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Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias

June 12, 2016 by · Comments Off on Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias
Filed under: General 

Australian business is starting to see the light when it comes to their hiring policies for mature aged employees, and the positive impact they can have on the workplace. A brief visit to main street shopping centre and you will begin to see a few more weathered faces at work than you would have seen a few years ago.

However, if you scratch below the surface, you begin to see this trend still has a long way to play out. A few older workers get hired into the senior ranks where experience and maturity are greatly valued, more older workers are now being hired at the lower end of the corporate scale into unskilled roles, however the numbers being hired into the mid tier ranks remains low.

This barbell approach to hiring mature workers at the top and bottom of an organisation reflects an ongoing bias that remains difficult to overcome. A company is a microcosm of society, and in a perfect world employers should (within reason) seek diversity in the workplace and value skill, experience and aptitude, regardless of age, race or gender.

Unfortunately, we live in a far from perfect world. When it comes to mature aged workers they tend to be penalised on two fronts. Often the first to be made redundant in uncertain economic times, this setback is then compounded when they are regularly overlooked for someone younger as they begin searching for a new job.

As a result of these two biases towards mature aged job seekers, once out of work, the journey back can often be long and arduous. This is reflected in RBA statistics which indicate long-term unemployment at approximately 40% for those aged 45-64, compared to about 25% for those aged between 25 and 44.

So what are the reasons employers provide for not hiring mature aged workers? Typically, reasons include being overqualified or over-experienced. Taken at face value being overqualified or experienced might not seem so bad, but when you hear the same reason trotted out time and again, it becomes less palatable.

Openly negative feedback from employers tend to include perceptions that mature aged workers are not as IT savvy, do not possess the latest skills, or are not as flexible as their younger counterparts. While these reasons may hold true in many instances, many of the older job seekers I speak to, believe these are often used as convenient excuses to exclude them.

Employer feedback that you are not likely to hear include concerns about health (and subsequent cost) or worse insecurity. There are many poor managers in the workplace that may be intimidated by the experience a mature applicant brings to the role. Rather than leveraging the knowledge and experience an older worker can bring to the workplace, the insecure hirer is concerned about the potential competition, and the presence of someone who may know more than they do.

Dealing with many of these preconceived concerns and fears remains an ongoing challenge for the mature aged job seeker. Perhaps the following facts should be mandatory reading for hiring managers. These facts debunk many of the concerns and myths that persist in the workplace relating to mature aged workers;

    • Mature aged workers can deliver cost savings to employers through increased retention rates. For example, workers over 55 are five times less likely to change jobs compared to workers aged 20-24, reducing both recruitment and training costs. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006)Labour Mobility Survey,
    • Mature workers can deliver an average net benefit of $1956 per year to their employer compared to other workers due to high retention rates, lower rates of absenteeism, decreased recruitment costs and greater return on investment.Business, Work and Ageing (2000) Profiting from Maturity: The Social and Economic Costs of Mature Age Unemployment
    • Australians are living longer and are healthier.2005 ABS survey found the proportion of Australians aged 55-64 reporting their health as ‘good’, ‘very good’ or ‘excellent’ was 75.5% – an increase of four per cent since 1995. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006) National Health Survey: Summary of Results, 2004-05
    • Mature workers were the least likely group to take days off due to their own illness or as a carer. In the two week period prior to the survey nearly half the number of mature workers had days off compared to workers aged 25-34. ibid
    • ABS data shows that Australians aged 55-64 are the fastest growing users of information technology. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2005) Year Book Australia,
  • Australian Health Management which examined the daily work habits of 4000 employees found that workers aged 55 years and over performed at their best for approximately seven hours out of an eight-hour day-an achievement that other workers in the study were unable to match. Australian Health Management (2006), Baby boomers give employers a bang for their buck

While government has been doing its part to address mature aged unemployment through initiatives like DEEWR Experience+, the introduction of the Age Discrimination Act (2004) and appointment of an Age Discrimination Commissioner, it remains imperative that older job seekers directly address some of these age bias issues themselves if they are to enhance their prospects for employment.

Following are some helpful hints that mature aged workers can utilise to make themselves more appealing to employers and thus improve their chances of a speedy return to the workforce;

Government or Community Assistance– Take advantage of government or community based initiatives and assistance. There is a considerable amount of free information and assistance available, and I would strongly recommend looking into these resources. For example, the DEEWR “Experience+” initiative provides free career planning and advice for over 45’s until June 2016, along with an Assistance Program delivering refresher and basic training in IT and social media applications.

Value Proposition– Whether writing your resume or cover letter, or sitting in an interview, ensure the focus of discussion clearly remains on the value that you can bring to an organisation. Discuss how you can help, what you have done in the past and what you can deliver going forward. Outline how your experience might bring special insights and perspectives that other candidates may not possess.

Training– Undertake relevant training or up-skilling. Keeping ‘up to date’ is critical if you expect serious consideration for any position, especially if there is a technical element. The benefit will be that an employer will see that you have not fallen behind and therefore will not require retraining, along with any associated cost.

Resume– You will need a properly structured and well written resume to be considered for most roles. Use an appropriate resume style that is tailored to your strengths, skills and experience. Also ensure primary focus of your resume is on the last 5-10 years (include older information where pertinent). Think about getting assistance from a professional resume writer, whocan add significant value if you are looking to ‘get it right the first time’.

Age Bias – To counter potential impact of age bias, you will need to carefully address the following with any potential employer;

Health– Don’t hesitate to communicate your good health and fitness to potential employers at opportune moments. Inform them if you play sport, run, walk or go to the gym regularly. This should allay any potential concerns about health.

IT Savvy –Take every opportunity to indicate your IT capability. Whether it’s your ability to use specialised systems, the MS Office suite or even your use of Facebook or Twitter, this will highlight your ability to embrace new technology.

Adaptability – Highlight your adaptability in the workplace, providing actual examples where appropriate. If you don’t know something, indicate you are keen to learn (and not that you wouldn’t know where to start). Highlighting your adaptability will help to dispel concerns of rigidness and inflexibility.

Team Player –Communicating that you work well as part of a team is critical. It shows a willingness to take direction and work for the common good, and can present you as less threatening, especially if the hirer feels concerned by a mature more experienced candidate.

Be Positive –Though you need to be fully prepared to discuss negative issues, make every attempt to keep the discussion on a positive footing. Unless specifically requested, there is no need to volunteer information of a negative nature.

While industry is beginning to see the light when it comes to acceptance of mature aged workers, the pace of change remains slow. While providence is on the right side due to the ageing Australian population and the inevitable necessity to hire older workers, the fact remains that age discrimination is still entrenched in much current thinking.

As a result, dealing with age bias will continue to be a challenge for the foreseeable future. However with the combination of positive government policy, changing attitudes and a proactive attitude to making oneself more appealing to employers (as outlined above), the situation is not without promise.

Honing your individual approach and message will take time and effort. To strike the right balance the mature job seeker will need to walk a fine line between sounding experienced, but not old, adaptable, but not inflexible and appear keen, not desperate. There is no magic formula for success except practice, perseverance and occasionally seeking help where necessary.

A.J. Bond, is the proprietor of Absolute Resume Writing Services ( http://absoluteresume.com.au ), an Australian based consultancy specializing in the provision of Resume and Cover Letter writing services.

Absolute Resume assists a broad range of job seekers to find their preferred roles, including mature aged job seekers, individuals out of work for a period of time and those made redundant.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7334746

Take a Number: Five Ways to Look at Age

April 24, 2016 by · Comments Off on Take a Number: Five Ways to Look at Age
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One for the Ages

Satchel Paige was a great baseball pitcher, one of the greatest of all time. He was an African-American and, due to the racial discrimination of the time, most of his outstanding career was not spent in the (white) major leagues. However, after the historic breakthrough by the courageous and talented Jackie Robinson (Mr. Paige’s junior by about 14 years), Satchel Paige pitched in the major leagues for a number of years. In fact, he was still able to get major league batters out at the age of 60! (Mr. Paige’s age at his retirement from baseball is not known for certain because no one, probably including Mr. Paige himself, knew his exact year of birth; some thought he was older than 60). Mr. Paige revealed a mind as sharp as the break on his curve ball when he asked this profound question for the ages:

“How old would you be if you did not know how old you are?”

These writings are dedicated to the memory of Satchel Paige and to all the so-called “over-the-hill” guys and gals in every sport and in every area of life, from Churchill and Reagan in politics to Jessica Tandy in acting and Paul McCartney in fatherhood. They and many like them in the past and present will be joined by many more in the future who are not really “over the hill” because they are too busy taking the hill.

Five Ways to Look at Age

Chronological Age

The most common way to look at age is the Chronological. This is the one that everyone is familiar with. It is simply the time that has passed since your date of birth to today. It is the one that governments and insurance companies require of you and that your Doctor knows, even if your boy friend doesn’t. It is a unidimensional measure because it considers only time. It is uniform because everybody who is 48 years, 6 months, and 3 weeks old is exactly that, chronologically. People who view age only from the chronological perspective are somewhere between dumb and dumber.

True Age

True Age is another and better way to look at your age. True age is basically what a measurement of all the biomarkers of aging would reveal about you. Here’s four points about true age. One, if a well-trained physician did NOT know how old you are but reviewed a print-out of your biomarkers, she or he could accurately estimate your true age. Two, your true age is not uniform but varies by individual: you can be younger or older than your chronological age. Three, true age is multidimensional rather than confined to time. Four, absolutely nothing can be done about chronological age because it is fixed, but a great deal can be done about true age.

Appearance Age

Appearance Age is the age you appear to be to others. It no doubt has some relationship to both chronological age and true age. Yet it is different. This is because it is heavily influenced by a number of factors outside the scope of biomarker measurement, not the least of which is attitude. We all know people that appear to be quite a bit younger or older than their chronological age. But the only scientific way to measure a person’s appearance age would be to have a representative sample of the population observe a person for at least a few minutes. A quick glance is not sufficient because appearance age includes factors such as movement of the body and alertness, not just a frozen face. Then the estimates from all members of the representative sample would be gathered, simple statistical measures applied, and Voila! You have the person’s appearance age. Of course, unless we are part of a study, none of us will ever get this scientific about it. We will just have to rely on random comments from friends, family, and nice or mean strangers to estimate our appearance age; and usually it’s a pretty good estimate.

NEAT Age

A new way to look at age, which occurred to me awhile back, is what I call one’s N.E.A.T. age. This is simply one’s time left on the planet from right Now to the time of death. This age is unknowable by readers or anyone, except those committed to imminent suicide (and these poor folks are no more likely to take the short time remaining to do age calculations than they are to be caught dead reading an article about lively longevity). The best we can do is make a calculated estimate based on what we know about the general population and factor in any pluses or minuses that apply to us individually.

The N in NEAT of course stands for Now since the calculation is from the present, today, right now. E is for Elusive because I believe moments of time are elusive. As we humans try to hold or capture a moment of time it eludes us because the next moment is here, and then the next. Time and life are a flow.

The A in NEAT is for Allotted. Everyone who has ever lived has only so much time to live. Some have short lives, some have long lives, and some have lives neither particularly long nor short. But human life is finite and almost certainly will remain finite into the distant future if not forever. We do not need to take sides in the age-old debate about whether or not our allotted time is predestined by God in order to recognize that the amount is finite.

Of course, T is for Time. Time remaining is what it is all about. As has been oft noted: a millionaire on his death bed would gladly exchange his riches for a little more time, say one more day of healthy living.

So one’s NEAT age is one’s Now Elusive Allotted Time. It is a concept that provides a different perspective on aging and on life. For example, let’s suppose there was a 30-year old person named Terry and a 60-year old person named Sydney living in the same town in 1960. Conventional wisdom and simple arithmetic agree that Sydney was twice as old as Terry at that time. Such wisdom carries the (usually) unstated assumption that Terry is about 30 years further from the grave than Sydney. Statistically, this is difficult to argue with. But statistics are oft off for an individual and sometimes by a wide margin.

Let’s suppose that Terry had a lifetime of very bad health habits and, never having had the opportunity to read my writings, continued the very bad habits. Poor Terry expired a little shy of 40. (The same fate could have befallen Terry due to a dreaded disease or tragic accident.) Sydney, on the other hand, decided at some point to lead a health-conscious life. Sydney made good choices and stuck with them. Sydney enjoyed basically good health beyond age 100 before passing on. When Sydney was 60 and Terry was 30, Sydney had a NEAT age of 40+ and Terry had a NEAT age just under 10. So way back in 1960, who was younger: the one with less than a decade of life left, or the one with more than four decades of vibrant life left? One of the neat things about the NEAT age is that the bigger this age number the better.

Ideal Age

The fifth and final way that we will look at age is one’s Ideal Age. Your ideal age is your age of choice, your preferred age. The concept of ideal age brings us back to Satchel Paige’s question:

How old would you be if you did not know how old you are?

In a sense, perhaps most of us do NOT know how old we are anyhow. Sure we know our chronological age, and some of us have a rough gauge of our appearance age. But few of us know our true age, and none of us knows our NEAT age. So it should not be so difficult to put chronological age aside for a few moments and answer Mr. Paige’s question.

Before leaping to an answer like 21, keep in my mind that successful living usually involves a combination of physical vigor, mental acuity, and wisdom. Personally, my ideal age is 37; thus even at my next birthday I will still be one year younger than all the women over 40.

What about you? What’s your number? What’s your ideal age? The way my anti-aging program works for you is that after reflection you establish your ideal age. Then we work with all the tools and techniques of the program to bring your true age into ever closer alignment with your ideal age. There is a balance to be struck. A 90-year old reader shooting for an ideal age of 19 is setting up way too much of a challenge and thus is setting up for failure. A 50-year old reader settling for an ideal age of 45 is not challenging herself or himself enough.

Take a number.

Satchel Paige was the impetus for me to write the close to this article:

When it comes to matters of age,

It is best to take a page out of Paige,

And move forward with grace,

Paying no mind to this myth of the human race.

Gary Patrick is a certified anti-aging professional (Giovane Medical Services). He is also an author, hypnotist, personal trainer, and speaker. Free stuff is available for a limited time at his web site: [http://rapidresults.biz]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Gary_Patrick/18668

Task Force evidence reviews suggests that one-time screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms could benefit older men

January 28, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

A one-time screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in men 65 years or older is associated with decreased AAA rupture and AAA-related mortality rates, according to a new review being published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

AAA is a weakening in the wall of the infrarenal aorta resulting in localized dilation, or ballooning, of the abdominal aorta. A large proportion of AAAs are asymptomatic until a rupture develops, which is generally acute and often fatal (up to 83 percent of patients die before hospitalization). Risk factors for AAA include advanced age, male sex, smoking, and a family history, with smoking being the most important modifiable risk factor.

The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) reviewed published evidence to update its previous recommendation on screening for AAA. The reviewers found convincing evidence that screening men aged 65 and older decreased AAA-related mortality rates by approximately 50 percent over 13 to 15 years. Determining the most effective and efficient approaches to population-based AAA screening was an important goal of the review.

Continue reading here:  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/271716.php

Living with diabetes? Watch your mouth!

January 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

11723Living with diabetes? Watch your mouth!

 

(Family Features)  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people with diabetes are two times more likely to develop gum disease. In fact, about one-third of people with diabetes have severe gum disease.

 

Why are those with diabetes more vulnerable to gum disease? High blood glucose levels impair the body’s ability to heal from oral infections and uncontrolled diabetes can make treating gum disease more difficult, according to the American Diabetes Association. The Association is joining with Colgate to launch a new “Watch Your Mouth!” campaign to help raise awareness surrounding the often over-looked link between oral health and diabetes. Here are some tips to help you live well with diabetes:

 

  • Watch your mouth! Begin to develop healthy oral care habits, like brushing, flossing and visiting the dentist regularly. Research shows that brushing twice a day with Colgate Total toothpaste can help improve gum health in as little as four weeks.*
  • Don’t miss out on your favorite foods. Just eat healthier versions that everyone in your family can enjoy. Making simple substitutions to most dishes can help increase nutritional value, while not sacrificing on taste.
  • Use the right tools. Stay organized with a journal large enough to keep your diet, exercise, goals and health information together. Keep a week’s worth of prescriptions in one place with a handy pill case.
  • Know your risks. The American Diabetes Association lists the common risk factors for diabetes as being 45 or older, being overweight, not exercising regularly, having high blood pressure and being a part of certain racial and ethnic groups.
  • Visit your dentist. While your doctor and certified diabetes educator play an important role in helping with your diabetes, so does your dentist. If you don’t see a private-practice dentist, you can visit dental schools that provide services at a fraction of the cost to help you keep your mouth healthy.

 

For more expert tips and information, visit www.OralHealthAndDiabetes.com.

 

*Results improve with continued twice daily use, as shown in 6 month clinical studies of the general population.

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

New Survey Reveals that Aging Parents and Adult Children Aren’t Always On the Same Page!

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

In honor of National Family Caregivers Month, life transition planning and daily money management firm LifeBridge Solutions, LLC surveyed nearly 400 aging parents and adult children. The national survey was conducted online November 12 – 14, 2013.

Survey results indicate that adult children are generally more concerned about their aging parent’s wellbeing than the older adult is about his or her own situation. Both generations are concerned about the older adult’s general health and safety and about driving. However, the aging parents top concerns include worry about running out of money and how they will pay for care, while the adult children worry about their parent not asking for (or accepting) the help they need and about their parent’s inability to manage medications.

LifeBridge Solutions’ President Sheri L. Samotin says, “Unfortunately, adult children often live a long distance from their aging parents and don’t see them as often as they’d like. As a result, they worry about what’s going on with Mom or Dad and feel a need to put mechanisms in place to keep their parent safe. By the same token, many aging parents are adept at hiding their need for assistance from their children as they fear that their children will try to take over.” Samotin is the author of the forthcoming book, Facing the Finish: A Road Map for Aging Parents and Adult Children (www.FacingtheFinish.com).

While only 25% of the aging parents surveyed report that they are stressed because of their adult children, nearly twice as many adult children report being stressed because of their aging parents. Consistent with these results, it is not surprising that more adult children than aging parents would change something about their relationship with the other generation. However, the top thing both groups would change is to live closer to and/or see the other more often. The next most common wish for both groups is to have better relationships with one another.

According to government statistics an estimated 25% of adult children currently provide hands-on and/or supervisory care for one or more of their parents. This number has tripled over the past fifteen years and is expected to increase dramatically as the population ages. Caring for aging parents is often referred to as the new mid-life crisis.

LifeBridge Solutions, LLC, founded in 2009 provides life transition planning, daily money management and medical billing advocacy services to clients nationwide.

For more information contact:
Sheri L. Samotin, President, LifeBridge Solutions, LLC
323.452.2680

Read more news from LifeBridge Solutions.

U.S. Veterans Honored by Encore.org’s 2013 Purpose Prize

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Seven Awards for People Over Age 60 Solving the World’s Toughest Social Problems

The Purpose Prize has become a “MacArthur genius award for people who develop a second career as social service entrepreneurs.” – The New York Times.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy organizes a network of volunteers across the country to teach disabled veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan how to combat stress — through fly-fishing.

A public relations executive helps wounded warriors find and renovate foreclosed homes – and transforms lives and neighborhoods in the process.

These are two of the seven winners of the 2013 Purpose Prize, awarded by Encore.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who translate decades of skill and experience into “second acts” that contribute to society’s greater good.

Now in its eighth year, The Purpose Prize is the nation’s only large-scale investment in people over 60 who are combining their passion and experience for the social good. Created in 2005 by Encore.org, the prize is aimed at those with the passion to make change and the wisdom to know how to do it, showcasing the value of experience and disproving the notion that innovation is solely the province of the young.

Two winners will receive $100,000 each and five winners will receive $25,000 each.

This year’s winners:

* Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. ($100,000 winner of The Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra)

* Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron taps into her own experience as a cancer survivor to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. ($100,000)

* Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing emotional wounds through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. ($25,000)

* Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
Fennelly runs a unique summer camp behind bars that is transforming federal prisoners into involved parents. ($25,000)

* Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
Huttinger’s project is on a path to eradicate human schistosomiasis, a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. ($25,000)

* Reverend Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. ($25,000)

* Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
Young’s rise from immigrant nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. ($25,000)

The Purpose Prize winners will be honored on December 5, 2013, at an awards ceremony in Sausalito, Ca. NBC’s Jane Pauley will emcee the event for hundreds of Encore leaders and the Purpose Prize winners.

Twenty-one judges – leaders in business, politics, journalism and the nonprofit sector – chose the seven winners from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees. Judges include Sherry Lansing, former CEO of Paramount; David Bornstein, author and New York Times columnist; Eric Liu, writer and founder of CitizenUniversity; and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, The Purpose Prize is a program of Encore.org, which aims to engage millions of boomers in encore careers combining personal meaning, continued income and social impact in the second half of life.

This year, Symetra is sponsoring the $100,000 Purpose Prize for Future Promise, which recognizes an individual whose approach for helping society has the potential to grow steadily over the next five years. The company plans to sponsor another Purpose Prize for Future Promise in 2014.

“While Purpose Prize winners are helping to solve a wide range of pressing social problems, they have one thing in common,” said Marc Freedman, CEO and founder of Encore.org and author of The Big Shift (PublicAffairs Books). “They – and millions of others in encore careers – are turning personal passions and decades of experience into invaluable contributions across sectors, continents and generations, often through entrepreneurship.”

Short summaries for all winners follow. Photos are attached. Longer bios and higher resolution photos are available.

Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas, winner of this year’s Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra, rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. Following a 35-year-career as a fundraising and marketing dynamo, she became the director of communications at Purple Heart Homes in 2008 in an effort to provide greater services for veterans who have service-connected disabilities. In just three years, Thomas helped take the fledgling nonprofit to new heights. She has raised millions for Purple Heart Homes in financial contributions and material donations. Revenue shot up 600% in her first year with the startup. She’s developed an innovative program that matches veterans with foreclosed homes donated by banks, then raises the funds to renovate a home for the individual veteran’s needs. It’s a win-win for all generations—and communities too. It helps veterans to grow assets, towns to recoup lost taxes and neighborhoods that have struggled with foreclosures to stabilize.

Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron is an award-winning journalist with more than 42 years in television broadcasting. She tapped into her own experience as a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. To focus on the plight of low-income Latinos fighting the disease, Duron founded Latinas Contra Cancer (Latinas Against Cancer), an organization committed to educating, supporting and providing essential services to low-income Spanish speakers often overlooked by the health care system. Latinas Contra Cancer has offered a range of programs that have taught more than 3,000 men, women and teens about the disease, resulting in more than 300 preventative cancer screenings. The group has provided psychological and social support to over 100 patients per year. However, the call to action Duron answered has had an impact far beyond the Bay Area. Her passionate commitment is helping Latino communities across the U.S. gain access to cancer support, information and treatment. Her great empathy for cancer patients has made her utterly clear on her bigger purpose in the second stage of life.

Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing the emotional wounds of battle through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. A cancer survivor and war veteran himself, Nicholson was impressed by the fortitude of disabled veterans at the Walter Reed military hospital, where he was treated for prostate cancer in 2005. It spurred him to found Project Healing Waters, a program dedicated to helping disabled soldiers and veterans recover from the trying aftermath of war through the sport of fly-fishing. One-on-one connections have been key to Project Healing Waters’ approach since the beginning. Nicholson knew there were fly-fishing groups and facilities all over the country. His innovation was to convince them to start, manage and lead fly-fishing instruction and outings with veterans through military and Veterans Administration facilities. The quiet bonds forged over fishing lines began to transform lives. Again and again Nicholson heard from family members who said their loved ones had returned from war withdrawn, angry, and difficult to be around. But after fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters, they’ve become happier, more open and engaged. Project Healing Waters works closely with VA Recreational and Occupational therapies to identify those who would most benefit from the program. Many are in wheelchairs or using prosthetics. A few are blind. Participants reflect of full spectrum of disabled veterans and include all ages, genders, ethnicities and disabilities. Nicholson says the impact “goes well beyond the mechanics of fly-fishing.”

Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
A lifelong social activist who ran homeless shelters in the District of Columbia for 17 years, Carol Fennelly abandoned her plans to retire in 1998 when she learned that D.C. inmates had been transferred to Youngstown, OH. One woman made 10-hour round-trip drives twice a week to visit her son. Moved to answer a social need, Fennelly thought about opening a hospitality house in Youngstown for family members visiting inmates. She soon learned that while 93% of the federal inmate population is male, in sheer numbers there are more programs for mothers in prison than there are for fathers. She decided she had what it took to change things. “I had spent years organizing, dealing with government, making change happen, and that emboldened me to think I could go into prisons and start all these radical programs,” Fennelly says. So she launched an encore career with Hope House, an innovative organization that helps prison inmates stay in regular contact with their children. In the past 14 years, Hope House has hosted 200 video teleconferences, 18,000 personalized book readings by fathers and 31 week-long summer camps, which allow kids to spend time with their fathers free of the usual restrictions that come with visitor hours and family chaperones. California recently decided to implement the Hope House model in its 33 state prisons. Prisons in Texas, Idaho and New Hampshire may follow. In 2013 Fennelly was honored at the White House as a Champion of Change.

Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
International public health expert Elizabeth Huttinger spotted a big idea in shrimp, and launched an encore career that could eradicate a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. Huttinger’s project – founded in 2006 – is targeting human schistosomiasis, an infectious parasite carried by river snails. Understanding that the population of prawns that eat those snails had precipitously declined, Huttinger, 63, has devoted her encore career to restoring the prawn population in the SenegalRiver Basin. Projet Crevette’s mission is multifaceted: the restoration of the prawn population diminishes the spread of schisto, provides new economic opportunities to afflicted communities and heals families infected by the disease. Today, Projet Crevette is a prawn-farming microenterprise, operated by locals at public watering holes. It has brought social innovation, new microbusinesses, environmental restoration and improved health to communities. Huttinger is confident Projet Crevette will meet its bold goal to fully restore the indigenous prawn population—and improve countless lives in the process.

Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Reverend Violet Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. After 14 years as parish pastor trained in psychotherapy, Little left behind her traditional congregation to create a religious refuge for the homeless on the streets of the city, which became the “WelcomeChurch.” The church relies mostly on word of mouth, and services can pop up in a city park or on a sidewalk. No questions are asked, and everyone is welcome. The WelcomeChurch coordinates medical services through local universities, helps people get into rehab or jobs, and offers educational services to the public on the causes of homelessness. Little estimates 40 percent of her congregants have moved off the streets into permanent housing and the WelcomeChurch celebrates each and every one of them, many of whom stay connected with Little through their transition. Little’s congregation has grown to include hundreds of homeless as well as non-homeless volunteers in the EvangelicalLutheranChurch in America.

Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
An immigrant from the West Indies who built a meaningful life on meager income, Young’s gritty rise from nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. She’s encouraged thousands to stand up for their right to earn a living wage, and counsels and trains others to become leaders themselves. In 2004, Young began building a movement to legislate a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in New YorkState, which would make overtime, paid time off and rest days mandatory. In 2009, when she heard then Governor David Patterson say on the radio that he’d sign the bill if it made it to his desk, she put on a full court press, becoming the engine behind passage of the law in 2010. The law is the first of its kind in the country, but Young is committed to making sure it isn’t the last. She’s now a key player in the NDWA’s expansion from 11 to 44 affiliated organizations with 15,000 members, up from 5,000 in 2007. Young’s passion for serving her community has only just begun.

Read More About Encore’s Purpose Prize at www.encore.org/prize.

About Encore.org

Encore.org is a national nonprofit that promotes the idea that people in their second acts have the talent and experience to solve some of society’s greatest problems.

About The Atlantic Philanthropies

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. In keeping with the Giving While Living philosophy of founder Charles “Chuck” Feeney, The Atlantic Philanthropies believes in making large investments to capitalize on significant opportunities to solve urgent problems now, so they are less likely to become larger, more entrenched and more expensive challenges later. The Atlantic Philanthropies also seeks to encourage others of significant wealth to engage in major philanthropic pursuits in their lifetime.

About The John Templeton Foundation

The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, supporting research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.

About Symetra

Symetra Financial Corporation (NYSE: SYA) is a diversified financial services company based in Bellevue, Wash. In business since 1957, Symetra provides employee benefits, annuities and life insurance through a national network of benefit consultants, financial institutions, and independent agents and advisors.

 

CONTACT: Sara Ying Rounsaville, srounsaville@encore.org, 415-952-5121, or Russ Mitchell, rmitchell@encore.org, 510-969-0801

Study Shows that People Who Undergo Cataract Surgery to Correct Visual Impairment Live Longer

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Australian researchers find a 40 percent lower mortality risk among patients who had their vision corrected through the procedure  

SAN FRANCISCO – Sept. 4, 2013 – People with cataract-related vision loss who have had cataract surgery to improve their sight are living longer than those with visual impairment who chose not to have the procedure, according to an Australian cohort study published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. After comparing the two groups, the researchers found a 40 percent lower long-term mortality risk in those who had the surgery.

The research is drawn from data gathered in the Blue Mountains Eye Study, a population-based cohort study of vision and common eye diseases in an older Australian population. A total of 354 persons aged 49 years and older and diagnosed with cataract-related vision impairment –  some of whom had undergone surgery and others who had not – were assessed between 1992 and 2007. Adjustments were made for age and gender as well as a number of mortality risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, smoking, cardiovascular disease, body mass index and measures of frailty and comorbid disease. Follow-up visits took place after five and ten years since the baseline exam.

Previous research had indicated that older persons with visual impairment were likely to have greater mortality risk than their age peers with normal vision, and that cataract surgery might reduce this risk. These studies – unlike the Blue Mountains Eye Study – compared people who had undergone cataract surgery with those in the general population or with those who had not had cataract surgery, and did not link vision status to the surgical status.

“Our finding complements the previously documented associations between visual impairment and increased mortality among older persons,” said Jie Jin Wang, Ph.D., of the Westmead Millennium Institute and one of lead researchers of the study. “It suggests to ophthalmologists that correcting cataract patients’ visual impairment in their daily practice results in improved outcomes beyond that of the eye and vision, and has important impacts on general health.”

The association between correction of cataract-related visual impairment and reduced mortality risk is not clearly understood, but plausible factors may include improvements in physical and emotional well-being, optimism, greater confidence associated with independent living after vision improvement, as well as greater ability to comply with prescription medications.

Dr. Wang noted one limitation of the study is that participants with cataract-related visual impairment who did not have cataract surgery could have had other health problems that prevented them from undergoing surgery, and that these other health problems could partly explain the poorer survival among non-surgical participants. This issue is addressed by the researchers in a subsequent study.

Caused by the clouding of the lens, cataract is a leading cause of treatable visual impairment that will affect more than half of all Americans by the time they are 80 years old.[1]  Surgical removal of the opaque lens with an artificial lens implanted is a successful procedure of cataract treatment. If completing everyday tasks is difficult, cataract surgery should be discussed with an ophthalmologist − a medical doctor specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

Seniors who are seeking eye care but are concerned about cost may qualify for EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, which offers eye exams and care at no out-of-pocket cost to qualifying seniors age 65 and older. Learn more at www.eyecareamerica.org. For more information on cataracts and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology 
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons — Eye M.D.s — with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who has the education and training to treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trusted and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

About Ophthalmology
Ophthalmology, the official journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, publishes original, peer-reviewed, clinically applicable research. Topics include the results of clinical trials, new diagnostic and surgical techniques, treatment methods technology assessments, translational science reviews and editorials.

AARP Report Highlights Need for Innovative Long-Term Care for the Aging Baby Boomer Population; Japan’s Technological Secrets May Hold the Answers

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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A newly published AARP report illustrates a profound demographic shift that will have consequences for decades to come, particularly in the senior living and long-term care industry. Baby boomers are entering their retirement years, while the ratio of potential family caregivers to those who require long-term services and support is beginning to drop. Fewer available caregivers will mean the senior living industry must rapidly adapt to a surging market. The AARP’s full report is available here: http://bit.ly/156phYi

Family caregiving is a low-cost but often burdensome approach to elder care. Becoming a primary caregiver often involves leaving behind a career, among other sacrifices. Plus, these well-intentioned caregivers may not have the expertise necessary to provide the level of care needed by an aged parent. Adults in these roles often feel enormous pressure and stress, sometimes even resentment. At any rate, the nation’s changing demographics will make today’s family caregiving situation far different in the near future.

Between 1990 and 2010, there were about 7 potential caregivers for every one person aged 80-plus. That ratio is at the start of a freefall that will force society to change the way it cares for its elderly members. By 2030, the ratio of caregivers to elderly will be 4 to 1. All remaining baby boomers will have reached their years of highest risk (80+) by 2050, when the caregiver ratio will have plummeted still further to 3 to 1.

Kevin Williams, president of SeniorMarketing.com, suggests innovative thinking will be required to bridge this care gap: “Naturally, with fewer family caregivers available, the responsibility will largely shift to senior living communities, care agencies and already overextended government programs. But it will take more than simply building more communities or training more staff—assuming an adequate number of candidates are even available. Technological innovation may be the silver bullet to raise the standard of living for aging boomers, improve efficiency, and reduce costs.”

The nation of Japan, which has the greatest life expectancy and one of the oldest average populations in the world, has recently experienced a demographic transition of its own. Recently, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare put out a call for 2 million new professional caregivers, but only received 1.3 million eligible candidates. With low birth rates being the norm, that shortfall will only increase. A tech-savvy society to begin with, the Japanese have embraced robotics and automation as a solution to the elder care issue. Motorized, assistive devices can help older individuals perform tasks themselves, while automated pill dispensers can prevent dangerous medication mistakes. A recent blog post on The Economist explained Japan’s inventive approach to the elder care dilemma: http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2013/05/automation-elderly

Williams concluded: “This demographic shift is a great challenge but also a great opportunity. Forward-thinking, entrepreneurs will be leading the way in this new environment. Technology to assist with daily tasks, provide medical care, monitor, and connect seniors to loved ones is advancing at a faster pace every year. It’s not unreasonable to predict that the future will witness even better care for our future seniors.”

About SeniorMarketing.com

Baltimore-based SeniorMarketing.com was created with twin goals in mind. First, the company helps connect caregivers and seniors with local, affordable care options. Second, the company increases income for senior living communities and health care agencies.

Contact:

Kevin M. Williams, President
SeniorMarketing.com
5024 Campbell Blvd., Suite D-3
Baltimore, MD 21236
Phone: 1-888-523-3311

Senior Citizens Need Their Pets by Debbie Foster

June 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Most senior citizens who have pets treat them like they are their children. Of course, you don’t need to be a senior to do that, but homes without children of the human kind truly do have children of the furry kind.

In addition to providing companionship, unconditional love and a calming effect, larger pets can also provide a sense of safety to seniors. Its also been shown that people who have pets tend to live longer. Pet ownership, as we all know, also has its responsibilities. Sometimes these responsibilities are more difficult on seniors and keeping their pets can present problems. The escalating cost of veterinary bills and the ability to transport their pets when many don’t drive are very real issues.

Several cities in Colorado have been surveying their veterinarian population to find out which ones offer discounts to senior citizens for pet care, as well as which ones either make home visits or provide some type of transportation assistance and other help. In Fort Collins, their Senior Advisory Board obtained a grant allowing it to start a mobile veterinary service for seniors called Elder Pet Care. What a great idea!! Seniors are charged based on a sliding scale for veterinary services performed at their homes. The program is now self-sustaining after ten years.

Some transit systems, like the city of Loveland, CO are also on board by allowing pets to ride in crates. Transit systems in Boston, Toronto, Seattle and San Francisco allow full size dogs on leashes to come on board as well as ferries in some of these cities.

I think all these programs are worth duplicating across the United States. Next time you’re at your vet, why not ask if they’re involved in any programs that offer discounts or mobile pet care to seniors. After all, it never hurts to ask!

Debbie Foster is the owner of Pet Beds Unlimited and an avid animal lover. You can find a wide selection of quality pet beds, dog crates, dog carriers [http://www.petbedsunlimited.com/dog_carriers.html], dog pens [http://www.petbedsunlimited.com/dog_pens.html], cat beds, cat carriers and pet strollers at [http://petbedsunlimited.com]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Debbie_Foster

EarlySense System Implementation Shown to Reduce Falls, Decrease Transfers to Hospitals and Increase the Quality of Care for Elderly in Multi-Center Nursing Home Study

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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  EarlySense System Implementation Shown to Reduce Falls, Decrease Transfers to Hospitals and Increase the Quality of Care for Elderly in Multi-Center Nursing Home Study

Clinical data presented at the 2013 Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Geriatrics Society

 

Waltham, MA, May 3, 2013 —- EarlySense, the market leader in Proactive Patient Care Solutions™, announced today the results of a multi-center clinical study demonstrating that the EarlySense system helps medical teams at rehabilitation centers to reduce patient falls as well as the number of patients transferred back to the hospital.  The clinical data was collected from The Hebrew Home at Riverdale, NY and Dorot Medical Center in Israel.  The data was presented today at the 2013 Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) by Hebrew Home medical director and study principal investigator Dr. Zachary J. Palace in a poster titled The Effect of a Continuous Patient Monitoring System on Reducing Hospitalization and Falls in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

 

Dr. Palace said, “The implementation of EarlySense on the post-acute care units has demonstrated a significant decrease in the total number of falls and a trend towards reduction in the readmission rate back to hospitals, thus improving the overall quality of care for the elderly. The system also alerted regarding early warning signs of patient deterioration which enabled our medical team to proactively respond and literally save four lives. As clinicians we are always on the lookout for better ways to provide safer, more effective care for our patients.”

 

Dr. Palace continued, “Patient falls and subsequent hospital transfers are an ongoing challenge for most rehabilitation centers. The EarlySense system is the first technology to help us more effectively and proactively respond to early warning signs of deterioration and potential falls to secure better patient outcomes. We’ve experienced success and look forward to continuing this trend.”

 

Dorot Medical Center principal investigator Dr. Gad Mendelson said, “As the population ages, we are seeing a growing need to provide safer, smarter care without increasing our staffing level.  In this clinical trial, we saw that the continuous monitoring nature of the EarlySense system and its low level of false alarms allowed our team to reach deteriorating patients earlier without creating alarm fatigue.”

 

Eight-hundred and thirty-three (833) patient records at The Dorot Geriatric Center, a 374-bed facility in Netanya, Israel and seven-hundred and seventy-three (773) records at the Hebrew Home at Riverdale, an 870-bed skilled nursing facility in Riverdale, N.Y. were collected and reviewed over a six month period.  The transfer rate to the hospital decreased by 21% (p=0.12) at Dorot, and the falls rate decreased by 38.5% (p<0.05) at the Hebrew Home.

 

Mr. David Weinstein, Executive Vice President & Chief Operating Officer of the Hebrew Home at Riverdale said, “The Hebrew Home at Riverdale has always been at the forefront of care and technology.  Early Sense compliments our unique platform by offering our residents innovative advancements that are safe and effective.”

 

EarlySense Vice President of Clinical and Regulatory Affairs Dalia Argaman said, “We are fortunate to be able to work with two outstanding and highly skilled nursing facilities like the Hebrew Home and Dorot.  We look forward to continuing what has been a very productive cooperation at both of these fine locations with the vision that the EarlySense system will continue to benefit medical teams, patients and their families within the entire healthcare spectrum, in the various markets across the world where we are actively promoting the EarlySense Solutions.”

 

About EarlySense

EarlySense has brought to market an innovative technology designed to advance proactive patient care and enable clinicians to achieve better patient outcomes, by assisting in preventing adverse events from occurring through the early identification of potential adverse events, in the form of falls, pressure ulcers and/or patient deterioration.  The company’s flagship product, the EarlySense System, is a continuous, contact-free, patient safety monitoring solution that monitors and documents a patient’s vital signs and movement using a sensor that is placed underneath a bed mattress. There are no leads or cuffs to connect to the patient who has complete freedom of movement and is not burdened by any cumbersome attachments.  The system was initially designed to monitor non-ICU ‘lower risk’ patients on medical surgical floors who are usually monitored by nursing staff approximately once every four hours. The system is currently installed at hospitals and rehabilitation centers in the USA and Europe.  It is also commercially available in Canada. Hospital administrators report that patients, their families and staff feel more comfortable knowing the system is in place.  EarlySense Inc. is headquartered in Waltham, MA.  Investors include: JK&B, Pitango Venture Capital, Etgar Challenge Fund, ProSeed VC Fund (TASE: PRSD), Docor International Management, Noaber, and Bridge Investment Fund, and Peter Soderberg, managing partner of Worthy Ventures Resources, LLC and former president and CEO of Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: HRC).  For additional information, please visit www.earlysense.com.

 

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Marketing, Selling, and Serving the Older Adult, Senior Citizens, Family Caregivers by Barbara Mascio

May 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Are your clients pleased by the fine quality service that you provide?  Validating your clients’ endorsement of you through Certification as a Senior Approved Service will increase your client base.  Senior Approved Certification leads a family towards a service like yours side stepping the possibility of connecting with a less than desirable service.

If you serve the older adult, the disabled or those with chronic illnesses you may qualify for an independent consumer-driven survey process leading to certification as a Senior Approved Service.

You will not pay for clients, leads or referrals.  You will not violate HIPAA or the Anti-kickback rulings.  You will not pay for membership or advertising space.

Certifications are offered for medical, non-medical, alternative healing practices, housing, elder-law, and financial planners – virtually any type of business that reaches this population.  “We are building the ultimate one-call solution,” states Barbara Mascio, founder.  “Seniors are need of many kinds of service, including lawn care, handyman services and so on.  We save the headache of shopping around and completely remove the guess work.”

Confident business owners recognize the benefits of being part of an exclusive network of Certified Senior Approved Services.  See [http://www.qualityeldercare.com/senior-services.html]

Jean F. Wales, President of Wales Consulting LLC and Author of “Do It Now! An Organizing Handbook for Families and Senior Citizens writes  Becoming a Senior Approved Service instantly raised the credibility of my book “Do It Now! An Organizing Handbook for Families and Senior Citizens.  [http://www.seniorsapprove.com/organizing.html]

Ester Whitney, owner of Sweet Adeline’s Home writes  I feel I have been given a great opportunity to be the first Residential Home Care Provider to be approved by Senior Approved Services in the Dallas Area … everyone has been impressed …  [http://www.sweetadelineshomes.com/]

Tony Latina and Peggy Schmidt, co-owners of Advanced Laser Solutions writes  We have had nothing but positive feedback from the referrals from Senior Approved Services. They have been excellent to work with and we strongly recommend them.   [http://www.seniorsapprove.com/stop_smoking.html]

Paul Stone, owner of Occasional Help for Seniors a general cleaning and handyman service writes  We are so proud to be Certified as a Senior Approved Service. Putting this on our brochures, business cards and other advertisement pieces has clearly, without a doubt, increased our client base. Barbara is right; seniors need services but are afraid or confused about which one to call. [http://www.seniorsapprove.com/occasional-help.html]

See [http://www.qualityeldercare.com/providers] for details.  Mention Savings Code 0630 when you apply for certification.

Barbara Mascio, Founder of Senior Approved Services – a National Network of Products, Resources and Services Endorsed by Seniors

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Barbara_Mascio

Senior Citizens May Find Time is Running Out by Irene Mori

May 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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For senior citizens, sometimes it feels like time is running out. The oldest  of the baby boomers entered the realms of becoming seniors several years ago.  This large group of the population has been influencing markets for years and  still do so. Now as they enter the twilight years, they must come to realize  that their youthfulness has been spent and there may not be that many more  spring times left. Health and wellness is still an issue.

Many seniors have already commenced vigorous pursuit of the completion of  their “bucket list” which includes the experiences they want to have before they  leave this earthly existence. It’s time for this segment of people to be  concerned with themselves and to do the things they enjoy while they still can  do them.

If and when good health and a stable mental capacity leave a person, it then  becomes too late to pursue the interests which may be there now. Senior citizens  are able to have active, busy lives full of productivity and enjoyment.

Because money is not plentiful for a number of seniors, many are working  menial jobs at stores or fast food outlets. The reasons for doing so may be  varied such as for extra income necessary to make ends meet or to simply have a  place to go and enjoy the company of other people. Many are searching for home  based businesses as a means of supplementing their social security or other  meager retirement income.

Although there are thousands of wealthy senior citizens, there are  undoubtedly many more who struggle in their daily lives. They find it difficult  to pay for necessities like shelter, food, and medications. Some seniors find  life has little meaning, but it does not have to be that way. Keeping one’s mind  and body active helps a person feel better and act younger.

Dorothy Dale Kloss is an example of someone who is young at heart and young  in actions although at age 85, she is the oldest showgirl in the Universe  according to the Guinness Book of World Records. Dorothy decided she needed  something to do fourteen years ago so she auditioned with the Fabulous Palm  Springs Follies. She got the job and now dances at about nine performances each  week. She has been dancing since she was five years old and obviously loves to  dance. Upon seeing and meeting her, there is no way that anyone would guess that  she is 85.

Although time may be running out, seniors can still find ways of being  productive, engaged citizens who can still enjoy life to the fullest.

Irene Mori lives near the Nation’s capital where she is able to regularly  experience the happenings of the government. She is involved with home based  business and network marketing. For information on an affordable money making  opportunity with a company which provides discount savings on everyday purchases  and cash back for online shopping along the chance to make some extra income,  visit http://www.moremlmsuccess.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Irene_Mori

Marketing Real Estate to Senior Citizen Buyers by Marte Cliff

May 9, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Have you noticed? Senior citizens aren’t as old as they used to be. At least  some aren’t. And that means you cannot market to all seniors in the same  way.

Senior buyers come in two varieties. The first are those who are actually  suffering from the ravages of age – and are only too happy to tell you all about  it. They’ll give you a list of ailments and things they can no longer do, so  your job in finding them a home is a bit more straightforward.

You can openly discuss issues like stairways, counter heights, doorway  widths, and space to install grab bars in the bathroom. They’ll tell you what  they need and want so you can go out and find it for them.

When you’re selling to this group, go preview homes before you take them  along.

When people are having a hard time getting around, need a wheelchair or  walker, or are just unsteady on their feet, they don’t need to be dragged around  looking at all the wrong homes. They won’t appreciate you wasting their energy  by showing them homes that are obviously wrong.

So pay careful attention to their needs, and if you eliminate a house they’ve  asked about, tell them why. It might be because the bathrooms and bedrooms are  on the second floor and the laundry room is in the basement – or perhaps because  of steep steps leading to the house. Maybe the garage is too narrow to allow  them room to put a wheel chair in and out of the car, or the bathroom door is  too narrow for the wheel chair to get through.

Do your homework, tell them the straight facts, and you’ll earn their  loyalty.

This segment of the senior population may be focused on living within minutes  of a medical facility, and they’ll probably tell you which one.

But what about the second group? What about the ones who are  officially senior citizens, but have no intention of acknowledging the fact?

You’d do well not to mention the words “Senior citizen” in their  presence.

Instead, find out more about them and their lives. Many are still working, so  see if they want to locate near the workplace. After that, inquire about hobbies  and other leisure time activities. Your new seniors may be avid golfers, they  may want to hit the gym three days a week, they make require fast access to a  swimming pool, or perhaps want to locate near a boarding facility where they can  keep a horse.

They may even want a home with a bit of pasture so they can take care of that  horse themselves.

Don’t assume anything. Some seniors are anxious to leave yard care  behind so they can pursue other interests, while others have been waiting for  retirement to have time to landscape a yard and grow a huge garden.

Take the time to listen. Listening is important no matter who your  client is, but when you’re selling to senior citizens, you need to listen to the  subtle hints as well as the open statements.

Remember, in the back of their minds, they’re recognizing the possibility of  ill-health in the future. How could they avoid it, with the television and  newspapers shouting it at every turn?

They know that the day could be coming soon when they won’t be able to easily  navigate those stairways – and they know that a wheel chair could be a part of  their future. They may even have a secret fear of living too far from a medical  facility.

But many simply do not want to talk about that. So don’t bring it up  unless they do.

Selling to seniors isn’t really all that different from selling to anyone  else. Your job is to listen and pay  attention to what you hear. When you do  that with each and every customer and client you’ll be head and shoulders above  your competition – because listening is almost a lost art.

Marte Cliff is a Freelance Copywriter and former real estate broker who  specializes in writing for real estate and related industries.

Marte offers a free mini-course for Realtors trying to build a business, as  well as web copywriting and lead generation packages. Learn more about them at  http://www.copybymarte.com

Marte offers a weekly ezine for real estate professionals and others with an  interest in marketing themselves or their property. To subscribe, and get a copy  of her report: How to Get Referrals & Testimonials, visit her at http://www.marte-cliff.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Marte_Cliff

 

Need Self Defense for Senior Citizens? Buy Personal Alarms by Carl Vouer

April 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Human beings are the most dangerous creature ever to walk the Earth. I am not  saying all humans are bad; in fact I like to think that the vast majority of us  are caring, thoughtful, non-violent creatures that pose a threat to absolutely  no one. However, I am not so naive that I don’t realize the fact that there are  those of us out there that truly live without a conscience and have no trouble  nor lose no sleep over hurting others for their own personal gain. What really  concerns me is that these bad people I speak of are not always entirely  unintelligent and because of this they are going to choose targets they feel  will give the least resistance. These bad guys (and gals) are going to take  advantage of people they consider to be of inferior strength when choosing  someone to mug and you know who oftentimes fits that bill? Senior citizens.

Time unfortunately slows us all down and as a result our growing senior  population is finding themselves the target of more and more wrong doings. This  is something that should concern each and every senior citizen and why every  senior should have a means of defending themselves in the unfortunate event of  an attack. The options for defending one’s self are relatively vast but the one  that makes the most sense for senior citizens, in my opinion, is personal  alarms. Personal alarms are ideal for seniors because they are completely safe  to use, unlike a firearm, self-defense baton, pepper spray, stun gun or any of  the other most popular choices available when discussing self-defense.

A personal alarm does not work by incapacitating an attacker but by hopefully  scaring them away with the fear of being apprehended. You see a criminal will  not have a very successful criminal career if that criminal is not afraid of  being caught and a great way for a criminal to be caught is for people to be  watching when he or she commits a crime. And what is a great way to draw  people’s attention? How about with a 130 decibel shriek from a personal alarm?  That will usually do the trick and when an attacker hears that shriek he or she  knows darn well that anybody in the nearby vicinity heard it as well and will be  looking his way immediately. I think chances are pretty good that the second a  senior citizen sets a personal alarm off that the majority of criminals will  turn tail and run from the scene.

So if you are a senior citizen or anyone that wants to add a very effective  measure of safety please consider buying a personal alarm.

Stay Safe,

Carl Vouer

To see more items of self defense for seniors or to buy personal alarms please visit us online

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Carl_Vouer

 

Niche Marketing Strategies For Tutoring Businesses Looking To Attract Senior Citizens by SK Tilton

April 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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For years, we’ve heard about the graying of our population from the baby boom  years. Our current class of senior citizens inductees (the population born  during the Baby Boom after World War II from 1946 to 1964) is going to make up  close to 20% percent of the total US population by 2029 according to the US  Census Bureau. What often goes unmentioned is that this mature population also  controls one of the largest percentages of disposable income. As a group, senior  citizens are and will be for some time the most affluent Americans. They hold  about three quarters of the nation’s financial assets worth approximately $1  trillion in disposable income annually.

Again, that is $1 trillion dollars in disposable income annually.

Many product and/or service oriented businesses have taken the long view and  begun marketing various products and services geared specifically to the older  consumer. Despite this recognition on the part of a few marketers, this  financially secure, mature group of consumers remains largely untapped by  educational companies and services. Take for instance the onslaught of new  technologies that seem to pop up like daisies in the spring, out of all consumer  groups, our seniors, are usually the last to be courted. While it may be true  that certain technologies are better suited for younger tech savvy consumers (I  am reminded of my elderly grandmother who purchased an unlimited text messaging  package on a small phone without text messaging capability and did I mention she  had arthritis), it doesn’t mean that this market is entirely unsuited for those  educational businesses and services that use technology to deliver their product  or service.

For a supplemental education service tutoring provider, this mature consumer  group is wide open with far less competition and minimal requirements in the way  of overhead expenditures. Two of the much-needed services that senior citizens  in particular lack are computer training and technology acclimation. Many of the  services supplemental education companies can provide, are the ones that are  most often overlooked or taken for granted, i.e. using the internet, opening up  an email account, social networking account registration, etc. If you are  reading this article, you can definitely offer those services and more. Suppose  for a moment you feel uncomfortable with your level of competence in offering a  few of these services, let me repeat what I said in my previous article, Niche  Marketing Strategies for Tutoring Businesses Looking To Attract Parents of  Students Taking State Standardized Tests, you do not have to be an expert in the  subject matter in order to provide supplemental services in the subject matter,  you just need to hire people with thorough experience related to the field.

The reason for the lack of competition in this age group is precisely because  this mature audience is a bit more discerning with their spending habits and a  more sophisticated approach is required to gain their attention, loyalty, and  dollars. However, it is for this very reason that supplemental education service  providers should dive into this market with fervor and enthusiasm. Education is,  and has always been a cornerstone for any age group. The value that the 50 and  over age group places on education should not go unnoticed. Along with  education, communication plays an important role in everyone’s lives and its  role only expands as one gets older. In the past, many grandparents would send  letters to their grandchildren and eagerly await their response. Grandparents  yearn to be a part of their grandchildren’s lives. Why not offer the ability to  stay in touch while simultaneously helping an older population learn and acquire  new skills? Imagine grandma’s joy every time she logs on to her e-mail account  and sees a message from her grandchild or when she receives a tweet. It’s truly  a win-win proposition!

Of course that’s just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the type of  services supplemental education providers can offer up in addition to computer  training. Curriculum and/or activities marketed to senior citizens can range  from learning a new language to scrap booking to ballroom dancing. If you’re  looking for ideas on what senior citizens are interested in learning, you can  find a compiled starter list below. Since most of your organized activities and  programs will consist of a variety of group sizes, you will have the ability to  market age specific specials and discounted tuition fees accordingly. Remember,  you run a supplemental education service business that should be able to teach  and tutor in multiple disciplines. You do not need to have any expert knowledge  in any of these areas, just hire someone who does. It is highly unlikely that  Sam Walton knew how to repair the diesel engines of every tractor-trailer that  brought in a load of merchandise to his stores, but his business (Walmart) hired  people who did have that expertise.

The best part about marketing to this age group is that they are fairly  accessible if you know where to look. Putting up postings/flyers at local  community church bulletins, visiting the adult education departments of local  community colleges, and contacting the Facility Director or Onsite Coordinator  at various assisted living facilities to propose your computer training or other  services to their residents, is a good way to start. If interested, there are  plenty of online directories that list full contact information for assisted  living facilities narrowed by zip code or state.

How about the Bingo nights? They are usually held at lodges, halls, churches,  and schools/community colleges.

Hold the presses! Yet another great source that has been largely abandoned by  the younger generation is the newspaper. Here’s a little known fact about the  newspaper industry – 65% of its readers are over the age of 55. By advertising  in this medium you are reaching over half of the newspapers readers – Now that’s  worth another read!

When it comes to reaching senior citizens, let your creativity lead the way,  your opportunities are limitless. For the astute, forward thinking individual,  this is a unique opportunity to service an undeserved demographic and separate  your business from the competition. Remember, thinking outside the box never  gets old!

Activity Ideas for Senior Citizens: · Computer Training  · Dance   · Yoga  · Painting  · Sewing · Journal Writing · Knitting or  crocheting  · Photography · Discussion Groups  · Exercise  ·  Knitting  · Foreign Language Conversation · Needlepoint  · Pinochle   · Quilting  · Tai Chi  · Writing workshops  · Crafts  ·  Bowling  · Bridge

S.K. Tilton has served as a program director, site coordinator, area  director, and as a SES business consultant to various SES (Supplemental  Education Services) tutoring companies across the United States. S.K. Tilton has  written numerous business plans for SES start ups and filed many approved  applications on behalf of SES tutoring companies. As a consultant, S.K. Tilton  has been responsible for presenting and implementing successful marketing plans  and helping first year start ups achieve success normally enjoyed by seasoned  SES veterans. S.K. Tilton’s latest work combines practical experience of the  best and worst SES practices to bring you the only SES success guide book  available. For further information on the SES Made Easy book and the author,  please visit http://www.sestutoringbiz.com.

Stay informed on the latest information regarding supplemental education  service tutoring at http://sestutoringbiz.com/category/Blog/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=SK_Tilton

 

A Brain Fitness Program to Determine If Senior Citizens Are Safe Drivers by Diane Carbo

April 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Are senior citizens safe drivers? A brain fitness program that is being  tested may determine just that. A brain exercise program has just been  determined to possibly be the next big breakthrough in automotive safety.

Research studies have shown that a brain fitness program may decrease risky  driving habits and improves the response time for braking and stopping the  vehicle. As the population ages, there will be more and more senior citizens  driving than ever before.

It is presently known that as driver’s age, especially as they move into  their 70s and beyond, a number of problems with response time, planning and  concentration can get in the way of safe driving. It is the goal of a brain  fitness program to determine, “Are senior citizens safe drivers?”

The goal of the brain exercise program is to see if there is an increase in  response time, better planning executed and more concentration by the senior  drivers.

More on a brain fitness program that may determine “Are senior citizens safe  drivers?”

Medications that aging individuals are prescribed are a major problem that  affect their thinking (cognitive) abilities. As we age, we are more likely to  take multiple medications. These multiple medications can lead to impaired  driving ability in the senior citizen driver.

How does a brain fitness program improve a senior citizen driver to make them  safe? Brain fitness exercises can help senior drivers avoid or delay cognitive  decline and assist those aging drivers to maintain an independent life style as  long as possible.

A brain fitness program that encouraged an increase response time, visual  attention, memory, the ability to measure the processing of speed and the  ability to react to unexpected situations was studied. Past brain fitness  program research shows that not only do brain fitness exercises improve all of  the above, but the studies have shown that the brain training has sustained  those improved results beyond a 5 year period.

Start a brain exercise program today. There is increasing amounts of evidence  that specific thinking skills that are used for driving can be trained. The  results are better driving skills. It is never too late to start a brain fitness  program.The benefits may have lasting results that will assure a better quality  of life.

Diane Carbo Registered Nurse has more than thirty five years in the nursing  field. Her experience as a geriatric care manager, makes her uniquely qualified  to help those who want to live out their lives in their own homes. That decision  may be made when you are 20, 30, 40 or in fact at any age, with sooner rather  than later being ideal. Diane has developed a web site to make people aware of  issues and options. You will find a mountain of helpful information that will be  continually updated. Please visit http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com/brain-fitness-program.html to learn more about brain fitness. Sign up for “The Caring Advocate” her free  newsletter and receive a complimentary copy of the Home Health Care Planning  Guide.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

 

Senior Citizen Homes by David Stillwagon

April 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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As the birth rate continues to go down in most of the world the senior  citizens population as a percentage of the total population is increasing. One  of the main reasons is health care that is geared toward older folks and the  increasing awareness of making the most of your later years. Not only are senior  citizens staying active they are also involved in their community and where they  want to reside. Senior citizens homes and apartments have become an important  issue in this country and others.

What are the issues facing senior citizens regarding where they live?

If you are an older person or couple and your children have left the house  then you might feel as though your present home is a little too big and you want  to down size. Of course it would be a tough decision not only for you but also  for your children. They probably don’t want to see you sell the house where they  grew up in and had so many memories. But you find that it is just too big for  the two of you now and taking care of the house and a lawn might be more than  you can handle.

Finding a home that is affordable, comfortable and one that meets your needs  can be a job for anyone no matter what age group you are in. The major indicator  of which house you choose is probably the price of the house. This is especially  true if you are a retiree living on a fixed income, you know what you can afford  and what you can’t. Unfortunately some of the houses that you may have thought  ideal were probably out of your pricing range.

Selling a house can be a real hassle whether the economy is good or bad. And  if you are in the market for a home it makes it twice as bad. But you have to  take your time find the house that is just right for you. Are there enough  bedrooms and bathrooms, is there room if you have overnight guest? And what  about that yard, is the right size to take care of?

It’s not only the house that you have to think about it is also the  neighborhood. What is the crime rate? Are the other houses in the neighborhood  taken care of? How close are you to your doctors and a hospital?

Finding senior citizen homes and apartments is a worthy task that takes time  and effort to achieve.

David Stillwagon blogs about health and age issues such as senior citizen homes

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Stillwagon

 

The Critical Importance of Recreation For Senior Citizens by Robert McCluskey

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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As our population ages, there is increasing emphasis on teaching and learning  lifelong recreational skills. Research has shown that recreation is an important  part of an individual’s social behavior. Recreation plays a critical role in the  lives of older adults by contributing to an improved quality of life. People who  participate in recreational activities as senior citizens report significantly  more life satisfaction than those who do not.

Physical recreation is especially important. Engaging in physical activity  reduces almost every risk of disease, including heart disease, high blood  pressure, colon cancer and diabetes. Participation in recreational activities  improves mental health, as well. Again, research shows that older individuals  who participate in recreational activities have better coping behaviors in  response to stressful life events and daily frustrations. They learn that social  support is important, and available, through these activities.

Unfortunately, we have come to view our older years as a time of diminishing  activity and social interaction. As a result of these expectations, aging folks  often assume they are incapable of recreational activity or that it will not be  available to them. They often cite scarce financial resources, lack of  transportation or declining health as reasons for avoiding these important  activities. Although there is some validity to these concerns, we often overlook  the increasing resources that are being dedicated to wellness among senior  citizens. Some of these resources are:

  • Travel programs. Fees are usually required, but deep discounts for seniors  are often available.
  • Volunteering. Seniors bring valuable experience, wisdom and compassion to  others
  • Elderhostel. A world-wide travel program bringing affordable adventure and  learning to seniors
  • Theme parks. Senior days! Special entry fees!
  • Entertainment and arts. Museum and theatre tours often provide discounts and  transportation to seniors
  • Local parks and recreation programs. Great outdoor activities
  • Community Gardening. Check with your local parks and recreation office
  • Senior citizen centers. Free or reduced price meals and more!
  • Book clubs. Reading and socialization are a potent therapeutic combination  for the brain

 

It is important for senior citizens and those who care for them to seek out  recreational activities even at this time when they may be reluctant to do so.  Research indicates that seniors who participate in these kinds of activities  tend to remain active once they begin.

Western cultures sometimes view their aging populations as economic and  social liabilities. In fact, when they are nurtured, they become assets.  Recreational activities can provide help and motivation that seniors require to  enable them to contribute their valuable time and wisdom in return for that  nurturance.

Robert A. McCluskey Bob McCluskey is a semi retired teacher and school  administrator. He has recently been teaching college-level psychology classes  and has developed a course in the psychology of aging. Bob teaches courses  specifically designed for senior citizens and is especially interested in the  mental health of aging, With an emphasis on the preservation and enhancement of  memory.

If you would like to learn more about this topic visit our web site: Senior Technology News! Going Strong Seniors is your premier source for Internet  resources!

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Senior Citizens Can Become Great Customers by Michael McCann

April 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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If you think the senior citizen market isn’t dynamic, then you’re really out  of touch with marketing. Thirty-five percent of our population is over 55 years  old, and these very affluent seniors control almost 45 percent of the disposable  income of our country.

Neither Madison Avenue nor the advertising agency down the block takes this  group seriously, and as a result, the market is virtually untapped. Here are  four suggestions on how to target your business efforts to penetrate this  market.

o Gain an understanding of this large market… Throw out  everything you ever heard about the over-55 group. These people are vibrant and  full of life. They are looking for new ideas, challenges, and new and innovative  ways to enjoy life. Thanks to Social Security, wise investing and good  retirement plans, they have the money to pay for what they want. Most senior  citizens want what you want: health, happiness and security. Many want  excitement, romance and adventure. They want to maintain close ties with their  children and grandchildren.

o Target products and services… Yes, senior citizens want to  know about cruise ships, vitamins and wheelchairs, but so do thousands of people  under 55.

The difference is that seniors are looking for solutions to problems. They  want to make their life easier and more enjoyable, and they have the money to  pay for the services and products that can help them achieve these goals. If  your product solves a specific problem, you will find this market is for  you.

o How to advertise to seniors… Forget the flowery phrases, cute  word plays and fast-action ads. Senior citizens want to know the facts and what  benefits those facts will provide for them.  Your products and services are just  the carrier of benefits, not benefits in themselves.

Seniors want to know how your offering will make life easier or better or  more fun. Problem solving is high on the list of benefits wanted, and proof of  claim is requirement. Straight talk is appreciated, and as usual, a picture is  worth a thousand words.

Two-step advertising works well in the senior market. Seniors have time, so  snap decisions are seldom made. Advertisements that offer more information work  especially well. Always be positive in your advertising, and never talk down to  your audience. Most seniors are a lot smarter than you or I.

o Things to avoid… It is not a good idea to sell marginal ideas  to senior citizens such as work-at-home projects and get-rich-quick business  schemes. The senior lobby had watchdog groups looking for scam artists, and  these two topics top the list of no-nos. Get on their list and you will find  your business in trouble.

If you’re looking for the best source of information as to how to advertise  to the senior market, read what they read. Buy some of the newsstand magazines  on retirement, vacations, travel, cooking or investing targeted toward seniors,  and read both the articles and the ads. Find copies of Modern Maturity.  This and other magazines and periodicals will provide valuable insight into how  to advertise to this lucrative market.

Make more money faster by easily connecting with hard-to-reach decision  makers who can buy your products and services…NOW! Get started free by getting  Michael McCann’s new Special Report excerpted from his newest edition of his  popular business development book, Connecting with Key Decision Makers (How to  Reach Hard-to-Reach Businesspeople Who Can Say “Yes”)…just for asking at http:/www.GlobalBusinessCafe.com/  http://Twitter.com/MikeHMcCann Go now!

Michael McCann is a 25-year veteran of developing unique and professional  business development programs that create tangible results for individuals and  companies. Let him help you instantly…free!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Michael_McCann

 

ConnectMyFolks iPad App Offers New Way For Tech-Resistant Seniors To Connect With Family, Friends

April 22, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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ConnectMyFolks iPad App Offers New Way For Tech-Resistant Seniors To Connect With Family, Friends

EUGENE, Ore., April 18, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — A new iPad app that’s free to download and use will keep technologically challenged seniors in safe, simple and easy electronic touch with their friends, children and grandchildren. ConnectMyFolks delivers email, texts, photos and videos instantly to technophobes of all ages, although it’s designed to be used by people 65 and older. It is now available in the App Store.

Email and texting have replaced letter writing and phone calls for most people, and that leaves seniors out of the loop, says ConnectMyFolks co-founder Steve Lee. “If someone’s not able to get email or texts, they can end up isolated from their own family,” Lee says. “These days if you’re not receiving emails or texts, you’re left behind.”

Although the nation’s tech-savvy population is aging and bringing its expertise with it, the 85-year-old and up age category is the fastest growing demographic in the United States . Many of these seniors never acquired tech skills and are often intimidated by computers and smart phones.

ConnectMyFolks is simple and secure. Only people on the senior’s approved list can communicate through the app. That eliminates spam, scammers and other threats. “Whether it’s a nephew who’s always asking for money, or it’s a random phishing attempt, those emails won’t get through,” Lee says.

Housed on the intuitive iPad, ConnectMyFolks is designed for people easily overwhelmed by traditional tech devices. It launches with three big buttons – one for mail, one for pictures and one for videos. Forward, back and home buttons make navigation simple. “You absolutely cannot get lost in this app,” Lee says. “You can’t break it. When it doubt, just ‘go home.'”

A key feature is the simple web-based admin panel, where a designated friend or relative can set up the senior’s approved ConnectMyFolks sender list, select reply options based on the senior’s needs (pre-set replies, typed emails or voice recordings) and make adjustments to font sizes and other interface settings.

The app is expected to be popular in part because families are so geographically scattered. Even grown children who take care of their folks are often helping from afar, according to the US Census Bureau, which reports 7 million to 10 million adults care for their aging parents long distance.

ConnectMyFolks was developed by In the Loop, a Eugene , Oregon , company devoted to the use of technology to solve everyday challenges faced by modern families. Learn more at www.connectmyfolks.com.

What Makes Someone a Senior Citizen? by Lynn Dorman, Ph.D.

April 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Good question!

Developmental Psychologists have long used either ages or stages to define  segments of the population. Many developmental textbooks are divided into  chapters based on one or the other of these definitions.

Age definitions are ones that use numbers – such as: being 65 or older means  you are a senior citizen; or all over 55 get a senior citizen discount.

Stage definitions are usually feeling and behavior related – along the lines  of: “you are only as old as you feel or act.”

Over the last few decades, as we learn more and more about the later  stages/ages of the lifespan, the thinking about aging is changing – and so are  the textbooks. But the definitions are still stuck in the past.

The field of Developmental Psychology is itself aging – as are the original  developmental psychologists – and more information is becoming known and  understood about the lifespan.

Add to this that we are living longer. In 1940, the average life expectancy  at birth in the USA was 62.9 years; in 1960 it was 69.7; by 1980 it was 74.1 and  in 2000 it was 77.2. [The statistics differ by sex and ethnicity but these are  the averages for all persons.]

Average only is a middle figure. Half die before and half after the ages  cited. And if one lives past infancy, life expectancy increases and it increases  every year one is still alive. So those who were born in 1940, and are obviously  now well past 62.9, have a far different life expectancy than when they were  born. That expectancy is now somewhere into their mid 80s.

So as to defining what makes you a senior citizen? It is often left up to the  language or stereotypes we use and some legal definitions.

Most jurisdictions rely on when you can start collecting social security  benefits to define what is their senior population. Eligibility for full Social  Security benefits will increase to age 67 for those born in 1960; yet as we can  still sign up for Medicare at age 65 – 65 seems still to be the “age” definition  of senior citizen.

Will that change? It might…but not for those who are already at or near 65.  We ARE labeled senior citizens.

And what about behavioral definitions – the stages aspect?

That is up to us. We can continue to do what we have been doing – living life  to the fullest and not becoming the stereotypes many have about senior  citizens.

We are who we are – and are the ages we have accumulated!

If we let someone else’s characterizations of “senior-ness” define us or our  behavior – then we are falling prey to their stereotypes. Create your own  definition of senior.

I am of the thought that we are only as old as we feel and act! So feel  and act young!

You may still be called a “senior” but you’ll wind up confounding a lot of  people.

I invite you to read more of my take on aging at http://growolderbetter.com – and where you can sign up for  even more tidbits.

From Lynn Dorman, Ph.D., a developmental psychologist who was around way back  then and is now a 70-year-old-senior-citizen who is still figuring out what she  will do when she grows up.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lynn_Dorman,_Ph.D.

The Benefits of Becoming a Senior Citizen by Rahmat Suki

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Most people hate or dislike the fact that in the years to come, they will be  living the second half of their lives as an old man or as an old woman. Being  old has been stereotyped to becoming ugly, slow, weak and isolated. But this is  not the reality at all times; some people grow old without the comfort of their  loved ones or even the care of other concerned citizens, but most of us have the  privilege to stay with our families and loved ones as we grow older each day.  Aging has its own disadvantages and unpleasant consequences, but there are a lot  of privileges being given to a senior citizen. The benefits that you can derive  from growing old are truly valuable and can help you deal better with aging.

To be considered as a senior citizen, one must reach the age of sixty-five in  the United States or depending on the age stated on the laws of a country. The  age of becoming a senior citizen is also considered as the retirement age for  professionals who have dedicated themselves to their work. Every month, there  are over one million people who turn sixty-five and imagine the fraction of the  population that belongs to this age group. By the time you have reached this  age, you are qualified for numerous benefits exclusive.

In the official context, a senior citizen is a term used for legal and  policy-related causes in verifying individuals who are eligible for specific  benefits to the age group. Some of the benefits of aging include caregivers  resources, consumer protection for seniors, education, jobs, and volunteerism  for seniors, end-of-life issues, federal and state agencies for seniors, health  for seniors, housing for seniors, laws and regulations concerning seniors, money  and taxes for seniors, retirement and travel and recreation for seniors. Even  for those seniors who are raising their own grandchildren have corresponding  benefits for doing so. Becoming old is not entirely full of detriments.

Senior citizen is a responsibility of every community. Every country has  responded to the needs of their graying population and being a senior citizen  means that you have fulfilled your role in your own community.

Do visit [http://www.agingpeople.net] to find out more FREE tips and secrets  of Anti-aging solutions.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Rahmat_Suki

 

Senior Citizens Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, and Arthritis – Causes and Treatments By David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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“Arthritis” does not mean only that someone has stiff, aching joints. Many types of arthritis exist, each with its own symptoms and treatments. Most types are chronic, meaning that they can be a source of discomfort for an extended period of time. Arthritis can afflict joints almost anywhere in the body and may cause changes you can see and feel, including swelling, warmth, and redness in the joints. It can last for a short time but be very painful or continue for a long time with less pronounced results while still damaging the joints.

Arthritis is extremely common in the United States, especially among senior citizens. Still, there are many steps they and those providing care for the elderly can take to relieve the different types of arthritis. The most common types in this population are osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and gout.

Osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis in senior citizens and begins when cartilage, the type of tissue that pads joints, begins to wear away. This can eventually cause all the cartilage between bones to wear away, forming painful rubbing of bones against each other. This type of arthritis is most common in the hands, neck, lower back, knees, and hips.

Symptoms of OA can range from stiffness and mild pain that accompanies exercise or bending to severe pain in the joints even in times of physical rest. OA can also cause stiffness during times in which you haven’t used specific joints in a while, like when you’re on a long car ride, but this stiffness usually goes away when you move your joints again. OA can eventually lead to problems moving joints and sometimes to developing a disability if the areas affected are the back, knees, or hips.

Aging is often the greatest risk factor for developing OA. Other factors depend on the area of the body afflicted-for instance, OA in the hands or hips may be caused by genetic factors; OA in the knees may be caused by being overweight; and injuries or overuse of joints in the knees, hips, and hands may lead to OA.

Rheumatoid arthritis.

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) differs from OA in that it’s an autoimmune disease, meaning that your immune system attacks and damages the lining of a joint as if it were an injury or disease. RA leads to inflammation of the joints, which causes pain, stiffness and swelling, sometimes in multiple joints at once. It may be severe enough to prevent you from moving a certain joint. Senior citizens with RA may often experience fatigue or fever. You can develop RA at any age, and it’s more common in women.

RA can afflict almost any joint in the body and is often symmetrical, meaning that if you have RA in a specific joint on one side of your body, you probably experience RA in the same joint on the other side of your body. RA can damage not only joints, but also the heart, muscles, blood vessels, nervous system, and eyes.

Gout.

Senior citizens with gout experience the most severe pain relative to many other arthritis patients. An attack begins when uric acid crystals form in the connective tissue or joint spaces, leading to swelling, stiffness, redness, heat, and pain in the joint. Attacks often follow eating foods like shellfish, liver, dried beans, peas, anchovies, or gravy. Drinking alcohol, being overweight, and taking certain medications may worsen the symptoms. In senior citizens, using certain medications to lower blood pressure may also be a risk factor for a gout attack.

Gout is most common in the big toe, but it can occur in other joints such as the ankle, elbow, knee, wrist, hand, or other toes. Swelling may cause discoloration and tenderness due to skin stretching tightly around the joint. If you see a doctor during an attack, he or she may take a sample of fluid from the affected joint.

Other forms of arthritis.

Other forms include psoriatic arthritis  in patients who have psoriasis; ankylosing spondylitis, which mainly affects the spine; reactive arthritis, which occurs as a reaction to another illness in the body; and arthritis in the temporomandibular joint, the point at which the jaw attaches to the skull.

Arthritis Symptoms and Warning Signs.

Senior citizens and those providing their elder care should look out for the following symptoms as they may be indications of arthritis:

  • lasting joint pain
  • swelling in a joint
  • stiffness in a joint
  • tenderness or pain when touching a joint
  • difficulty in using or moving a joint normally
  • warmth and redness in a joint

 

Any of these symptoms lasting longer than two weeks should be addressed by a physician. If you experience a fever, feel physically ill, have a suddenly swollen joint, or have problems using a joint, a doctor should be contacted sooner. You will have to answer questions and go through a physical exam. Before suggesting treatment options, your doctor may want to run lab tests and take X-rays.

Arthritis Treatment.

Some common treatment options exist even though each type of arthritis is treatedsomewhat differently. Rest, exercise, eating a healthy diet, and becoming educated about the right way to use and protect the joints are key to minimizing the effects of arthritis. Proper shoes and a cane can minimize pain the feet, knees, and hips while walking, and some technology exists for helping open jars or bottles, turn doorknobs more easily, and otherwise improve quality of life in senior citizens with arthritis.

Additionally, some medications can lower the pain and swelling. Acetaminophen (in Tylenol) and some NSAIDs are sold over-the-counter and can ease pain. Other NSAIDs must be prescribed. It is important for senior citizens and those providing their in home care to pay attention to the warnings on both prescribed and over-the-counter drugs and to ask a doctor about how to properly and best use over-the-counter medicine to treat arthritis. The FDA also has information about many medications.

Some treatment options are specialized for individual types of arthritis.

Osteoarthritis Treatment.

There are medicines to help senior citizens with pain associated with OA, and rest and exercise may ease movement in the joints. Managing weight is also important. If one experiences OA in the knees, a doctor can provide shots in the knee joint, which can help to move it without as much pain. Surgery may also be an option to repair or replace damaged joints in senior citizens.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatments.

Treatment can diminish the pain and swelling associated with RA and cause joint damage to slow down or stop. One will feel better overall, and it will be easier to move around. On top of pain and anti-inflammatory medications, a doctor might prescribe DMARDs, which are anti-rheumatic drugs that can slow damage from RA. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, can minimize swelling while waiting for DMARDs to kick in. Additionally, biogenic response modifiers block the damage inflicted by the immune system and help people with mild to moderate RA when other treatments have failed to work properly.

Gout Treatment.

If you’ve gone through a gout attack, talk to a doctor to discuss possible causes and future prevention of attacks. Work together with your doctor and other elder care providers to plan and execute a plan for prevention. Commonly, NSAIDs or corticosteroids are recommended for an acute attack. This treatment diminishes swelling, allowing you to feel better fairly shortly after treatment. Usually, the attack fully stops within a few days. If one has experienced multiple attacks, a doctor may be able to prescribe medication to prevent further attacks.

Exercise can help Arthritis.

In addition to taking the proper medication and allowing your joints to rest, exercise can help senior citizens to stay in shape, maintain strong muscles, and control symptoms of arthritis. Daily exercise like walking or swimming keeps joints moving while lessening pain and strengthening the muscles around joints. Before starting any new exercise program, it is important to discuss options with your physician.

Three types of exercise are the best for senior citizens with arthritis:

  • Range-of-motion exercises reduce stiffness, improve flexibility, and keep joints moving. Activities like dancing fit into this category.
  • Strengthening exercises strengthen muscles, which improves support and protection to your joints. Weight training fits into this category.
  • Aerobic or endurance exercises improve health in the heart and arteries, prevent weight gain, improve how your body works overall, and may decrease swelling in some joints. Riding a bike fits into this category.

Other things to do to manage Arthritis.

 

On top of exercise and weight control, a number of other methods may help senior citizens ease the pain around joints. Applying heat or cold to joints, soaking in a warm tub, or swimming in a heated pool may help you feel better and move your joints more easily.

Surgery may be an option when damage has become disabling or when other treatment options have not adequately diminished pain. With surgery, joints can be repaired or replaced with artificial ones. Commonly, arthritic knees and hips are replaced.

Unproven remedies.

Many senior citizens with arthritis try treatments that have not been tested or proven to help. Some are harmful, like snake venom, while others are harmless yet unhelpful, like copper bracelets.

Here are a few ways to determine whether a treatment is unproven:

  • The remedy is said to work for all types of arthritis and other diseases
  • Scientific support is from only one research study
  • The label doesn’t include directions or warnings of use

Areas for further research.

 

Studies suggest that acupuncture could ease OA pain in some senior citizens. Dietary supplements such as glucosamine and chondroitin are also under investigation and may reduce OA pain. More research is needed to determine whether these types of treatments actually work to reduce symptoms and damage to joints.

Talk to your doctor and others involved in your elder care.

Try not to make light of your symptoms by telling yourself that joint pain or stiffness is simply caused by aging normally. Your doctor and other elder care providers can discuss possible treatment options with you to safely minimize your pain and stiffness and prevent more serious joint damage.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

AARP: George Davis Appointed AARP State President

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

George Davis Appointed AARP State President

African-American Business Executive is Top Advocate for AARP’s 3.1 million members California

PASADENA, Calif., April 3, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — George Davis of Los Angeles, CA, has been appointed AARP California State President. Prior
to his appointment, Davis was acting state president and served for two
years on the state’s Executive Council, a five-member council that provides
direction and leadership in carrying out AARP’s strategic priorities in
California.

Davis came to AARP as a distinguished executive in the broadcasting and
entertainment industry.  He is currently Principal of Davis Broadband Group, a Culver City based consulting firm that advises media and entertainment
companies on digital content distribution.  Earlier in his career, Davis was
managing television technical operations in the US and Asia at Technicolor
and Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Throughout his career, Davis has been actively involved in
community and public service.  In 1999, he was appointed by Governor Pete
Wilson to the board of the California African American Museum.  A few years
later Davis was appointed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to represent the
public as a member of the Board of Governors of the California State Bar.  He
is also a board member of New Directions, a nonprofit organization that helps
homeless veterans.

As volunteer state president, Davis will lead the California Executive Council and work in partnership with State Director Katie Hirning and in collaboration with other volunteers and staff to achieve AARP’s strategic priorities in the state.

“We are thrilled to have George as our new state president,” said State Director Katie Hirning. “He’s a long-time advocate for small businesses and a strong supporter of
technology and outreach to diverse populations.  His knowledge and experience
in these areas will greatly benefit AARP’s more than 3 million California
members.”

Davis is an avid hiker and enjoys collecting rare books when traveling abroad.  He resides in Los Angeles and has two adult daughters and a son attending college.

AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, with a membership of more than 37 million, that helps people turn their goals and dreams into real possibilities, strengthens communities and fights for the issues that matter most to families such as healthcare,
employment security and retirement planning. We advocate for consumers in the
marketplace by selecting products and services of high quality and value to carry the AARP name as well as help our members obtain discounts on a wide range of products, travel, and services.  A trusted source for lifestyle tips, news and educational information, AARP produces AARP The Magazine, the world’s largestcirculation magazine; AARP Bulletin; www.aarp.org

AARP TV & Radio; AARP Books; and AARP en Espanol, a bilingual news source.  AARP does not endorse candidates for public office or make contributions to political campaigns or candidates.  The AARP Foundation is an affiliated charity that provides security, protection, and empowerment to older persons in need with support from thousands of volunteers, donors, and sponsors. AARP has staffed offices in all 50 states, the District of
Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Learn more at www.aarp.org

.

Sometimes Little Things Can Be Huge!

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

By Thair Phillips, President, RetireSafe

A small and relatively new product is making life easier for older Americans. It’s a simple thing, but unit dose laundry detergent packs (or pods) are helping seniors perform necessary laundry chores that they might not otherwise be able to do without help. The laundry packs’ small size and pre-measured, consistent content is perfect for aging hands and eyes. With ten thousand of our fellow Americans reaching the age of 65 each day, it’s a really big deal!

While younger Americans can choose from many options, the pods are a huge help to the frail and the disabled.  Consider those who suffer from arthritis, for example. According to 2007-2009 data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), an estimated 50 million adults have self-reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis. That number is expected to grow to 67 million by the year 2030, per NHIS data. Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States, negatively impacting function and mobility for millions of senior citizens. The laundry pods meet the need created by those who can no longer heft a jug of detergent and pour it into a measuring cup. The small (but not too small to handle) size detergent pod fits the bill for aging-in-place seniors who wish to remain self-reliant.

And then there are those who must struggle each and every day with impaired vision.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), individuals over the age of 65 accounts for roughly 30 percent of the U.S. population considered to be visually impaired. Dimming eyesight can reduce physical, functional, emotional, and social well-being.  Doing the laundry can be a chore for all of us, but trying to measure the exact amount of liquid or powder for the person who is vision impaired can be a laundry room disaster resulting in ruined clothes and dangerous messes. For age-in-place seniors with cataracts, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and/or diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes that causes visual impairment, anything that can help simplify the laundry measuring process is truly a godsend.

Keep in mind that many older Americans in single family homes and apartments may well have to take their laundry and laundry supplies to a communal laundry room or a Laundromat.  Having the convenience of smaller, self-contained detergent pods to carry instead jugs of liquids and large boxes of powder is a big advantage for the elderly.  This is especially true for those navigating with canes or walkers, or those needing to keep one hand free for stability.

In short, pre-measured laundry detergent packs or pods are critical innovations for seniors. This is one small-sized product with a huge functional impact for seniors. In an aging America, we need every one of these impactful products, and many, many more.

RetireSafe is a nationwide organization of 4000,000 supporters that advocates on behalf of seniors on issues regarding Social Security, Medicare, health and financial well-being.

Contact Thair Phillips, (202) 628-5095

CVS Caremark Emphasizes Commitment to Older Americans at Annual American Society on Aging Conference

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Company highlights the importance of medication adherence in helping seniors on their path to better health

CVS Caremark (NYSE:CVS) will highlight how medication adherence plays a vital role in helping older Americans on their path to better health at the 2013 Annual American Society on Aging Conference, which is being held in Chicago this week.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20090226/NE75914LOGO )

CVS Caremark, a Titanium Sponsor of the conference, will also be participating in a number of general sessions and panels and will highlight its efforts to ensure customers and patients receive quality care and guidance as they age. David Casey, the company’s Vice President of Workforce Strategies and Chief Diversity Officer, will open the March 12 General Session: Mysteries of Population Aging.

As a pharmacy innovation company, CVS Caremark is committed to developing new ways to lower costs and improve health. By advancing the understanding of medication adherence through research collaborations, the company is gathering important information about why some patients take their medications as prescribed and why others do not. CVS Caremark is also refining the ways it interacts with patients through proven programs, such as Pharmacy Advisor and Maintenance Choice, that help patients stay on their medications and improve health outcomes.

“People age 65 and older typically take two or three times as many medications as younger Americans,” said Casey. “As we reinvent pharmacy care, we will continue to be a trusted health care partner to all of our customers, but particularly to aging Americans who are more likely to have chronic conditions and require more guidance.”

CVS Caremark is not only committed to its older customers and patients, it is also committed to recruiting mature workers and supporting older colleagues who are already part of the company.

“At CVS Caremark, we believe talent is ageless. Our mature colleagues’ knowledge and experience are important assets to our company. They provide us with insight into the best ways to serve our mature customers and sometimes become mentors to their younger colleagues,” added Casey.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 4.7 percent of the nation’s workforce is age 60 and over. Currently, 6.9 percent of CVS Caremark’s workforce is age 60 and over, higher than the national rate. The number of CVS Caremark colleagues who are age 50 and over has grown from approximately 6 percent in 1990 to nearly 20 percent in 2013. To continue this upward trend, CVS Caremark is cultivating public and private partnerships at the local, state, and national level with the goal of recruiting more mature workers into all areas of its workforce.

About CVS Caremark

CVS Caremark is dedicated to helping people on their path to better health as the largest integrated pharmacy company in the United States. Through the company’s more than 7,400 CVS/pharmacy stores; its leading pharmacy benefit manager serving more than 60 million plan members; and its retail health clinic system, the largest in the nation with more than 600 MinuteClinic locations, it is a market leader in mail order, retail and specialty pharmacy, retail clinics, and Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans.  As a pharmacy innovation company with an unmatched breadth of capabilities, CVS Caremark continually strives to improve health and lower costs by developing new approaches such as its unique Pharmacy Advisor program that helps people with chronic diseases such as diabetes obtain and stay on their medications.  Find more information about how CVS Caremark is reinventing pharmacy for better health at info.cvscaremark.com.

Contacts:

Jeff Ventura
Corporate Communications
(401) 770-1990
Jeffrey.Ventura@cvscaremark.com

Veterans Village Collaborates with Heaven Can Wait Animal Society

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Veterans to pilot dog adoption program 

 

WHAT:                 VeteransVillageLas Vegas, a comprehensive housing and resource facility for U.S. veterans and their families, is collaborating with Heaven Can Wait Animal Society (HCWAS) Las Vegas.  Two veterans will pilot a dog adoption program by volunteering to assume responsibility for the care of a dog while staying at the facility.  When they leave, veterans can opt to adopt the dog permanently at no charge.  The plan is to expand the program so that more veterans will enjoy the opportunity to have a loving companion, while helping to save dogs’ lives by giving them a safe home at VeteransVillage.

 

WHEN:                 Two veterans will officially adopt their dogs on Thursday, March 14 at 10 a.m.

Other dogs will be onsite to meet potential veteran owners to be considered for future adoption.

 

WHERE:               Veterans Village Las Vegas, 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard South

 

DETAILS:              Veterans are responsible for keeping their dog active, grooming, ensuring the dog is fed and, crated when left alone. HCWAS will properly train the dogs, provide food, treats and toys as well as assume financial responsibility for all veterinarian visits.  HCWAS will also train veteran residents how to properly care for their animal.

 

HCWAS offers many other services for animals in the Las Vegas area. In addition to finding safe homes for animals, HCWAS focuses its attention on eliminating companion animal suffering and pet overpopulation through spay/neuter, adoptions, community outreach programs and education. By pairing with Veteran’s Village, HCWAS hopes to reach its projected goals of better educating adults on the importance of spay/neuter for their pet and eliminating the killing of more than 30,000 cats and dogs annually in Las Vegas.

 

In addition to providing temporary housing for vets and their families, Veterans Village provides a comprehensive roster of services to vets through partnerships with other community organizations and government agencies, including employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events.

 

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org

 

About Heaven Can Wait Animal Society

Heaven Can Wait Animal Society, a non-profit 501 (c)(3) animal humane organization, was formed in 2000 by a group of 5 concerned citizens with the idea of building a beautiful 20 acre sanctuary to house all of the unwanted animals in our community.  In the meantime, though, animals were and still are dying at rate of around 30,000 per year in our local shelters with even more just dying in the streets.  Therefore, we decided to refocus our efforts slightly away from rescue and more toward promoting spay/neuter as the solution to the tragic pet overpopulation problem here in Las Vegas.www.hcws.org

Queen’s study shows psychotropic drug dispensing increases on entry to care homes

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 
Queen’s study shows psychotropic drug dispensing increases on entry to care homes
 

 

A study by Queen’s University Belfast has found that the dispensing of psychotropic drugs to older people in Northern Ireland increases on entry to care homes.

According to the study, due to be published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, antipsychotic drug dispensing in older people more than doubled from 8.2 per cent before entry to care homes to 18.6 per cent after entering care.

The study was carried out by researchers from Queen’s Centre for Public Health in the School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences.  It analysed prescribing data for over 250,000 people, aged 65 years and over living in Northern Ireland from 2008 to 2010, and looked at drug uptake within the older population during the transition from community to care.

The study revealed that psychotropic drug use was higher in care homes than the community, with 20.3 per cent of those in care homes dispensed an antipsychotic in January 2009, compared with 1.1 per cent of those in the community.

Lead researcher on the Queen’s study, Aideen Maguire, who is based in the Centre of Excellence for Public Health Northern Ireland said: “Although drug dispensing is high in older people in the community, we have found that it increases dramatically on entry to care. This study showed that the high uptake of psychotropic drugs observed in care homes in Northern Ireland cannot be explained by a continuation of drug use initiated in the community prior to entering care.

“With an ageing population globally it is important that we look at the reasons behind this type of increase following admission to care. Antipsychotic uptake in Northern Ireland is similar to that in the rest of the UK and Ireland, and this study highlights the need for routine medicines reviews especially during the transition into care.”

Other key findings of the study included:

·         Of the 250,617 people studied, 6,779 (2.7 per cent) experienced a transition into care during 2008-2010.

·         The psychotropic drugs prescribed to patients included in the study were being prescribed for the first time for many.

·         Six months after admission, 37.1 per cent of all new residents had received at least one prescription for a hypnotic drug, 30.2 per cent for an antipsychotic, and 24.5 per cent for an anxiolytic.

·         1.1 per cent of those living in the community were dispensed at least one prescription for an antipsychotic in January 2009, (7.3 per cent for a hypnotic, and 3.6 percent for an anxiolytic).

·         Hypnotic drug dispensing increased from 14.8 per cent to 26.3 per cent after entering care.

·         This study shows that use of psychotropic medication in a small proportion of residents of care homes was a continuation of a prescription that had been started before entry, but one in six individuals with no history of psychotropic drug use in the six months before entry had been exposed to at least one antipsychotic prescription within six months of entering care.

Professor Carmel Hughes from the School of Pharmacy at Queen’s added: “This is an important study of national and international relevance, as with an ageing population, quality of care for older people is an ongoing public health concern.

“The number of older people entering care across Ireland is predicted to increase in the next 10 years, and studies further predict a 69 per cent increase in the Irish population aged over 65 years from 2006-2021, and a 40 per cent increase in the those aged over 65 years in Northern Ireland in the same time frame.  With a globally ageing population, it is vitally important that we look at the reasons behind the increase in the prescription of psychotropic drugs in care homes.”

For further information on the Centre for Public Health and Centre of Excellence for Public Health Northern Ireland is available online at

http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/CentreforPublicHealth/

Ends.

For media enquiries please contact Claire O’Callaghan on +44 (0) 28 9097 5391 or 07814415451 or at c.ocallaghan@qub.ac.uk

Notes to Editors

  1. Aideen Maguire is available for interview.  Interview bids to Claire O’Callaghan on +44 (0) 28 9097 5391 or 07814415451 or at c.ocallaghan@qub.ac.uk
  2. A photograph of Aideen Maguire has been issued to picture desks and is available on request.
  3. Audio interview clips of Aideen Maguire and an online ‘WhatQneedtoknow’ video will be available at http://www.qub.ac.uk/home/ceao/Qtv/
  4. The full report is available for ‘early view’ at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jgs.12101/pdf
  5. Other studies have looked at drug uptake in care and in the community separately.

 

 

 

SLCC Joins National Program to Train Baby Boomers for Jobs

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Salt Lake Community College was recently chosen to join the Plus 50 Encore Completion Program, a national effort to train 10,000 baby boomers for new jobs in healthcare, education and social services. The program is sponsored by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC).

The College will assist adults age 50 and over in completing degrees or certificates in high-demand occupations that give back to the community. With many adults age 50 and over out of work or seeking to transition to a new career, the program offers skill updates and career makeovers. Salt Lake Community College will prepare older adults for careers such as pharmacy or ultrasound technicians and medical terminology specialists. In addition, the College’s Transition to Teaching program is offered in partnership with the State Office of Education to prepare students as elementary and secondary educators.

“The Plus 50 Encore Completion Program represents a meaningful, national validation of the work the College’s Division of Continuing Education has undertaken. The program will support individuals who want to design a second career—either out of practical necessity or personal interest,” said Jennifer Saunders, Associate Dean of Continuing Education. “People returning for education and training at this stage of their lives are building on rich employment histories, valuable interpersonal skills, and knowledge achieved through experiential learning. These resources are then being coupled with the most current workforce education.”

The program will be implemented utilizing a variety of strategies, including accelerated classes, flexible scheduling and cohort models, which provide groups of students with similar goals an opportunity to move through a program together.

Since 2008, AACC and its network of Plus 50 Initiative colleges have worked with baby boomers to help them prepare for new careers. An independent evaluation of AACC’s Plus 50 Initiative found that 89 percent of students agreed that college work force training helped them acquire new job skills, and 72 percent attributed landing a job to such training.
“Many adults age 50 and over want to train for new jobs that help others and are hiring, but they need to update their skills. Community colleges offer a supportive environment where baby boomers can train for new jobs quickly and affordably,” said Mary Sue Vickers, director for the Plus 50 Initiative at AACC.

In addition to grant funds to augment training programs, participating colleges gain access to toolkits and extensive marketing resources tailored to reach baby boomers. They’ll also benefit from the advice and support of staff at other community colleges that have successfully implemented programs for older learners and understand the unique needs of the plus 50 student population.

The Plus 50 Encore Completion Program is funded with a $3.2 million grant to AACC provided by Deerbrook Charitable Trust—supporting AACC’s work to increase the number of students who finish degrees, certificates, and other credentials. In April 2010, AACC committed alongside other higher education organizations, to promote the development and implementation of policies, practices and institutional cultures that will produce 50 percent more students with high quality degrees and certificates by 2020.

While the AACC Encore Completion Program focuses on serving the Plus 50 population, Salt Lake Community College welcomes anyone interested in making a career transition to learn more about the broad range of training opportunities available at: www.slcccontinuinged.com.

For more information about the Plus 50 Initiative at AACC, see: http://plus50.aacc.nche.edu.

The Encore Institute at Salt Lake Community College is an innovative program designed for adult learners who want to expand their knowledge through career and personal enrichment courses. The Institute offers flexible class scheduling, non-degree and degree learning experiences and affordable training to deepen or expand the personal and professional skills of students.

The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) is a national organization representing close to 1,200 community, junior and technical colleges nationwide. Community colleges are the largest and fastest growing sector of higher education, enrolling more than 13 million credit and non-credit students annually. More information is available at: http://aacc.nche.edu.

About the College: Salt Lake Community College is an accredited, student-focused, urban college meeting the diverse needs of the Salt Lake community. Home to more than 62,000 students each year, the College is the largest supplier of workforce development programs in the State of Utah. The College is the sole provider of applied technology courses in the Salt Lake area, with 13 sites, an eCampus, and nearly 1,000 continuing education sites located throughout the Salt Lake valley. Personal attention from an excellent faculty is paramount at the College, which maintains a student-to-teacher ratio of less than 20 to 1.

Grimaldi’s Pizzeria To Host Special Dinner for Susan G. Komen for the Cure of Southern Nevada

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

“Grimaldi’s Pizzeria For the Cure” to serve three-course meal for $15 donation on Feb. 25

LAS VEGAS – Grimaldi’s Pizzeria, famous for its award-winning, hand-tossed, coal-fired brick oven pizzas, will host a special dinner for Susan G. Komen of Southern Nevada on Monday, Feb. 25 at the Rainbow restaurant (7155 S. Rainbow Rd.) A three-course meal, including salad, pizza and dessert, will be served for a cash-only donation of $15.

The event is open to the public and two seatings will be offered for guests. The first from 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. and the second from 6:30 – 8 p.m. To RSVP for this event call Komen Southern Nevada at 702-822-2524.

“Komen Southern Nevada is a non-profit that is close to many of our employees’ hearts,” said Mikaela Clough, manager of S. Rainbow Grimaldi’s Pizzeria. “Raising funds for an organization that is vital to our community is our way of giving back and we hope that many people will come out and show support.”

“With so many very worthy charitable organizations in our amazing city, we are tremendously grateful to be chosen by Grimaldi’s Pizzeria to be a beneficiary of their fundraising efforts,” said Stephanie Kirby, Executive Director of Komen Southern Nevada. “Las Vegas is a large city based on population, but we are made up of people who feel so strongly about caring for our community and, more importantly, caring for others in our community. Grimaldi’s is a prime example of a business that is determined to make a positive difference.”

About Grimaldi’s Pizzeria:
In the world of pizza, Grimaldi’s is an institution that has garnered more awards than any other pizzeria in the country with more celebrity sightings than most 5-star restaurants. Using only the freshest ingredients, a “secret recipe” pizza sauce, handmade mozzarella cheese and dough, Grimaldi’s serves traditional pizza (as it began in Naples, Italy) in an upscale yet casual, family oriented pizzeria. The intense heat of the oven evenly bakes the pies to create Grimaldi’s famous crispy and smoky thin crust that Zagat has voted best pizza year after year. Grimaldi’s Pizzeria has five locations in Las Vegas and one in Sparks, Nev. Las Vegas locations include The Shoppes at The Palazzo, Rainbow and 215, Boca Park Fashion Village The Fashion Show Mall and Richmar Plaza. The Sparks restaurant is located in The Legends at Sparks Marina.

For more information on Grimaldi’s Pizzeria visit www.grimaldispizzeria.com
“Like” Grimaldi’s Pizzeria on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/GrimaldisPizzeria
Follow Grimaldi’s Pizzeria on Twitter: www.twitter.com/grimaldispizza

About Susan G. Komen of Southern Nevada:

The Southern Nevada Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure® – along with those who generously support the organization with their talent, time and resources – is working to better the lives of those facing breast cancer in our community. Through events like the Komen Southern Nevada Race for the Cure®, we have invested more than $6 million in local breast health and breast cancer projects in Southern Nevada over the past 17 years. Up to 75 percent of net proceeds generated by the Affiliate provide grants for innovative community programs that reduce breast cancer mortality through screening, treatment, education and safety-net services, while the remaining 25 percent supports groundbreaking breast cancer research grants. This year, the Affiliate funded over $837,000 in local breast health programs for the uninsured and underserved in Las Vegas and surrounding areas, while providing $150,000 to breast cancer research.

For more information on Susan G. Komen for the Cure of Southern Nevada visit www.komensouthernnevada.org

Like Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Komen-Southern-Nevada-Race-for-the-Cure/255100881352

New International Federation on Ageing Report Declares Vision Loss No Longer an Inevitable Part of Ageing

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Calls for Investments in Preventive Eye Health to Reduce Social and Economic
Burdens of Vision Loss

The International Federation on Ageing (IFA) today released a new report describing the health, social and economic burdens of vision loss on a global society that is rapidly ageing. The report calls for increased public education and awareness programs, improved public policies and greater integration of preventive eye health interventions into public health systems.

The report, titled “The High Cost of Low Vision: The Evidence on Ageing and the Loss of Sight ,” highlights that vision loss is no longer an inevitable part of the ageing process, as people can now age with strong, healthy vision, given 21st-century innovations in diagnosis, biomedicine, nutrition, technology and preventive care.

“The economic implications are equally huge as we now have it in our grasp to delink vision loss from ageing, which will have great impact on active, productive and more enjoyable ageing. This shift in the traditional perception of ageing is truly transformative,” said Jane Barratt, BSc, MSc, PhD, Secretary General of the IFA. “As 80 percent of vision loss is preventable, it is our ethical responsibility and a public health imperative that we take action now.”

“As the 21st century’s seminal challenge of population ageing leads to increasing prevalence of deteriorating vision, it brings about huge social, personal and economic consequences,” said Kathy Spahn, President and CEO of Helen Keller International. “This report is both timely and critical as a tool for raising awareness of and driving solutions for preventable vision loss, which can have a positive and profound impact on economic growth and the human condition.”

The over-60 population is expected to reach 2 billion by mid-century. As this cohort rapidly grows to become the largest population segment of many societies globally, rates of preventable vision loss are also soaring. Today, 285 million people around the world are visually impaired, including 39 million who are totally blind, and that number will explode without preventive measures. The direct costs of vision impairment worldwide are estimated to reach $2.8 trillion by 2020, and the indirect costs will add another $760 billion.

“IFA’s report highlights the critical need for action and investment in preventive eye health,” said Francisco Rodriguez, MD, Retina and Vitreous Specialist and Scientific Director, Fundación Oftalmológica Nacional in Colombia. “Across the globe, new policies to improve the diagnosis, management and care associated with preventable eye diseases – especially among ageing populations – will go a long way in alleviating the burdens triggered by age-related vision loss.”

“As millions around the world are living longer – bringing about increasing prevalence in visual impairments – global institutions, governments, the scientific and medical communities, payers, patient groups, NGOs and businesses must partner to find innovative solutions to treat and prevent vision loss – one of the greatest challenges of global population ageing,” said Dr. Kemal Malik, Head Global Development at Bayer Healthcare.

The report emphasizes that measures to prevent vision loss are cost-effective and calls for urgent attention in key areas: Download the Executive Summary
Download the Report
Media Contact:
Melissa Mitchell
+1.212.332.3942(T) +1.646.404.1149(M)
mmitchell@globalcoalitiononaging.com
About the International Federation on Ageing
The International Federation on Ageing (IFA)is an international non-governmental organization with a membership base of NGOs, the corporate sector, academia, government, and individuals. IFA aims to generate positive change for older people throughout the world by stimulating, collecting, analyzing, and disseminating information on rights, policies, and practices that improve the quality of life of people as they age.
“The High Cost of Low Vision: The Evidence on Ageing and the Loss of Sight” was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant by Bayer Healthcare to the International Federation on Ageing.

No more “empty nest”: middle-aged adults face family pressure on both sides

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

The “empty nest” of past generations, in which the kids are grown up and middle-aged adults have more time to themselves, has been replaced in the United States by a nest that’s full – kids who can’t leave, can’t find a job and aging parents who need more help than ever before.

According to a new study by researchers at Oregon State University, what was once a life stage of new freedoms, options and opportunities has largely disappeared.

An economic recession and tough job market has made it hard on young adults to start their careers and families. At the same time, many older people are living longer, which adds new and unanticipated needs that their children often must step up to assist with.
The end result, researchers suggest, are “empty nest” plans that often have to be put on hold, and a mixed bag of emotions, ranging from joy and “happy-to-help” to uncertainty, frustration and exhaustion.

“We mostly found very positive feelings about adults helping their children in the emerging adulthood stage of life, from around ages 18 to 30,” said Karen Hooker, director of the OSU Center for Healthy Aging Research.

“Feelings about helping parents weren’t so much negative as just filled with more angst and uncertainty,” Hooker said. “As a society we still don’t socialize people to expect to be taking on a parent-caring role, even though most of us will at some point in our lives. The average middle-aged couple has more parents than children.”

The findings of this research were just published in the Journal of Aging Studies, and were based on data from six focus groups during 2009-10. It was one of the first studies of its type to look at how middle-aged adults actually feel about these changing trends.
Various social, economic, and cultural forces have combined to radically challenge the traditional concept of an empty nest, the scientists said. The recession that began in 2008 yielded record unemployment, substantial stock market losses, lower home values and increased demand for higher levels of education.

Around the same time, advances in health care and life expectancy have made it possible for many adults to live far longer than they used to – although not always in good health, and often needing extensive care or assistance.

This study concluded that most middle-aged parents with young adult children are fairly happy to help them out, and they understand that getting started in life is simply more difficult now. Some research has suggested that age 25 is the new 22; that substantially more parents now don’t even expect their kids to be financially independent in their early 20s, and don’t mind helping them through some difficult times.

But the response to helping adult parents who, at the same time, need increasing amounts of assistance is not as uniformly positive, the study found – it can be seen as both a joy and a burden, and in any case was not something most middle-aged adults anticipated.

“With the kids, it’s easy,” is a general purpose reaction. With aging parents, it isn’t.

“My grandparents died younger, so my parents didn’t cope with another generation,” one study participant said.

Many middle-aged people said it was difficult to make any plans, due to disruptions and uncertainty about a parent’s health at any point in time. And most said they we’re willing to help their aging parents, but a sense of being time-starved was a frequent theme.
“It brings my heart joy to be able to provide for my mom this way,” one study participant said. “There are times when it’s a burden and I feel resentful.”

The dual demands of children still transitioning to independence, and aging parents who need increasing amounts of care is causing many of the study participants to re-evaluate their own lives. Some say they want to make better plans for their future so they don’t pose such a burden to their children, and begin researching long-term care insurance. Soul-searching is apparent.

“I don’t care if I get old,” a participant said. “I just don’t want to become debilitated. So I would rather have a shorter life and a healthy life than a long life like my mom, where she doesn’t have a life. She doesn’t have memories. Our memories are what make us who we are.”

An increasing awareness of the challenges produced by these new life stages may cause more individuals to anticipate their own needs, make more concrete plans for the future, reduce ambivalent approaches and have more conversations with families about their own late-life care, the researchers said in their study.
About the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences: The College creates connections in teaching, research and community outreach while advancing knowledge, policies and practices that improve population health in communities across Oregon and beyond.

National Surgical Association Comes to Las Vegas

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) is hosting its 71st Annual Scientific Conference in Las Vegas on February 11-14, 2013 at Mandalay Bay Resort & Conference Center. ACFAS is a professional society of more than 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons dedicated to promoting the art and science of foot, ankle, and related lower extremity surgery; addressing the concerns of foot and ankle surgeons; and advancing and improving standards of education and surgical skill.

This year’s conference will bring about 1,500 surgeons and 150 exhibiting companies to the city of Las Vegas and we are looking forward to the Las Vegas experience! During the conference our surgeons will discuss the latest trends and procedures in foot and ankle surgery to help improve the health and quality of life for patients. Three of those topics have been turned into consumer-aimed press releases for distribution during the conference. The three press releases, which are embargoed until the conference, include:
Smoking and Bone Healing – A Risky Combination: Smokers take nearly 50 percent longer to heal after surgery than non-smokers. For every non-smoking patient whose bones heal normally, four smokers will experience non-union, or failure of the bone to mend. Surgeons discuss ways to treat this challenging patient population.
Lisfranc Injury – Easy to Miss, Hard to Get Over: Left untreated, this little-known and often overlooked foot injury can lead to serious long-term problems like osteoarthritis, chronic pain and even foot deformities. Surgeons assess the best treatment options for this complex injury that seems to be afflicting more and more professional athletes.

Pediatric Flatfoot Deformity – A Cause for Alarm? Left untreated, pediatric flatfoot poses a serious developmental threat to children. Foot and ankle surgeons re-examine the best course of treatment for optimal long-term health.
Please contact Tracy Hulett or Melissa Matusek if you are interested in receiving advance copies of these embargoed releases, or if you are interested in setting up interviews/photo opportunities with the College’s physician media spokespeople. You can reach us by e-mail at the below addresses or by phone at 773-693-9300. You can also visit FootHealthFacts.org, the College’s patient education website for more valuable foot and ankle health information.
Thank you and we hope to see you in Vegas!
Tracy Hulett
Manager, Public Relations and Communications
tracy.hulett@acfas.org
Melissa Matusek
Director of Marketing and Public Relations
melissa.matusek@acfas.org

Global Vitamin D Interactive Map Illustrates Vitamin D Insufficiency Among U.S. Population and Worldwide

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Worldwide: Rates of vitamin D insufficiency are higher among women than men with older women being at most risk for developing osteoporosis.

The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) has launched an interactive global map of vitamin D status, which presents a snapshot of vitamin D levels worldwide. The map and accompanying publication1 confirm that vitamin D insufficiency is a major public health issue in both the developing and industrialized world, with more than one third of all the populations studied, showing insufficient levels of vitamin D2.

Osteoporosis is a serious chronic disease which affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Vitamin D improves bone mineral density, which lowers risk of fracture, while also improving muscle strength, balance, and leg function which decreases the risk of falling and sustaining a fracture in the first place. As a consequence, vitamin D insufficiency has been linked to a higher risk of osteoporotic fractures. Studies show that adequate vitamin D intake can reduce the risk of falls and fractures by around 30 percent3.

Additional key findings include:
„h Older people are especially at risk for vitamin D insufficiency, including older women who are a risk group for osteoporosis, and those living indoors in institutionalized care;
„h Overall, insufficient vitamin D levels were detected in more than one third of the study population4;
„h Vitamin D insufficiency affects both the developing world and industrialized world;
„h The main source of vitamin D is sunlight, but even in sunny countries, vitamin D levels are generally low and below recommended levels (taking India as example: a sunny country; yet, with low vitamin D status);
„h It is estimated that 50-70 percent of the European adult population have insufficient levels of vitamin D.
1 A Global Representation of Vitamin D status in healthy populations, Wahl et al. Archives of Osteoporosis, August 2012
2 Understood as mean 25 (OH)D values below 50 nmol/l
3 A pooled analysis of vitamin D dose requirements for fracture prevention. Bischoff-Ferrari HA et al New England Journal of Medicine. 2012.
4 Blood levels below 50 nmol/l considered as insufficient

In the U.S., approximately 30 percent of the study population had sub-optimal vitamin D levels, rising to around 70 percent among participants with darker skin color, highlighting skin color as a risk factor for vitamin D insufficiency. Overall the U.S. vitamin D status was significantly higher compared to other regions, which may in part, be attributable to the routine fortification of foods with vitamin D (such as milk, juice and cereals).

The map has also created a very clear picture as to where the vitamin D insufficiency knowledge gaps exist and where further research is required. Dr. Eggersdorfer added, ¡§There is far too little data available, for example, in relation to adolescents and young people, and across the developing world in general. These maps are an important starting point, but it is essential that research continues to better understand the scale of vitamin D insufficiency.¡¨

DSM joins IOF in calling on healthcare policymakers to raise awareness of vitamin D insufficiency and to take action to ensure intake of recommended vitamin D levels, including through safe and effective measures such as food fortification, access to proper supplements and better consumer education.

Additional country findings include:
„h In Germany 57 percent of men and 58 percent of women had vitamin D status below recommended levels, rising to 75 percent among 65-79 year olds
„h U.K. studies focused on older people reveal that nearly two thirds of women (57 percent), and half of men (49 percent) are not getting enough vitamin D
„h In the Netherlands, around half of all study participants had sub-optimal vitamin D levels
„h The Middle East revealed lower vitamin D status compared to Europe which could result from cultural factors such as clothing and lifestyle
„h Asia showed a widespread insufficient vitamin D status across different countries, with a few exceptions (vitamin D status was ranked desirable in Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam)
„h Most regions offer some data, however no information was available for Central America, South America (except Brazil) and much of Africa
„h The most striking data gaps were found in children and adolescents
DSM ¡V Bright Science. Brighter Living..

Royal DSM is a global science-based company active in health, nutrition and materials. By connecting its unique competences in Life Sciences and Materials Sciences DSM is driving economic prosperity, environmental progress and social advances to create sustainable value for all stakeholders. DSM delivers innovative solutions that nourish, protect and improve performance in global markets such as food and dietary supplements, personal care, feed, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, automotive, paints, electrical and electronics, life protection, alternative energy and bio-based materials. DSM¡¦s

More information can be found at www.dsm.com

Blindness and Vision Loss Spike by 23 Percent in the U.S.

September 24, 2012 by · Comments Off on Blindness and Vision Loss Spike by 23 Percent in the U.S.
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

American Academy of Ophthalmology Urges Seniors to Save their Sight through Prevention and Early Detection

Blindness and vision impairment are on the rise in the United States. A recent report by Prevent Blindness America indicates that, since the year 2000, incidence of blindness and vision impairment has increased by 23 percent among Americans age 40 and older.[i] However, most blindness in this country is preventable with proper eye care. The American Academy of Ophthalmology and EyeCare America urge Americans to get regular eye exams to better prevent and detect sight-stealing eye diseases.

Rising rates of age-related eye diseases and conditions are largely to blame for the increase in vision loss. Four of the most common causes of vision loss are diabetic retinopathy, where blood vessels in the retina swell or become blocked due to diabetes; age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a breakdown of the eye’s macula; glaucoma, an eye disease that damages the optic nerve; and cataracts, in which the eye’s lens becomes clouded. These conditions have shown a marked increase over the past 12 years:
• The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy increased by 89 percent.
• The frequency of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) increased by 25 percent.
• The incidence of glaucoma increased by 22 percent.
• The number of people affected by cataracts increased by 19 percent.[ii]
As baby-boomers continue to age, the incidence of age-related eye disease is also expected to continue to increase. Currently, people age 80 and older constitute only 8 percent of the population, but account for 69 percent of all cases of blindness.[iii] Early detection and treatment by an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor – may help prevent and in some cases, such as cataracts, even reverse vision loss.

Many seniors age 65 and older may qualify for an eye exam and up to 1 year of care at no out-of-pocket-cost through EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. EyeCare America matches qualifying patients age 65 and older with an ophthalmologist who provides a comprehensive medical eye examination. EyeCare America is co-sponsored by the Knights Templar Eye Foundation, Inc, with additional support from Alcon. To see if you or a loved one is eligible, visit the online referral center at www.eyecareamerica.org.

“Regular eye exams are imperative to detect and treat eye diseases and prevent serious vision loss,” said Richard P. Mills, M.D., chairman of EyeCare America. “This is especially true for people age 65 and older who are at increased risk for eye diseases. That’s why EyeCare America is so focused on providing access to eye care, and we hope that fewer people will suffer from preventable causes of blindness as a result.”

To learn more about EyeCare America or to find out if you or a loved one qualifies for the program, visit www.eyecareamerica.org. Learn more about eye diseases and conditions, and keeping your eyes healthy at www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® public education program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision, by providing the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. Visit www.geteyesmart.org to learn more.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. Since its inception, EyeCare America has helped more than 1.7 million people. More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

Seniors Citizens are a high priority in Washoe County

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Seniors Citizens are a high priority in Washoe County

Washoe County is experiencing a rapid demographic shift because of the aging of the “baby boom” generation. Like every community in America, we are evaluating how to provide services to the most vulnerable seniors.
 After an April 2, 2012 presentation by Washoe County Senior Services WCSS), the Joint Meeting of the Board of County Commissioners, Reno City Council, Sparks City Council and Washoe County School District Board of Trustees requested that the Department prepare a report on the cost and benefit of increased funding.
 The Department offers both a $1.2 million and $2.4 million option.
 Please ask your elected officials, in-person, by letter or e-mail, and in testimony at public hearings to support the proposal. The following is a summary:

Washoe County, like all of the United States, is seeing the “Baby Boomers” turn 60 in unprecedented numbers. This demographic shift is having a dramatic impact on seniors, families and our community.
 The senior population is growing faster than any other segment of the Washoe County community; 25% are now over 55, with the age group 55-64 years absorbing 27.3% of all County population growth over the last decade.
Washoe County Senior Services (WCSS) is not able to meet the needs of the rapidly growing number of vulnerable seniors.
 Today, Washoe County Senior Services assists only 8% of the more than 71,000 County residents over the age of 60. We are forecast to have as many as 93,000 over 60 by 2016.
 The Washoe County Senior Center, 9th and Sutro, is 34 years old, and over half of its Meals on Wheels delivery vehicles are over 10 years old.
 In 1985, when voters approved the $.01 Senior Citizens ad valorem Fund in perpetuity, it was believed to be adequate for all future facility, program and service needs. Because of increasing costs, the addition of essential programs and above all, population growth, this is no longer true.
 Almost all Washoe County Senior Services programs have a waiting list.
Washoe County Senior Services helps “Bend the Curve” of health and long term care costs by keeping seniors active, involved and independent.
 Planning to prepare the community for an aging society; leverage new resources.
 Senior Centers operated in partnership with cities and GID that provide classes, activities and events; volunteer opportunities.
 Congregate Meals at 8 locations in senior centers and public housing.
 Outreach and early intervention programs to connect seniors to services as early as possible.
 “Help Line” – Aging and Disability Resource Center – provides information, advice and counseling about health and long term care.
 Social Services, including case management, nursing, Home Delivered Meals and in-home care for the most vulnerable.
 Senior Law for legal matters including advance directives, public benefits appeals, elder law, and housing counseling.
 DayBreak Adult Day is an alternate to nursing home care.
Seniors and their families need help managing the maze of services and choices; many seniors are not able to pay for the services they need
 Almost every Washoe County family will be faced with providing care for aging parents and relatives. Most are not prepared.
 In a 2006 Washoe County needs assessment, only 34% of all seniors said that they could afford to pay for their own care.
WCSS low cost supportive services reduce public expenses by keeping people healthier, longer, supporting independent living in their homes and by delaying or preventing institutionalization. The additional funding would provide services and reduce other costs:
 Congregate Meal sites and Senior Centers
• 20% of the 2,100 seniors report that it is their only meal of the day.
• Site managers, which were eliminated in previous budget cuts, would be restored for all meal sites.
• Provide clerical and social work support for senior centers.
 WCSS “Help Line” provides counseling on long term care and health care options, empowering seniors to make an informed choice on decisions that affect their entire family.
• Expert information, advice and counseling would be available to an additional 5,500 seniors and family members per year.
 Case management and visiting nurse
• An additional 350 seniors would receive medication management, help with medical professionals and an in-home nursing assessment.
• An additional 600 seniors would be assisted by a case manager to coordinate care and arrange for services.
• An additional 400 low-income seniors would get in-home services, such as home care, personal care and escorted transportation that are not available elsewhere.
 Home Delivered Meals provides 1/3 of the USDA Recommended Daily Allowance to homebound seniors, who cannot prepare their own meals.
• Today, 175 (37%) of WCSS current HDM case load need assistance in 2 or more Activities of Daily Living (ADLs – bathing, dressing, eating, toileting, etc.) and receive additional case management, nursing and in-home care. They have received services for at least one year.
• New funding would serve an additional 300 homebound seniors per year; provide an additional 70,000 meals per year, for a total of 180,000.
• Additional funding would help an additional 400 high risk clients
 Senior Law: Provide legal services to an additional 400 people.
 DayBreak Adult Day Health: An additional 10 low-income seniors will get services.
• The annual cost for a DayBreak client is $11,000. Nevada Medicaid Nursing Home cost for the same senior is about $59,000 per year; an annual savings of $48,000 per year, and total potential annual savings of $3.48 million.

Condos And Lofts For Active Senior Citizens (Nevada Senior Guide)

September 27, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Your kids are out of the home. You are fully retired, or perhaps working somewhere a few hours a week just so you can keep yourself busy. You want to travel, or at least have that option. That home maintenance you used to relish? Not so much anymore. For many people, the senior years mark a time of changes. Many want to simplify things so they can focus on the good things in life.

That is why many active senior citizens decide to live in lofts or condos.

In many cases, there are buildings specifically for seniors. Or if they are not meant just for seniors, many have senior-dominated resident populations. A good real estate agent will be able to point you in the right direction. Of course, some seniors have no interest in living only with other seniors and may want to live in a downtown-type condo that generally would cater to a younger crowd.

So why might active senior citizens choose to live in a loft or condo? There are a few reasons:

Activities
If you choose a building that is home to many other seniors, there very well may be organized activities that cater to seniors. Those include activities like book clubs, card games and movies. There also may be designated social spots and times.

Fitness
Maintaining their physical health is important to many active seniors. The fitness rooms and pools that are relatively common features at many condo buildings makes doing so easy. Plus, outside of your association fee, which covers such amenities, there is no membership fee that you would pay to join a gym.

Relax
Perhaps the top reason seniors choose condos or lofts is because of the reduced maintenance. There is no lawn to mow or driveway to shovel. There is no need to worry whether the bushes need trimming, or the house needs painting. The association takes care of all such maintenance, giving seniors more time to focus on enjoying life. In addition, many seniors choose condos or lofts that are smaller than their original house, so keeping their homes clean is not as time-consuming.

Community
Seniors who choose to live in places where lots of other seniors live often develop a strong sense of community. That is not surprising, given that they share many spaces with other people, and that they probably have even more opportunity for conversation than people who live in a neighborhood of single-family homes.

Options
There are condo and loft buildings in a wide variety of urban areas. Some are right in the middle of the downtown hustle and bustle, while others are further away but still provide convenient access to the downtown arts, restaurants and sporting events that many seniors particularly enjoy.

Andy Asbury has a unique team of lofts and condos REALTORs® specializing in Minneapolis condos and lofts who offer sound advice to all of their clients. To find the most information about Minneapolis condos visit http://www.MinnesotaLoftsandCondos.com today!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Andy_Asbury

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5998786

Senior Living Community Trends (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Senior living communities are relatively new, are responding to constantly changing demands and while even this industry is reacting to the current economic downturn, baby boomers are creating and responding to trends in a variety of ways. A recent survey conducted by Mather LifeWays with Life Services of Illinois in late 2008 revealed some interesting findings. This survey is “significant because there are few published studies that examine trends in programs, amenities, and environments among aging services providers,” states Mary Leary, President and CEO, Mather LifeWays.

Independent living is at the top of the list for most seniors and most are serious about technology. That means that senior living communities must offer state-of-the-art systems for computer savvy seniors. Those leaving the workforce today have become accustomed to and very adept at building their careers and a portion of their personal lives around computers. Seniors want services available that will allow them to maintain independence.

New models in Senior Living Communities
The Beacon Hill model, as described in American Association of Retired Persons Magazine is an innovative program that allows residents to stay in their homes and maintain their independence safely and comfortably. Beacon Hill Village in Boston is being embraced by communities with seniors across the nation because of its model as a full-service concierge program dedicated to linking older residents of the neighborhood with anything from a ride to the doctor’s office to house painting services to free lectures and exercise classes. Members must live in the neighborhood and pay an annual fee. The Beacon Hills Village program has sparked grassroots movements across the country.

“The New Retirement Survey” released in 2005 by Merrill Lynch focused on how baby boomers, who are quickly approaching retirement age, will have a noticeable impact on all aspects of senior living, including housing. In fact, because baby boomers will fundamentally reinvent retirement by living longer and remaining engaged and employed beyond age 65, the impact will influence all trends in senior living communities. The survey describes the “turning point”: 76% of boomers intend to keep working and earning after retiring from their current job and even exploring entirely new careers. This desire to continue working is motivated by earnings and by a desire for “continued mental stimulation and challenge which will motivate them to stay in the game.” Naturally, this finding supports the senior living community trend of a desire for further education. Visit the Bernard Osher Foundation to learn about the location of classes and opportunities for lifelong learning offered by this well-regarded foundation.

Trends can also be observed in surveys targeting the operators and owners of these communities. The Mather Lifeways survey describes trends in senior living communities that include wellness and lifelong learning options available as well as environmental considerations, such as green living standards. The survey also found that wireless technology is opening even more opportunities to pursue a wealth of knowledge. Currently, 22% of continuing care retirement communities are now offering Web-based education; however that number is expected to soar to 69% over the next four years, while wellness offerings, including classes and recreation, are projected to grow to 52%, up from 25%. Studies also reveal that 35% of senior living community providers are expected to observe “green” standards in new construction or renovation.

Another study, by Ziegler Capital Markets, queried senior living community owners, explores senior living community trends from a marketing standpoint. The majority of respondents stated that their multi-site organizations have been impacted by the current downturn in the economy. When asked how they intend to react, most said they will offer a variety of discounts on monthly service and entrance fees, which will naturally be attractive to those considering a senior living community. Marketing programs are also focusing more on what their community can offer in response to trends in senior living communities.

Technology, independence, education, health and environmental concerns will undoubtedly keep the newest members of the senior population occupied, challenged and productive for many years.

SeniorHomes.com is a free resource for people looking for senior housing or senior care for a loved one or themselves. Browse valuable articles to help you through or search or find assisted living, independent living, Alzheimer’s care, or a retirement community with our nationwide directory. Visit our website to stay abreast of the latest trends in senior living communities.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Angela_Stringfellow

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August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
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The Nevada Senior Guide is your comprehensive resource directory for seniors and those who support them.

Are you looking for something in particular?  

An assisting living facility in a certain area, perhaps?  

Whatever it is, just let us know by filling in the form you see below and we will do our very best to help!

Your Name

Your Email

Your Telephone Number

How can we help you?
* Important Note: If you wish us to send you a physical copy of the Nevada Senior Guide, please provide your postal address, including zip *

 

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COMPLETE SENIOR GUIDE LISTING

Homes

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The Nevada Senior guide provides information about homes, health, services and leisure activities.

Featuring wonderful health care providers such as Circle of Life:

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The print version of Nevada Senior Guide is free and is available throughout Las Vegas, Henderson, Green Valley, Boulder City, North Las Vegas, Pahrump and Summerlin.

 






The Nevada Senior Guide contains the Senior Services Directory including government and non-profit agencies that offer services to seniors in Nevada. These services include food and housing assistance, transportation for medical appointments and other life enhancing services.

A Level of Care Directory is included to assist in the selection of appropriate services in assisted living faculties.

Previously known as the Las Vegas Senior Guide, Mathis began the publication in 2001 because she recognized the need to inform seniors about services that were available to them. It is distributed in Von’s Grocery Stores, Whole Foods Grocery Stores, all libraries and hospitals through-out southern Nevada.

 


 

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Our Mission Statement:  To Publish the most popular, user friendly, visible, results-based, free publication & website

The publication is filled with informative articles that relate to Senior issues including health care, home health and leisure activities.

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“Seniors are a unique group because they have so many needs that aren’t met as easily as those of the younger generations,” Mathis stated. “They are the largest percentage of our country’s population and are always looking for resources and good deals, no matter what their income level. The directory is also useful to baby boomers who can use it to find resources for their aging parents.”

“I do not know of any other advertisement that gives you so much for the price and not only produces results, but also has a staff that goes out of its way to help their advertisers through education and networking. Megan and her staff WANT you to be successful. To not advertise in Nevada Senior Guide is like giving your competition referrals.”  – Mark A. Simmons, QDCS, Exploring Life Transitions, Memory Care Consultant

 

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Nevada-Senior-Guide Multiple Services Directory – Northern Nevada

Access to Healthcare Networks

Discounted Dental and Vision Program

4001 S. Virginia St., Ste F, Reno, NV 89502

(775) 284-8989, 1-877-385-2345 HELP

Affordable Dental and Vision Care, SHIP,

Medical, Massage therapy

www.accesstohealthcare.org

Catholic Charities of N. Nevada & St. Vincent                     Program

500 E. 4th St., Reno, NV 89512, 775-322-7073

Dining room free lunch, 11:30am – 12:30pm.
No Sundays. Pantry, Housing assistance,
Assist low income residents. Call for

additional resources.

 

Community Health Program/Urban Indians                            Outreach

745 W. Moana Ln., Ste. 375, Reno, NV 89502

775-788-7600

Education, Behavior and domestic violence                           counseling, AA and substance abuse

programs. Calll for info.

 

Community Services Agency

1090 E. 8th Street, Reno, NV 89512

(775) 786-6023, Ext. 206, www.csareno.org

Weatherization program, work force

programs, food assistance, HeadStart

 

Discounted Healthcare –

www.AccessToHealthcare.org

Discount plan

 

ALS of Nevada

4220 S. Maryland Pkwy., Bldg. B, Ste. 404

Las Vegas, NV 89119, 702-777-0500

Respite, Support Groups. Call for Hours.

 

Easter Seals of Southern Nevada

6200 West Oakey Blvd., Las Vegas, NV 89146

(702) 870-7050, www.eastersealssn.org

Respite Care, Assisted Care,Referral,

Handicap Day Care, Assisted Technology,

Adult Day Services

 

Family Resources

1950 Villanova Dr., Reno, NV 89562

(775) 321-3185, www.Washoe.k12.nu.us

Referrals to counsling. Assist with food                              stamps and energy assistance applications.
Call for appointments and hours.

 

Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada

775-355-0600, Call for additional info

Serving the Native Americans of Nevada,                                ITERC Program, Domestic violence, Native                    workforce, Appellate court assistance, Wick                      Program, Elders Program, HEADSTART

 

Mini-Medi File – REMSA

450 Edison Way, Reno NV 89502

Free portable wallets, including personal                           medical history and emergency contact

information, instruction sheet and

immunization card.

 

Nevada Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)

1820 E. Sahara Ave., Las Vegas, NV 89104

(702) 486-3403, 1-888-838-7305

Medicare fraud and abuse prevention project

Nevada State Contractors Board

9670 Gateway Drive, Ste 100, Reno NV 89521

(775) 688-1141, www.nscb.nv.gov

Regulatory agency promoting quality

construction by Nevada licensed contractors.                   Provides contractor license verifications,

assistance with contractor workmanship

issues and homeowner education

regarding unlicensed contractors.

 

North East Community Center

1301 Valley Rd., Reno, NV 89051

775-334-2262. Senior activities, Call for details

 

Renown Rehabilitation Hospital

1495 Mill St., Reno, NV 89502

775-982-3500 Washoe County

www.renown.org

Inpatient Rehab, Skilled Nursing,

Pain Management/Clinic

 

Senior Companion Program of N. Nevada

& Elvirita Lewis Respite Voucher Program

1380 Greg Street, Ste. 212, Sparks, NV  89431

775-358-2322, Mary Brock, Director

 

Washoe County Senior Law Project

1155 E. 9th Street, Reno, NV 89512

(775) 334-3050 or (775) 284-3491

Legal assistance to persons 60 years & older.

Washoe Residents. Call for hours.

Nevada-Senior-Guide KNPR 88-9 Radio – Las Vegas

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Leisure 

http://www.knpr.org/

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Nevada Public Radio KNPR

Radio Reading Service
Nevada Public Radio
 Do you know someone who has a problem reading?Let Nevada Public Radio Help.The Radio Reading Service offers free reading broadcast 24 hours a day, seven days a week for people who are visually and print impaired.Statewide newspapers including the Review-Journal, Las Vegas Sun and Reno Gazette-Journal
National publications including Newsweek and the Wall Street Journal
Best-selling and critically-acclaimed booksSpecial radio receivers are provided free of charge for the broadcasts.

For an application, call Jay Bartos at
702-258-9895

KNEWS 970am

970 AMKNUU Las Vegas

Business & Financial Talk

Your money

Your life

Your radio station

News, Traffic & Weather throughout the day

Community shows on finance and lifestyle

Plus Paul Harvey, Ray Lucia

Bruce Williams, Lou Dobbs,

Wall Street Journal Reports

Donald Trump & Andy Vierra

Streaming on the web 24/7

970KNUU.com

Frequently Asked Questions About Nevada Public Radio
  • Privacy Policy
  • Mailing List Policy
  • Membership Information
  • Prize Giveaway Guidelines
  • Annual Report
  • Contact
  • Programs
  • Features
  • Radio Reading Service
  • Sponsors
  • Transmitters
  • Jobs
  • Auto Donation
  • E News
  • HD Radio
“Nevada Public Radio will be recognized as the leading independent source of information and cultural expression, and a catalyst for civic engagement.”

Our history…

Nurtured in its formative years by the Clark County Library District, Nevada Public Radio was incorporated in December, 1975 as an independent, Nevada non-profit corporation. Its flagship station, KNPR signed on the air March 24, 1980 as Nevada’s first National Public Radio (NPR) affiliated station.

Nevada Public Radio operates a non-commercial, radio broadcast network comprised of seven stations, KNPR Las Vegas (88.9), KCNV Las Vegas (89.7), KTPH Tonopah (91.7), KLNR Panaca (91.7), KWPR Lund/Ely (88.7), KSGU St. George (90.3), KLKR Elko (89.3), plus five rural translators. It is overseen by a volunteer Board of Directors including founder and Director Emeritus, Lamar Marchese.

The staff includes full-time staff of 30, plus part time and contract employees, and dozens of administrative and fundraising volunteers. More than 9,000 members and 50 corporations and foundations support the stations.

KNPR broadcasts with 100,000 watts (ERP), at 88.9 FM. It programs a 24 hour service of National Public Radio (NPR) news and information, with specialty shows like A Prairie Home Companion and Car Talk. (See our program schedule.)

Nevada Public Radio produces 10 hours a week of original content. KNPR’s State of Nevada is a national award-winning public affairs program supported by a dynamic web site.  Launched with a $500,000 grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, KNPR’s SoN has been honored locally and nationally for program excellence including the ACE Award from the Public Radio Program Directors Association.

Independent research shows the combined Nevada Public Radio weekly audience is more than 200,000 listeners, our website attracts approximately 240,000 visitor sessions each month and more than 200,000 audio downloads of original content.

To serve residents of Nevada and adjacent states, Nevada Public Radio operates a series of transmitters extending service to more than 150,000 residents within its 49,000 square miles coverage area, including Tonopah, Panaca, Ely, Mesquite, Laughlin and Scotty’s Junction, NV, plus Death Valley and Ridgecrest, CA, Lake Havasu City, AZ and St. George, UT.

In 1993, responding to another unmet need, Nevada Public Radio established the state’s first and only Radio Reading Service. This closed-circuit, 24 hour reading service delivers timely, original information totally free of charge to blind and visually-impaired listeners throughout the coverage area. With the cooperation of KUNR-Reno and KNCC-Elko, the service is available to 98% of the Nevada population.  It is also available online.

After many years of effort in 2003, Nevada Public Radio signed on a new full-service station in Las Vegas, Classical 89.7, which provides 24-hours a day classical music.

Our newest, full-service station is in Elko, NV – News 89.3 KLKR, which provides 24-hours a day news and information.

Nevada Public Radio operates on an annual budget of $4.7-million. See our latest Annual Audited Financial Statement  and our latest Form 990.

This on-line Annual Report informs members, underwriters, grantors and other community shareholders about the financial health of Nevada Public Radio, including investments, station goals and objectives.  The member recognition includes profiles of some the supporters of Nevada Public Radio.

In 1996, Nevada Public Radio was one of seven applicants, out of 1,300 candidates, to receive a grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation. NVPR received $4.5 million dollars to construct and equip a new permanent home for KNPR.

Endowment

In accepting the Reynolds award, the Board of Directors committed itself to raising a minimum of $1.5 million in endowment funding. That commitment has increased to $2.2 million. The endowment campaign received a lead gift from the L. J. Castle family, along with early contributions from the Boyd Foundation, the Nevada Arts Council, the Lincy Foundation, Frances Saxton, Jim Rogers, J. A. Tiberti, John Klai, the Laub family (Bill Sr., Mary and Bill Jr.), Louis Castle and Westwood Studios, The National Endowment for the Humanities, the Union Pacific Foundation, as well as individual contributions from the listeners, staff and Board of Directors of Nevada Public Radio.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Siena Hills – Henderson

www.sienahills.com

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Assisted Living Las Vegas

Siena Hills Assisted Living in Las Vegas offers Independent Living, Assisted Living, Memory Care and Alzheimer’s Care.  Our staff is available 24 hours a day. Life at Siena Hills is comparable to living in a fine resort, with many of the same lifestyle enhancing amenities.

Independent Living & Assisted Living.

At Siena Hills, we strive to meet the needs of each Resident by providing an individualized care program that maintains each Resident’s privacy and dignity. Our health care services    are provided 24 hours a day and change according to your personal needs.

Reputation, Experience & Leadership.

Siena Hills’ unparalleled reputation in the community is fostered by our Executive Director, Mary Pophal. Mary has nearly twenty years of leadership experience in assisted living and memory care. Our residents and families benefit from Mary’s vision and knowledge.

Siena Hills

Active Assisted Living & Memory Care Community

Located in Henderson at
2910 Horizon Ridge Pkwy
702-614-8733

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Life Care Centers of America – Las Vegas

http://www.lcca.com/

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About Life Care

Your family is special with its deep bonds and unique relationships. Facing a dramatic change – such as moving a loved one into assisted living or a nursing home – is an unsettling prospect for most people. Life Care Centers have helped families for decades to work through the difficult decisions about how best to care for their loved ones. We understand how trying it is to choose nursing home care for your loved one, and how most struggling caretakers feel there is no other choice.

That’s why we’re here.

We want those special members of your family to become equally special members of ours. We want to relieve the anxiety and frustration you may be experiencing by providing a nursing home community of constant support, attention and personalized care. Above all, we want to serve each person entrusted to us with compassion, dignity, purpose and respect.

That’s not just our goal. It’s our privilege.

Services

At Life Care Centers of America, we take elderly care very seriously. That’s why we offer residents a wide range of living arrangements and amenities, services and care. From home assisted living to retirement living to nursing homes – and even campuses that offer all three in a continuum of care – Life Care has the experience, expertise, and dedication to provide a full scope of specialty services.

Whether your needs include Alzheimer’s care, in-home nursing care, rehabilitation or recovery help, or any of a number of other specialty services, Life Care will be there, with all the support, education, and commitment you and your loved one need.

Rehabilitation

Life can deliver some unexpected twists: accidents, sudden illnesses or emergency surgeries can happen when you least expect them. And in the aftermath of such events, your energy is focused primarily on recovery—trying to also find the best available resources for help can be pretty challenging.

At Life Care, we understand the intense desire to recuperate and get back to normal as quickly as possible. But serious illness or trauma can sometimes force you to relearn even basic functions. The struggle to regain those lost capabilities while still recovering is frustrating and often overwhelming.

That’s when our teams of experts can make an overwhelming difference. Our skilled therapy services can hasten your recovery, help return lost skills and bring back strength and mobility. Our caring professionals work tirelessly with our residents not only in physical areas, but also by constantly supporting and encouraging them emotionally.

We believe our residents are the extraordinary people who refuse to allow temporary setbacks or disabilities to affect them permanently. Their determination and effort become invaluable tools in the rehabilitation process.

And it is our greatest privilege to partner with them—or you, or your loved one—during recovery … and become your strongest advocates in the road to reclaiming total wellness.

Life Care Centers of America

The sun setting is no less beautiful that the sun rising.

Imagine living in a beautiful, peaceful environment, surrounded by friends and activities.

Caring for Life…
Since 1970, Life Care Centers of America has been providing unequaled nursing care and assisted living service. Our continuum of care campuses give our residents an individual care plan through various levels of care. But it\’s our commitment to quality and professionalism that makes us second to none.

2325 E. Harmon
Las Vegas, NV 89119
702-798-7990

Nevada-Senior-Guide Lakeview-Terrace-Boulder-City

www.lvterrace.com

Welcome to Lakeview Terrace of Boulder City Assisted Living Community

Boulder City Assisted Living

Lakeview Terrace of Boulder city is a close, intimate assisted living community, located in a small, friendly historic town outside of Las Vegas.  We enjoy the natural beauty of Lake Mead, the grandeur of the mountains, and the views of the big horn sheep in our front yard.  The glitz and glamour of Las Vegas is only minutes away!

Whether you are a Boomer seeking the best for your parent, a senior interested in securing your own future care, or someone who values the companionship and wisdom of elders—you have started in the right place. Our mission guides us in creating a senior services environment where elders direct their lives. We support each individual’s choices and desires to be healthy, embrace life-long learning, and experience elderhood to its fullest.

At Lakeview Terrace, we believe in the power of the team, families, and elders working together to create a real sense of community. We invite you to visit Lakeview Terrace of Boulder City to experience the joy and security we can help provide.

Boulder City, NV Senior Care Options

Lakeview Terrace of Boulder City provides a full range of exceptional senior living options. Our  community offers all of the comforts of home with the added benefit of a  team of experienced, caring professionals dedicated to providing you or  your loved one with quality service.

Senior Care Boulder City Services & Amenities

Welcome  to your new home at Lakeview Terrace of Boulder City in Boulder City, NV. As soon as you step  foot into our beautiful senior living community, you’ll  feel right at home.

Lakeview Terrace of Boulder City offers the finest senior living in Boulder City, including daily  activities, organized outings, nutritional meals, a variety of exercise  programs and much more. Our programs are individually designed for each  senior living option. Whether you are seeking specialized memory care, or a more independent or residential care style of living, we’d love to welcome you or your loved  one home at Lakeview Terrace of Boulder City.

 

 

 

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!