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primary care | Nevada Senior Guide

New research: Cranberry concentrate reduces risk of urinary tract infections in elderly

January 22, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

New research [1] published in the American Journal of Geriatrics shows that over 25% of bladder infections (cystitis) can be reduced with the regular use of cranberry concentrate supplements in vulnerable older people in nursing homes at high risk of urinary tract infections. Over 20% of these high-risk elderly did not develop any UTI’s at all when taking the cranberry capsule. The Public Health and Primary Care (PHEG) department of the Leiden University Medical Center conducted the one-year study in 21 Dutch nursing homes in cooperation with the supplier of cranberry concentrate Springfield Nutraceuticals.

It’s estimated that half of all women in the UK will have a UTI at least once in their life [2] with nearly 50% of vulnerable elderly people regularly suffering from UTI’s [1]. As many as 30% of all infections occurring in nursing homes in the UK are urinary tract infections [1]. The importance of preventing infections in nursing homes is paramount, many residents have fragile health and for them, an infection can have serious consequences. Furthermore, resistance of bacteria commonly found to cause urinary tract infections is becoming more frequent so antibiotic therapy is not always a solution.

Effect of Cranberries

In the one-year study, 928 people with an average age of 85 years participated [1]. During the study, cranberry capsules with a specific composition were used and compared with a placebo. The preventative effect of cranberries on urinary tract infection has been known for many years. “The Indians already knew the medicinal properties of these berries”, says Monique Caljouw PhD (PHEG). “Among other particles, these berries contain the so-called PAC-particles that prevent the adhesion of infection-causing bacteria in the bladder wall,” Prof. Dr. Jacobijn Gussekloo (PHEG) explains.

The benefits of taking other types of cranberry products is often disputed. Many people drink cranberry juice when they have cystitis. Cranberry juice has a sour taste and patients – especially the elderly – often fail to drink a glass twice a day, for an extended period. Using sweetened juice for a long period of time is not desirable because of the high levels of sugar used in most cranberry juices to mask the sour taste. Caljouw and Gussekloo found the use of the cranberry supplement an effective method to prevent urinary tract infections. Other prevention methods are less appropriate. “Vitamin C does not seem to work and cranberry juice has its disadvantages. The administration of a low dose of antibiotics causes resistance.” “Cranberry capsules are therefore appropriate,” says PhD Caljouw.

In this study the cranberry supplement used contains the whole cranberry: skin, seeds, pulp, juice and fiber which previous research has shown is preferable to those which do not contain the whole fruit. It also has a patented manufacturing process that provides a bioactive protection to all parts of the cranberry avoiding destruction by gastric acid.

Danger of Antibiotic Resistance

Because of excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics, an increasing number of… continue reading here:  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/271491.php

AARP Report Highlights Need for Innovative Long-Term Care for the Aging Baby Boomer Population; Japan’s Technological Secrets May Hold the Answers

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

A newly published AARP report illustrates a profound demographic shift that will have consequences for decades to come, particularly in the senior living and long-term care industry. Baby boomers are entering their retirement years, while the ratio of potential family caregivers to those who require long-term services and support is beginning to drop. Fewer available caregivers will mean the senior living industry must rapidly adapt to a surging market. The AARP’s full report is available here: http://bit.ly/156phYi

Family caregiving is a low-cost but often burdensome approach to elder care. Becoming a primary caregiver often involves leaving behind a career, among other sacrifices. Plus, these well-intentioned caregivers may not have the expertise necessary to provide the level of care needed by an aged parent. Adults in these roles often feel enormous pressure and stress, sometimes even resentment. At any rate, the nation’s changing demographics will make today’s family caregiving situation far different in the near future.

Between 1990 and 2010, there were about 7 potential caregivers for every one person aged 80-plus. That ratio is at the start of a freefall that will force society to change the way it cares for its elderly members. By 2030, the ratio of caregivers to elderly will be 4 to 1. All remaining baby boomers will have reached their years of highest risk (80+) by 2050, when the caregiver ratio will have plummeted still further to 3 to 1.

Kevin Williams, president of SeniorMarketing.com, suggests innovative thinking will be required to bridge this care gap: “Naturally, with fewer family caregivers available, the responsibility will largely shift to senior living communities, care agencies and already overextended government programs. But it will take more than simply building more communities or training more staff—assuming an adequate number of candidates are even available. Technological innovation may be the silver bullet to raise the standard of living for aging boomers, improve efficiency, and reduce costs.”

The nation of Japan, which has the greatest life expectancy and one of the oldest average populations in the world, has recently experienced a demographic transition of its own. Recently, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare put out a call for 2 million new professional caregivers, but only received 1.3 million eligible candidates. With low birth rates being the norm, that shortfall will only increase. A tech-savvy society to begin with, the Japanese have embraced robotics and automation as a solution to the elder care issue. Motorized, assistive devices can help older individuals perform tasks themselves, while automated pill dispensers can prevent dangerous medication mistakes. A recent blog post on The Economist explained Japan’s inventive approach to the elder care dilemma: http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2013/05/automation-elderly

Williams concluded: “This demographic shift is a great challenge but also a great opportunity. Forward-thinking, entrepreneurs will be leading the way in this new environment. Technology to assist with daily tasks, provide medical care, monitor, and connect seniors to loved ones is advancing at a faster pace every year. It’s not unreasonable to predict that the future will witness even better care for our future seniors.”

About SeniorMarketing.com

Baltimore-based SeniorMarketing.com was created with twin goals in mind. First, the company helps connect caregivers and seniors with local, affordable care options. Second, the company increases income for senior living communities and health care agencies.

Contact:

Kevin M. Williams, President
SeniorMarketing.com
5024 Campbell Blvd., Suite D-3
Baltimore, MD 21236
Phone: 1-888-523-3311

The Benefits of Medicare Advantage

October 31, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Dr. Amir Bacchus

The annual election period during which seniors can enroll in Medicare Advantage plans began on Oct. 15 and ends Dec. 7.  During this open enrollment period, many of Nevada’s senior citizens will assess their health care needs and weigh their options carefully to determine whether a Medicare Advantage plan is right for them.

As a physician and the chief medical officer of HealthCare Partners Medical Group, I have a great deal of knowledge and experience related to Medicare Advantage plans, and I urge seniors to make informed decisions this fall.

Medicare Advantage plans can be an excellent choice for seniors without private supplemental insurance, as many offer improved access to coordinated care and protection against high out-of-pocket expenses. Medicare Advantage is an alternative to what is known as Medicare Fee-For-Service or “original Medicare.”  Medicare Advantage plans typically provide prescription drug coverage and eliminate the need to purchase a Medigap policy. The premiums tend to be lower than you would pay by purchasing original Medicare, Part D (prescription drug coverage) and Medigap separately.

When comparing Medicare Advantage plans, it is essential to consider the costs, benefits and health care provider choices within each available plan. You should take time to learn about the “in-network” providers associated with the health insurance plan.  It is important to know whether the providers have a reputation for offering high-quality, coordinate care and if they have a large enough network to meet your health care needs.  Finally, you should also consider access to the primary care physicians, specialists and other providers you use on a regular basis under each plan. Consistency of care has numerous benefits, especially for those who feel comfortable with their current health care providers.

When considering your coverage options this fall, pick the plan that works best for you. It’s a big decision, and I hope seniors explore their options during this year’s enrollment period.

Dr. Amir Bacchus is the chief medical officer and co-founder of HealthCare Partners Medical Group.  Bacchus received his M.D. from Wayne State University School of Medicine in 1993 and is a diplomat of the American Board of Internal Medicine.

 

 

In an Aging Society – Are Senior Citizens Driving Safely? by Diane Carbo

August 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Remember when you couldn’t wait until you were old enough to drive. Getting a driver’s license gave us an opportunity to experience a new freedom we did not have before. For those of us with two parents working, driving meant taking ourselves and our siblings to after school activities and work. Driving took us to a level of independence that we had not experienced before. In an aging society of drivers, those very same feelings exist in many today. Driving gives us a sense of independence and freedom, the ability to go out and socialize, go to work or to church. Safety issues are a concern as many move into the golden years. The life expectancy of seniors is increasing. There are more active senior citizens out on the road today than ever before. Since we all age differently, many aging adults, can drive into their seventies and eighties. As we age, the risks for having a serious car accident that requires hospitalization rises. Statistics show that fatal car accidents rise after the age of seventy.

If you know an aging adult driver who is experiencing difficulty with driving, it is important to carefully monitor the situation. This article can help you determine whether you should take steps to encourage the senior to stop driving.

An aging society and risk

Some key risk factors that affect our aging society are:

Vision declines affecting depth perception and ability to judge speed of oncoming traffic. Night vision becomes a problem as our eyes loose the ability to process light. By age 60, you need three times the amount of light that you did at age 20 in order to drive safely after nightfall. We also become more sensitive to bright light and glare. Signs and road markings can be difficult to see.

With age, flexibility may decrease as response time increases. A full range of motion is crucial on the road. Turning your head both ways to see oncoming traffic, moving both hands and feet can be difficult for those with chronic conditions such a rheumatoid arthritis, or Parkinson’s disease, heart disease and diabetes.

Older adults in an aging society will often need to begin to take medications. Certain medications, as well as a combination of medications and alcohol, can increase driving risk. Be aware and careful about medication side-effects and interactions between medications. It is important to talk to your pharmacist to be aware of interactions that could affect your driving safely. Some medications cause drowsiness.

Aging affects our quality of sleep, resulting in daytime sleepiness. Falling asleep at the wheel is a major concern for those that dose off during the day.

The beginning of dementia or mental impairment can make driving more dangerous. A decreased mental capacity or decrease tolerance to stressful driving situations such as complex and confusing intersections may cause delayed reactions to sudden or confusing situations on the road. An aging brain and body does not have the same response time as we did when we were younger.

Look for warning signs

There are multiple warning signs that an aging adult is becoming or is an unsafe driver. Some of them are small, but if there are multiple concerns it may be time to talk about your concerns with the aging driver. Warning signs of an unsafe driver include

 

  • Abrupt lane changes, braking, or acceleration.
  • Increase in the dents and scrapes on the car or on fences, mailboxes, garage doors, curbs, etc
  • Trouble reading signs or navigating directions to get somewhere
  • Range-of-motion issues (looking over the shoulder, moving the hands or feet, etc.)
  • Becoming anxious or fearful while driving or feeling exhausted after driving
  • Experiencing more conflict on the road: other drivers honking; frustration or anger at other drivers. Oblivious to the frustration of other drivers towards them
  • Getting lost more often
  • Trouble paying attention to signals, road signs, pavement markings, or pedestrians
  • Slow reaction to changes in the driving environment
  • Increased traffic tickets or “warnings” by traffic or law enforcement officers
  • Forgetting to put on a safety belt

 

If you are concerned about an aging adult driver, closely monitor their driving before deciding whether they need a refresher coarse on their driving skills or approaching them to give up their driver’s license altogether. Ongoing and open communication is important to addressing the issue of driving. Studies conducted by Harvard and MIT show that while most drivers preferred to discuss the issue with their spouse, doctor or adult children (in that order), this is not the case for everyone. The right person may not necessarily be the most forceful or outspoken one, but rather someone whose judgment and empathy are especially trusted by the driver.

Talk with other family members, your doctor, and close friends to determine the best person for “the conversation.” Remember driving signifies independence, freedom and being self sufficient to active senior citizens. Realize you may meet with resistance and the aging driver may become defensive. Emotion may get in the way of a rational conversation. Express your concerns and give specific reasons for those concerns.

The goal is to get the aging driver be part of the decision making process

You may begin by asking your loved one to make some concessions because of your concerns.

 

  • Taking a driver refresher course
  • Not driving at night
  • Suggest they not drive on busy thoroughfares or during rush hour
  • Taking shorter trips
  • Not driving under adverse weather conditions
  • Encourage a visit to their primary care physician or pharmacist to go over medications that may affect driving skills. Your physician may be able to recommend a Driver Rehabilitation Specialist. This individual can assess driving safety by an office exam and driving test and make recommendations regarding special equipment or techniques that can improve the driver’s safety. Consider ways to decrease the need to drive. Check out alternatives to shopping by car, including:

  • Arrange for home deliveries of groceries and other goods, and try to arrange for home visits by clergy, medical and personal care providers, and government service providers.
  • Use financial services that don’t require bank visits, like automatic bill paying, direct deposit, and bank-by-phone or on-line banking services.

Fears of those living in an aging society 

Fear of isolation and decrease in socializing is a real concern for the aging driver. It is important to keep spirits high as the aging driver makes the adjustments to becoming a non driver. Be in tune to their need for fun, volunteering, work and religious activities. Create a transportation plan that can make it easier for the aging driver to give up driving. You can create a list of friends and family that are willing to drive, contact the church and the local Area Agency on Aging in regards to transportation programs in the area.

Some seniors may adjust better if they can keep their own car, but have others drive them. Their own car may feel more comfortable and familiar, and the sense of loss from not driving may be lessened. Remember, baby boomers have grown up walking out the door and being able to go where they want to go. We need to keep the aging adult driver and those on the road with them safe.

Diane Carbo RN- As a geriatric care manager, that has cared for her father and mother in law in their homes, she learned first hand how overwhelming, stressful, and time consuming caring for a loved one can be. Staying in their homes was very important to them. As a result, Diane started http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com to assist others age in familiar surroundings and avoid the emotional and frustrating task of maneuvering the medical delivery system

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

Renown Provides Advanced Training for Healthcare Professionals

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Renown Provides Advanced Training for Healthcare Professionals

RENO, Nev. (Oct. 30, 2012) – Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health is teaming up with the Nevada Academy of Family Physicians (NAFP) to provide advanced training for healthcare professionals across northern Nevada this weekend in a three-day educational conference.

The 23rd Annual Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine Conference will be held at the Resort at Squaw Creek in Olympic Valley, Calif., Friday through Sunday, Nov. 2 – 4. This continuing medical education program is designed for internal medicine and family physicians, hospitalists, cardiovascular specialists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, pharmacists, nurses and all other physicians and healthcare personnel.

Topics include the most recent advances and current established guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, stroke and diseases or problems associated with heart disease.

The conference is sponsored by Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health. For more information and to register for the conference, visit renown.org/UpcomingEvents. Registration will also be available at the conference. To download a copy of the event program, click here.

About the Nevada Academy of Family Physicians:
The NAFP promotes the profession of family practice by preserving the scope of practice, promoting primary care research and encouraging family physicians to assume leadership roles. The NAFP works as an advocate for family physicians and their patients to various government and non-governmental organizations affecting healthcare access and delivery.

About Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health
Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health has more than 30 years of recognition as the region’s leader of heart and vascular care. More heart procedures are performed at Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health than anywhere else in northern Nevada. Renown’s heart physicians have access to sophisticated diagnostic and surgical equipment such as the D-SPECT camera that detects heart attacks faster, the da Vinci® S HD™ Robotic Surgical System, 64-slice CT scanner, nuclear medicine, MRI and cardiac catheterization so patients can be diagnosed and treated quickly. For more information, visit renown.org/heart.

Innovative Senior Housing Community Takes Shape in Tucson include Horses! (equine therapy)

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Read about the role of horses and Dr. Andrew Weil along with other exciting news about Watermark’s latest innovation in senior living, The Hacienda at the River in Tucson, Arizona.

Innovative Senior Housing Community Takes Shape in Tucson
Partnerships and Affiliations Announced
Tucson, Ariz. – Before concrete is even poured for the Hacienda at the River, longtime Tucson senior housing developer David Freshwater and his operating partner, David Barnes, are carefully laying the foundation for Tucson’s newest and most innovative senior living community by solidifying partnerships and affiliations with some of Tucson’s biggest names in integrative medicine and therapy.
Most notably, Freshwater and Barnes are teaming with Andrew Weil, MD, to oversee onsite organic gardens and establish culinary principles that will promote optimum health. Co-directors of the Arizona Center on Aging, Mindy Fain, MD, and Janko Nikolich-Zugich, MD, Ph.D., have agreed to provide team-based interdisciplinary healthcare (Fain), incorporating the latest standards and advances of geriatric research (Nikolich) to Hacienda residents, complementing their primary care. Steven Wool, M.D. will serve as medical director and private practice doctor for the community. Evan Kligman, M.D. will coordinate and act as ongoing liaison for all University of Arizona partnerships and affiliations with the Hacienda at the River and other programs under development for Freshwater and Barnes’ organization, Watermark Retirement Communities.
According to Freshwater, the Hacienda team has also entered into an agreement with Barbara K. Rector, MA, CEIP co-founder of Therapeutic Riding of Tucson and Adventures in Awareness, to direct onsite equine therapy, believed to be the first program of its kind to be permanently integrated into an assisted living community.
“We’ve seen equine therapy work so well with residents in other Watermark locations that we’ve made it central to our vision for The Hacienda at the River,” said Freshwater. “Given that The Hacienda site is historically a horse property, we feel this use is especially fitting.”
Utilizing Mission Revival architecture, reflective of the Southwest’s iconic heritage, and set on the terrace at the edge of the Rillito River near River and Hacienda del Sol roads, the Hacienda at the River is envisioned to be a new style of community for mature individuals who need assisted living, memory care, nursing and short-term rehabilitation. The Hacienda is Watermark’s branded response to a new paradigm for de-institutionalized senior living environments: elders receive care almost invisibly through universal workers integrated into the core household, creating a family-centered setting that seamlessly provides expert personal and health support. Each of the four single-story homes at the Hacienda includes a living room and kitchen, library, family room and a front porch. The homes have courtyards with mesquite and other canopy trees. Resident suites in each home have private baths and roll in showers. Nursing and rehab services will also be provided at the new community in a two-story building with the look and feel of a boutique hotel rather than a traditional, institutional nursing home.
Other features of the development will include:
• Green building techniques including water harvesting and gray water systems, and other energy and water saving techniques leading to LEED certification;
• On-site orchard and gardens for providing a portion of fruits and vegetables used at the community;
• On-site restaurant and café featuring natural, organic foods (including those grown on-site) whenever possible serving residents, family members and visitors alike;
• Two rehab facilities for short-term and outpatient services including speech, hearing, occupational, and physical therapies. The Hacienda is also planning to integrate aquatic as well as equine therapies into its rehab programming.
The purchase of the 7.5-acre site closed October 3 and groundbreaking is expected in 2013. More affiliations are in the works, to be announced.
Freshwater and Barnes are nationally noted seniors’ housing experts who happen to live in Tucson. They opened their first senior living community, The Fountains at La Cholla, 25 years ago. Watermark now operates 31 communities coast to coast.
www.watermarkcommunities.com

Dr. Quinn Pauly Joins Premier Care at Renown Medical Group

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Dr. Quinn Pauly Joins Premier Care at Renown Medical Group

To help meet the need of patients in northern Nevada seeking more convenience and greater access to their primary care physician, Renown Medical Group is pleased to announce the addition of Quinn Pauly, M.D. as a new Premier Care physician.

Dr. Pauly is board certified in family medicine. He received his medical degree from the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine and completed his residency at Natividad Medical Center in Salinas, Calif.

The Premier Care Program, first introduced to the region through Renown Health last October, offers patients greater access to their primary care physician beyond traditional scheduled office visits. The program is based on a national trend and is made possible through a reduced practice size.

“Patients are requesting enhanced access and expanded personalized care,” said Larry Trilops, vice president of Ambulatory Services at Renown Health. “This program allows us to meet customer demand.”

What’s the difference?
Renown Medical Group offers same or next day appointments with your doctor if he’s available or another doctor, within Renown’s Medical Group consisting of more than 80 providers and 15 locations, if he’s not.

In contrast, the Premier Care program offers more access through a reduced practice size. With monthly membership fees (not covered by insurance) ranging from $35 – $55, you may communicate directly with your primary care physician 24/7, including weekends.

“My focus has always been to take time to listen to my patients so I can attend to their healthcare needs thoroughly,” Dr. Pauly said. “I enjoy getting to know my patients and their families and strive to give my patients personalized, compassionate care”.

Key Premier Care Benefits include:
• A smaller, low volume practice.
• Convenient appointments with your dedicated Premier Care physician with little to no waiting guaranteed.
• Online communication directly with your physician, regarding scheduled appointments, sick visits or general medical advice, with a response within 24 hours, seven days per week.
• Extended office time for appointments.

For more information about Premier Care, please visit renown.org/premiercare or call 775-982-8265.

About Renown Medical Groups
Renown Medical Group has more than 80 providers at 15 locations including Reno, Sparks, Fernley and Silver Springs.

Earlier this year, Renown announced awards that recognized two Renown Medical Group sites for initiatives for excellence in patient quality. In 2010, Renown became the first NCQA recognized Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) in Nevada, and in 2011, Renown became the fourth organization in the country to be recognized as a Level III PCMH under the new 2011 standards.

Renown Medical Group physicians provide preventive care and health education for all ages and treat most common illnesses and injuries including colds, flu, and aches and pains. They also coordinate their patients’ medical care including checkups, immunizations, referrals to specialists, lab and x-ray services and hospital admissions. Physicians see patients by scheduled appointment. Medical Group locations accept most insurance plans, including Hometown Health, UnitedHealthcare, Anthem Blue Cross/Blue Shield, Cigna, Great West, Coventry/First Health, Humana, Principal, Tricare and Medicare.

For added convenience, Renown Medical Group is the only primary care provider in the region that offers a secure, online venue for patients to manage their healthcare. With MyChart, patients can schedule and keep track of appointments, obtain certain test results and request prescription refills 24 hours a day. To sign up, ask a Medical Assistant for your access code at your next office visit. Same-day appointments are available by calling 982-5000, Monday through Thursday between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m., and Fridays between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. For more information, visit renown.org/medicalgroup.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Health Care Partners Medical Group

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Las Vegas 

facebook.com/healthcarepartnersnevada

About Us

HealthCare Partners Nevada is a network of more than 200 primary care physicians and more than 1,300 specialists. With medical clinics and specialty care affiliates throughout Las Vegas, North Las Vegas, Henderson, Boulder City and Pahrump, HealthCare Partners Nevada (HCPNV) is committed to delivering the highest quality of care to all our patients.
Through our total care model, HealthCare Partners provides patient centered comprehensive primary care, specialty, and urgent care services. Founded in 1996, HealthCare Partners Nevada is an affiliate of HealthCare Partners LLC with offices in California, Florida and Nevada.

For Patients

At HealthCare Partners we approach your health with Total Care. Our mission is to deliver the highest quality care to all our patients. We do this by offering you complete access to our services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We also accommodate same-day appointments.
Our health care providers are ready and able to offer expert care when you need it most. While our mission is to deliver the best possible care for our patients, our promise is to provide the personal attention you deserve. It is our pleasure to ensure your individual healthcare needs are met.

Specialty Services

When you choose HealthCare Partners, you are choosing to manage your health through what we call our Total Care Model.  Total care means that you are actively involved with a team of healthcare professionals lead by your primary care physician who is responsible for coordinating your care and ensuring the best outcome possible for your medical needs.
HealthCare Partners is continually adding medical specialties to our team of healthcare professionals, including cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, internal medicine, pediatrics, and podiatry.

Cardiology

Cardiologists are doctors with special training and skill in finding, treating and preventing diseases of the heart and blood vessels.
Click here to find a HealthCare Partners Medical Group cardiologists.

  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Repair
  • Angioplasty
  • Atrial Fibrillation Management
  • Cardiac Catheterization /Angiography
  • Cardiovascular Disease Management
  • Carotid Ultrasonography
  • Catheter Ablation (CA)
  • Cholesterol Management And Testing
  • Coagulation Monitoring
  • Coronary Angioplasty/Stenting
  • Doppler Ultrasound
  • Echocardiography (Echo)
  • Electrophysiological Studies (EPS)
  • Gated Blood Pooling Imaging
  • Heart Rhythm Management
  • Holter/Event Monitoring
  • Implantable Cardioverter /Defribrillator (ICD)
  • Laser Lead Extractions
  • Nuclear Cardiac Imaging
  • Patent Foramen Ovale Repair (PFO)
  • Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Rotational Atherectomy (PCTRA)
  • Peripheral Vascular Disease Management And Testing
  • Peripheral Vascular Interventions
  • Permanent Pacemaker Implantation
  • Stress Testing
  • Structural Heart Disease
  • T-Wave Alternans
  • Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)
  • Transesophageal Echocardiography
  • Ventricular Septal Defect Repair (VSD)
  • Women And Heart Disease
Endocrinology

Endocrinologists are doctors that focus on the medical aspects of hormones and their associated diseases and conditions.  Endocrine disorders may include: cholesterol disorders, coronary artery disease, diabetes, hormone replacement therapy, hypertension, hypoglycemia, obesity, osteoporosis, reproductive medicine and thyroid disorders.

Dermatology

Dermatologists are doctors that specialize in the diagnosis, treatment and management of disorders of the skin, hair and nails.

Internal Medicine

Internal medicine specialists are doctors that focus on adult medicine and have had special study and training focusing on the prevention and treatment of adult diseases. Internists are sometimes referred to as the “doctor’s doctor”, because they are often called upon to act as consultants to other physicians to help solve puzzling diagnostic problems.

Pediatrics

Pediatricians are doctors that focus on babies, children, adolescents, and young adults from birth to age 21.  Pediatricians manage the physical, mental, and emotional well-being of their patients in every stage of development.

Podiatry

Podiatrists are doctors that diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and related structures of the leg.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Nevada Personal Care Services Inc

August 10, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Las Vegas 

www.nevadapersonalcareservices.com

At Nevada Personal Care, you’re in control.

You choose the time/days your aide comes!

You choose the aide!

You always have the option to change caregivers!

  • You choose how much help you want. From a few hours a week, to around-the-clock care. We’re flexible. We can work around doctors’ appointments, work schedules and sleep patters.

You always have the option to change caregivers!

  • You choose how much help you want. From a few hours a week, to around-the-clock care. We’re flexible. We can work around doctors’ appointments, work schedules and sleep patters.

  • We can assign a caregiver, or you have the option to assign a friend or relative, (but not a spouse) to care for you. In some cases, we can bill Medicaid or Long-Term care insurance, then we pay that friend or relative to provide care.

Most people love their caregivers, but once in a while there’s friction. If you’re not getting along with your aide, just call us and we’ll arrange for another to provide care. We want you to be satisfied with your care and your caregiver.

Personal Care Assistance

PCA services are provided in the client’s home by a qualified professional called a Personal Care Assistant. PCA programs offer assistance with activities of daily living (ADL’s) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL’s).

Respite Care

(Similar to PCA/Chore services) Respite is provided when the primary caregiver (Friend or Family member) needs temporary relief.

Chore Services

Chore services include general housekeeping, laundry, shopping, Meal planning and preparation, running errands and more

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Helping Hands of Vegas Valley – Las Vegas

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

www.hhovv.org

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SERVING SENIORS in SOUTHERN NEVADA

No Cost Services Assist Seniors to Remain Independent

  Established in 2000, Helping Hands of Vegas Valley is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization with the mission to provide free, assistive services to senior citizens in Southern Nevada, allowing them to maintain their dignity and independence while improving health and daily living.

Our services include:

  • Transportation
  • Food Pantry
  • Respite Care Vouchers

Volunteer at your convenience!

SERVICES

We are a community agency providing the following free services to seniors 60 and over in the Las Vegas Valley.

Transportation

Transportation

HHOVV has two Para transit buses that can accommodate wheelchair clients. Rides are provided for medical appointments, grocery store shopping and other errands.

HHOVV volunteer drivers provide transportation to and from medical appointments, shopping trips and errands. All volunteers receive orientation training and a background check.

New clients meet with HHOVV’s intake coordinator for an assessment and must be 60 years of age or older, show proof of Nevada residency and display a need for assistance. Individuals needing services are typically alone and frail, chronically ill, homebound, and/or dependent on a primary caregiver. Reassessments are completed on an annual basis. HHOVV does not charge for these services. Volunteers and staff do not accept tips, gifts, fees, loans or anything of value from clients.

To be added to the waiting list for transportation services please contact Myrna or Nichole at 702-633-7264 x29.

Respite Care Vouchers

Respite Care Vouchers

The HHOVV respite voucher program is funded by the state Aging and Disabled Services Division and provides temporary relief for caregivers. Individuals who do not take time off while caring for a loved one may compromise their physical and mental well-being. Utilizing respite services is one way to reduce stress, allowing individuals to be more effective caregivers. Also, using respite services may delay early institutionalization

Food Pantry

Food Pantry

HHOVV also keeps a food pantry stocked with non-perishable items and delivers a free bag once a month to clients who meet eligibility requirements. Clients must be 60 years of age or older, show proof of Nevada residency and proof that their annual income is at or below 150% of current poverty guidelines. To become a pantry recipient a senior may call 702-633-7264 x22 and leave their name and phone number.

The organization accepts donations of non-perishable food items at a warehouse office in North Las Vegas. Donations are always appreciated!

If you are interested in holding a food drive for HHOVV please contact Lorri Highet at 702-633-7264 x30.

An organization serving the Seniors of Las Vegas.

2320 Paseo Del Prado #B112

Las Vegas, NV 89102

702-633-7264

E-mail: hhofvv@aol.com

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!