Warning: trim() expects parameter 1 to be string, array given in /home/nvsenior/public_html/wp-content/plugins/custom-post-order-category/wp-customcategorypostorder.php on line 492
period of time | Nevada Senior Guide

Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias

June 12, 2016 by · Comments Off on Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias
Filed under: General 

Australian business is starting to see the light when it comes to their hiring policies for mature aged employees, and the positive impact they can have on the workplace. A brief visit to main street shopping centre and you will begin to see a few more weathered faces at work than you would have seen a few years ago.

However, if you scratch below the surface, you begin to see this trend still has a long way to play out. A few older workers get hired into the senior ranks where experience and maturity are greatly valued, more older workers are now being hired at the lower end of the corporate scale into unskilled roles, however the numbers being hired into the mid tier ranks remains low.

This barbell approach to hiring mature workers at the top and bottom of an organisation reflects an ongoing bias that remains difficult to overcome. A company is a microcosm of society, and in a perfect world employers should (within reason) seek diversity in the workplace and value skill, experience and aptitude, regardless of age, race or gender.

Unfortunately, we live in a far from perfect world. When it comes to mature aged workers they tend to be penalised on two fronts. Often the first to be made redundant in uncertain economic times, this setback is then compounded when they are regularly overlooked for someone younger as they begin searching for a new job.

As a result of these two biases towards mature aged job seekers, once out of work, the journey back can often be long and arduous. This is reflected in RBA statistics which indicate long-term unemployment at approximately 40% for those aged 45-64, compared to about 25% for those aged between 25 and 44.

So what are the reasons employers provide for not hiring mature aged workers? Typically, reasons include being overqualified or over-experienced. Taken at face value being overqualified or experienced might not seem so bad, but when you hear the same reason trotted out time and again, it becomes less palatable.

Openly negative feedback from employers tend to include perceptions that mature aged workers are not as IT savvy, do not possess the latest skills, or are not as flexible as their younger counterparts. While these reasons may hold true in many instances, many of the older job seekers I speak to, believe these are often used as convenient excuses to exclude them.

Employer feedback that you are not likely to hear include concerns about health (and subsequent cost) or worse insecurity. There are many poor managers in the workplace that may be intimidated by the experience a mature applicant brings to the role. Rather than leveraging the knowledge and experience an older worker can bring to the workplace, the insecure hirer is concerned about the potential competition, and the presence of someone who may know more than they do.

Dealing with many of these preconceived concerns and fears remains an ongoing challenge for the mature aged job seeker. Perhaps the following facts should be mandatory reading for hiring managers. These facts debunk many of the concerns and myths that persist in the workplace relating to mature aged workers;

    • Mature aged workers can deliver cost savings to employers through increased retention rates. For example, workers over 55 are five times less likely to change jobs compared to workers aged 20-24, reducing both recruitment and training costs. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006)Labour Mobility Survey,
    • Mature workers can deliver an average net benefit of $1956 per year to their employer compared to other workers due to high retention rates, lower rates of absenteeism, decreased recruitment costs and greater return on investment.Business, Work and Ageing (2000) Profiting from Maturity: The Social and Economic Costs of Mature Age Unemployment
    • Australians are living longer and are healthier.2005 ABS survey found the proportion of Australians aged 55-64 reporting their health as ‘good’, ‘very good’ or ‘excellent’ was 75.5% – an increase of four per cent since 1995. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006) National Health Survey: Summary of Results, 2004-05
    • Mature workers were the least likely group to take days off due to their own illness or as a carer. In the two week period prior to the survey nearly half the number of mature workers had days off compared to workers aged 25-34. ibid
    • ABS data shows that Australians aged 55-64 are the fastest growing users of information technology. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2005) Year Book Australia,
  • Australian Health Management which examined the daily work habits of 4000 employees found that workers aged 55 years and over performed at their best for approximately seven hours out of an eight-hour day-an achievement that other workers in the study were unable to match. Australian Health Management (2006), Baby boomers give employers a bang for their buck

While government has been doing its part to address mature aged unemployment through initiatives like DEEWR Experience+, the introduction of the Age Discrimination Act (2004) and appointment of an Age Discrimination Commissioner, it remains imperative that older job seekers directly address some of these age bias issues themselves if they are to enhance their prospects for employment.

Following are some helpful hints that mature aged workers can utilise to make themselves more appealing to employers and thus improve their chances of a speedy return to the workforce;

Government or Community Assistance– Take advantage of government or community based initiatives and assistance. There is a considerable amount of free information and assistance available, and I would strongly recommend looking into these resources. For example, the DEEWR “Experience+” initiative provides free career planning and advice for over 45’s until June 2016, along with an Assistance Program delivering refresher and basic training in IT and social media applications.

Value Proposition– Whether writing your resume or cover letter, or sitting in an interview, ensure the focus of discussion clearly remains on the value that you can bring to an organisation. Discuss how you can help, what you have done in the past and what you can deliver going forward. Outline how your experience might bring special insights and perspectives that other candidates may not possess.

Training– Undertake relevant training or up-skilling. Keeping ‘up to date’ is critical if you expect serious consideration for any position, especially if there is a technical element. The benefit will be that an employer will see that you have not fallen behind and therefore will not require retraining, along with any associated cost.

Resume– You will need a properly structured and well written resume to be considered for most roles. Use an appropriate resume style that is tailored to your strengths, skills and experience. Also ensure primary focus of your resume is on the last 5-10 years (include older information where pertinent). Think about getting assistance from a professional resume writer, whocan add significant value if you are looking to ‘get it right the first time’.

Age Bias – To counter potential impact of age bias, you will need to carefully address the following with any potential employer;

Health– Don’t hesitate to communicate your good health and fitness to potential employers at opportune moments. Inform them if you play sport, run, walk or go to the gym regularly. This should allay any potential concerns about health.

IT Savvy –Take every opportunity to indicate your IT capability. Whether it’s your ability to use specialised systems, the MS Office suite or even your use of Facebook or Twitter, this will highlight your ability to embrace new technology.

Adaptability – Highlight your adaptability in the workplace, providing actual examples where appropriate. If you don’t know something, indicate you are keen to learn (and not that you wouldn’t know where to start). Highlighting your adaptability will help to dispel concerns of rigidness and inflexibility.

Team Player –Communicating that you work well as part of a team is critical. It shows a willingness to take direction and work for the common good, and can present you as less threatening, especially if the hirer feels concerned by a mature more experienced candidate.

Be Positive –Though you need to be fully prepared to discuss negative issues, make every attempt to keep the discussion on a positive footing. Unless specifically requested, there is no need to volunteer information of a negative nature.

While industry is beginning to see the light when it comes to acceptance of mature aged workers, the pace of change remains slow. While providence is on the right side due to the ageing Australian population and the inevitable necessity to hire older workers, the fact remains that age discrimination is still entrenched in much current thinking.

As a result, dealing with age bias will continue to be a challenge for the foreseeable future. However with the combination of positive government policy, changing attitudes and a proactive attitude to making oneself more appealing to employers (as outlined above), the situation is not without promise.

Honing your individual approach and message will take time and effort. To strike the right balance the mature job seeker will need to walk a fine line between sounding experienced, but not old, adaptable, but not inflexible and appear keen, not desperate. There is no magic formula for success except practice, perseverance and occasionally seeking help where necessary.

A.J. Bond, is the proprietor of Absolute Resume Writing Services ( http://absoluteresume.com.au ), an Australian based consultancy specializing in the provision of Resume and Cover Letter writing services.

Absolute Resume assists a broad range of job seekers to find their preferred roles, including mature aged job seekers, individuals out of work for a period of time and those made redundant.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7334746

New research: Cranberry concentrate reduces risk of urinary tract infections in elderly

January 22, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

New research [1] published in the American Journal of Geriatrics shows that over 25% of bladder infections (cystitis) can be reduced with the regular use of cranberry concentrate supplements in vulnerable older people in nursing homes at high risk of urinary tract infections. Over 20% of these high-risk elderly did not develop any UTI’s at all when taking the cranberry capsule. The Public Health and Primary Care (PHEG) department of the Leiden University Medical Center conducted the one-year study in 21 Dutch nursing homes in cooperation with the supplier of cranberry concentrate Springfield Nutraceuticals.

It’s estimated that half of all women in the UK will have a UTI at least once in their life [2] with nearly 50% of vulnerable elderly people regularly suffering from UTI’s [1]. As many as 30% of all infections occurring in nursing homes in the UK are urinary tract infections [1]. The importance of preventing infections in nursing homes is paramount, many residents have fragile health and for them, an infection can have serious consequences. Furthermore, resistance of bacteria commonly found to cause urinary tract infections is becoming more frequent so antibiotic therapy is not always a solution.

Effect of Cranberries

In the one-year study, 928 people with an average age of 85 years participated [1]. During the study, cranberry capsules with a specific composition were used and compared with a placebo. The preventative effect of cranberries on urinary tract infection has been known for many years. “The Indians already knew the medicinal properties of these berries”, says Monique Caljouw PhD (PHEG). “Among other particles, these berries contain the so-called PAC-particles that prevent the adhesion of infection-causing bacteria in the bladder wall,” Prof. Dr. Jacobijn Gussekloo (PHEG) explains.

The benefits of taking other types of cranberry products is often disputed. Many people drink cranberry juice when they have cystitis. Cranberry juice has a sour taste and patients – especially the elderly – often fail to drink a glass twice a day, for an extended period. Using sweetened juice for a long period of time is not desirable because of the high levels of sugar used in most cranberry juices to mask the sour taste. Caljouw and Gussekloo found the use of the cranberry supplement an effective method to prevent urinary tract infections. Other prevention methods are less appropriate. “Vitamin C does not seem to work and cranberry juice has its disadvantages. The administration of a low dose of antibiotics causes resistance.” “Cranberry capsules are therefore appropriate,” says PhD Caljouw.

In this study the cranberry supplement used contains the whole cranberry: skin, seeds, pulp, juice and fiber which previous research has shown is preferable to those which do not contain the whole fruit. It also has a patented manufacturing process that provides a bioactive protection to all parts of the cranberry avoiding destruction by gastric acid.

Danger of Antibiotic Resistance

Because of excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics, an increasing number of… continue reading here:  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/271491.php

Memory Loss in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

June 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many senior citizens experience some form of memory loss. Still, there are differences between mild forgetfulness and more serious memory problems. And, it is important that senior citizens and those involved in their elder care address problems with memory, as it may be a sign of a more serious condition.

Mild Forgetfulness

As we age, we lose some of the sharpness of memory we had when we were younger. We may notice that it takes longer to recall facts or information, learn new things, or find or identify familiar objects. In general, these are all signs of mild forgetfulness rather than a more serious medical problem. If you are becoming worried about your memory, schedule an appointment with your doctor to rule out larger problems. Many activities can sharpen your mind and memory, such as picking up a new hobby, visiting friends, eating well, and exercising.

Some more tips for helping your memory are listed below:

 

  • Learn a new skill.
  • Volunteer in a local school, hospital, place of worship, or somewhere else in your community.
  • Spend a lot of time with loved ones.
  • Make use of memory tools such as large calendars, agendas, and notes to yourself.
  • Make an effort to put your wallet, purse, keys, or glasses in the same place each time you set them down.
  • Get ample rest.
  • Exercise and eat a healthy diet.
  • Avoid drinking a lot of alcohol.
  • Seek help if you feel depressed for an extended period of time (more than two weeks).

 

You can also make use of the following:

 

  • Large calendars
  • Agendas for each day
  • Notes about safety in the home
  • Directions for using common items around the house

Serious Memory Problems 

More serious memory problems disrupt your ability to carry on normal activities like driving, shopping, or handling money. Some signs of a serious memory problem include:

 

  • Repeating the same questions over and over.
  • Getting lost in a usually familiar place.
  • Being unable to follow directions.
  • Experiencing confusion about time, people, or places.
  • Taking poor care of yourself (eating poorly, forgetting to bathe, or engaging in unsafe actions or activities).

Causes of Serious Memory Problems 

Medical conditions. Certain medical conditions can lead to serious memory problems that should disappear after treatment. Some things that can cause memory problems are bad reactions to certain medications, depression, dehydration (insufficient amount of fluids in the body), poor diet (insufficient vitamins and minerals), minor head injuries, and thyroid problems. These are all serious medical conditions that should be handled by a physician.

Emotional problems. When senior citizens have certain emotional problems, serious memory problems may develop. Sadness, loneliness, worrying, or boredom can cause confusion and forgetfulness. An active lifestyle, visiting with loved ones, and learning new skills can be helpful, but it may be necessary to seek the help of a doctor or counselor for treatment. If this is the case, getting proper help should minimize memory problems.

Alzheimer’s disease. This disease also causes problems with memory. It begins slowly, but the symptoms get progressively worse as the brain changes. Although it may appear to be mild memory loss at first, people with Alzheimer’s get to a point at which it’s difficult to think clearly. Everyday activities like shopping, driving, cooking, and carrying on a conversation become complicatedTaking medication during the early or middle stages of Alzheimer’s disease can delay memory loss and can be of great help if you have trouble sleeping or are worried or depressed.

Multi-infarct dementia. This is another disease that causes memory problems, where symptoms often appear abruptly. Memory loss and confusion associated with this disease come about through small strokes or short periods of decreased blood flow to the brain. Preventing additional strokes can maintain or improve memory after a stroke, but having more strokes generally leads to more memory loss. To prevent strokes and multi-infarct dementia, maintaining a healthy blood pressure is key.

Diagnosing Serious Memory Problems

As with all health concerns, if you have cause to worry about your memory, you should see your doctor. Be prepared to have a complete checkup if your doctor thinks it is necessary. This checkup may include tests to check memory, problem solving, counting, and language skills, and your doctor may need to take a CAT scan of your brain. A CAT scan is helpful because it shows normal and problem areas in the brain and can help to identify a problem. When your doctor comes to a conclusion as to what is causing your memory problems and makes a diagnosis, ask which treatment options are best for you.

Support

Friends and family members can provide support to help you cope with memory loss. They can help you exercise, visit friends, and continue daily routines and activities. They can also remind you of the time, your location, and what is going on around you.

If memory problems progress to the point that you have difficulty taking care of yourself, in home care for senior citizens can be helpful. Home health care aides can assist with personal care, meal preparation, and health management. And they provide services according to your need, from a few hours a week to 24-hours a day.

The Caring Space
http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

 

The Senior in Senior Citizens Doesn’t Automatically Mean Senile by Jeanne Gibson

April 27, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

I am well aware that teenagers often think that people over thirty don’t know  anything. They are partially right—many of us don’t know much about  things that interest teenagers, and don’t really want to. But that’s not what I  meant by the title of this article.

When a group is formed at church or in some other organization, a Senior  Citizen is seldom asked to lead it. It is just assumed that they aren’t capable  of thinking clearly enough for such an important job.

If a senior citizen applies for a regular 9-5 job, he or she is not likely to  get it if there are other equally qualified applicants, or often some not as  qualified applicants.

Should a Senior Citizen choose to run for President, a major talking point  against him is his age. He is referred to as dottering, senile, not all there,  and/or suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. (Although, I don’t see how they could  prove that last point since even doctors admit that they have to examine a brain  after the patient has died to be sure of that diagnosis.)

Today, I was called “Hon,” at least 3 times by a clerk that waited on me in a  local store. Do you think she would have called a woman in her 30’s or 40’s  “Hon?” I don’t think so. Do we older people look like little children or  something?

Sometimes, when a older person loses a spouse or someone close to them, they  experience a temporary period of time during which they may appear to be  withdrawn and confused, but this is not limited to seniors. It is often used,  however, to take advantage of seniors.

Recently, an elderly relative of mine lost her husband, who left a legally  witnessed will, leaving everything to her, but, within a few weeks relatives  began to descend on her, claiming that “Dad,” or “Uncle,” or “Grandpa,” had  promised him or her a particular item.

His wife, still grieving, and a bit bewildered by it all, rather than risk  dishonoring a promise her husband may have made, handed over the items without  question. It was months later that she realized she had been the victim of  greed.

Even senior citizens are sometimes guilty of assuming another person is  senile just because of their age.

I overheard two older single men in a group I belonged to discussing a  lovely, but very quiet widow lady in our group. One suggested that the other  invite the lady in question to a movie, but the reply was, “No way. I think  she’s senile because she doesn’t say much. Besides, she’s too old for my taste.”  Neither man was under 70 and both were overweight and almost bald. They assumed  that this woman was senile without even knowing her. The truth is that she was  younger than either of them and her shyness kept her from talking much until she  got to know a person well.

Senior citizens are not all senile, as some people seem to think. True, many  are not quite as strong in body as they were a few years ago, but most still  have as much if not more wisdom than many younger people today. If you are  guilty of leaping to conclusions due to a person’s age, take another look. You  may be missing out on one of the very best relationships of your life.

Jeanne Gibson writes from her home in Springfield, Oregon on a variety of  subjects such as marriage, divorce, kids, cats, electric bikes, working from  home and senior citizen issues. To learn more about keeping your brain alert,  check out her blogpost at: http://sowingseedsthatmatter.blogspot.com/2010/07/perk-up-old-brain-cells.html

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jeanne_Gibson

 

Senior Citizen Jobs – Great Opportunities Revealed by Abhishek Agarwal

April 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

It cannot be denied that some employees prefer to employ younger people. In  spite of this, job market researches have shown that senior citizens have a wide  range of job opportunities before them.

The following statistics reveal that the number of employers who realize the  potentials of senior citizens, and the benefits of employing them, is on the  rise.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics has shown that from August 1989 to August  2003, the positions of over 380,000 employees aged between 15 and 24 were  replaced by senior citizens. To explain the point further, when a large number  of Australia’s younger workers left their jobs to become full-time students,  their employers preferred to employ older people in their stead.

More than 500,000 employees in Netherlands are aged 55 and above, and the  number has been steadily rising since 1995.

Competing with the Younger Generation

In order to compete with the younger generation, a senior job seeker has to  take the following factors into consideration.

When you are preparing your resume, emphasise on your accomplishments,  without seeming to brag about them. You have one advantage over the younger  applicants and, that is, your experience, along with a list of achievements and  posts held over a long period of time.

Your work history is just as important as your personality. Employers have a  tendency to notice gaps in employment when a person has been unemployed;  however, they also emphasize on how long a person has served each of his or her  previous employers.

Refresh and enhance your skills by reading voraciously and enrolling in a  variety of programs that will improve your expertise. Keep in touch with the  latest developments and trends in your particular field of service.

Continuously research the Internet for fresh opportunities. Several agencies  place advertisements on the Internet, especially stressing their preference for  senior citizens. The availability of a number of search engines and job sites  will definitely make your job easier.

Best Jobs for Senior Citizens

Here is a list of opportunities that do not focus on the applicants age.

Specialized jobs: For example, people applying for the position of a doctor  are hired on the basis of experience and not age.

Lecturers or speakers: Senior citizens are paid to speak on a topic of their  expertise, and here, age does not really matter. What matters, however, is  qualification, knowledge, and experience.

Writers: A writer’s age is irrelevant. All that is required for novelists,  playwrights, or children’s writers is an excellent hold over language. Moreover,  they can work in peace and comfort from their own houses,  a real bonus for  those who are advanced in years.

Abhishek is an expert at conducting interviews and he has got some great  Interview Success Secrets [http://www.Career-Guru.com/4/index.htm] up his  sleeves! Download his FREE 82 Pages Ebook, “How To Ace Any Interview”  from his website [http://www.Career-Guru.com/4/index.htm]. Only limited Free  Copies available.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Abhishek_Agarwal

 

Senior Citizens Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, and Arthritis – Causes and Treatments By David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

“Arthritis” does not mean only that someone has stiff, aching joints. Many types of arthritis exist, each with its own symptoms and treatments. Most types are chronic, meaning that they can be a source of discomfort for an extended period of time. Arthritis can afflict joints almost anywhere in the body and may cause changes you can see and feel, including swelling, warmth, and redness in the joints. It can last for a short time but be very painful or continue for a long time with less pronounced results while still damaging the joints.

Arthritis is extremely common in the United States, especially among senior citizens. Still, there are many steps they and those providing care for the elderly can take to relieve the different types of arthritis. The most common types in this population are osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and gout.

Osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis in senior citizens and begins when cartilage, the type of tissue that pads joints, begins to wear away. This can eventually cause all the cartilage between bones to wear away, forming painful rubbing of bones against each other. This type of arthritis is most common in the hands, neck, lower back, knees, and hips.

Symptoms of OA can range from stiffness and mild pain that accompanies exercise or bending to severe pain in the joints even in times of physical rest. OA can also cause stiffness during times in which you haven’t used specific joints in a while, like when you’re on a long car ride, but this stiffness usually goes away when you move your joints again. OA can eventually lead to problems moving joints and sometimes to developing a disability if the areas affected are the back, knees, or hips.

Aging is often the greatest risk factor for developing OA. Other factors depend on the area of the body afflicted-for instance, OA in the hands or hips may be caused by genetic factors; OA in the knees may be caused by being overweight; and injuries or overuse of joints in the knees, hips, and hands may lead to OA.

Rheumatoid arthritis.

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) differs from OA in that it’s an autoimmune disease, meaning that your immune system attacks and damages the lining of a joint as if it were an injury or disease. RA leads to inflammation of the joints, which causes pain, stiffness and swelling, sometimes in multiple joints at once. It may be severe enough to prevent you from moving a certain joint. Senior citizens with RA may often experience fatigue or fever. You can develop RA at any age, and it’s more common in women.

RA can afflict almost any joint in the body and is often symmetrical, meaning that if you have RA in a specific joint on one side of your body, you probably experience RA in the same joint on the other side of your body. RA can damage not only joints, but also the heart, muscles, blood vessels, nervous system, and eyes.

Gout.

Senior citizens with gout experience the most severe pain relative to many other arthritis patients. An attack begins when uric acid crystals form in the connective tissue or joint spaces, leading to swelling, stiffness, redness, heat, and pain in the joint. Attacks often follow eating foods like shellfish, liver, dried beans, peas, anchovies, or gravy. Drinking alcohol, being overweight, and taking certain medications may worsen the symptoms. In senior citizens, using certain medications to lower blood pressure may also be a risk factor for a gout attack.

Gout is most common in the big toe, but it can occur in other joints such as the ankle, elbow, knee, wrist, hand, or other toes. Swelling may cause discoloration and tenderness due to skin stretching tightly around the joint. If you see a doctor during an attack, he or she may take a sample of fluid from the affected joint.

Other forms of arthritis.

Other forms include psoriatic arthritis  in patients who have psoriasis; ankylosing spondylitis, which mainly affects the spine; reactive arthritis, which occurs as a reaction to another illness in the body; and arthritis in the temporomandibular joint, the point at which the jaw attaches to the skull.

Arthritis Symptoms and Warning Signs.

Senior citizens and those providing their elder care should look out for the following symptoms as they may be indications of arthritis:

  • lasting joint pain
  • swelling in a joint
  • stiffness in a joint
  • tenderness or pain when touching a joint
  • difficulty in using or moving a joint normally
  • warmth and redness in a joint

 

Any of these symptoms lasting longer than two weeks should be addressed by a physician. If you experience a fever, feel physically ill, have a suddenly swollen joint, or have problems using a joint, a doctor should be contacted sooner. You will have to answer questions and go through a physical exam. Before suggesting treatment options, your doctor may want to run lab tests and take X-rays.

Arthritis Treatment.

Some common treatment options exist even though each type of arthritis is treatedsomewhat differently. Rest, exercise, eating a healthy diet, and becoming educated about the right way to use and protect the joints are key to minimizing the effects of arthritis. Proper shoes and a cane can minimize pain the feet, knees, and hips while walking, and some technology exists for helping open jars or bottles, turn doorknobs more easily, and otherwise improve quality of life in senior citizens with arthritis.

Additionally, some medications can lower the pain and swelling. Acetaminophen (in Tylenol) and some NSAIDs are sold over-the-counter and can ease pain. Other NSAIDs must be prescribed. It is important for senior citizens and those providing their in home care to pay attention to the warnings on both prescribed and over-the-counter drugs and to ask a doctor about how to properly and best use over-the-counter medicine to treat arthritis. The FDA also has information about many medications.

Some treatment options are specialized for individual types of arthritis.

Osteoarthritis Treatment.

There are medicines to help senior citizens with pain associated with OA, and rest and exercise may ease movement in the joints. Managing weight is also important. If one experiences OA in the knees, a doctor can provide shots in the knee joint, which can help to move it without as much pain. Surgery may also be an option to repair or replace damaged joints in senior citizens.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatments.

Treatment can diminish the pain and swelling associated with RA and cause joint damage to slow down or stop. One will feel better overall, and it will be easier to move around. On top of pain and anti-inflammatory medications, a doctor might prescribe DMARDs, which are anti-rheumatic drugs that can slow damage from RA. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, can minimize swelling while waiting for DMARDs to kick in. Additionally, biogenic response modifiers block the damage inflicted by the immune system and help people with mild to moderate RA when other treatments have failed to work properly.

Gout Treatment.

If you’ve gone through a gout attack, talk to a doctor to discuss possible causes and future prevention of attacks. Work together with your doctor and other elder care providers to plan and execute a plan for prevention. Commonly, NSAIDs or corticosteroids are recommended for an acute attack. This treatment diminishes swelling, allowing you to feel better fairly shortly after treatment. Usually, the attack fully stops within a few days. If one has experienced multiple attacks, a doctor may be able to prescribe medication to prevent further attacks.

Exercise can help Arthritis.

In addition to taking the proper medication and allowing your joints to rest, exercise can help senior citizens to stay in shape, maintain strong muscles, and control symptoms of arthritis. Daily exercise like walking or swimming keeps joints moving while lessening pain and strengthening the muscles around joints. Before starting any new exercise program, it is important to discuss options with your physician.

Three types of exercise are the best for senior citizens with arthritis:

  • Range-of-motion exercises reduce stiffness, improve flexibility, and keep joints moving. Activities like dancing fit into this category.
  • Strengthening exercises strengthen muscles, which improves support and protection to your joints. Weight training fits into this category.
  • Aerobic or endurance exercises improve health in the heart and arteries, prevent weight gain, improve how your body works overall, and may decrease swelling in some joints. Riding a bike fits into this category.

Other things to do to manage Arthritis.

 

On top of exercise and weight control, a number of other methods may help senior citizens ease the pain around joints. Applying heat or cold to joints, soaking in a warm tub, or swimming in a heated pool may help you feel better and move your joints more easily.

Surgery may be an option when damage has become disabling or when other treatment options have not adequately diminished pain. With surgery, joints can be repaired or replaced with artificial ones. Commonly, arthritic knees and hips are replaced.

Unproven remedies.

Many senior citizens with arthritis try treatments that have not been tested or proven to help. Some are harmful, like snake venom, while others are harmless yet unhelpful, like copper bracelets.

Here are a few ways to determine whether a treatment is unproven:

  • The remedy is said to work for all types of arthritis and other diseases
  • Scientific support is from only one research study
  • The label doesn’t include directions or warnings of use

Areas for further research.

 

Studies suggest that acupuncture could ease OA pain in some senior citizens. Dietary supplements such as glucosamine and chondroitin are also under investigation and may reduce OA pain. More research is needed to determine whether these types of treatments actually work to reduce symptoms and damage to joints.

Talk to your doctor and others involved in your elder care.

Try not to make light of your symptoms by telling yourself that joint pain or stiffness is simply caused by aging normally. Your doctor and other elder care providers can discuss possible treatment options with you to safely minimize your pain and stiffness and prevent more serious joint damage.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

Las Vegas Level of Care Directory

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under:  

Nevada Senior Guide: Level of Care Directory – LAS VEGAS

Definitions:

  • Retirement Community: Complete independent living with amenities such as transportation, daily scheduled activities, housekeeping, and full meals.
  • Assisted Living: Assistance is provided for daily activities such as dressing, bathing, grooming and medication management.
  • Memory Care: Specialized facility for residents suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease or any other form of dementia in a secure environment.
  • Category 1: Resident must be able to leave their bedroom area in 4 minutes or less with no assistance in case of fire or emergency.
  • Category 2: Resident must be able to leave their bedroom area in 4 minutes or less with assistance in case of fire or emergency.
  • Rehab: Skilled nursing services providing rehabilitation as prescribed by a doctor.
  • Respite: 24 hour care for anyone in need of assistance, including memory care for a short period of time. Usually 7 – 30 days.
  • Skilled Nursing Facility: Provides skilled nursing services under the supervision of licensed nurses.
  • Intermediate Care: Offers a level of care between an Assisted Living facility and a Skilled Nursing facility under the supervision of licensed nurses.
  • Long Term Acute Care: Offers a higher level of medical care and rehabilitation than is offered at a skilled nursing facility for long or short term stays.

nsg_novdecjan_2016-17_web-9 nsg_novdecjan_2016-17_web-10 nsg_novdecjan_2016-17_web-11

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!