will have no problem the right vacation for you at the right price and next thing you know, you will be on your way to relax and have some fun in a place you have always wanted to see!

Next, now that you understand how you can get inexpensive senior citizens travel will you take advantage of it?

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Bruce_A._Hoover

Fullfilling Your Dreams, As a Senior Citizen by Eva Fry

August 12, 2013 by · Comments Off on Fullfilling Your Dreams, As a Senior Citizen by Eva Fry
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Senior-Citizen-Health-Care

Today there are 30 million seniors. In 2030 there will be 70 million. The senior years can be an opportunity to fulfill dreams. Think of how happy those 70 million seniors will be if they believe they still have time to live their dreams. Think of how much happier and better our world will be when it is filled with people who are productive, doing good and living fulfilled lives, in their latter-years.

When we were young, we each had dreams of what we wanted to do with our life. Unfortunately many of us have never realized those dreams.

Why? We may have had parents who didn’t provide the opportunities we needed, when we were young. We may have married young, had children and the responsibilities of life took over. Before we knew, it we were seniors and believed we were too old to live our dreams.

I’m happy to report I am not one of those who live with regret or wish they had done more with their lives. Today, I am 67 years old and I am living my dreams.

I had three dreams when I was a young girl. My first, to be married, have children, and be a good mother with a happy family. My second, to be an entertainer and my third dream was to be a missionary.

Thankfully I have accomplished all three of my dreams and I’m starting on new ones.

My husband and I have been married for 48 years. We have three wonderful grown children and nine grandchildren. Why was this dream so important to me? My father was alcoholic and my mother emotionally ill. My childhood was sad and troubled. I desperately wanted a happy family like some of my friends. I was blessed to have that dream come true because I worked hard to make it come true.

Through the years, I never forgot my dreams to become an entertainer and a missionary. I just put them on hold. These dreams took a long time coming, but today my dreams have come true.

How have I accomplished my long-awaited dreams, in my senior years?

Change is the answer! Life doesn’t always stay the same. One door to our life may close but a new door always opens and we must be ready for it. When my children grew up and started their own lives, it left me in an empty nest. I was smart enough to use it as a launching pad to direct me toward my life-long dreams. I now had time to pursue them.

It began with me going back to college and taking a speech class. I took it to overcome my shyness and to learn to be more outgoing to I would have a chance at being an entertainer. You must know that I had no musical training and could not play an instrument so I had big dreams.

The class was a big step toward my dreams. I discovered I was a pretty good speaker and was asked to be on the college speech team. I traveled all over the USA competing with my speeches with intelligent teenagers. It was so much fun and I won a national speaking award. I joined Toastmasters and became president of my club. I took a stand-up comedy class. For many years I spoke for Mother’s Against Drunk Driving, because I had been a victim of a drunk driver when I was a teenager. These all helped me gain confidence in myself and encouraged me to see what I could do as an entertainer.

I began to learn words to old songs and entered a talent contest for the city of San Diego and won another award. For several years now, I have been the master of ceremonies for the same talent show and for their variety show at the San Diego Fair.

At the age of 60 I began entertaining at senior residences and to learn to play the piano and guitar. I began to write my own music. I have produced 60 songs and had my music played on 150 radio stations. For several years now I have entertained with my own show using my own music at many functions.

I feel I have actually accomplished my second dream to become an entertainer. I wrote a book to encourage others to do the same called “You Must Have a Dream.”

Accomplishing my third dream, to become a missionary, has been a wonderful blessing to me. Because I spoke for MADD, I was asked to speak at Juvenile Hall in San Diego. Because of my involvement with incarcerated kids, I began my own program called “Be a Winner in Life.’ which I presented for ten years to over 10,000 young people. From this I wrote two books to help the kids “Be a Winner in Life” and “Letters From Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids.”
This work has helped me be a missionary to these children teaching them true values and principals of life. My books help me share the message of The Gospel of Jesus Christ and the joy that it brings.

I am a senior citizen now and very thankful to God that I was able to fulfill the dreams of my heart.

We can all live to be 100 years old. How will your life turn out? I hope that when your life is over you will have no regrets and you will never have to say “I wish”, “if only”, but rather you will say, ” I fully lived my life and I have no regrets. I loved my life because I lived my dreams! This is how I feel about my life. I am so thankful. The Lord has truly blessed me. I pray He will bless you too.

My books can be purchased at http://www.evafry.com . I hope they will encourage you to live your dreams.

Eva Fry’s mission is to help others become better and happier. She is an inspirational author, singer/songwriter/ motivational speaker and seminar leader. Eva has published three books – “YOU MUST HAVE A DREAM” -for seniors, “BE A WINNER IN LIFE”-for good kids, troubled kids and their parents. “LETTERS FROM JUVENILE HALL, KIDS HELPING KIDS” (Actual letters from kids at Juvenile Hall, intended to save other kids from destroying their lives) She invites you to use the FREE ARTICLES she has written for: at- risk kids Also FREE ARTICLES of inspiration to help meet life’s challenges. http://www.evafry.com She has produced 7 Music CD’s

“Remember” (new music for seniors), “Oh What Joy Christmas” “The Little Things” (inspirational country), “I Love Living The Teachings of The Lord” (Gospel/Christian) “Savior of Mine” – (Christian) “God Gave You Intelligence” (for children)

“Classical Style” (instrumental)

Her music and books can be purchased at http://www.evafry.com Her books can also be ordered at any bookstore. Her articles have been published, all over the world.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eva_Fry

A Senior Citizen In Juvenile Hall by Eva Fry

August 9, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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It was my first time speaking at Juvenile Hall, I was terrified! I had seen enough movies to know I didn’t want to be there. As I hurried through the metal detectors, and pushed through the big metal doors, my heart was pounding and I was filled with fear. I wondered if I would get out of this place alive.

I passed the holding tanks, rooms with big windows containing kids who had just been arrested. In there were kids pacing, fighting addictions, fearfully waiting to be assigned to a unit. Some kids were right at home. They knew this place! They had been there before.

When I stepped into the inner sanctum I heard sounds that confirmed my fears. Angry kids were screaming, using profane language. I heard loud pounding on the doors, which dotted the narrow hallways. Juvenile inmates were communicating through the thick cement walls. As I scurried along, I saw empty eyes piercing out at me through the small, eye level windows of their rooms. I passed through more metal doors and hallways, until I came to the unit I was to speak in. Inside sat fifty young men, of all nationalities. I knew from their varying hair color. Their backs were toward me. They were juveniles from the age of 15 to 17.

As I slowly walked to the front of the room, I made sure there was a guard on either side, in case one of them grabbed me. I took a deep breath and turned toward them. My heart stopped! I was shocked! They were just kids! I expected them to look like criminals, but they looked like they could be one of my nine grandkids.

Although some did appear tough, and others rough, there was something about them that touched me. At that moment, my life changed! A still small voice inside me said, “you must try to help them!”

Thus began my continuing, nine-year mission, to help kids who are in trouble with the law. These are my kids. “The Forgotten Kid.” The children we think we can lock up, throw away the key, and forget. The ones who learned most of the bad things they have done, from us, the older generation. They are kids, paying the price for the sins of society. Our scapegoats

There are up to 600 kids locked up, in this facility, at any time. The Hall houses kids from the age of 10 to 18, although I saw a nine-year and ten-year-old carrying blankets and pillows. Were they going camping?
No! They were headed to their rooms, to be locked up, for armed robbery.

BE A WINNER IN LIFE IS MY PROGRAM. I help the kids believe they can still be WINNERS. I teach them they have potential to do amazing things with their life. In fact, I believe God sent them to this earth to do good with their lives. I tell them each one is a genius, in their own way, and can do something better than anyone else can do. They must find their genius. They must go to school, obey the law, obey their parents, be honest and work hard. My goal is to share with them the same truths I taught my kids: the basic truths of right and wrong.

I hope to support the parents who are good parents, but their kids got on the wrong track. I try to teach the ones with bad parents, or no parents, values they were never taught: basic principals of good and bad.

How did I start speaking at Juvenile Hall? It began a long time ago, when I was a little girl, the daughter of an alcoholic father who emotionally damaged my mother and us kids. I grew up in circumstances similar to some of these young wards.

I speak to them because I would have loved to have had someone, who cared, talk to me when I was young.

Some of these kids, like me, are the off spring of parents who didn’t care how their actions affected their kids. We were from homes full of contention caused by parents with addictions. Sick parents who were unable to control their own lives, let alone parent a child. So-called parents, who lived in their own hell and created havoc in the lives of their children. Parents who abandoned their kids.

When I talk to the kids, I relate to the ones who hope to fix their parents, and those who must care for their siblings. I relate because I remember pouring my Dad’s alcohol down the drain, thinking it would fix our problems but instead, I got myself into lots of trouble. I remember taking money from my Dad’s pocket, after he passed out, to give to my Mom. Money for food.

I remember the day I realized that whatever I did at home would change nothing. I would never have the loving family I longed for. Like many of these kids, I turned to friends for the family I needed. Like them, they were usually the wrong kids of friends, peers who were doing bad things. I remember drinking alcohol, even though I hated it, so I could fit in.

I hear my same story, over and over again, at Juvenile Hall.

To help them I share a profound truth, which I discovered in my young life. “Bad things happen for a reason!”

My bad thing: after a wasted life, at the age of 57, my Dad died an alcoholic. His drink of choice was 100% over proof rum. The good thing: My Dad’s death led to me realize I didn’t want to end up like him, or give my kids the life he gave me. I eventually made a commitment to stop drinking and change my life. Thankfully I was young and not an alcoholic, like my Father and Grandfather.

My commitment worked! I share with them how wonderfully my life has turned out, because of one small choice. I used my Dad’s mistakes to choose a better life for myself. I now have the life I dreamed about. My husband and I have been happily married for 45 years and with our children and grandchildren, are a close knit, happy, non-drinking family.

I tell them, “you can turn the bad things which have happened in your life into motivation for a better life too.” I help them believe they still have time to change.

Another reason I speak at Juvenile Hall is because I was a victim of a drunk driver. At the age of 17, the car I was riding in was hit head-on by a drunk driver. My head went through the windshield. My nose and part of my ear was torn off. Thankfully doctors put me back together, but I came to realize the terrible carnage alcohol could cause. I’ve had a mission all my life to teach the evils of alcohol use. I was a speaker for Mother’s Against Drunk Driving for several years. In fact, they were the ones who first sent me to speak at Juvenile Hall.

I teach the kids to abstain from alcohol and drugs. I have commitment cards, which I encourage them to sign and honor. I know if I can help them make a commitment not to drink alcohol, or use drugs; they will have a better chance at changing their lives and reaching their potential. They don’t need alcohol or drugs in their life. Most of the kids are locked up because of their first drink of alcohol, which lead to drug use and criminal behavior.

One of the questions people always ask me is “what is it like to talk to young criminals? Do they listen to you?”

My answer is, “at first it took a little time to know what to say and how to say it, so they would accept me. It took me time to overcome my fear of knowing how to communicate with them and have them accept me.”

One night, one of them asked, “why do you come to Juvenile Hall?” I answered, “why do you think?” His response, “for the money!” I replied, “no one pays me, in fact the first time I spoke, someone stole the hub caps from my car.” His mouth fell open and then he really listened to my program.

I’m happy to say I do very well with them! The kids are very attentive. They know I care. I don’t judge them. In most cases, I don’t know what their crime is. I don’t want to know. I tell them that what they have done is wrong and they must pay the price. On the other hand, I hope to stop them from getting deeper into crime. If I can stop them from hurting someone in the future, I feel my time is worthwhile.

I know I won’t get through to all of them, but I hope to plant seeds, which may take root someday when they have choices to make. My dream is to save as many as I can.

It is very gratifying when I feel I have gotten through to them and when they thank me. One boy said. “You told me bad things happen for a reason. Your right!” I never would have gotten an education if I hadn’t come to Juvenile Hall. I just got my GED. I applied to a college and was accepted. I will be going to school to be come an engineer when I get out.”

I am happy when I feel I have helped them look at life in a more positive way.

I try to help them turn their mistakes and bad experiences into something good. My greatest success is that I encourage the kids at Juvenile Hall to write letters to save other kids from the consequences they are experiencing. They have written incredible letters. Their letters have great impact on other kids because they come from their peers. My latest book “Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids contain the letters.

Here are inserts from some of the letters:

Addiction controlled my life. Don’t let it control you! I wish for all you guys to be safe, and I pray for you kids that don’t know what life is really about, because after that second when you make the bad decision, it goes down hill from there. Only you can change your future. I hope you all understand that there’s a number in prison with your name on it, if you don’t change. Now’s the time to change. Not later. Not when you get out, but now! If you don’t change now you never will.

Gang banging was my worst thing I ever gotten into. If I could take it back, I would. I repeated my Dad’s cycle.

Now I sit here in a one-room cell, facing 25 years to life. I want you to look around and see what kind of situation you’re in. Open you eyes and your minds and soak as much education as you can. I’m 17 years old in a couple of weeks. I will be graduating from high school (in Juvenile Hall). Education is the key to life.

I’m in the Hall, Unit 800. Why? Because I committed a sin while I was on drugs. At the age of 13, I started using drugs because my best friend was asking me to try some. At the age of 16, my charges are DUI, evading a peace officer, driving at an unsafe speed with no license, a firearm in the car and 187 murder.

All the violence that is going on in our community is not solving nothing. The only thing it’s doing is killing us off, one by one. Before you know it the human race will be extinct. Because we are the last of the dying breed. I’m only telling you this so you guys can make the right decision. Your homies probably say they are down for you, but they be faking, and that’s real. The only people that’s going to stick by you is your mama and your family. I seen too much in my life young homies and it’s not what you are thinking. I lost my little homie and that really hit me. All that was on my mind was retaliation but when I thought about it, I knew it wouldn’t bring him back so I thought of another game plan. I prayed!

Eva, I want to thank you for all the help that you have given me. All the little words you’ve spoken in your groups have helped me so much along the way. I have changed in ways that people wouldn’t believe. I have done a whole 360. Without the help of you, I see the change being 100% more difficult. I wish my family was around to see my new life.

As you can see, my experience with my kids, at Juvenile Hall, has been emotionally rewarding and very satisfying to me. These kids give my life meaning. I feel I am making a difference.

I continue to try to help kids. I have written a book called “BE A WINNER IN LIFE”, which I hope to get into the hands of every child in Juvenile Hall’s, all over the country. Also, I want to get it into the hands of parents. I hope to get to kids before they are locked up.

Yes I’m a grateful to be a senior citizen at Juvenile Hall! I’m grateful my senior years have value and that I am doing something with my time, which is worthwhile.

I now know that every senior citizen can use the wisdom they have gained throughout their life to make a difference. We can all do something. I encourage you to find a way to help a child. Our kids need you!

Eva Fry is an author, singer/songwriter and motivational speaker. She had a ten year volunteer program at Juvenile Hall called “Be a Winner in Life” She has three books “You Must Have a Dream” for seniors, “Be a Winner in Life” for kids, troubled kids and their parents, and Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids” – for all kinds, especially those who are locked up and to help kids from being locked up. She started writing and songwriting at the age of 60. Her goal is to encourage seniors to reach their potential and help kids do the same. She has many free articles on her web site to help young and old. She has six CD’s which are spiritually based and inspire young and old. She is avilable as a speaker or performer. Her work is available on her web site Eva Fry – eva@evafry.com http://www.evafry.com ( She has many free articles on her web site)

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eva_Fry

Ophthalmologists Warn that Fireworks-Related Injuries Can Cause Permanent Vision Loss

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Ophthalmologists Warn that Fireworks-Related Injuries Can Cause Permanent Vision Loss
American Academy of Ophthalmology and Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology urge parents to closely supervise children when around fireworks

LAS VEGAS – June 26, 2013 – As the Fourth of July holiday approaches and Americans make plans to celebrate the stars and stripes with a little red glare from celebratory rockets, the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology urge the public to take important steps to prevent fireworks-related eye injuries. The academies ask parents and other adults to be especially cautious when children are in the presence of fireworks.

Of the more than 9,000 fireworks injuries that occur in the United States each year, [I]approximately 45 percent are sustained by children age 15 and under.[II] Eyes are among the most injured body parts,[III] and one in six fireworks-related eye injuries results in permanent vision loss or blindness.[IV]

All fireworks are dangerous if not properly handled; however, sparklers cause the most injury and are particularly dangerous since many children handle them on their own. Sparklers typically burn at 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit. That temperature is nearly 1,000 degrees hotter than the boiling point of water, double the heat required to burn wood, hot enough to melt glass and cause third-degree burns to the skin.[V] Out-of-control bottle rockets also cause some of the most serious eye injuries, including corneal abrasions, traumatic cataract, retinal detachment, optic nerve damage and rupture of the eyeball – all of which can lead to potential blindness.

Both Academies advise the public that the best way to avoid potentially blinding injuries is to attend a professional public fireworks display instead of using consumer fireworks. For those who still decide to use legal consumer fireworks, the Academy recommends they follow these safety tips to prevent eye injuries:

  • Never handle fireworks without protective eyewear and ensure that all bystanders are also wearing eye protection.
  • Never let young children play with fireworks of any type. If older children are permitted to handle fireworks, ensure they are closely supervised by an adult and wear protective eyewear.
  • Clear the area of flammable materials and view fireworks from at least 500 feet away.
  • Leave the lighting of professional-grade fireworks to trained pyrotechnicians.

For those who attend professional fireworks displays and/or live in communities surrounding the shows:

  • Respect safety barriers at fireworks shows.
  • Do not touch unexploded display (show) fireworks; instead, immediately contact local fire or police departments to help.

“It’s vital that the public take seriously the dangers of using consumer fireworks. If mishandled, devastating injuries can occur – particularly to the eyes,” said Adam J. Rovit, M.D., president of the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology. “We urge parents and adults to be on high alert about these risks, especially if children are in the presence of fireworks, and take these safety measures to reduce the risk of eye injury.”

The Academy and the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology believe these tips can help to ensure safe Independence Day observances for everyone. If, however, a fireworks-related eye injury occurs, call 911 and seek medical help immediately. These injuries typically need advanced care by an ophthalmologist, a medical doctor who specializes in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

For more fireworks safety tips and additional information on how to maintain healthy vision, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology
The mission of the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology is to promote and advance the science and art of medical eye care. The Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology’s members are dedicated to treating and preventing eye diseases for all patients.  Learn more at Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide.  Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org.

About EyeSmart
The American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.orgto learn more.

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[I] Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2011 Fireworks Annual Report, accessed at http://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/113888/2011fwreport.pdf

[II] Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Fireworks-Related Injuries to Children, accessed at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/108/1/190.full

Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2011 Fireworks Annual Report, accessed at http://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/113888/2011fwreport.pdf

[IV]  British Journal of Ophthalmology, Ocular firework trauma: a systematic review on incidence, severity, outcome and prevention, accessed athttp://bjo.bmj.com.proxy1.library.jhu.edu/content/94/12/1586.full#ref-11

[V] National Fireworks Protection Agency fireworks tips, accessed at http://www.nfpa.org/assets/files/pdf/public%20education/fireworkssafetytips.pdf

Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads

June 5, 2013 by · Comments Off on Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads
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Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads

BOSTON, May 2, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Mother’s and Father’s Day celebrations are approaching, yet millions of adult children care for parents year round while on the brink of burnout.  Catapulted into the accidental caregiver role without warning, stressed-out kids are doing their best to hold life together when everything seems to be falling apart.

Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom issues a timely warning. “You must seek support as a caregiver.  The life you save may be your own.”

Bloom offers practical coping strategies to help family caregivers recharge their energy and avoid burnout during a free monthly Caregiving Power Hour.  During these tele-sessions, caregivers get tactical solutions to get through the week ahead.  Bloom wants to inspire and train caregivers to provide quality support for their loved ones while fully living their own lives.

“It’s coaching, community, and caring in the gift of an hour of sacred time that can really make a difference,” Bloom says.

Bloom knows the stressful caregiving journey well.  He served as the primary, live-in caregiver for his parents during their final years.  His father passed away in 2009 and, after a courageous battle with cancer, Bloom’s mother passed away in his loving arms on Mother’s Day 2012.

“Caregivers put the well-being of loved ones first which can mean putting their own needs and plans on the back burner.  The regret for career or life enhancing opportunities not taken can be a bitter pill to swallow,” Bloom says.

He honors the legacy of his parents by sharing key steps along the roadmap to caregiving without regret.

  1. Release Crisis Mode. Stop being a victim to circumstances so you feel stronger and become laser-focused to meet your family’s needs.  Supporting loved ones through medical challenges is overwhelming and scary.  When you become aware that feeling like a victim or in a state of crisis is a mindset, you can successfully shift back into taking control and positive action.
  2. Overcome Conflict.  Communicate and cope with calm and clarity. Otherwise, you will crash while riding the emotional roller coaster associated with disability or disease. Mastering your own trigger points for anger and frustration will lead you to deal effectively with the most challenging people and circumstances in your life.
  3. Achieve Buy-In. Motivate others to contribute based upon their individual abilities, preferences, and talents so your loved one receives the most satisfying support possible.  Giving others choices for how they can serve will foster their desire to gladly help on a regular basis.
  4. Deliver Greatness and Compassion in Equal Doses.  Become the inspiring caregiver that people cheer for and gladly support in meaningful ways.  Let your compassion shine through in all actions as you support your loved one.  Devote equal time for self-care so you have the energy to let your best shine through even during tough times.
  5. Magnetize and Motivate Talent. Create an atmosphere that attracts and retains the best people to join your loved one’s care team and experience brilliant performance.  Stay positive and open to the opinions of others so you can facilitate options for the best care and support.
  6. Access Intuition.  Trust your instincts and let your care and dedication guide your decisions.  Share any concerns and questions with key support professionals.  It is better to explore a concern that proves to be okay rather than ignore something that could be life threatening.
  7. Put Chocolate in Your Pill Box.  Find ways to fuel your soul so you can thrive during the caregiver journey and develop the passion and purpose for your life beyond caregiving.  Dose yourself regularly to avoid burnout while creating enduring satisfaction and success.

About Certified Professional Coach and Energy Leadership™ Master Practitioner A. Michael Bloom

Since 2011, A. Michael Bloom has revitalized the careers of hundreds of family and professional caregivers with practical, tactical soul-saving coping strategies that support them in saving lives – including their own.  An in-demand New England speaker, workshop leader, and coach, Bloom has influenced hundreds of caregivers to follow a roadmap to avoid burnout and recharge their caregiving energy.  The author of the forthcoming book, The Accidental Caregivers Survival Guide: Your Roadmap to Caregiving Without Regret, Bloom welcomes media interviews, speaking engagements, and the opportunity to inspire caregivers around the world via his monthly Caregiving Power Hours.  Learn more at http://www.bloomforcoach.com/powerhour/.

Respecting The Rights Of Senior Citizens – 4 Factors To Pick The Right Care Facility For The Elderly by Abhishek Agarwal

June 4, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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There is no formal ‘Senior Citizens Bill of Rights’, but as individuals, senior citizens are entitled to their rights. However, the senior citizens have little energy left in them in their old age to fight for their rights and therefore, it is the duty of the children to see that their elderly parents are getting what they are rightfully entitled to.

Every right must be claimed to be deemed as a right. There are laws in existence for the running of nursing homes for the elderly and retirement communities. Even if your elderly mom or dad is in an assisted care facility, there are certain laws that are fundamental and expected to be followed by these care facilities too. It is your duty as a caregiver to see that they are following the laws and living up to the expectations.

There are some factors that you must verify before selecting a facility for your elderly parents:

– Ensure that the facility will provide the basic cleanliness and safety. Check out the evacuation plans in place, in case of an emergency situation. Verify whether the evacuation plan is a workable one, considering the fact that the facility may be full of elderly and invalids who may be slow in moving out of the building in case of a fire. Find out if there is emergency power available to operate the automatic doors and elevators so that everyone can get out safely.

– If food is provided by the facility, ensure that meals will be provided three times a day. The meals should be healthy and the food should be delivered to the room if your parent is disabled or injured. There should be some variety in the diet and since there is a separate charge for the food, it is not wrong to expect some quality and variety in the food.

– If your parent has moved to an assisted care facility, they have every right to live as they wish in that apartment, since they have paid for it. However, they have to observe certain restrictions because they are living in a community setting. They should be able to live without any interference from the staff of the facility and have the freedom to select the décor of the apartment or have family and friends to visit.

– Another fundamental right of a senior citizen is to be treated with compassion, respect and dignity. Although this is not a tangible right, how the staff at the facility treats the elderly is an important aspect in the selection of a facility for your parents. The staff of the facility must be respectful and pleasant in their dealings with your parents. If your parent complains of any emotional or verbal abuse, you must investigate and hold the facility accountable for it.

As a primary caregiver, responsible for the well being of your elderly parents, you have the right to remind the assisted care facility of their responsibilities. Ensure that your parents are getting the service and care that they paid for and that they are comfortable in their living quarters and enjoying their stay there.

Abhishek successfully runs an Old Age Home and he has got some great Eldercare Secrets up his sleeves! Download his FREE 80 Page Ebook, “How To Take Great Care Of Elders” from his website http://www.Senior-Guides.com/560/index.htm. Only limited Free Copies available.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Abhishek_Agarwal

Thoughtful Gift Ideas for Senior Citizens by Natalie Aranda

May 31, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Kids are easily pleased by almost any gifts as the whole world is new to them. Senior citizens may have experienced and owned everything they wanted in their life. That’s what makes a challenge when it comes to choose gifts for your grandmothers or grandfathers.

No matter what time of year it is, personalized yet unique gifts will sure impress them if you listen to they say and look at what they do. Far too often people tend to buy senior citizens items that they’d never want. Consequently, you should first make a list of what type of hobbies they like. Do they enjoy golfing or spending time playing games with their friends? If this is the case, you could purchase a unique game for their Christmas gift. Researching vintage entertainment or new board games on EBay would be a different approach. This way you could give them something one of a kind. Christmas gift ideas may be tricky to come up with, but they should also incorporate how much you are thinking about them. Since you do want them to enjoy what you purchase, you could get them a gift certificate to a spa or a day at a romantic inn. These gifts are wonderful and inspiring items, regardless of what holiday it is. Chances are they will thank you for months, because the majority of gift givers do not think so deeply.

If you are having trouble coming up with birthday gift ideas, you should always remember to avoid joke presents! When we all get older, we cringe at the thought of age being mentioned. Although some senior citizens embrace who they are, some people would rather not make a big deal of their age. Therefore, you should avoid the birthday gift ideas that involve age jokes. You never know when you are going to offend someone. After all, the last thing you want to do is remind them of their life insurance settlements or the life settlement issues they may have to worry about.

If you are trying to find a better birthday idea, you should explore the idea of scrapbooks. By creating a book filled with photos, memories, and comments, it will bring your grandparents to tears. They embrace nostalgia and would love to have a keepsake that they can look through for years. As a result, these special birthday gift ideas are an extraordinary way to say you love them and are happy to be part of their lives.

Senior citizens may seem like they are impossible to buy for, but all they want are unique gifts like everyone else. No matter whom you are buying presents for, the gift ideas need to be out of the ordinary. Discouraged and don’t have a lot of money to spend? Even by taking time to create a memory book or photo album, it would bring a smile to their face. From birthday gift ideas to Christmas gift ideas, anything is possible as long as you put your heart into it. If you are looking for a quick fix and a simple present to buy, sadly you will be like everyone else.

Natalie Aranda writes on home and family [http://www.moonsome.net/Family-1/]. If you are having trouble coming up with birthday gift ideas, you should always remember to avoid joke presents! When we all get older, we cringe at the thought of age being mentioned. Although some senior citizens embrace who they are, some people would rather not make a big deal of their age. Therefore, you should avoid the birthday gift ideas that involve age jokes. You never know when you are going to offend someone. After all, the last thing you want to do is remind them of their life insurance settlements or the life settlement issues they may have to worry about.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Natalie_Aranda

Why Should You Care About Senior Citizen Cell Phones, Cell Phones For Kids And Dexterity Challenged? by Sheri Davis Collins

May 7, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Cell phones for senior citizens are getting better and better. Cell phones  for seniors and kids usually have a number of mutual needs. This is one  phone that can meet the demands of both.

Its main features are a large keypad, screen and fonts. It does not text,  take photos, do music or have ring tones. Arrives ready to use with your choice  of preprogrammed telephone numbers.

Another great features is by pushing one button, it quickly dials a Live  Operator for help in emergencies, who will dial anyone on a call list, or look  up new numbers. The Operator is available 24 hours 7 days a week.This will allow  you to rest assure that your parents, kids, and loved ones, can always reach you  with Operator Assistance. In my opinion, it’s the best selection for kids and  senior citizens.

It will also give the senior more of a sense of independence by having a  simple cell phone that is larger, preprogrammed with the essential phone  numbers, and without all the features they will not use or get in their way.

Its features are:

Ease of use

One Push Button to Live Operator for emergencies or calling assistance

Amplified Speakerphone with large cushioned earpiece that coordinates with a  hearing aid

Volume can be adjusted quite loud

Large viewing screen and text

Comes preprogrammed with telephone numbers of your choice

Voice mail options are questions that can be answered either yes or no, for  simplicity in operation

Dial tone

Large keypad for dexterity challenges

Not available at traditional mobile phone providers

Children can only call where you designate.

This would make a unique gift for anyone you want or need to communicate  with.

Rest assured that your parents, kids and loved ones can always reach you with  Operator Assistance 24/7.

Why should you care about cell phones for senior citizens, kids and the  dexterity challenged? Because, it’s an important thing to do, for their safety,  ability to communicate, and your peace of mind.

Sheri Davis Collins recomends that you visit http://www.haven-designs-decorative-pillows.com/unique_gift_catalog.html for specifics about this cell phone designed for senior citizens and kids.  (Scroll down on page)

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sheri_Davis_Collins

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Niche Marketing Strategies For Tutoring Businesses Looking To Attract Senior Citizens by SK Tilton

April 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

For years, we’ve heard about the graying of our population from the baby boom  years. Our current class of senior citizens inductees (the population born  during the Baby Boom after World War II from 1946 to 1964) is going to make up  close to 20% percent of the total US population by 2029 according to the US  Census Bureau. What often goes unmentioned is that this mature population also  controls one of the largest percentages of disposable income. As a group, senior  citizens are and will be for some time the most affluent Americans. They hold  about three quarters of the nation’s financial assets worth approximately $1  trillion in disposable income annually.

Again, that is $1 trillion dollars in disposable income annually.

Many product and/or service oriented businesses have taken the long view and  begun marketing various products and services geared specifically to the older  consumer. Despite this recognition on the part of a few marketers, this  financially secure, mature group of consumers remains largely untapped by  educational companies and services. Take for instance the onslaught of new  technologies that seem to pop up like daisies in the spring, out of all consumer  groups, our seniors, are usually the last to be courted. While it may be true  that certain technologies are better suited for younger tech savvy consumers (I  am reminded of my elderly grandmother who purchased an unlimited text messaging  package on a small phone without text messaging capability and did I mention she  had arthritis), it doesn’t mean that this market is entirely unsuited for those  educational businesses and services that use technology to deliver their product  or service.

For a supplemental education service tutoring provider, this mature consumer  group is wide open with far less competition and minimal requirements in the way  of overhead expenditures. Two of the much-needed services that senior citizens  in particular lack are computer training and technology acclimation. Many of the  services supplemental education companies can provide, are the ones that are  most often overlooked or taken for granted, i.e. using the internet, opening up  an email account, social networking account registration, etc. If you are  reading this article, you can definitely offer those services and more. Suppose  for a moment you feel uncomfortable with your level of competence in offering a  few of these services, let me repeat what I said in my previous article, Niche  Marketing Strategies for Tutoring Businesses Looking To Attract Parents of  Students Taking State Standardized Tests, you do not have to be an expert in the  subject matter in order to provide supplemental services in the subject matter,  you just need to hire people with thorough experience related to the field.

The reason for the lack of competition in this age group is precisely because  this mature audience is a bit more discerning with their spending habits and a  more sophisticated approach is required to gain their attention, loyalty, and  dollars. However, it is for this very reason that supplemental education service  providers should dive into this market with fervor and enthusiasm. Education is,  and has always been a cornerstone for any age group. The value that the 50 and  over age group places on education should not go unnoticed. Along with  education, communication plays an important role in everyone’s lives and its  role only expands as one gets older. In the past, many grandparents would send  letters to their grandchildren and eagerly await their response. Grandparents  yearn to be a part of their grandchildren’s lives. Why not offer the ability to  stay in touch while simultaneously helping an older population learn and acquire  new skills? Imagine grandma’s joy every time she logs on to her e-mail account  and sees a message from her grandchild or when she receives a tweet. It’s truly  a win-win proposition!

Of course that’s just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the type of  services supplemental education providers can offer up in addition to computer  training. Curriculum and/or activities marketed to senior citizens can range  from learning a new language to scrap booking to ballroom dancing. If you’re  looking for ideas on what senior citizens are interested in learning, you can  find a compiled starter list below. Since most of your organized activities and  programs will consist of a variety of group sizes, you will have the ability to  market age specific specials and discounted tuition fees accordingly. Remember,  you run a supplemental education service business that should be able to teach  and tutor in multiple disciplines. You do not need to have any expert knowledge  in any of these areas, just hire someone who does. It is highly unlikely that  Sam Walton knew how to repair the diesel engines of every tractor-trailer that  brought in a load of merchandise to his stores, but his business (Walmart) hired  people who did have that expertise.

The best part about marketing to this age group is that they are fairly  accessible if you know where to look. Putting up postings/flyers at local  community church bulletins, visiting the adult education departments of local  community colleges, and contacting the Facility Director or Onsite Coordinator  at various assisted living facilities to propose your computer training or other  services to their residents, is a good way to start. If interested, there are  plenty of online directories that list full contact information for assisted  living facilities narrowed by zip code or state.

How about the Bingo nights? They are usually held at lodges, halls, churches,  and schools/community colleges.

Hold the presses! Yet another great source that has been largely abandoned by  the younger generation is the newspaper. Here’s a little known fact about the  newspaper industry – 65% of its readers are over the age of 55. By advertising  in this medium you are reaching over half of the newspapers readers – Now that’s  worth another read!

When it comes to reaching senior citizens, let your creativity lead the way,  your opportunities are limitless. For the astute, forward thinking individual,  this is a unique opportunity to service an undeserved demographic and separate  your business from the competition. Remember, thinking outside the box never  gets old!

Activity Ideas for Senior Citizens: · Computer Training  · Dance   · Yoga  · Painting  · Sewing · Journal Writing · Knitting or  crocheting  · Photography · Discussion Groups  · Exercise  ·  Knitting  · Foreign Language Conversation · Needlepoint  · Pinochle   · Quilting  · Tai Chi  · Writing workshops  · Crafts  ·  Bowling  · Bridge

S.K. Tilton has served as a program director, site coordinator, area  director, and as a SES business consultant to various SES (Supplemental  Education Services) tutoring companies across the United States. S.K. Tilton has  written numerous business plans for SES start ups and filed many approved  applications on behalf of SES tutoring companies. As a consultant, S.K. Tilton  has been responsible for presenting and implementing successful marketing plans  and helping first year start ups achieve success normally enjoyed by seasoned  SES veterans. S.K. Tilton’s latest work combines practical experience of the  best and worst SES practices to bring you the only SES success guide book  available. For further information on the SES Made Easy book and the author,  please visit http://www.sestutoringbiz.com.

Stay informed on the latest information regarding supplemental education  service tutoring at http://sestutoringbiz.com/category/Blog/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=SK_Tilton

 

Senior Citizens and Pets by Kay Catlett

April 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As baby-boomer pet parents reach retirement age it is common to think about  putting aside the dog collars, pet clothing and dog harnesses and retire from  being pet parents. This is especially common as a beloved pet may die. The usual  questions of a grieving pet owner are magnified by older pet owners. The only  real questions with younger owners concerns whether or not they miss the joy of  pet ownership and whether they still possess the desire to take on the  responsibility of another pet. As the pet parent ages, more questions have to be  asked. The age and health of the human along with whether or not the needs of  particular pets can be managed are the most important questions for aging pet  parents.

The primary question concerns whether or not a pet is beneficial for aging  people.

Many seniors crave and miss nurturing. Often, a lifetime of nurturing has  defined a person, first as a parent, friend, spouse or grandparent. With  children and grandchildren growing older, nurturing may no longer required on a  personal basis. Senior citizens may find the circle of friends narrowing as  interests change, people retire and move, and activities lessen. Having a pet to  nurture, and providing that pet with food, comfort, exercise, toys, play and  companionship can fill the void in a changing life.

As the years pass, people may find their lives boring and lonely. Having a  pet cat or dog can fill this void. Taking care of a pet can provide meaning and  provide positive feelings of caring for another being. A pet can provide  structure missed by people following the routine of working outside of the home.  Caring for a pet provides some structure: time to eat, time to play and go  outside, time to be combed, time for naps. At the same time, the pet parent has  a role: to take care of the pet. This sense of responsibility provides structure  as well as a sense of being needed.

Another plus for seniors to have dogs, is for the protection a dog can give.  Seniors are often prey for intruders since the resistance of a senior citizen is  perceived as being lower and often it is known that there are less people living  in the home. However with a dog, the fear of barking or being bitten inhibit the  activities of intruders to that home. Research shows that homes with barking  dogs are violated fewer times than homes without dogs. Dogs provide safety to  seniors.

Another benefit of a senior owning a dog is that it makes them more active.  Owning a dog will compel the senior to live a more active lifestyle then if they  are by themselves. The dog will need to go outside to use the bathroom; feeding  and grooming must take place. These simple activities will give the owner  exercise. Matching the activity needs of the pet to the activity level of the  owner is an important factor to consider in deciding what kind of pet or breed  is best for both the senior and the pet.

Aging pet parents need to think about the future of their pets as time goes  on. A plan for pet care should be arranged so that if a hospitalization is  necessary, or a period of recovery in the home should occur, the needs of the  pets need to be met in those circumstances. Pet care in the home of another,  kennel care or acquiring the assistance of others to provide assistance in the  home are all necessary elements of a pet care plan. Pet parents of every age,  but especially senior citizens need to investigate alternatives in the dire case  of having to give up the pet. This author strongly suggests that “no-kill” pet  shelters need to be listed in the plan in the direst situations.

Overall, a senior owning a pet is an excellent idea. Dogs and cats provide  excellent companions and safety to senior citizens. Studies show that seniors  with pets are happier and live longer then seniors without pets. Preparing the  home properly with crates, dog collars, cat harnesses and pet beds coupled with  preparing plans for all contingencies will make for happy seniors and their  happy pets.

Kay Catlett [http://www.PetCollarStoreAndMore.com]

I believe that as we are humane to our pets, they make us more human. My  online pet store has carefully selected products at competitive prices.

I welcome your input on what products you like and want me to  carry.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kay_Catlett

 

Senior Citizen Discounts at Luxury Hotels by Kelvin Kong

April 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As people reach the age of 60, they think that they have already experienced  a lot in life. They had been through the ups, downs and zigzags of everyday  living. There were enough smiles given away and tears cried out. Old people  choose to stay laid back and stop wanting, desiring and wishing for more in  life. But it should not always be the case.

There are things in life that are still good to experience regardless of age  or status. There are still unanswered wanting that remain within us but would  not want to submit to. One of these desires is to feel pampered and be treated  like a queen or a king. At old age, grandparents sometimes feel that their  children and grandchildren are way too busy with their individual businesses  that they tend to devote lesser time for them. To rekindle family ties and spoil  the seniors, a family bonding and relaxation trip in a luxury hotel would be a  great idea.

Spending a night in a luxurious five-star hotel like the Ritz Hotel,  Dorchester Hotel or Marriott Hotel may seem impossible because it requires a lot  of cash out to make it happen. But with great discounts, this dream is not that  far to fulfill.

Luxury hotels, ranging from five to seven-star hotels, in London offer  special discount for senior citizens. The best deals, discounts and promo rates  are always available on the official websites of the hotels. This information is  also readily accessible in the tourism websites of London.

Discounted rates do not equate with less privileges or services. The best  deals are offered to senior citizens without sacrificing quality and efficiency  of service. Some of the special treats included in these deals are: 24-hour room  service, health club facility and free internet services. Luxury hotels also  have their own restaurants, where grandparents can eat a luscious dinner with  the family; cafes, where they can just relax while reading their favorite book  and drinking tea; and bars, just in case they feel like reminiscing their teen  years.

Luxury hotels like Millennium Hotel Mayfair, Renaissance Chancery Court Hotel  and the Radisson Edwardian Hampshire Hotel understand the importance of creating  a family-like environment for the senior citizens. Staff and employees undergo  intensive training in guest relations to enable them to deal with their guests  in a manner that will make them feel that they are not far from their own  homes.

Since luxury hotels are usually located in the city center, senior citizens  can take part in varied activities like the city tour where they can visit and  take pictures of prominent British landmarks like the House of Parliament, the  Tower of London, the Buckingham Palace, the Westminster Abbey, the Big Ben and  the London Eye.

With great discounts and special treatments prepared for senior citizens, who  can say that luxurious relaxation trips are impossible? Nothing is never too  late for old age: if there’s a will, there’s definitely a way.

London Budget  Hotels provides comprehensive information on London travel and detailed  reviews of the hotels and accommodation available in London. Check out the best  offers, and also the excellent reviews of each of the available hotels at this  fantastic site.

If you are looking for affordable Paris Hotels to spend your nights in Paris  (France), do also checkout our fabulous recommendations at Paris Budget Hotels.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kelvin_Kong

 

Email Marketing For Senior Citizen Centers by Dan Forootan

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Ads in the phone book and Yellow Pages are a better investment than a  newspaper ad, but senior citizen centers need to provide gentle reminders of  their presence to potential patrons, many of whom are living alone and uncertain  about venturing into something new and unknown. How can they encourage newcomers  to come to the center while reminding regular visitors of all the center has to  offer? The answer is email marketing!

A senior citizens’ center email marketing campaign will achieve a pair of  essential objectives for the center by cutting costs and delivering the message  straight to the target audience. The idea that senior citizens would be relying  on email for news would have sounded ludicrous 15 or even 10 years ago. But with  more senior citizens jumping aboard the information superhighway than ever  before, an email marketing plan is the best way to reach seniors!

Email marketing allows these establishments to provide the type of  interactive advertisement newspapers and even television commercials cannot  offer. In addition to listing the essentials such as address, contact  information and operating hours, an email can include a schedule of upcoming  events, photos of people at the center and even videos of some of the fun  activities that take place at the center. What better way is there to convince  people to come to a senior center than by showing them what they are  missing?

Even those senior citizens who do not use email can be reached via email  marketing efforts. Often times, it is the children and/or grandchildren who  investigate senior centers on behalf of their elders. The “next generation” can  sign up to receive emails from a senior citizen center and then let their  parents or grandparents know the types of events that are taking place there,  from lunches and dinners to movies, card game tournaments and performances by  local music or theatre groups.

In addition, senior citizens who use email but who aren’t the ones checking  out senior citizen centers online can still receive these forwarded messages  from their children, grandchildren or friends. The email marketing software  required for these campaigns makes it very easy to forward messages to other  interested people, which can only help generate further business for the  centers. Just as importantly, this software is inexpensive to purchase and easy  to install and manage. There is no need to add staff to implement and/or handle  these email marketing projects. Add it all up and aemail marketing campaign is a  win-win for those who operate the center as well as those who visit  it!

Dan Forootan is the President of EZ Publishing, Inc., the creator of the  StreamSend Email  Marketing service.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Dan_Forootan

 

Boston-Area Over 55 Community Publishes Free Senior Living Guide

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

Boston-Area Over 55 Community Publishes Free Senior Living Guide

Resource Helps Active Adults Untangle Their Senior Living Options
South Weymouth, MA — Mar 26, 2013 / (http://www.myprgenie.com) — The decision to move — whether to an over 55 community or other option — can be challenging. There are a lot of decisions to make. Sometimes, the choices available can seem confusing.
Fairing Way has created a free Senior Living Guide [www.FairingWay.org/LiveConfident] to help transitioning active adults make their decision with confidence. The guide explains:

  • The types of retirement living options and senior housing choices available — and most importantly, which works for you
  • How to set your priorities
  • Common financial considerations
  • The nine questions you must ask before you move
  • When and how to involve your family in the process
  • And much more!

The guide is available as a PDF on Fairing Way’s website. Active adults can download the free guide at www.FairingWay.org/LiveConfident.
While the Fairing Way Senior Living Guide does highlight a few area resources, the resource is not specific to the Boston market.
“Active adults everywhere are struggling with the same questions,” said Fairing Way Executive Director Joyce Haglund. “What options are available to me, or to my parents? What is right for our needs and desires? The Fairing Way Senior Living Guide helps those over 55 make the choice that’s best for them.”
Fairing Way is the Boston area’s newest over 55 community, located within the new SouthField live-work-play development. Sponsored and developed by established, local, not-for-profit leaders in senior living, Fairing Way offers distinctive apartments with flexible services in an intergenerational setting. Download the senior housing guide for free at http://www.FairingWay.org/LiveConfident.

Charleston Heights Arts Center Hosts Rainbow Company Musical And Summer Conservatory

April 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Las Vegas, Press-Media Releases 

Musical “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale” Presented April 26-May 5  

Join the fun as Rainbow Company Youth Theatre presents the hilarious musical “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale,” created by the musical team of Janet Yates Vogt and Mark Friedman of “How I Became a Pirate” fame.  Everyone knows Rapunzel has the longest hair, but “Lady Za Za” has the biggest hair in Rainbow Company’s wacky version of the favorite fairy tale. Off-beat and up-beat characters abound as the plot unfolds, and surprise after surprise will entertain audiences of all ages.

The play will be performed April 26-27 and May 3-4 at 7 p.m., and April 28 and May 4-5 at 2 p.m., at the Charleston Heights Arts Center, located at 800 S. Brush St. Tickets are available now at $7 for adults, $5 for teens/seniors/military; and $3 for children age 12 and younger. To purchase tickets, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-6383 or 229-6553.

The Rainbow Company also will be offering a two-week actor training conservatory June 17-29 for youth ages 8-16 of all theater experience levels. Guest artists and award-winning staff will conduct classes and rehearsals leading up to a performance on the main stage of Charleston Heights Arts Center June 29. The cost is $225 per youth. Space is limited. Registration is open now and will remain open until full. Youth ages 8-11 will attend morning sessions from 8 a.m. to noon; ages 12-16 will participate from 1 to 5 p.m. For more information about the Rainbow Company or to register for the conservatory, call (702) 229-6553 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

The Rainbow Company is a nonprofit, community theatre operated by the city of Las Vegas. The theater group holds auditions open to both adults and young people throughout the year. The staff offer classes in all aspects of theatre for ages 4 through high school at Charleston Heights Arts Center, and presents four productions annually that bring the magic of live theatre to family audiences. In its 35-year tenure, Rainbow Company has received numerous accolades, including the Governor’s Arts Award, Nickelodeon’s Parents’ Picks Award, the National Recreation and Park Association First-Place Dorothy Mullen Arts & Humanities Award, and many more.

Attorney Receives National Community Service Award for Advocacy in Elder Law

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

The National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA) is proud to announce the winner of the 2013 Powley Elder Law Award: Reginald H. Turnbull, of Jefferson City, Mo. This award is presented annually to a NAELA member who is recognized in his or her community as a leader in promoting a greater understanding of the rights and needs of the elderly and people with special needs, and of how Elder Law attorneys advocate for those rights.

The award was established in the memory of Wes and Helen Powley, grandparents of NAELA member Timothy L. Takacs, of Hendersonville, Tenn. Both Wes and Helen were active in civic affairs for all of their lives, and Wes practiced dentistry well into his 80s. The award is funded by a cash grant from the Takacs family to a nonprofit organization chosen by the Powley Award recipient.

For more than a decade, Turnbull has served as an officer and leader of the Missouri Chapter of NAELA, keeping fellow Chapter members up-to-date on important legislation and encouraging continuing education in the field through such legal education programs as the Chapter’s “Missouri Elder Law Fundamentals Institute.” He has been a Certified Elder Law Attorney by the National Elder Law Foundation since 2003 and is a Fellow of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys.

Turnbull frequently speaks at local and statewide events on public and private benefits for people who are aged and people with disabilities. He serves on the pro-bono attorney panel of the Samaritan Center.

Turnbull has also demonstrated his commitment to promoting the needs of the elderly and special needs communities as past Chair and Board Member of the Missouri End-of-Life Coalition; as a past general manager and member of the Special Needs Alliance, a national organization of Special Needs Law attorneys; current Chair of the Elder Law Committee and Vice Chair of the Probate and Trust Committee of the Missouri Bar Association.

Turnbull is a Co-Chair of MO-WINGS, the working interdisciplinary network of guardianship stakeholders, which is rewriting Missouri’s guardianship code. He serves as a member of the Advisory Council of the Mid Missouri Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association and Ethics Committee of the Capital Regional Medical Center.

As part of his recognition, Turnbull can direct $1,000 from the Takacs family to charities providing services to people with disabilities. He has chosen to have $500 awarded to the Cole County Residential Services and $500 to the Jefferson City Area Chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI).

Turnbull will receive the award at NAELA’s Annual Conference in Atlanta, being held May 2-4, 2013.

About NAELA
Members of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA) are attorneys who are experienced and trained in working with the legal problems of aging Americans and individuals of all ages with disabilities.  Established in 1987, NAELA is a non-profit association that assists lawyers, bar organizations, and others.  The mission of NAELA is to establish NAELA members as the premier providers of legal advocacy, guidance, and services to enhance the lives of people with special needs and people as they age.  NAELA currently has members across the United States, Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom. For more information, visit NAELA.org.

National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA) Celebrates 25th Anniversary

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Elder and Special Needs Law Attorneys Association Kicks Off Celebration at Annual Conference in Atlanta

Washington, D.C. — The National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA) is proud to celebrate “25 years of sharing and caring” through the Elder and Special Needs Law profession. Since 1988, NAELA’s mission has been to establish NAELA member attorneys as the premier providers of legal advocacy, guidance, and services to enhance the lives of people with special needs and people as they age. Through its meetings, publications, educational materials, and advocacy efforts, NAELA has established itself as a leader in Elder and Special Needs Law.

NAELA members go beyond traditional estate planning, helping their clients make complex decisions in areas such as how to plan for the rising cost of long-term care (especially for the Baby Boom generation that is living almost a decade longer than its parents) and transferring decision-making in the event of incapacity. In addition, NAELA members assist families with acquiring and maintaining public benefits to cover the lifelong costs of caring for those with disabilities. NAELA members are advocates for the rights of seniors and people with disabilities to have access to better medical care, the ability to stay in their own homes, and maintain self-respect and as much independence as possible.

“NAELA always has been at the forefront of Elder and Special Needs Law. Founded by a core group of 42 attorneys who were dedicated to meeting the legal needs of older Americans and persons with disabilities and special needs, NAELA now has a membership of 4,400 which continues to grow. NAELA members are the reason that the Academy has thrived, by contributing not only to NAELA but also to the communities they serve,” said NAELA President Gregory S. French, CELA, CAP.

NAELA is a founding member of the Elder Justice Coalition, a coalition of organizational members that support the fight against elder abuse, promote awareness of elder justice issues, highlight government’s responsibility to help create systems to ensure elder justice, and the passage of the Elder Justice Act (S.333).

NAELA also is a founding member of the Leadership Council of Aging Organizations, a coalition of aging organizations that serve older Americans and are dedicated to providing a voice for seniors and their families in the ongoing national debate on aging policy.

Visit the 25th anniversary website to learn more about NAELA’s history, read reflections by NAELA Past Presidents, view member photos, and more.

NAELA will kick off the 25th anniversary celebration at its Annual Conference, being held at the Atlanta Marriott Marquis in Atlanta, Georgia, from May 2-4, 2013. The Annual Conference is an unparalleled venue for Elder and Special Needs Law practitioners to learn, network, and engage with leading experts in the field. Members of the media are encouraged to attend the Annual Conference. For more information, contact Abby Matienzo.

About NAELA
Members of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA) are attorneys who are experienced and trained in working with the legal problems of aging Americans and individuals of all ages with disabilities. Established in 1987, NAELA is a non-profit association that assists lawyers, bar organizations, and others. The mission of NAELA is to establish NAELA members as the premier providers of legal advocacy, guidance, and services to enhance the lives of people with special needs and people as they age. NAELA currently has members across the United States, Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom. For more information, visit NAELA.org.

Pediatric Flatfoot – Cause for Alarm?

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Untreated Flat Feet in Children Can Result in Chronic Pain, Reduced Mobility

and an Increased Risk for Obesity

 

Parents keep a close eye on their growing children, watching for proper development and alert for any sign of a problem because small problems can have big implications. Surgeons at the Annual Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) this week are conferring with one another on Pediatric Flatfoot, a childhood condition that, if left untreated, can result in permanent deformity in adulthood. Flatfoot deformity makes mobility and exercise painful, increasing the risk of reduced cardiovascular health and obesity.

“Parents never want their child to undergo a surgical procedure,” says Mary Crawford, DPM, FACFAS, an Everett, Washington foot and ankle surgeon and conference presenter. “But uncorrected symptomatic flatfoot can lead to chronic pain and instability as the child ages into adulthood. Children will be on their feet for a long time to come. It’s vital to keep those feet healthy. A foot and ankle surgeon can help parents understand the options – surgical and non-surgical – for treating pediatric flatfoot.”

 

Not all children have symptoms, but others will complain of pain, tenderness or cramping in the foot, leg, and knee. Parents may notice an outward tilting of the heel, awkwardness or clumsiness in walking and difficulty with shoes. Pediatric flatfoot makes participating in activities more difficult, so parents should take note if their child is unable to keep up with playmates, tires easily or voluntarily withdraws from physical activities.

 

To diagnose a pediatric flatfoot, a foot and ankle surgeon examines the child’s foot in weight bearing and non-weight bearing positions, both in and out of shoes. The physician also notes how the child walks and evaluates the foot’s range of motion. In some cases, flat feet are associated with issues of the hip and knee, so the physician may examine those as well.

 

For further detailed analysis, the physician may order imaging tests such as x-ray, a CT scan, MRI or bone scan. Family history will be evaluated as well, since the presence of flatfoot disorder in the family increases the possibility of flatfoot in the child.

 

“There are different types of flatfoot deformities,” notes Crawford. “Thorough testing helps us pinpoint the causes of the flatfoot disorder and develop an appropriate treatment plan.”

 

Pediatric flatfoot can be divided into two categories, flexible and rigid. Flexible flatfoot is characterized by a normal arch when non-weight bearing, or sitting, and disappearance of the arch when standing.  There may or may not be symptoms. In the case of rigid flatfoot, however, the arch is stiff and flat when both sitting and standing. In most cases, children with rigid flatfoot display symptoms associated with the condition. In either case, flexible or rigid flatfoot, there are a variety of underlying reasons, requiring different treatments.

 

Babies often appear to have flat feet due to cramped positioning inside the womb, and the symptoms will abate with time. In other cases, the surgeon recommends stretching exercises or a soft brace for a short period. Children who do not exhibit symptoms typically do not require treatment, but will be monitored and reevaluated periodically by the foot and ankle surgeon.

 

For children who do exhibit symptoms, the physician may recommend physical therapy, shoe modifications, anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen to reduce pain and inflammation, or an orthotic device. This device fits inside the shoe and supports the structure of the foot. In some cases, surgery is the best alternative.

 

For more information on pediatric foot and ankle conditions or injuries, visit the ACFAS patient health education website, FootHealthFacts.org.

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The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of over 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons.  Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research and provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its consumer website, FootHealthFacts.org.

Research Suggests Massage Therapy Is Effective For Health Conditions In People Of All Ages

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Massage Therapy Shown to be Beneficial for Enhancing Immune Function in Preterm Infants, Decreasing Blood Pressure and Improving Stability in Older Persons and Reducing Stress in Cancer Patients.

People of all ages are beginning to understand the many benefits of massage therapy, including the role it can play in overall health and well-being. Recent research compiled by the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) suggests that massage can enhance the immune function in preterm infants, decrease blood pressure and improve stability in older persons, as well as reduce stress and anxiety in cancer patients.
Massage Therapy for Improved Immune Function and Weight Gain in Preterm Infants
Research[1] published in Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), showed that for stable, preterm infants, daily massage therapy is positively associated with higher natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity and weight gain. American Massage Therapy Association President, Cynthia Ribeiro, says of the study, “This research demonstrates that massage therapy can benefit preterm infants by enhancing immunity and stimulating growth. Parents of preterm infants are encouraged to speak with a certified massage therapist to learn more about certain techniques designed to aid in their child’s development.”
Massage Therapy for Improvements in Balance, Neurological, and Cardiovascular Measures in Older Adults
Research[2]published in the International Journal of Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (IJTMB ) found that older adults who receive massage therapy for up to six weeks could benefit from decreased blood pressure and improved stability. “This study suggests that regular massage therapy can produce several advantages for the older generation, including a relaxation affect for the entire body, lowering blood pressure, decreasing stress and improving balance, amongst other things,” says American Massage Therapy Association President, Cynthia Ribeiro.
Massage Therapy for Decreasing Stress in Cancer Patients
Research[3] published in BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care indicates that massage therapy can have a positive influence on the quality of life of people suffering serious illnesses such as brain cancer. The American Massage Therapy Association acknowledges these study results, which suggest that massage therapy can improve physical as well as emotional well-being in patients with late stage disease and when used in combination with standard care, massage can help reduce stress, anxiety, pain and fatigue.
View AMTA’s Research Roundup Volume 2 online
Visit AMTA’s Find a Massage Therapist® to find a qualified massage therapist in your area.
Research Roundup, Volume 1
AMTA issued its first research roundup in 2012 which also highlighted the growing body of evidence showing that massage therapy can be effective for a variety of health conditions, including:
• Osteoarthritis of the knee
• Inflammation after exercise
• Chronic low-back pain
• Fibromyalgia
View this research in further detail.
Massage Therapy Facts
• Between July 2010 and July 2011 roughly 38 million adult Americans (18 percent) had a massage at least once
• 75 percent of American’s surveyed claim that their primary reason for receiving a massage was medical (43 percent) and stress (32 percent) related
• 89 percent of individuals believe that massage can be effective in reducing pain; with 29 percent of respondents admitting they have used massage therapy for pain relief
• 50 percent of people claim their doctor has either strongly recommended or encouraged them to get a massage
Visit AMTA’s research section for more information from our consumer and industry fact sheets.
About AMTA
The American Massage Therapy Association® (AMTA®) is a professional association of more than 56,000 members. AMTA professional members have demonstrated a level of skill and knowledge through education and/or testing and must meet continuing education requirements to retain membership. AMTA provides information about massage therapy to the public and works to improve the professional climate for massage therapists. The association also helps consumers and healthcare professionals locate qualified massage therapists nationwide, through AMTA’s Find a Massage Therapist® free national locator service available at www.findamassagetherapist.org.
[1] Ang J, Lua J, Mathur A, et al. A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial of Massage Therapy on the Immune System of Preterm Infants. Pediatrics. 2012; 130(6):e1549-58.
[2] Sefton JM , Yarar C, Berry JW, et al. Six weeks of massage therapy produces changes in balance, neurological and cardiovascular measures in older persons. International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork.2012; 5(3):28-40.
[3] Keir SM and Saling JR. Pilot study of the impact of massage therapy on sources and levels of distress in brain tumour patients. BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. 2012; 2:363-36.
For more information, contact:
Bob Szafranski
Edelman, 312.240.2687
Bob.Szafranski@edelman.com
or
Caroline Dowdy
Edelman, 312.240.2801
Caroline.Dowdy@edelman.com

ElderCarelink.com launches contest to reward family caregivers

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

ElderCarelink.com is hosting the “Share Why You Care” contest that asks caregivers to share stories about their caregiving experiences. Readers vote for their favorite caregiver to win a free spa day and in-home care of their loved one for a day.

January 7, 2013 (VOCUS) Foster City, Calif. – – ElderCareLink.com, a one-stop elder care resource, is hosting a contest this January specifically for caregivers. The “Share Why You Care” contest is designed to give a voice to the approximately 76 million unpaid family caregivers in the U.S. From January 7, 2013 to February 1, 2013 the site encourages these dedicated individuals to share their stories, struggles and memories.

As the first wave of the Baby Boomer generation prepares for retirement, many are finding themselves in caregiving positions because their parents are living longer than ever before. In some cases, plans for a leisurely retirement have been put on hold have so they can be available 24 hours a day, seven days a week for aging loved ones.

“It can be exhausting being responsible for someone else all the time,” explained Vicki DeLuca, spokesperson for ElderCareLink.com. “We want our users and caregivers to know they are appreciated for all they do.”

Caregivers may submit an essay of 300 words or less describing why or how they became a caregiver and what caregiving means to them. Optionally, users may also submit a photo of themselves and those they have cared for. Essay submissions are entered automatically into the competition for a chance to win weekly $50 prizes and the submission with the most votes will be awarded the grand prize of a free spa day and in-home care of their loved one, worth $350.

“Caregivers aren’t always appreciated for all the work they do,” continued DeLuca. “The real value of the ‘Share Why You Care’ contest is that their voices can be heard.”

To see the entries or enter the contest, please visit the contest homepage and follow ElderCareLink.com on Twitter and Facebook.

About ElderCareLink.com
ElderCarelink.com, a one-stop elder care resource, provides a community of support, advice, and caregiving resources for families in need of elder care. To date, ElderCarelink has provided information and assistance to more than one million families nationwide with finding in-home care, assisted living, nursing homes, adult day care, private duty nursing, and care management services. ElderCareLink.com is owned and operated by QuinStreet, Inc. (NASDAQ: QNST), one of the largest Internet marketing and media companies in the world. QuinStreet is committed to providing consumers and businesses with the information they need to research, find and select the products, services and brands that meet their needs. The company is a leader in visitor-friendly marketing practices. For more information, please visit QuinStreet.com

The Dr. Miriam & Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus Presents a Free Parenting Workshop from World-Renown Psychologist

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The Dr. Miriam & Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus Presents a Free Parenting Workshop from World-Renown Psychologist New York Times Best Selling Author Michael G. Thompson, Ph.D. Provides a Practical Guide to Raising Healthy, Secure Children

Las Vegas – Jan. 8, 2012 –The Dr. Miriam & Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus is offering a free Parenting Workshop hosted by world-renowned psychologist specializing in children and families, Michael G. Thompson, Ph.D. On Sunday, Jan. 13 from1 – 3 p.m., 400 parents will have the opportunity to hear from this best selling author and sought after speaker who has appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show, The Today Show, CBS 60 Minutes, ABC 20/20, Good Morning America, and The Early Show. Thompson’s workshop is titled Pressured Children, Worried Parents: A Conversation about Parenting in 2013: managing you and your child’s expectations and emotions with regards to adolescence, friendship development, popularity and social cruelty.

“This is Michael Thompson’s fourth visit to our school and he is back by popular demand,” said Paul Schiffman, head of school of Adelson Educational Campus. “As a celebrated psychologist, he provides parents with wisdom, guidance and humor through all the tough decisions they make. We look forward to hearing his insight on Jan. 13.”

Michael Thompson, Ph.D. is a consultant, author and psychologist specializing in children and families. He is the supervising psychologist for the Belmont Hill School and has worked in more than five hundred schools across the United States, as well as in international schools in Central America, Europe, Africa and Asia.

He and his co-author, Dan Kindlon, wrote the New York Times best-selling book, Raising Cain: Protecting the Emotional Life of Boys (Ballantine Books, 1999). He is the author of Homesick and Happy: How Time Away from Parents Can Help a Child Grow, Speaking of Boys: Answers to the Most-Asked Questions about Raising Sons Ballantine, 2000), and co-author (with Catherine O’Neill Grace and Larry Cohen, Ph.D.) of Best Friends/Worst Enemies: Understanding the Social Worlds of Children (Ballantine, 2001) and Mom, They’re Teasing Me: Helping Your Child Solve Social Problems (Ballantine, 2002.) About Best Friends, Worst Enemies the Publishers Weekly review declared, “Not since Dr. Spock and Penelope Leach has there been such a sensitive and practical guide to raising healthy children.” The Pressured Child: Helping Your Child Achieve Success in School and in Life (with Teresa Barker, Ballantine, 2004) was written to help parents understand the complex journey of children through school, from Kindergarten through senior year. His third book on the psychology of boys, entitled, It’s a Boy!: Understanding Your Son’s Development from Birth to Eighteen, was published in 2008. It focuses on the importance of undirected, free play in the lives of boys. He is presently writing a new book about summer camps and schools trips entitled, Homesick and Happy: How Children Change and Grow When They Are Away from Their Parents.

A dedicated speaker and traveler, Michael Thompson has appeared on The Today Show, The Oprah Winfrey Show, ABC 20/20, CBS 60 Minutes, The Early Show and Good Morning America. He has been quoted in the New York Times, The Washington Post, Newsweek, Time and U.S. News and World Report and has been a guest on NPR’s “Morning Edition” with Susan Stamberg, “Talk of the Nation” with Ray Suarez and the Diane Rhem Show. He wrote, narrated and hosted a two-hour PBS documentary entitled “Raising Cain” that was broadcast nationally in 2006.

Dr. Thompson serves on the board of the American Camping Association and is on the Advisory Board of Parent Magazine. Dr. Thompson lives in Arlington, Massachusetts. He is married to Dr. Theresa McNally, a psychotherapist, and is the father of Joanna, 26, and Will, 20.

About The Dr. Miriam & Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus
The mission of The Dr. Miriam and Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus is to instruct and inspire new generations of students who will draw strength from a rich Jewish heritage, use their knowledge, values and vision to fulfill their own potential, and build a better world. Adelson Educational Campus was originally founded in 1980 and now educates children from 18 months through 12th grade. Adelson Educational Campus accepts students of all faiths and affiliations and offers a drug-free commitment to its students and faculty. Adelson Educational Campus is located at 9700 West Hillpointe Road in Summerlin. For more information please call (702) 255-4500 or visit www.adelsoncampus.org or Facebook/Adelson Campus

Nevada Senior Guide : Senior Living Facilities – Some Criteria to Take into Consideration

November 27, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

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Senior Living Facilities – Some Criteria to Take into Consideration
by: Justin Woods

Once the professionals retire from the work, life becomes too dull for many of them. Though they live under the same roof with their children and grandchildren, still they feel the strong sense of mental loneliness. They miss the office environment where they used to share their feeling and experiences with the other colleagues and it was a real fun for all of them. The working sons and daughters are snowed under the workloads and find no time to chat with the elder parents. Some children are deeply immersed into the thought for their own loaves and fishes. Joining the senior living facilities is a prudent decision for the retirees to cut the shackles of loneliness and share the spaces and experiences with the others.

Senior living facilities: Are they ideal for you- Well, there are many criteria to mull over prior to opting for such choice. The persons feel strong pang of isolation when they have to move out of their houses. Their houses are the largest reservoirs of many fond memories. Still, sometime they have no other way but to choose the senior living facilities. Their children may be settled abroad or in some other parts of the country. They may be too self-centered to take care of the ageing parents. In such cases, the elder persons will feel good by living the rest of their life with the other retired seniors. Sharing the experiences and memories of the bygone days with the other members of the senior living facilities prevents the aggressive depression from setting in.

Senior living facilities: Choose the right one- The elder age is often infested with the minor and major health hazards. So, you need the facility to avail the quick services of a bunch of specialist doctors and trained nurses in times of your needs. Cleanliness and a flock of dedicated and well-behaved staffs are the major considerations prior to making any decision. There are other criteria too to be taken care of before choosing the senior living facilities. The location of the place is also an important factor. The elder persons hate the blaring horns, too much hustle-bustle and love the cool breeze, hues of flowers and sprawling garden in front of the building. So if the senior living facilities offer these criteria, you can go ahead to look for the other benefits.

Quality of food is another essential consideration to ponder over. Gather sufficient information about the qualification of the staffs, provision of any entertainment facility such as TVs or DVDs. The old age does not mean an end of life, it often implies to turn a new leaf. If you have been always a book worm, then ask the authorities if there is any library in the compound of the senior living facilities. Some senior facilities also offer ample spaces to play golf or badminton or lawn tennis. Such indulgence is not only good for the bodies but also a vital tonic for the mental refreshment.

Senior living facilities: Cost factor- It is the deciding factor for many retirees but it is not fair to compromise a lot to find the affordable senior living facilities. The investors often pass the bulk of the multifamily apartment purchase loans borrowed to accommodate the senior citizens to members of the house, but one should avert the over-the-top priced living facilities.
About The Author

Justin Wood is a financial advisor who have good information on Senior living facilities & multifamily apartment purchase loans. For more information please visit http://www.nationalcommercialpropertyloans.com/
The author invites you to visit:
http://www.nationalcommercialpropertyloans.com

Improving Senior Life With Medical Alert For Seniors

November 26, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Improving Senior Life With Medical Alert For Seniors
by: Lance Mcisaac

Senior Citizens are in a time of their lives when they should be able to enjoy the freedom to live independently and go places when they desire. Unfortunately, sometimes their freedom is restricted by health concerns caused by their aging bodies. Medical Alert for Seniors can provide them with a sense of security, enabling them to enjoy the freedom they want and deserve. Seniors can come and go as they desire knowing that they have an alert button they can press at any time should they require assistance. This medical alarm system can provide loved ones with peace of mind as well. They can be assured that medical help is only a push of a button away.

With medical alert for seniors, senior citizens can live independently. They have the comfort of knowing that help is available any time day or night should they need it, while they have the freedom to continue to live in their own homes and follow their own routines without feeling like burdens on family members. Should they experience a fall or other medical emergency, all they have to do is press their medical panic button and help is available.

Nowadays, people move around frequently with careers, often leaving elderly parents in distant states. This can frequently be a source of concern for loving children. Being so far away often causes worry for family members who can’t visit frequently or be available in case of an emergency. When their parents or other senior family members have a medical alarm system, relatives can feel secure that they will receive the immediate medical help they might need. This can bring great peace of mind to family members living long distances from their aging relatives.

If you are a senior living alone or the relative of an independent senior, medical alert for Seniors may provide the assurance you need to avoid worrying. Knowing an alert button is always on hand will allow you to continue the independent lifestyle without worry. Seniors love the freedom it allows and their relatives enjoy the peace of mind it provides.

About The Author

Lance Mcisaac is the author of this article on Medical Alert Systems.

Find more information about Medical Alert Pendant here.
The author invites you to visit:
http://www.medicalguardian.com

Helping Hands Surgical Care Selects Eight Uninsured Nevadans to Receive no-cost surgeries on Second Annual Charity Surgery Day

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
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Helping Hands Surgical Care Selects Eight Uninsured Nevadans to Receive no-cost surgeries on Second Annual Charity Surgery Day

WHAT: Eight uninsured Nevadans suffering from a variety of conditions will receive surgeries at no cost from Helping Hands Surgical Care (HHSC), a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization founded by Dr. Kevin Petersen and his wife, Kelly Petersen, who also serves as HHSC’s unpaid executive director. The surgeries will be performed by Dr. Petersen and other Las Vegas surgeons, with the assistance from the medical staff at Valley View Surgery Center – all of whom are volunteering their services for the day. A medical advisory board screened the applications to select patients to receive no cost surgeries. HHSC’s mission is to fund and facilitate surgeries for uninsured and underinsured Nevadans without the means to pay for medically necessary surgeries.

WHEN: CHARITY SURGERY DAY – HELPING HANDS SURGICAL CARE
November 13, 2012
Surgeries scheduled on the hour from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (First arrivals starting at 8 a.m.)
Patients and doctors are available to media prior to or on surgery day.

WHERE: Valley View Surgery Center
1330 S. Valley View Blvd.
Las Vegas, NV 89102
PATIENTS:
Jeffery Silverman, 52, Hernia repair, mesh removal
Silverman had an initial hernia repair in 2009 and has been in constant pain ever since. With very little money left in the bank and no insurance, he is embarrassed to ask for help, but grateful Dr. Petersen is willing to remove the mesh that was used in his initial surgery and repair it again without mesh. He has formed a large support group on Facebook comprised of people around the country suffering from the same condition, and he is grateful to be chosen for free surgery. He can’t wait to reclaim his life.

Donald Sykes, 51, Umbilical hernia repair
Sykes is minister of Pentecostal Temple Church of God in Christ, married with four children and eight grandchildren. He had insurance at one point but lost it due to his inability to keep up with the payments. Sykes has suffered from his hernia condition for nine years and is in considerable pain. He is grateful that the pain will be gone soon, that his life will be extended and the hernia will no longer be visible through his clothing.

Mariana Flores, 26, Umbilical hernia repair
Flores is married with two sons, ages 2 and 7. She is excited she will be able to help her sons and be active again. She feels she has not been a good mother since her mobility has been so limited by excessive pain. In fact, she has not been able to clean her home. She is so grateful she was chosen to receive charity surgery so she can become a better mother and wife and not dependent on others.

Mark Babcock, 54, Umbilical and Right inguinal hernia
Babcock, who is single with three children, is unable to work because of his medical condition. He currently lives with a friend free of charge. He has been to the emergency room twice and was turned away both times because the surgery to cure his condition is considered elective. He is looking forward to regaining the confidence he has lost over the last seven years as he has struggled with debilitating pain. He is extremely thankful to finally receive the help he needs to get back his life.

Mario Zaccone, 49, Right inguinal hernia
Zaccone has suffered from his hernia for five years and is unemployed because of his inability to work due to pain. Previously, he worked in the food industry where he was required to lift, which is impossible for him now given his current condition. He is single with four children and lives with his mother because of his inability to provide for his children and care for himself. He is extremely grateful for HHSC and looks forward to beginning his life again.

Paul Labarre, 42, Umbilical hernia repair
Labarre is a veteran construction worker who with specific skills in flooring and laying carpet. He is unable to work due to his hernia and has lost his home and insurance. He currently lives with his parents and is looking forward to being healthy again and passing a physical so he can go back to work and provide for his family.

Michael Haws, 53, Left inguinal hernia repair
Haws has worked for years in the construction and oil industries. He has not been able to lift due to his hernia condition. Unable to provide for himself, he has been forced to move in with his brother. His current situation has had a major effect on his self-esteem, and he feels drained both physically and emotionally. He is thrilled to be chosen and looks forward to a bright future.

Linda Willis, 59, Trigger finger
Willis has been without medical insurance since she lost her job several years ago. Right-handed, she has not been able to do anything with her right hand for a long time. This includes preparing food, writing and simple daily tasks. Willis has been forced to move in with her daughter for both financial support and assistance with her daily care. She is excited about the future and the possibility of regaining some independence. She particularly looks forward to resuming things she enjoys, including sewing and refinishing furniture.

PARTICIPATING DOCTORS:

Dr. Kevin C. Petersen, General Surgeon
Dr. Bishr Hijazi, Hand Surgeon
Dr. Jon Darwin Halling, Anesthesiologist
Dr. Hosny Habashy, Anesthesiologist

COMMUNITY SUPPORT:
The Las Vegas community is coming together to support the efforts of HHSC.
• Valley View Surgery Center is donating the use of the one operating room for an entire day.
• The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf is providing coffee and breakfast for the physicians and medical staff (up to 35 people) on surgery day.

About Helping Hands Surgical Care
Helping Hands Surgical Care is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization whose mission is to fund and facilitate surgeries for uninsured and underinsured individuals without the means to pay for medically necessary, quality of life surgeries. Founded by Dr. Kevin Petersen of Las Vegas, Nevada based No Insurance Surgery, Helping Hands Surgical Care values the health and well-being of each individual regardless of their ability to pay. The organization is guided by its focus on the physician-patient relationship and its dedication to transforming and improving the lives of those it serves. For more information, visit www.HelpingHandsSurgicalCare.com or call 702-242-5393.

Renown Health News Update – October 2012

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Renown Health News Update – October 2012
Renown Health is committed to providing media with the latest news and events, national health trends and observances. Subject matter experts are available to discuss the following topics. Please contact Dan Davis at 775-982-6370 or ddavis2@renown.org to schedule an interview. Photos and video can also be made available.

INSIDE RENOWN HEALTH
• Pinterest – Renown Health has launched a Pinterest page featuring boards like Kidtastic Art, No Place Like Home and Passion for Purple. Renown’s Motivated Mommies board features pins from healthy and active moms who maintain a balance between work, parenting and self. If you know someone who fits this description, nominate them to participate by sending an email to support@renown.org.
• Flu Shots Available – As winter begins, so will an increase in cold and flu sicknesses. To keep from catching the flu virus, people should protect themselves with flu shots. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that everyone six months and older get a flu vaccine each year. A Renown representative is available to speak about ways to prevent the flu virus and other methods to keep from getting sick.
• Komen Race for the Cure – Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer and the fifth most common cause of death. To help spread awareness and raise funds, Renown Health’s team Renown Racers will raise money and participate in the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. Renown also offers preventative measures for women in the community. Screening and self breast exams are imperative to all women and should be discussed with a doctor. A medical expert is available to talk about the importance of early detection.

NATIONAL TRENDS LOCALIZED
• Halloween Tips and Tricks – As Halloween approaches, parents should prepare for a safe and healthy evening of trick or treating. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest offering nutritious snacks, limiting the number of treats children eat and ensuring that costumes and makeup are safe for children to wear. A Renown representative can discuss ways to make this Halloween night safe and fun for kids.
• Survival from Heart Attacks on the Rise – Death due to heart attacks is on the decline in the United States. Some doctors believe this trend is due to changes in healthcare and increases in medical technology. At Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health, leading edge physicians and technology help community members stay healthy and recover quickly if heart problems occur. A Renown representative is available to discuss ways to prevent heart attacks and to improve survival chances if one occurs.
• Paleo Diet – The Paleolithic Diet and other elimination diets like it have become increasingly popular as a way to lose weight quickly. Yet, once an individual stops dieting, he or she is likely to gain back most of the weight lost. A Renown representative is available to discuss more effective ways to lose weight and keep it off.

IMPORTANT HEALTH DATES/OBSERVANCES
• National Health Education Week – National Health Education Week is Oct. 15 to Oct. 19. This celebration focuses national attention on a major public health issue. This year’s health issue is “Adolescent Health: Planting Seeds for a Healthier Generation,” which aims to improve the health and future of America’s youth. A Renown representative is available to discuss ways to keep children healthy both physically and mentally.
• National Physical Therapy Month – October is dedicated to recognizing the important roles of those medical professionals who keep us moving. At the CARF accredited Renown Rehabilitation Hospital, physicians and physical therapists provide quality care to patients helping them to get back to their lives. A Renown Rehab representative can discuss how physical therapy helps people return to the quality of life they desire.
• Respiratory Care Week – Respiratory Care Week is Oct. 21 to Oct. 27. The week is dedicated to respiratory care professionals, and it is designed to bring awareness to the lung diseases like CDP and asthma. At Renown, the department of Respiratory Care Services dedicates itself to patients ensuring they receive the treatment necessary to manage their diseases. A Renown representative is available to discuss ways to manage respiratory diseases and treatment options available at Respiratory Care Services.

City Of Las Vegas November 2012 Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City Of Las Vegas November 2012
Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle! Most facilities are closed Nov. 12, 22 and 23 for holiday observance.

“Souper” Family Swim Day (all ages)
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Cost: One can of soup or other canned goods If you bring more than one item, you will receive an additional one-day pass to use any day during open swim.
Municipal Pool, 431 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6309.
No school — come to the pool! Canned goods will be donated to a local food bank. Regular fees apply without donation.

E! Club (ages 6-13)
Friday, Nov. 16, 6 to 9 p.m.
Cost: $25 per child.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Parents can enjoy a night on the town while children enjoy a fun evening of activities.

Ward 4 Free Holiday Movie in the Park (all ages)
Friday, Nov. 30, 6:30 p.m.
Police Memorial Park, 3250 Metro Academy Way.
Enjoy the family movie, “The Grinch,” featuring Jim Carrey, as well as free holiday crafts, hot chocolate, candy canes, popcorn and cookies, while supplies last. Get your picture taken with the Grinch for free.
Please dress warmly and bring a blanket or chair to sit on; movie will be outside on the grass.

Adaptive Recreation
Adaptive Cycle Club (all ages)
Saturday, Nov. 3, 9 to 11 a.m. or 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Cost: $2 per person.
Wayne Bunker Family Park, 7351 W. Alexander Road, at Tenaya Way.
Call (702) 229-4796 to reserve your spot in the early or late session. Adaptive cycles provided.

Project D.I.R.T. Tent Camping (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Saturday-Sunday, Nov. 10-11, 11 a.m. Saturday to 11 a.m. Sunday. Advance registration required.
Cost: $30 per person.
Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road, (702) 229-8100.
Meet at Floyd Lamb Park to enjoy tent camping, hiking and fishing. Call (702) 229-4796 for registration and information. Cost includes meals and tent. Bring your own sleeping bag.
-more-

Paralympic Sport Free Activity Nights (kindergarten-grade 12)
Wednesday, Nov. 14, 5 to 8 p.m.
Rancho High School, 1900 Searles Ave.
Register at main school entrance. Call (702) 229-4796 or e-mail jfoster@lasvegasnevada.gov for additional information and locations.

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed staff development days and holidays.
Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Call (702) 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence.

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m. Closed Nov. 6, 12, 22-23.
Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Participants will enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

Wheelchair Athletes Open Gym (high school-adult)
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., excluding Nov. 22.
Fee: $2 per practice.
Fremont Middle School Gymnasium, 1100 E. Saint Louis Ave.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Wheelchair Basketball Practice (high school-adult)
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. No practice Nov. 22.
Fee: $20 per person.
Fremont Middle School Gymnasium, 1100 E. Saint Louis Ave.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Quad Rugby Team Practice (high school-adult)
Fridays, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. No practice Nov. 23.
Fee: $20 monthly
Chuck Minker Sports Complex, 275 N. Mojave Rd.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

# # #

 

How to Care for an Elderly Person or Senior

October 11, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

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How to Care for an Elderly Person or Senior
by: Starlet Nicole

It is not always easy caring for an elderly person. Their physical condition, health issues and their emotional state can present challenges for you, the caregiver. There are no doubts that caring for an elderly person is admirable, but it certainly comes with stress and at times can be overwhelming.

Far too many people feel guilty that they can not care for an elderly person on their own. Life presents far too many challenges and more often than not raising a family, paying into a mortgage and keeping food on the table can be challenging enough let alone adding to this caring for an elderly loved one. Although this can be challenging – it is not impossible. Preparing yourself and your family members for the transition is essential in order to make this work well.

Physical Considerations

Get informed about the physical needs of your loved one. Talk to the doctor and to anyone else who may have the wisdom and knowledge to help you care for the elderly member of your family. Know what to expect, what medications are required. Using services provided by a certified in-home caregiver from a professional agency can assist you in times that you need that extra help.

Keeping all important information in one file is important and this includes all medical information including test results, names and phone numbers of doctors, appointment dates, hospital cards, and insurance information. If your loved one is taking a lot of medications, make a chart to help keep track of what medication is to be taken and when.

Always be sure the home is safe. If your loved one uses a walker be sure throw rugs are secure, and there are no obstacles for them to trip over. Install safety railings should this help. If your loved one can get confused at times, it’s also a good safety precaution to have a baby gate positioned high enough in the door frame at staircases so that they can not fall down.

Emotional Considerations

Spending time caring for the elderly does not have to be all about taking care of their personal needs. Spend time asking them about their life. Everyone has stories to share about their life and some seniors have great experiences to share.

Teach an elderly person about the Internet. Many elderly people are nervous about computers and teaching them about all the amazing benefits of the Internet can spark new life in the person you are caring for.

The brain likes to stay active and no better way to do this than to play word games, crossword puzzles or even some board games such as Scrabble.

Always remember to be understanding because as we get older we tend to be very set in our ways and this means being stubborn at times. If the person you are caring for is being very stubborn and it is not a big issue, let it go. If the stubbornness is over something that is not negotiable it’s much easier to handle and you’ll have much less stress when you know to expect it.

When you have all the tools you need, it will make caring for the elderly much easier.

About The Author

Starlet is professional author for GC Nexus Group, Elderly Caregivers Agency help in finding professional caregivers throughout Montreal and Toronto in Canada. GC Nexus offers Live in Caregivers Canada, senior caregiver and elderly home care services for your parents and spouses by professionals.

http://www.gcnexus.com/elderly-care/
The author invites you to visit:
http://www.gcnexus.com

Renown Health Notices

Renown Health is committed to providing media with the latest news and events, national health trends and observances. Subject matter experts are available to discuss the following topics. Please contact Dan Davis at 775-982-6370 or ddavis2@renown.org to schedule an interview. Photos and video can also be made available.

INSIDE RENOWN HEALTH
• Hand Foot and Mouth Disease – During August, Washoe County School District and the Washoe County Health District issued warnings to parents of school children about hand, foot and mouth disease. A Renown Health pediatrician is available to answer questions about the disease and to suggest ways to prevent its spread.
• FastTrack ERs – The Emergency Rooms (ERs) at Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center now have the region’s first and only FastTrack ERs. Open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, the system is designed to treat patients who need immediate attention for small emergencies including minor cuts and burns, allergic reactions and other minor injuries. A Renown Health representative is available to discuss how FastTrack ER will help improve a patient’s ER experience.
• Pathway to Excellence® – Both Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center have been recognized as the first two Pathway to Excellence® hospitals in Nevada by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. This award honors a work environment designed to improve overall nursing satisfaction and retention of quality nursing staff. A Renown Health representative is available to discuss what this honor means for patient care.

NATIONAL TRENDS LOCALIZED
• Digital Accountability to Get Healthy – Getting exercise, eating right and losing weight always seems to be a challenge. Already connected to the digital world, people have turned to using social media tools and platforms to achieve their health goals. Renown Health has Healthy Tracks, an online program, to encourage employees to get screenings, exercise and eat nutritiously. A representative can speak on the benefits of digital accountability and how community members can become part of the Healthy Tracks challenge.
• Swallowing foreign objects – Each year, more than 100,000 cases of kids swallowing foreign objects are reported in the United States. Sometimes, the swallowed object may not harm a child at all. Other times, a doctor’s visit may be necessary. A Renown Health representative is available to talk about what to do if your child swallows something he or she should not.
• Dense breasts causing mammogram concerns – More women are learning from their physicians that they may have breasts too dense for mammograms to give a good picture. Women whose breast tissue is very dense have a greater risk of developing breast cancer than women whose breasts contain more fatty tissue. In addition, dense breast tissue makes spotting possible tumors on a mammogram more difficult. A Renown Health specialist can discuss other preventative measures and screenings women should take.

IMPORTANT HEALTH DATES/OBSERVANCES
• National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month – More than 23 million children and teenagers in the United States ages 2 to 19 are obese or overweight. Nearly one third of America’s children are at early risk for Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and even stroke. A pediatrician from Renown Health can discuss ways to prevent childhood obesity and keep children healthy.
• Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month – More than 20,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year, and approximately 15,000 women die annually from the disease. Ovarian Cancer is referred to as the silent killer because it usually is not discovered until its advanced stages. A gynecologist is available to talk about ways women can discover and effectively treat ovarian cancer early.
• Prostate Cancer Awareness Month – Prostate Cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in America affecting 1 in 6 men. Renown Institute for Cancer offers patients PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) screenings, da Vinci Robotic Surgery and leading radiation treatment options including TomoTherapy. Low-cost health screenings are offered every Wednesday. A local doctor is available to speak about this screening and cancer treatment options.

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 – Recreation, Adaptive Recreation, Sports & Community Special Events

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 – Recreation, Adaptive Recreation, Sports & Community Special Events

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle! Most facilities are closed Oct. 26 for holiday observance.

Ward 5 Coffee With The Councilman
Thursday, Oct. 4, 9 to 10 a.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Starbucks, 751 N. Rancho Drive, at Bonanza Road.
Join Ward 5 Councilman Ricki Y. Barlow for coffee and conversation about your ideas to improve Ward 5 and Las Vegas.

Ward 4 Walk & Roll For ALS (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 13, 6 a.m. registration. 5K begins 8 a.m., Walk begins 8:15 a.m.
Cost: $25 minimum donation to participate in walk; $35 for runners ages 18+; $25 runners ages 5-17; free for under age 5.
Police Memorial Park, 3250 Metro Academy Way, at Cheyenne Avenue.
Sign up your team at http://als.kintera.org/WalknRoll. Call (702) 777-0500 for more information.

Ward 2 Trunk or Treat Car Show and Free Kid’s Halloween Festival (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public. There is a fee for vendors and car show participants.
Veterans Memorial Leisure Services Center, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.
Please join Councilman Bob Beers for a fun day filled with music provided by DJ Brando, along with Halloween activities for the kids, including craft projects, costume contest, games, face painting and jump houses. Kids have the opportunity to “trunk or treat” at the cars decorated for Halloween in the car show. Help pick the spookiest! All makes, models and years welcome in the car show. Vendors are welcome. The event is sponsored by Ward 2 Councilman Bob Beers.

Contact John Bear at 229-2420 or e-mail to jbear@lasvegasnevada.gov, if you want to register your car in the show, become a vendor at the event, or volunteer to help. Early registration for the car show is $25 and is due by Thursday, Oct. 4. You also can register a car in the car show on the event date for $35. The vendor fee is $25, which includes a table.
-more-

Free Ward 6 Shredding Event
Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to noon.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive.
Bring your documents that need to be shredded. Complimentary shredding takes place in the Centennial Hills Community Center Active Adult Center parking lot. Limit of five boxes per vehicle. This is a safe and convenient way to get rid of old documents.

Movie at the E! (all ages)
Friday, Oct. 19, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
East Las Vegas Community Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Enjoy a family movie in the plaza. This will be a perfect chance for the family to relax and enjoy a safe and special night under the stars. Bring low folding chairs for your comfort.

E! Club (ages 6-13)
Friday, Oct. 19, 6 to 9 p.m.
Cost: $25 per child.
East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Avenue, (702) 229-1515.
Parents can enjoy a night on the town while children enjoy a fun evening of activities.

Ward 1 Trunk or Treat (all ages)
Wednesday, Oct. 24, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
Anthem Institute Parking Lot, 2320 S. Rancho Drive, at Sahara Avenue.
Enjoy a community celebration with trick-or-treating, jump house and more, hosted by Anthem Institute and co-sponsored by the city of Las Vegas.

Howling Halloween Carnival (all ages)
Thursday, Oct. 25, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
Doolittle Community Center, 1950 N. J St., (702) 229-6374.
There will be a costume contest, games, drawings and candy for the kids. There will also be a Haunted Hallway designed to frighten all who enter.

Las Vegas Mayor’s Cup International Tournament
Friday-Sunday, Oct. 26-28.
Free for spectators. Advance registration required for teams.
Bettye Wilson Soccer Complex, 7353 Eugene Ave., and other parks.
For teams ages 8-15. This soccer tournament is co-hosted by the city of Las Vegas and the Downtown Las Vegas Soccer Club. This top-ranked event drew teams from 11 different states, as well as Canada and Mexico last year. Teams are guaranteed three games. Individual awards are offered for 1st and 2nd place. The entry fee is only $515 for U8-U10 and $735 for U11-U15. Entry deadline is Sept. 6. For more information, go online to www.lvmayorscup.com.
-more-

Adaptive Recreation

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed staff development days and holidays.
Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Call (702) 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence.

Wheelchair Athletes Open Gym (high school-adult)
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., through December.
Fee: $2 per practice.
Fremont Middle School Gymnasium, 1100 E. Saint Louis Ave.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m. Closed Oct. 12, 26.
Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.
East Las Vegas Community Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Participants enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

Adaptive Cycle Club (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 6, 9 to 11 a.m. or 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Cost: $2 per person.
Wayne Bunker Family Park, 7351 W. Alexander Road, at Tenaya Way.
Call (702) 229-4796 to reserve your spot in the early or late session. Adaptive cycles provided.

Helter Skelter Quad Rugby Tournament
Oct. 12-14, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday.
Free for spectators.
Dula Gymnasium, 441 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6307.
Six teams from across North America will compete for medals for first through third place. Teams will include: Las Vegas Sin City Skulls; Northern California Quake; Sierra Strom from Reno/Sacramento; University of Arizona Wildcats; Boise Idaho Bombers; and the Ottawa Stingers from Canada. Spectators are welcome. Call (702) 229-4796 or e-mail jfoster@lasvegasnevada.gov for more information.
-more-

20th Annual Disability Awareness Day (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Free admission and lunch.
Pioneer Park, 7449 Braswell Drive.
Attend a free “Work Incentives Seminar on Ticket to Work & Employment for SSI/SSDI Beneficiaries Age 14 to 64.” This seminar will be held from 10 to 11:30 a.m. in conjunction with Disability Awareness Day. Also enjoy live entertainment, a free wheelchair safety check and a free lunch. Call (702) 889-4216 to reserve your space.

Free Paralympic Sport Activity Nights (kindergarten-grade 12)
Wednesday, Oct. 17, 5 to 8 p.m.
Rancho High School, 1900 Searles Ave.
Register at main school entrance. Call (702) 229-4796 or e-mail jfoster@lasvegasnevada.gov for additional information and locations.

Quad Rugby Team Practice (high school-adult)
Friday, Oct. 19, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Minker Sports Complex, 275 N. Mojave Road, (702) 229-6563.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Senior Living – An Ideal Place for Retired Seniors (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Everyone wants to live in peace and happiness even in old age, and senior living options are available for these people. In such a fast-paced world, children usually don’t have time to take care of their ageing parents. If they look for some retirement options, however, things could be easier. For all retired people, retirement communities are a great place to spend their lives in happiness and contentment. For most seniors, independence comes with a lot of difficulties, but for those who find it tough to accomplish their daily chores there are assisted living homes. When people get older and their children are unable to take care of them, there are a variety of senior living options.

Most seniors resist frequent change, so selecting a retirement community has to be done with great care. Most of the assisted living homes are set up so that the residents of the facility can have a better quality of life than they would experience in their traditional homes. It has often being observed that when it comes to elder care, the most important thing is to get exercise and have activities that enhance their lives and promote longevity. Improving the quality of life through senior living is a very real possibility, and this is the top goal of the assisted living homes. These facilities are there for all senior citizens, whether they are retired or not and whether they need assistance or not. After retirement, a lot of people tend to stop taking care of themselves as well and try to keep living on their own, but this stage of life ought to be the most enjoyable one. If you want to enjoy your life, then check into the best retirement community.

For retired people, there are a number of senior living options that can be chosen depending on the needs of the individual. The two main choices after retirement are living with family or moving to a retirement community. The choice of these senior homes depends on the overall health, independence, and mobility. If the aged person does not like going very far, then assisted living homes that are located near shopping areas would be best. As we get older, we try to find activities that will keep us engaged and happy. A lot of senior living facilities organize events for elderly people to share their thoughts.

Active seniors who are independent in their daily lives can opt for a regular retirement community which serves their individual needs. Senior citizens need to understand that staying in senior living is not a social stigma, but is a way to enjoy retired life to the fullest without being dependent on anyone. The ideal place for retired people among all the senior living options is the retirement community because it really caters to the needs of retired people.

Horizon Bay’s retirement communities, Active Adult Communities communities and Assisted Living Community redefine life for seniors where they are respected as individuals and encouraged to live life more meaningfully.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Thilo_Best

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5024874

Nevada-Senior-Guide Support Groups Directory – Southern Nevada

Adult Diabetes Education & Mgmnt.

West Charleston Library

6301 W. Charleston Blvd., LV, NV 89146

(702) 349-7370, www.diabetes-lasvegas.org

Support Group 2nd Tues. each month, 6-7:30pm

 

Alcoholics Anonymous

1431 E. Charleston Blvd., #15, LV, NV 89104-1734

702-598-1888, www.LVcentraloffice.org

Meeting Schedules, Telephone Reassurance,

12 Step-calls, literature

ALS of Nevada

4220 S. Maryland Pkwy., Bldg. B, Ste 404

Las Vegas, NV 89119

(702) 777-0500

Support Groups, ALS Clinic, Medical

Equipment to Lend (Lou Gehrig’s Disease)

 

Alzheimer’s Association S. Nevada Chapter

5190 S. Valley View Blvd.,#104, LV, NV 89118

(702) 248-2770, www.alzdsw.org

Referral Services, Resources, Support Groups,

24-hour Help Line 1-800-272-3900, respite
care, safe return program, education on
Dementia & Alzheimers

American Cancer Society

6165 S. Rainbow Blvd., Bldg. 12, LV, NV 89118

702-891-9009, www.cancer.org. Referral                             Service, call for appointment & event info.

American Diabetes Association

For diabeties info, call 702-369-9995 or

801-363-3024 x 7069, 888-342-2383

Resource/Referrals, Advocacy

American Lung Association

3552 W. Cheyenne Ave. #130, N. LV, NV 89032

(702) 431-6333, www.lungusa.org

Literature, Support Group, Better Breathers
Club, Freedom from smoking club

American Heart & Stroke Association

4445 S. Jones Blvd.,Ste. B1, LV, NV 89103

(702) 789-4370, www.strokeassociation.org

Resources to Physicians, hospitals, healthcare

professionals, and individuals, CPR classes

 

Arthritis Foundation Nevada

1368 Paseo Verde Pkwy, S-200B

Henderson, NV 89012. 702-367-1626

www.arthritis.org. Telephone Reassurance,                         Referral Service, Literature, Exercise Classes,         Aquatics, self-help programs

 

Cancer Connection

Comprehensive Cancer Centers of Nevada

3730 S. Eastern Ave., Las Vegas, NV 89109

(702) 952-3400 Call for Info and Locations

 

Divorced & Widowed Adjustment, Inc.

P.O. Box 26504, Las Vegas, NV 89106

(702) 735-5544, www.info4nv.org

Counseling Service

 

Epilepsy Support Group

Sunrise Hospital Auditorium

3186 S. Maryland Pkwy., LV, NV 89109

702-731-8115. 2nd Wed. of the month, 5:30pm.                     Meet other people with seizures

 

For the Cure, So. NV Affiliate

4850 W. Flamingo Rd., #25, LV, NV 89103

702-822-2324, www.komensouthernnevada.org

Education, Resources, Friendly Visitation,

Telephone Reassurance

Grief & Loss Support Groups

702-796-3157, www.NAH.org. Call for additional info

 

Hemophilia Foundation of Nevada

7473 W. Lake Mead Blvd., Ste 100, LV, NV 89128

(702) 564-4368, www.HFNV.org

Telephone Reassurance, Advocacy,

Education on bleeding disorders

Las Vegas Valley Lewy Body Dementia

Caregiver Support Group

Call (702) 789-8371 – Joan

Caregiver, Support group meets at Pacifica                          Green Valley: 2620 Robindale Rd., Henderson,                        last Monday of month – 2pm.

 

Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

6280 S. Valley View Blvd.,#342, LV, NV 89118

(702) 436-4220, www.lls.org/snv

Information Resource Center, Education,                             Referral, Financial Aid, Support Groups

 

Muscular Dystrophy Assn.

6320 W. Cheyenne #150, Las Vegas, NV 89108

(702) 822-6920, www.mgausa.org

Counseling, Telephone Reassurance, Medical                      Care, Referral, Medical equipment available,                           must be registered with Muscular Dystrophy

 

National Kidney Foundation

15490 Ventura Blvd., Suite 210

Sherman Oaks, CA 91403, 1 (800) 747-5527

Patient Helpline 1-855-653-2273

www.kidney.org. Info, Referrals.

National Multiple Sclerosis Society

2110 E. Flamingo, Ste., 203, LV, NV 89119

(702) 736-1478, www.nationalmssociety.org                         9am-5pm. Provide information, education,                   support services for families & persons with MS

Nevada Council on Problem Gambling

5552 S. Fort Apache Rd., Ste 100, LV, NV 89148

(702) 369-9740, www.nevadacouncil.org

Telephone Reassurance, Referral,

Problem Gambling Helpline:1-800-522-4700

 

Nevada Tobacco Users

Real help for smokers who want to stop.

Call 1-800-784-8669 (QUIT NOW)

 

No to Abuse – NV Outreach

621 S. Blagg Rd., Pahrump, NV 89048

Crisis line: 1-775-751-1118

Education, Food, Referral, 24/7 Crisis Line,                         Shelter, Counseling, Advocacy, Support                   Groups, intervention & prevention groups,                                parenting groups, shelter for domestic

violence, legal services

 

Ostomy Las Vegas – St. Rose Siena Hospital

Eastern and St. Rose Pkwy., Henderson, NV

Group meets from Sept. to June, 2nd Sat of                          Month, 2pm-4pm, 2nd Tues – Sept. – June, 7:30pm

www.ostomylasvegas.weebly.com

(702) 483-8116 for Info, snvostomy@gmail.com

 

Ovarian Cancer Alliance of Nevada

(702) 796-0430, www.ocan.org

Call for phone support from other women

 

Prostate Support Group, “Us Too”

702-917-7779, www.prostatetaskforce.nv.org

3rd Wed. of the month @7pm, St. Rose

Dominican Hospital, San Martin campus

8280 W. Warm Springs Rd. LV, NV

 

So. NV Association of Polio Survivors –

Las Vegas, Henderson, Pahrump & Boulder City

(702) 644-5091 – Diane. Call for locations.

Support Group for polio survivors , monthly

meetings every 3rd Saturday at 1pm, sharing

knowledge, information, social activities

Sunrise Hospital Breast Cancer Support

The Breast Cancer Center at Sunrise

3006 S. Maryland Pkwy., Ste. 250 LV, NV 89109

Oncology Nutrition Program: 6-7:30pm,

3rd Wed of the Month, need to RSVP

(702) 784-7870. Taichi: Thursdays

11am – 12pm, $5. Call for other programs.

 

Sunrise Hospital Stroke Support Group

Sunrise Hospital – Auditorium

3006 S. Maryland Pkwy., Las Vegas, NV 89109

Meet other people that have suffered a stroke.

3rd Wednesday of the month at 6pm. Free                              and open to the public. Registration not                    required. Learn valuable, educational info about                      strokes. This class is for adults only and you are
welcome to bring a friend or loved one.

Call 702-784-7983 for more info.

 

The Barbara Greenspun Women’s

Care Center of St. Rose

2651 Paseo Verde Pkwy, Ste. 180

Henderson, NV 89074, (702) 616-4902

Senior peer counseling for seniors 50+,
issues such as loss, bereavement, health                                problems, relationships and retirement

 

The Center – Wize Womyn

401 S. Maryland Pkwy. LV, NV 89101

702-733-9800, www.thecenterlv.org

Social and support group for LGBTQ Senior

drop ins. M-F 10:30am-2pm

 

The Center (Gay Men’s Forum)

401 S. Maryland Pkwy., LV, NV 89101

702-733-9800, www.thecenterlv.org

Social and support group for gay and bisexual                    men of all ages, each Wed. at 6pm.

 

Veterans National Caregivers Support Line

1-855-260-3274 VA Clinic Info 8am-8pm EST.

caregiver.va.gov

Nevada-Senior-Guide Advocacy Directory – Southern Nevada

AARP – Nevada State Office / Contact Center

5820 S. Eastern Ave. #190, LV, NV 89119

Toll Free 1-866-389-5652

www.aarp.org/nv

Advocacy, Employment Assistance, Safe

Driving Instruction, Tax Services

 

Clark County Senior Advocate Pgm.

1600 Pinto Lane, LV, NV 89106

(702) 455-7051, www.accessclarkcounty.com

Referral Service, C/C Social Services,

SR Programs, Long Term Placement. Home                            Maker Services. Call for appointment

 

Health Insight

6830 W. Oquendo Rd., #102, LV, NV 89118

(702) 385-9933, www.healthinsight.org

Quality improvements, Health care and

Health issues

 

Health Insightof Livanta

6830 W. Oquendo Rd., Area 5, LV, NV 89118

1-877-588-1123

Supports medical records from healthcare                         providers. Complaints, appeals regarding

hospital discharges, Medicare assistance.

Nevada Disability Advocacy & Law Center

2820 W. Charleston Blvd., Ste. 11, LV, NV 89102

1-(888) 349-3843, (702) 257-8150,

www.ndalc.org. Legal Services, Referral,                            Advocacy for people with disabilities

 

Nevada Health Care Association

35 E. Horizon Ridge Pkwy, Suite 110-137

Henderson, NV 89002, (702) 434-2273

Advocacy, Home living assistance

Nevada Secretary of State

555 E. Washington Ave., #5200, LV, NV 89101

(702) 486-2887, www.livingwilllockbox.com

New website – no cost secure way to file

living wills and advanced healthcare

directives for immediate access to healthcare                     providers. For all ages. Education, fraud info.

 

Office of the Governor Consumer Health

Assistance

555 E. Washington Ave.,#4800, LV, NV 89101

(702) 486-3587, www.govcha.state.nv.us,                               www.rx.help4nv.org. Advocacy, Referral,                     Medical Issues, Workman’s Comp

Rape Crisis Center

801 S. Rancho Dr., Suite B2

Las Vegas, NV 89106, 8am-5pm

(702) 385-2153, www.therapecrisiscenter.org

Hotline (702) 366-1640

Advocacy and Support, Outreach, Education

Counselor on Site

 

Safe House

921 American Pacific Drive #300

Henderson, NV 89014

702-451-4203, Hotline (702) 564-3227

Domestic violence

 

Senior Assistance Services-Senator

Harry Reid

333 Las Vegas Blvd. So.,#8016, LV, NV 89101

(702) 388-5020. Referral Service, Advocacy

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!