How to Talk to Aging Parents About Senior Housing

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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One in three adults ages 65 and older will fall each year. Use this podcast to learn how to talk to aging parents about senior living before an accident occurs.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in three adults ages 65 and older fall each year. Of these falls, 20–30 percent result in debilitating injuries limiting seniors’ ability to live on their own. It is more important than ever for seniors and their adult children to plan for senior living accommodations—before an accident occurs.

Of course, the conversation about senior living can be emotional and taxing for aging parents. Seniors may view the change as a loss of independence, and it can be difficult to think about leaving their home and existing lifestyle to join a new community.

In a recent podcast from MySilverAge.com, Lisa Holland—regional director of quality improvement at be.group, a nonprofit provider of California senior living communities—offers expert tips to ease these challenges and strategies to help start the conversation. Holland explains how to approach the subject respectfully and sensitively, and how to offer the right support for each parent’s unique needs.

To hear all of Holland’s tips on talking to aging parents about senior living, including whom to include in the discussion and ways to prepare for potential responses, visit: www.mysilverage.com/thetalk.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

U.S. Veterans Honored by Encore.org’s 2013 Purpose Prize

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Seven Awards for People Over Age 60 Solving the World’s Toughest Social Problems

The Purpose Prize has become a “MacArthur genius award for people who develop a second career as social service entrepreneurs.” – The New York Times.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy organizes a network of volunteers across the country to teach disabled veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan how to combat stress — through fly-fishing.

A public relations executive helps wounded warriors find and renovate foreclosed homes – and transforms lives and neighborhoods in the process.

These are two of the seven winners of the 2013 Purpose Prize, awarded by Encore.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who translate decades of skill and experience into “second acts” that contribute to society’s greater good.

Now in its eighth year, The Purpose Prize is the nation’s only large-scale investment in people over 60 who are combining their passion and experience for the social good. Created in 2005 by Encore.org, the prize is aimed at those with the passion to make change and the wisdom to know how to do it, showcasing the value of experience and disproving the notion that innovation is solely the province of the young.

Two winners will receive $100,000 each and five winners will receive $25,000 each.

This year’s winners:

* Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. ($100,000 winner of The Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra)

* Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron taps into her own experience as a cancer survivor to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. ($100,000)

* Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing emotional wounds through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. ($25,000)

* Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
Fennelly runs a unique summer camp behind bars that is transforming federal prisoners into involved parents. ($25,000)

* Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
Huttinger’s project is on a path to eradicate human schistosomiasis, a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. ($25,000)

* Reverend Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. ($25,000)

* Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
Young’s rise from immigrant nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. ($25,000)

The Purpose Prize winners will be honored on December 5, 2013, at an awards ceremony in Sausalito, Ca. NBC’s Jane Pauley will emcee the event for hundreds of Encore leaders and the Purpose Prize winners.

Twenty-one judges – leaders in business, politics, journalism and the nonprofit sector – chose the seven winners from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees. Judges include Sherry Lansing, former CEO of Paramount; David Bornstein, author and New York Times columnist; Eric Liu, writer and founder of CitizenUniversity; and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, The Purpose Prize is a program of Encore.org, which aims to engage millions of boomers in encore careers combining personal meaning, continued income and social impact in the second half of life.

This year, Symetra is sponsoring the $100,000 Purpose Prize for Future Promise, which recognizes an individual whose approach for helping society has the potential to grow steadily over the next five years. The company plans to sponsor another Purpose Prize for Future Promise in 2014.

“While Purpose Prize winners are helping to solve a wide range of pressing social problems, they have one thing in common,” said Marc Freedman, CEO and founder of Encore.org and author of The Big Shift (PublicAffairs Books). “They – and millions of others in encore careers – are turning personal passions and decades of experience into invaluable contributions across sectors, continents and generations, often through entrepreneurship.”

Short summaries for all winners follow. Photos are attached. Longer bios and higher resolution photos are available.

Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas, winner of this year’s Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra, rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. Following a 35-year-career as a fundraising and marketing dynamo, she became the director of communications at Purple Heart Homes in 2008 in an effort to provide greater services for veterans who have service-connected disabilities. In just three years, Thomas helped take the fledgling nonprofit to new heights. She has raised millions for Purple Heart Homes in financial contributions and material donations. Revenue shot up 600% in her first year with the startup. She’s developed an innovative program that matches veterans with foreclosed homes donated by banks, then raises the funds to renovate a home for the individual veteran’s needs. It’s a win-win for all generations—and communities too. It helps veterans to grow assets, towns to recoup lost taxes and neighborhoods that have struggled with foreclosures to stabilize.

Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron is an award-winning journalist with more than 42 years in television broadcasting. She tapped into her own experience as a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. To focus on the plight of low-income Latinos fighting the disease, Duron founded Latinas Contra Cancer (Latinas Against Cancer), an organization committed to educating, supporting and providing essential services to low-income Spanish speakers often overlooked by the health care system. Latinas Contra Cancer has offered a range of programs that have taught more than 3,000 men, women and teens about the disease, resulting in more than 300 preventative cancer screenings. The group has provided psychological and social support to over 100 patients per year. However, the call to action Duron answered has had an impact far beyond the Bay Area. Her passionate commitment is helping Latino communities across the U.S. gain access to cancer support, information and treatment. Her great empathy for cancer patients has made her utterly clear on her bigger purpose in the second stage of life.

Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing the emotional wounds of battle through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. A cancer survivor and war veteran himself, Nicholson was impressed by the fortitude of disabled veterans at the Walter Reed military hospital, where he was treated for prostate cancer in 2005. It spurred him to found Project Healing Waters, a program dedicated to helping disabled soldiers and veterans recover from the trying aftermath of war through the sport of fly-fishing. One-on-one connections have been key to Project Healing Waters’ approach since the beginning. Nicholson knew there were fly-fishing groups and facilities all over the country. His innovation was to convince them to start, manage and lead fly-fishing instruction and outings with veterans through military and Veterans Administration facilities. The quiet bonds forged over fishing lines began to transform lives. Again and again Nicholson heard from family members who said their loved ones had returned from war withdrawn, angry, and difficult to be around. But after fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters, they’ve become happier, more open and engaged. Project Healing Waters works closely with VA Recreational and Occupational therapies to identify those who would most benefit from the program. Many are in wheelchairs or using prosthetics. A few are blind. Participants reflect of full spectrum of disabled veterans and include all ages, genders, ethnicities and disabilities. Nicholson says the impact “goes well beyond the mechanics of fly-fishing.”

Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
A lifelong social activist who ran homeless shelters in the District of Columbia for 17 years, Carol Fennelly abandoned her plans to retire in 1998 when she learned that D.C. inmates had been transferred to Youngstown, OH. One woman made 10-hour round-trip drives twice a week to visit her son. Moved to answer a social need, Fennelly thought about opening a hospitality house in Youngstown for family members visiting inmates. She soon learned that while 93% of the federal inmate population is male, in sheer numbers there are more programs for mothers in prison than there are for fathers. She decided she had what it took to change things. “I had spent years organizing, dealing with government, making change happen, and that emboldened me to think I could go into prisons and start all these radical programs,” Fennelly says. So she launched an encore career with Hope House, an innovative organization that helps prison inmates stay in regular contact with their children. In the past 14 years, Hope House has hosted 200 video teleconferences, 18,000 personalized book readings by fathers and 31 week-long summer camps, which allow kids to spend time with their fathers free of the usual restrictions that come with visitor hours and family chaperones. California recently decided to implement the Hope House model in its 33 state prisons. Prisons in Texas, Idaho and New Hampshire may follow. In 2013 Fennelly was honored at the White House as a Champion of Change.

Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
International public health expert Elizabeth Huttinger spotted a big idea in shrimp, and launched an encore career that could eradicate a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. Huttinger’s project – founded in 2006 – is targeting human schistosomiasis, an infectious parasite carried by river snails. Understanding that the population of prawns that eat those snails had precipitously declined, Huttinger, 63, has devoted her encore career to restoring the prawn population in the SenegalRiver Basin. Projet Crevette’s mission is multifaceted: the restoration of the prawn population diminishes the spread of schisto, provides new economic opportunities to afflicted communities and heals families infected by the disease. Today, Projet Crevette is a prawn-farming microenterprise, operated by locals at public watering holes. It has brought social innovation, new microbusinesses, environmental restoration and improved health to communities. Huttinger is confident Projet Crevette will meet its bold goal to fully restore the indigenous prawn population—and improve countless lives in the process.

Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Reverend Violet Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. After 14 years as parish pastor trained in psychotherapy, Little left behind her traditional congregation to create a religious refuge for the homeless on the streets of the city, which became the “WelcomeChurch.” The church relies mostly on word of mouth, and services can pop up in a city park or on a sidewalk. No questions are asked, and everyone is welcome. The WelcomeChurch coordinates medical services through local universities, helps people get into rehab or jobs, and offers educational services to the public on the causes of homelessness. Little estimates 40 percent of her congregants have moved off the streets into permanent housing and the WelcomeChurch celebrates each and every one of them, many of whom stay connected with Little through their transition. Little’s congregation has grown to include hundreds of homeless as well as non-homeless volunteers in the EvangelicalLutheranChurch in America.

Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
An immigrant from the West Indies who built a meaningful life on meager income, Young’s gritty rise from nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. She’s encouraged thousands to stand up for their right to earn a living wage, and counsels and trains others to become leaders themselves. In 2004, Young began building a movement to legislate a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in New YorkState, which would make overtime, paid time off and rest days mandatory. In 2009, when she heard then Governor David Patterson say on the radio that he’d sign the bill if it made it to his desk, she put on a full court press, becoming the engine behind passage of the law in 2010. The law is the first of its kind in the country, but Young is committed to making sure it isn’t the last. She’s now a key player in the NDWA’s expansion from 11 to 44 affiliated organizations with 15,000 members, up from 5,000 in 2007. Young’s passion for serving her community has only just begun.

Read More About Encore’s Purpose Prize at www.encore.org/prize.

About Encore.org

Encore.org is a national nonprofit that promotes the idea that people in their second acts have the talent and experience to solve some of society’s greatest problems.

About The Atlantic Philanthropies

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. In keeping with the Giving While Living philosophy of founder Charles “Chuck” Feeney, The Atlantic Philanthropies believes in making large investments to capitalize on significant opportunities to solve urgent problems now, so they are less likely to become larger, more entrenched and more expensive challenges later. The Atlantic Philanthropies also seeks to encourage others of significant wealth to engage in major philanthropic pursuits in their lifetime.

About The John Templeton Foundation

The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, supporting research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.

About Symetra

Symetra Financial Corporation (NYSE: SYA) is a diversified financial services company based in Bellevue, Wash. In business since 1957, Symetra provides employee benefits, annuities and life insurance through a national network of benefit consultants, financial institutions, and independent agents and advisors.

 

CONTACT: Sara Ying Rounsaville, srounsaville@encore.org, 415-952-5121, or Russ Mitchell, rmitchell@encore.org, 510-969-0801

Holiday Season Is Perfect Time to “Talk Turkey” about End-of-Life Care Wishes

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Compassion & Choices Provides Tips to Families to Discuss Issue Everyone Will Face

The upcoming holiday season is the perfect time to “talk turkey over turkey” with your family about an important issue we all will face: our wishes for end-of-life care. It is the key message in the featured holiday story of the fall 2013 issue of Compassion & Choices Magazine.

Fewer than half of Americans over age 40 have completed an advance directive outlining what medical treatments they would want if they couldn’t communicate, according to a poll by the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Ironically, more than half of the Americans over 40 in the survey have already been caregivers for a sick relative or friend.

Compassion & Choices’ End-of-Life Consultation (EOLC) program has provided confidential, personal support for thousands of people over the last 20 years. People call our toll-free number (800-247-7421) specifically about end-of-life planning, such as preparation of advance directives.

“Everyone wants to die peacefully and with dignity. But it takes more than hope to achieve this end-of-life outcome,” said Compassion & Choices President Barbara Coombs Lee, who was an ER and ICU nurse and physician assistant for 25 years. “Making and communicating end-of-life plans is absolutely necessary to ensure we get the treatment we want – and to avoid treatment we don’t want. This step is especially important to prepare for a time we may be unable to speak for ourselves.”

How do families start this uncomfortable conversation? After many attempts to engage her family, one Compassion & Choices client set her Thanksgiving table with advance directive forms at every place setting and announced: “Nobody gets dinner until these are filled out.”

That tough-turkey tactic may not work for everyone. The best approach is the one that suits you and your family. While it’s important to fill out this paperwork, it’s essential is to get the conversation going.

“Talking Turkey Over Turkey” tips include:

  • “Appetizers” that could lead the way to a satisfying dialogue;
  • Four key questions your conversation should cover; and
  • Free tools you need to guide your conversation and document the results.

For more information, visit www.compassionandchoices.org/what-we-do/advance-planning, or call 800-247-7421 to speak to a Compassion & Choices’ consultant or to request information.

With over 30 local groups and 40,000 members and supporters throughout the United States, Compassion & Choices leads the end-of-life choice movement. We support, educate and advocate. Learn more at: www.compassionandchoices.org.

Contact: Sean Crowley, 202-495-8520-c, scrowley@compassionandchoices.org

Staying Safe on the Road: Senior Driving Guide

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Learn the challenges that may keep older adults off the road and find tips for staying safe behind the wheel

According to a recent study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, drivers in their mid- to late-80s have lower overall crash rates than drivers in their early 20s and roughly half as many crashes as teenagers—making them among the safest drivers on the road.

However, fatal crash rates skyrocket for drivers ages 85 and older. In “The Guide to Driving Safety for Older Drivers” from MySilverAge.com, Jake Nelson, AAA director of traffic safety advocacy and research in Washington, D.C., says it’s important to understand what health factors can compromise safe driving. If senior drivers have ongoing limitations that could put them or their passengers at risk, they may want to reconsider their capacity to continue driving.

Older drivers should evaluate how the following factors affect their driving ability:

  • Vision. How well a driver can see accounts for about 90 percent of his or her ability to drive safely. Weak visual aptitude can be measured by an inability to read signs, street markings, or to see other cars and pedestrians in low-light conditions.
  • Mobility. Loss of strength, coordination and flexibility can make it challenging to control a vehicle. Mobility difficulties may also be signaled by pain and discomfort performing daily activities as well as arthritis in the neck and shoulders.
  • Behavior. Trouble remembering familiar routes, anxiety or confusion while driving, or problems distinguishing the gas from the brake pedal are causes for immediate concern.

For a complete list of driving safety tips, including information on driver improvement courses, new driving technologies and alternate modes of transportation, download the driving guide for seniors.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

Virtual Life After Death: Why Digital Assets Should Be Included in Estate Plan

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

Who would answer your Facebook “friend requests” if you were no longer around?

That depends on whom you determine – or don’t – in your estate plan. October 21 through 27, 2013 is National Estate Planning Awareness Week, and one web service is using the time to bring attention to the preparation digital assets require.

Digital assets include a variety of web and computerized documents and accounts, including social media accounts, photos, videos, websites, blogs and financial accounts.

Currently, only seven states have legal protocol for what happens to these items and accounts if their owner dies without including them in final wishes.

Bill Simpson is the Founder and President of Life Document Storage, an online storage bank for family documents and vital records including estate and digital asset plans. He said many people don’t realize how important it is to include digital assets in their estate plans.

“Digital assets are new to estate planning. Many people die without knowing they should have included these items in their plans. This makes it difficult for family members to access or delete online accounts. Depending on the site, sometimes impossible,” he said.

Life Document Storage allows people to upload important documents such as estate plans, trusts, wills and other documents. Selected relatives are able to view documents, or access them when necessary, such as the death of a relative. The company launched earlier this year.

Simpson said he came up with the idea for a family-centered document storage company from his experience as a funeral director.

“I’ve helped thousands of people make funeral arrangements. And I noticed that many of their families weren’t prepared to handle final wishes and affairs,” he said. He hopes Life Document Storage will prompt family discussions and end of life planning.

Simpson said there are several ways to begin including digital assets into estate plans.

“It’s as simple as creating a list of what online accounts you have and writing down account information. You can take it further by deciding what should happen to those accounts upon your death,” he said.  “But no matter how you store your information, electronically or on paper, make sure your family can find it if something were to happen to you,” Simpson concluded.

For more information on digital asset planning or document storage, visit www.LifeDocumentStorage.com.

Contact:

Bill Simpson – Email – 1-800-377-7341

Downsizing? 4 Easy Ways to Get Rid of Unwanted Stuff

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

Use these methods from MySilverAge.com to declutter and pare down before moving into a new home.

Members of the National Association of Senior Move Managers recently reported that 98 percent of their senior clients downsized before relocating.

Downsizing before a move can be both liberating and overwhelming. But for seniors who have acquired many possessions over the years, it can be an especially daunting task. Seniors planning a move into smaller living spaces should begin the downsizing process about 90 days before moving, says Greg Gunderson, owner and president of Gentle Transitions, a senior relocation services company located in Manhattan Beach, Calif.

“The most time-consuming part is the decision-making process,” Gunderson says. But even after deciding what stays and what goes, Gunderson says one question remains:  “What’s the best way to get rid of the items I don’t want?” From donating a book collection to selling a grand piano, here are four ways to give possessions a new home.

  1. Hold an estate sale. Partner with an estate sales group that can facilitate the auction or sale of belongings at the home.
  2. Contact an auction house. Consider letting an auction house take over the sale of high-end valuables such as antique furniture, artwork or collectibles.
  3. Donate to a charity. Thinking about passing some possessions to those in need? Call the charity (for example Salvation Army, Goodwill) in advance to give them a list of the items that will be donated.
  4. Hire a paper-shredding service. Because financial, bank and private documents can contain confidential information, Gunderson says it’s important to practice caution when removing them from the home.

Downsizing can be an essential part of seniors’ transition to a new home. Another important step is finding the best housing solution to meet current and future needs. A free guide from MySilverAge.com addresses common questions about senior living and offers helpful resources to ease the transition. Find out:

  • When is the right time to move?
  • What are the available housing options?
  • Are there services to help with the moving process?

Download the full guide for all of these answers and additional senior living tips: http://www.mysilverage.com/seniorhousingguide.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

National Report: Oral Health of Older Americans In A ‘State of Decay’

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Oral Health America Launches First-of-its-Kind Website to Connect Older Adults to Affordable Dental Care and Resources

The oral health of older Americans is in a state of decay, according to a new national report released today by Oral Health America (OHA).  A State of Decay, a state-by-state analysis of oral healthcare delivery and public health factors impacting the oral health of older adults, reveals more than half of the country received a “fair” or “poor” assessment when it comes to minimal standards affecting dental care access for older adults. Florida and Arizona, areas with large older adult populations, rank in the bottom five states due to a shortage of oral health coverage, a strained dental health work force, and deficiencies in prevention programs.

“While we are seeing improvements in certain areas of older adult dental care, there is still a lack of progress in advancing the oral health of such a vulnerable population,” said Dr. Ira Lamster, Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, ColumbiaUniversity, Mailman School of Public Health. “Older adults face significant health challenges if their oral health is poor, and there is no coordinated program to help fund necessary services.”

A State of Decay gave a rating of “fair,” “poor,” “good,” or “excellent” based on state level data analyzing five variables impacting older adult oral health: adult Medicaid dental benefits, inclusion of older adult strategies in state oral health plans, edentulism (loss of teeth), dental health professional shortage areas, and community water fluoridation.

The final evaluations in the report for each state are mixed, with several states performing well in some variables, but still in need of improvement in other important areas. The top findings of this report that require scrutiny and action are:

  • Persistent lack of oral health coverage across much of the nation. Forty-two percent of states (21 states) provide either no dental benefits or provide only emergency coverage  through adult Medicaid Dental Benefits.
  • Strained dental health work force. Thirty-one states (62 percent) have high rates of Dental Health Provider Shortage Areas (HPSAs), meeting only 40 percent or less of dental provider needs.
  • Tooth loss remains a signal of suboptimal oral health. Eight states had strikingly high rates of edentulism, with West Virginia notably having an adult population that is 33.8 percent edentate. Photo – PRN Photo Desk, photodesk@prnewswire.com
  • Deficiencies in preventive programs. Thirteen states (26 percent) have upwards of 60 percent of their residents living in communities without water fluoridation (CWF), despite recognition for 68 years that this public health measure markedly reduces dental caries. Hawaii (89.2 percent) and New Jersey (86.5 percent) represent the highest rates of citizens unprotected by fluoridation, an unnecessary public peril.

Daily, 10,000 Americans retire and only 2 percent do so with a dental benefit plan. The State of Decay analysis provides a tool for states to use in addressing shortfalls in oral health status, dental professional access sites, dental benefits for low-income adults, and population-based prevention, all of which affect the oral health of older adults, the fastest growing segment of the American population.

To help older adults and their caregivers address oral health needs and overcome many of the barriers to accessing affordable dental care, OHA launched toothwisdom.org. The website is a first-of-its-kind online tool that connects older adults to dental care and educates on the importance of maintaining oral health with age. The American Dental Hygienists’ Association (ADHA) and Special Care Dentistry Association (SCDA) supported OHA and the launch of the website by encouraging their members to provide meaningful articles for the toothwisdom.org.

“Dental Hygienists have the opportunity to assist older Americans with the oral health challenges they may face as they age,”” said Ann Battrell, Executive Director, American Dental Hygienists’ Association. “We’re all committed to sharing the message that oral health matters and changing the common misperception that with age comes a decline in oral health.”

Few websites focus on oral and systemic health topics, and even fewer provide resources for older adult oral health. Toothwisdom.org offers oral care resources by state – including direct links to dental care, caregiving support, financial tools, social services, and transportation. It also shares the latest news and reliable health information from dental experts across the country on relevant oral health issues, the importance of continuing prevention with age, and the impact of oral health on overall health.

“My dental procedures have been very costly and I had to contact a social worker to help me understand my bills. Dental care should be more available and affordable because we know poor dental care affects overall health, which is particularly important for seniors,” said senior Patricia Cosgrove, a client of The Carter Burden Center for the Aging, Inc.  “Toothwisdom.org can help me find a community health center so I can finally get an affordable check-up and stay up-to-date on oral health information.”

A State of Decay and toothwisdom.org are part of Oral Health America’s Wisdom Tooth Project™, an initiative designed to meet the oral health challenges of a burgeoning population of older adults with special needs, chronic disease complications, and a growing inability to access and pay for dental services.

Links to the 2003 and 2013 editions of A State of Decay can be viewed on toothwisdom.org.

About OHA’s Wisdom Tooth Project
For 55 years, Oral Health America has been the leading national non-profit dedicated to improving the oral health and well-being of Americans throughout the entire spectrum of life. Over the decades, the organization has evolved and adapted to the dynamic nature of our country’s demographics and specific health needs. The Wisdom Tooth Project was born in 2010 due to the current and future implications of an aging population and the need for oral health resources for them mean that we must take meaningful action now.

About Oral Health America
OHA is a national, non-profit association dedicated to changing lives by connecting communities with resources to increase access to oral health care, education, and advocacy for all Americans, especially those most vulnerable. For more information about Oral Health America, please visit www.oralhealthamerica.org.

Study by Harvard Medical School Researchers Examines Senior Living’s Role in Changing Health Care System

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Individuals in senior living communities require an array of health and supportive services to maintain an optimum quality of life. Often, these older adults receive fragmented care through multiple providers and payers, resulting in unnecessary health care expenditures and lower quality-of-care. To address these challenges, Brookdale is partnering with researchers at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and other senior living industry peers to establish the Assisted Living Sector Healthcare Policy Research Fund.

“This support allows us to examine what role senior living providers have in the new models of care that have emerged under health care reform,” says David Grabowski, PhD, professor of health care policy at HMS, who is leading this research study.

Grabowski and his team will examine whether providing more comprehensive, coordinated services in the senior living sector reduces the need for Medicare-paid services and Medicaid-financed nursing home services.

According to Will Clark, Brookdale’s senior vice president of strategy and brand and a member of the HMS Health Care Policy Advisory Council, society’s ability to meet the needs of an aging population is an important political, economic, clinical, and social imperative.

“Harvard’s reputation for tackling some of health care’s biggest challenges and generating meaningful insights that shape our nation’s policy is unparalleled. We are confident Dr. Grabowski and his colleagues’ research will be influential in determining the appropriate role senior living can and should play in our evolving health care system,” Clark said.

Brookdale’s goals for this effort are to create awareness for the potential senior living has to positively impact the health, well-being and overall cost of care for seniors; to identify barriers to creating more integration among senior living and the health care system; influence policy; and identify innovative models that integrate senior living with our health care system.

The initiative is funded through a cumulative contribution of $150,000 from Brookdale and eight other senior living providers — Atria Senior Living, Elmcroft Senior Living, Emeritus Senior Living, Erickson Living, HCP, Inc., Health Care REIT, Inc., Sunrise Senior Living, and Ventas, Inc. Together, these organizations hope to begin a dialogue among health care providers, policy makers, regulators, and consumers on the value of senior living and its role in creating an integrated, outcomes-driven health care system.

The study will occur in two phases. The first phase will consist of analyzing the role of assisted living in new payment-delivery models and presenting a conceptual model of how an integrated model might work, as well as the opportunities and challenges associated with such an approach. Building on the results of the first phase, the second phase of the project will consist of primary data work and potentially the development of a pilot program.

For additional information about the study, contact David Cameron, HarvardMedicalSchool’s director of science communications, at 617-432-0441 or david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu.

For more information about Brookdale, visit www.brookdale.com.

Brookdale Senior Living Inc. is a leading owner and operator of senior living communities throughout the United States.  The Company is committed to providing senior living solutions within properties that are designed, purpose-built and operated with the highest-quality service, care and living accommodations for residents.  Currently, Brookdale operates independent living, assisted living, and dementia-care communities and continuing care retirement centers, with more than 650 communities in 36 states and the ability to serve approximately 67,000 residents.  Through its Innovative Senior Care program, the Company also offers a range of outpatient therapy, home health, personalized living and hospice services. For more information, visit http://www.brookdale.com.

Contact: Andrea Turner, 615-564-6829, aturner2@brookdaleliving.com

Keepsakes, Family Heirlooms Passed Down More Effectively with New Legacy Builder Tool Chest from LegacyStories.org

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Allianz American Legacy Studies researchers asked a group of Baby Boomers and their parents to rank on a scale of 1-10 (10 being most) what was more important to them when it comes to passing down an inheritance: values and life lessons or financial assets.

Perhaps not so surprisingly, the results showed that passing down values were over seven times more important than passing down valuables.

Yet only a small fraction of these three generations has made any provisions, mostly due to lack of awareness, education and the tools to do the job properly.

In addition to values and life lessons, a lot more should be included when building and passing down a legacy. Keepsakes and awards often represent defining moments and milestone events and can become family heirlooms when the stories behind their acquisitions are documented.

Identifying people in a select group of vintage family photos is one the best ways to document personal history, as some of the people in the old photos might as well be strangers to grandchildren. Those who grew up in the 20th century were first generations to record special events and moments.

Today’s digital technology offers a chance to pass down a purposeful legacy that will survive the ravages of time, and the experts at LegacyStories.org have developed an innovative Legacy Builder Tool Chest to help.

Consisting of fourteen drawers, each “toolkit” focuses on a specific legacy topic with interactive how-to guidebooks, downloadable forms, video tutorials and lots of helpful resources.

Toolkit topics include “Life Lessons and Values“, “Keepsakes & Heirlooms”, “Vintage Legacy Photos”, and one titled “Loved Ones in Care” to help caregivers build a legacy for victims of Alzheimer’s, people in hospice care, or seniors living in assisted or skilled nursing facilities.

“Since passing down life lessons and values is the highest priority, we provide members the ‘Life Lessons and Values’ toolkit at no cost,” says Tom Cormier, co-founder of LegacyStories.org. “Membership in LegacyStories.org is also free so there are no obstacles to prevent anyone from securing an honored place in family history. They just need to take action before regretting it.”

The Legacy Builder Tool Chest is also being recommended by financial advisors, estate planners and elder law attorneys as a means to engage with their clients in a purposeful way.

Content for the individual toolkits is contributed by top legacy experts including members of The International Assoc. of StoryKeepers (I-ASK) and the Association of Personal Historians (APH).

Our goal is to help people establish themselves as “effective elders” while they are alive, and to become “awesome ancestors” when they pass on,” Cormier states. “Our grandchildren and descendants will one day have an interest in learning about their family history. Because so few people will take the time to document their personal history, those who do will live on forever as their descendants’ go-to awesome ancestor.”

Contact info:
Tom Cormier — Co-founder
Phone: 423-295-5904
Email
Website: www.legacystories.org

Read more news from LegacyStories.org

AARP Report Highlights Need for Innovative Long-Term Care for the Aging Baby Boomer Population; Japan’s Technological Secrets May Hold the Answers

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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A newly published AARP report illustrates a profound demographic shift that will have consequences for decades to come, particularly in the senior living and long-term care industry. Baby boomers are entering their retirement years, while the ratio of potential family caregivers to those who require long-term services and support is beginning to drop. Fewer available caregivers will mean the senior living industry must rapidly adapt to a surging market. The AARP’s full report is available here: http://bit.ly/156phYi

Family caregiving is a low-cost but often burdensome approach to elder care. Becoming a primary caregiver often involves leaving behind a career, among other sacrifices. Plus, these well-intentioned caregivers may not have the expertise necessary to provide the level of care needed by an aged parent. Adults in these roles often feel enormous pressure and stress, sometimes even resentment. At any rate, the nation’s changing demographics will make today’s family caregiving situation far different in the near future.

Between 1990 and 2010, there were about 7 potential caregivers for every one person aged 80-plus. That ratio is at the start of a freefall that will force society to change the way it cares for its elderly members. By 2030, the ratio of caregivers to elderly will be 4 to 1. All remaining baby boomers will have reached their years of highest risk (80+) by 2050, when the caregiver ratio will have plummeted still further to 3 to 1.

Kevin Williams, president of SeniorMarketing.com, suggests innovative thinking will be required to bridge this care gap: “Naturally, with fewer family caregivers available, the responsibility will largely shift to senior living communities, care agencies and already overextended government programs. But it will take more than simply building more communities or training more staff—assuming an adequate number of candidates are even available. Technological innovation may be the silver bullet to raise the standard of living for aging boomers, improve efficiency, and reduce costs.”

The nation of Japan, which has the greatest life expectancy and one of the oldest average populations in the world, has recently experienced a demographic transition of its own. Recently, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare put out a call for 2 million new professional caregivers, but only received 1.3 million eligible candidates. With low birth rates being the norm, that shortfall will only increase. A tech-savvy society to begin with, the Japanese have embraced robotics and automation as a solution to the elder care issue. Motorized, assistive devices can help older individuals perform tasks themselves, while automated pill dispensers can prevent dangerous medication mistakes. A recent blog post on The Economist explained Japan’s inventive approach to the elder care dilemma: http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2013/05/automation-elderly

Williams concluded: “This demographic shift is a great challenge but also a great opportunity. Forward-thinking, entrepreneurs will be leading the way in this new environment. Technology to assist with daily tasks, provide medical care, monitor, and connect seniors to loved ones is advancing at a faster pace every year. It’s not unreasonable to predict that the future will witness even better care for our future seniors.”

About SeniorMarketing.com

Baltimore-based SeniorMarketing.com was created with twin goals in mind. First, the company helps connect caregivers and seniors with local, affordable care options. Second, the company increases income for senior living communities and health care agencies.

Contact:

Kevin M. Williams, President
SeniorMarketing.com
5024 Campbell Blvd., Suite D-3
Baltimore, MD 21236
Phone: 1-888-523-3311

Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

National Council on Aging Launches Second Year of Education Program for Older Adults and Those Who Care for Them Aimed at Helping to Protect More Older Adults from the Flu

Actor Lee Majors, best known for his iconic roles on The Big Valley, The Fall Guy, and The Six Million Dollar Man, is joining the National Council on Aging (NCOA) Flu + You program to help protect older adults from influenza (commonly known as “the flu”). Flu + You aims to inform adults 65 and older, their caregivers, and those who care about them, about the dangers of the flu, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options.

As a part of his involvement in the Flu + You campaign, Majors will appear in a public service announcement (PSA) that follows him as he embarks on an important and action-packed mission: learning about his vaccine options and getting vaccinated against the flu. The PSA will educate the public about the increased risk of flu in adults 65 years of age and older and the importance of knowing your vaccine options and getting a flu vaccine, even for tough guys like Majors.

Every year in the United States, roughly nine out of 10 flu-related deaths and more than six out of 10 flu-related hospitalizations occur in people 65 and older. Older adults are at a greater risk for flu due, in part, to the weakening of the immune system that typically occurs with age. This means that no matter how healthy or youthful we feel, as we age we become more vulnerable to the flu and its related complications.

“The CDC recommends an annual flu vaccine as the single best way to protect yourself from the flu, yet a third of people 65 and older still don’t get vaccinated,” said Richard Birkel, PhD, MPA, NCOA Senior Vice President for Healthy Aging and Director of NCOA’s Self-Management Alliance. “As NCOA continues to educate older adults about the flu and the potential severity of the illness, we hope to encourage more people to protect themselves and their loved ones by getting an annual flu shot.”

The flu vaccine offers the best defense to protect against the flu, and adults 65 years of age and older have several vaccine options. In addition to the traditional flu vaccine (which helps protect against three strains of the flu virus), there is also a quadrivalent vaccine (which helps protect against four strains), and a higher dose vaccine that was designed specifically for adults 65 and older. By improving the production of antibodies in older patients, the higher dose vaccine can provide a stronger immune response to the flu than traditional vaccines. All flu vaccines are covered as a Medicare Part B benefit, which means there is no copay for Medicare beneficiaries 65 years of age and older.

“I get the flu shot every year and encourage my peers to do the same – it’s a simple step you can take to protect yourself from the flu,” says actor Lee Majors.  “I urge everyone 65 years of age and older to talk to their health care provider about their vaccine options this flu season.”

The flu can make existing health conditions worse, and it is especially dangerous for people with lung disease, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer—conditions that commonly affect older adults. Nationwide, 86 percent of adults 65 years of age and older have at least one chronic health condition and approximately 66 percent of Medicare beneficiaries have two or more chronic conditions, putting them at increased risk of the flu and flu-related complications, which can be severe and include hospitalization and even death.

For more facts about flu, and to order free educational materials, including a brochure and fact sheet, visit www.ncoa.org/Flu.

About Flu + You
Flu + You is a national public education initiative, from the National Council on Aging with support from Sanofi Pasteur, to educate adults 65 years and older about the dangers of the influenza virus, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options. Older adults and their caregivers can learn more on the Flu + You website, www.ncoa.org/Flu, which features a public service announcement with Lee Majors and facts about the flu. Also available on the website is a calendar of Flu + You events that will be held in 12 cities throughout the United States in September and October. At the events, older adults will have the opportunity to learn more about their risks for flu and available vaccine options, as well as talk to a health care provider and receive a flu vaccination.

About NCOA
The National Council on Aging is a nonprofit service and advocacy organization headquartered in Washington, DC. NCOA is a national voice for millions of older adults—especially those who are vulnerable and disadvantaged—and the community organizations that serve them. It brings together nonprofit organizations, businesses, and government to develop creative solutions that improve the lives of all older adults. NCOA works with thousands of organizations across the country to help seniors find jobs and benefits, improve their health, live independently, and remain active in their communities. For more information, please visit:

www.NCOA.org | www.facebook.com/NCOAging | www.twitter.com/NCOAging

 

CONTACT: Dana Kinker, (212) 301-7181, dkinker@wcgworld.com

105-Year-Old Woman Surprised With New Car from Anonymous Fan

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

105-Year-Old Woman Surprised With New Car from Anonymous Fan

Gift enables California’s oldest driver to continue volunteering regularly at Direct Relief

California’s oldest driver, 105-year-old Edythe Kirchmaier, received a big surprise when she was gifted a brand new car from an anonymous fan.

Kirchmaier has a perfect 86-year driving record with no accidents, parking, or moving violations. She renewed her driver’s license this January after passing her test with flying colors.

The longtime Santa Barbara resident garnered international attention earlier this year with appearances on The Ellen DeGeneres Show, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, and Access Hollywood Live in which she inspired the world to make a difference by raising awareness for her beloved charity, Direct Relief.

As the oldest registered Facebook user, Kirchmaier’s 105th birthday wish was to get 105,000 people to like Direct Relief’s Facebook page by lighting a candle on the world’s largest virtual birthday cake that the humanitarian organization created for her.

Kirchmaier was given a brand new 2013 Honda Civic after the anonymous fan heard her 1997 minivan was having lots of break downs and needing many repairs, jeopardizing her ability to continue volunteering at Direct Relief, as she has for the past 40 years.

Driving since she was 19, Kirchmaier learned to drive on a Ford Model T.  

About Direct Relief
Direct Relief is a leading medical relief organization, active in all 50 states and in 70 countries. It works with more than 1,000 health clinics across the U.S. to assist in emergencies and an ongoing basis, providing them with free medications for people in need. The organization has been among the world’s largest medical suppliers in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake, has top charity ratings, including four-star and “top-notch” rating from Charity Navigator, and a 99% fundraising efficiency rating from Forbes magazine. For more information visit www.DirectRelief.org.

CONTACT:
Kerri Murray, (805) 452-7599
kmurray@directrelief.org

Deserving Senior Caregivers to be Rewarded through “Caring for the Caregiver” Program Sponsored by Twilight Wish Foundation and Parentgiving

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Deserving Senior Caregivers to be Rewarded through “Caring for the Caregiver” Program Sponsored by Twilight Wish Foundation and Parentgiving

Caregiver nominations taken online at www.twilightwish.org until October 15

The national nonprofit Twilight Wish Foundation and Parentgiving are pleased to announce the “Caring for the Caregiver” award. According to a recently released Bureau of Labor Statistics survey, over 39 million Americans provide hours of unpaid care to someone over the age of 65. Caregivers often struggle with their own physical, financial and mental needs. This program was created to recognize and reward these deserving senior caregivers who often put their own needs last by providing a respite from caregiving duties.

“Often, caregivers are seen as hidden patients themselves,” said Cass Forkin, founder of Twilight Wish. “Although caregiving is a labor of love to many, the stress and strain of providing around-the- clock care often takes a toll on the caregivers, both mentally and physically.”

According to David Spain, CEO of Parentgiving, many caregivers are often not able to get the break from their responsibilities that they need. “This program offers caregivers the chance to relax and rejuvenate, away from their daily duties,” said Spain. “We want them to know that their selfless contributions and dedication are appreciated.”

Twilight Wish and Parentgiving chose August 21 to launch “Caring for the Caregiver” because it’s National Senior Citizens Day, first proclaimed by President Ronald Reagan in 1988. “Older citizens are reinforcing their historical roles as leaders and as links with our patrimony and sense of purpose as individuals and as a Nation,” said the late president.

Anyone can nominate a deserving caregiver by filling out an application at www.twilightwish.org.  Caregivers can nominate themselves. Entries will be accepted through October 15, 2013. The winner will be notified in early November 2013. The “Caring for the Caregiver” award may be a two-night hotel stay, restaurant meal(s), spa treatment(s), or tickets to an event or any combination of these as chosen by the award winner. The winner will also receive free in-home caregiving services from a local senior homecare organization, ensuring a worry-free getaway.

Twilight Wish Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit charitable organization whose mission is to honor and enrich the lives of deserving seniors through wish granting celebrations that connect generations. Since its founding in 2003, Twilight Wish has granted over 1,931 individual wishes to deserving, low-income seniors, thanks to volunteers, corporate and community involvement, and donations. Recent wishes granted include a visit from a string band for a nursing home resident’s 89th birthday, transporting a nursing home resident to Christmas Eve dinner with family, and hearing aids for an Army veteran who wished to be able to hear his grandchildren’s voices. For more, visit www.twilightwish.org.

Parentgiving.com is a leading online destination for seniors and their caregivers, offering a wealth of information on eldercare, news, Q&As with experts, and healthy aging resources as well as a store with thousands of homecare products and medical supplies, delivered right to the home. Bestsellers include walkers, bed rails, bath safety bars, incontinence supplies, and daily living aids. For more, visit www.Parentgiving.com. For more about Parentgiving’s mission, contact Julie Davis at 203-984-4424.

For more about the “Caring for the Caregiver Award,” contact Mary Farrell, Twilight Wish Director of Community Relations, 215-230-8777 ext. 103

Read more news from Parentgiving

Fraudbuster Reports from Fraud Protection Network Can Protect Senior Citizens from Financial Losses

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Fraudbuster Reports from Fraud Protection Network Can Protect Senior Citizens from Financial Losses

New services are designed to offer added protections for the vulnerable senior citizen market and will provide guidance and help for these at-risk individuals.

The launch of Fraudbuster Reports by leading consumer and investor protection services firm Fraud Protection Network (FPN) is designed to help senior citizens avoid falling prey to common scams and fraudulent schemes in the consumer marketplace. Due to the prevalence of these types of crimes, the National Council on Aging has called scams that target seniors “the crime of the 21st Century.” FPN’s full line of services can provide guidance and support for older individuals and couples in avoiding fraudulent transactions and protecting themselves against financial scammers.

 

Each year, older Americans lose billions of dollars to sham investments, dishonest commercial transactions and outright scams.

  • Major insurer MetLife estimates that individuals over 60 years of age experienced losses of nearly $3 billion due to scams, frauds and sham investments in 2010. This represents a 10 percent increase over similar loses in 2009.
  • According to research performed by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, the average amount lost by senior citizens to these fraudulent transactions is $141,000.
  • Figures released by the Federal Trade Commission indicate that older Americans lose an estimated $35 million each year trying to claim fake lottery and sweepstakes prizes.

Senior citizens may be especially vulnerable to certain types of fraud that include the following tactics:

  • Healthcare scams that bill insurers for services not rendered or not needed
  • Counterfeit prescription medications that can actually harm patients when used as directed
  • Fake lottery and sweepstakes prizes that solicit a small advance cash payment to claim a much larger sum
  • Reverse mortgages from disreputable or unknown companies

These fraudulent schemes are among the most common scams that target senior citizens in the U.S. The Fraudbuster Reports service can be used to check out any company that offers services or provides investment opportunities for senior citizens. Fraudbuster Reports from FPN can be used to obtain a wide range of data on potential investments and retirement plans:

Protections for Consumers:

  • Comprehensive identity and background checks on businesses that target the senior citizen market, especially medical insurance plans, reverse mortgage offers and online prescription medication companies
  • Assessment and evaluation of online complaints to verify their credibility
  • Licensing checks to ensure proper federal and state credentials and business licenses
  • Contact with listed corporate references to ensure the authenticity of companies that offer services to older individuals

Senior citizens also receive personalized services from their own personal account executive to streamline the investigative process and ensure a comfortable working relationship.

Protections for Investors:

  • Due diligence investigations that identify primary stockholders and officers for companies and that disclose liens, judgments, pending charges and bankruptcies
  • In-depth evaluation of all information provided to senior citizens regarding the investment opportunities
  • Previous and current employment histories for company officers and board members
  • License checks for brokers to ensure appropriate state and federal licensing and to identify any areas of concern in the brokerage history
  • Reference checks and financial data for brokers and investment advisors
  • Investor protections also include all features available in the consumer protection tier

FPN does not evaluate the likely profitability of investments. However, the services rendered by FPN can help senior citizens avoid fraudulent investment schemes that offer no chance of financial gain.

To promote these new services and the launch of Fraudbuster Reports, FPN has begun a major media push that includes advertising spots on major networks that include CNBC, Fox News, Fox Business, MSNBC, CNN and CNN Headline News and Bloomberg TV. The commercial can also be viewed online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ocieWK1hDq8.

About Fraud Protection Network:
Since its founding in 2012, FPN has provided advanced investigative services to help clients avoid being taken in by scammers and fraudulent companies. Because senior citizens are especially vulnerable to these dishonest schemes, FPN provides an exceptional range of services that are specifically designed to prevent scammers from preying on older Americans. The newly released Fraudbuster Reports products will offer even more protection for these at-risk individuals and can ensure a brighter financial future for senior citizens.

Contact:
Fraud Protection Network
Raul Martinez, COO
raulm@fraudprotectionnetworkinc.com
855-203-0683
www.fraudprotectionnetworkinc.com

Video with caption: “Fraud Protection Network TV Ads.” Video available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ocieWK1hDq8

Convenience and Product Selection Encourage More People to Manage Incontinence Online, Parentgiving.com Survey Reveals

July 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Convenience and Product Selection Encourage More People to Manage Incontinence Online, Parentgiving.com Survey Reveals

For the first time in its five-year history, the senior wellness site Parentgiving.com conducted an opinion survey on incontinence, reaching out to nearly 5,000 of its customers who shop for self-care products in this category. The focus was to learn how people best cope with incontinence and if a greater awareness about it as a medical issue has erased its stigma and prompted more people to talk to their doctors about treatment. Respondents were also asked to share both their frustrations and their strategies for maintaining quality of life.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130724/PH51806LOGO)

Results show that progress is being made. Slightly over 70 percent have talked to their healthcare provider about incontinence—many of them are taking or have tried medications, and a few have had surgical procedures.

But nearly 30 percent of respondents have still not sought medical attention. Reasons are varied. A few people still feel too embarrassed to bring it up, even in front of a doctor, while some assume it’s just a normal part of old age (it’s not!) or don’t know that there are treatments that might help. Others say they have more life-threatening medical issues, from diabetes to stroke recovery, that take precedence when they’re at the doctor’s office. For a few, the possibility of yet another medication to add to their existing regimen would be financially out of the question.

More Key Points From the Parentgiving Survey

* Fear of accidents is the top concern.
Two-thirds of respondents ranked this as their number one worry. The lack of product selection came in second at 21%. People want more product choices, which will, in turn, help them feel more secure about avoiding accidents.

* Online is the way people want to buy products.
Nearly 46% buy products online where they can get the widest selection and have anonymity.

* Absorbency is the key feature in choosing products.
An overwhelming 81% ranked this first. Information on a product’s absorbency should be front and center on product descriptions, say the respondents. Comfort ranked second and the ability to buy a product online ranked a strong third at 36%, above both cost and anatomical design of items.

* Many people are satisfied with their incontinence products. In fact, 40% are very satisfied. However 44% are only somewhat satisfied—there’s room for better education about products to help people find those that are more effective for them and the respondents had numerous suggestions for incontinence product manufacturers to improve styles.

For complete survey results, go to http://www.parentgiving.com/elder-care/incontinence-survey-results/. There is also a companion article, “Survey Says: 50 Top Strategies for Managing Incontinence,” featuring respondents’ experiences and suggestions at http://www.parentgiving.com/elder-care/survey-says-50-top-strategies-for-managing-incontinence/. For more information, please contact Julie Davis, Chief Content Officer at 203-984-4424 or email.

About Parentgiving. Parentgiving.com is the online destination dedicated to the health and wellness needs of seniors and their caregivers. A comprehensive website, Parentgiving offers hundreds of informative articles on eldercare, plus Q&As with experts on healthy aging. The Parentgiving Store sells find thousands of products from medical supplies to practical tools for the activities of daily living. Everything can be ordered by phone or online with fast shipping right to the senior. For more information please visit www.Parentgiving.com or follow us on Twitter.

Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads

June 5, 2013 by · Comments Off on Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads
Filed under: Articles 

Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads

BOSTON, May 2, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Mother’s and Father’s Day celebrations are approaching, yet millions of adult children care for parents year round while on the brink of burnout.  Catapulted into the accidental caregiver role without warning, stressed-out kids are doing their best to hold life together when everything seems to be falling apart.

Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom issues a timely warning. “You must seek support as a caregiver.  The life you save may be your own.”

Bloom offers practical coping strategies to help family caregivers recharge their energy and avoid burnout during a free monthly Caregiving Power Hour.  During these tele-sessions, caregivers get tactical solutions to get through the week ahead.  Bloom wants to inspire and train caregivers to provide quality support for their loved ones while fully living their own lives.

“It’s coaching, community, and caring in the gift of an hour of sacred time that can really make a difference,” Bloom says.

Bloom knows the stressful caregiving journey well.  He served as the primary, live-in caregiver for his parents during their final years.  His father passed away in 2009 and, after a courageous battle with cancer, Bloom’s mother passed away in his loving arms on Mother’s Day 2012.

“Caregivers put the well-being of loved ones first which can mean putting their own needs and plans on the back burner.  The regret for career or life enhancing opportunities not taken can be a bitter pill to swallow,” Bloom says.

He honors the legacy of his parents by sharing key steps along the roadmap to caregiving without regret.

  1. Release Crisis Mode. Stop being a victim to circumstances so you feel stronger and become laser-focused to meet your family’s needs.  Supporting loved ones through medical challenges is overwhelming and scary.  When you become aware that feeling like a victim or in a state of crisis is a mindset, you can successfully shift back into taking control and positive action.
  2. Overcome Conflict.  Communicate and cope with calm and clarity. Otherwise, you will crash while riding the emotional roller coaster associated with disability or disease. Mastering your own trigger points for anger and frustration will lead you to deal effectively with the most challenging people and circumstances in your life.
  3. Achieve Buy-In. Motivate others to contribute based upon their individual abilities, preferences, and talents so your loved one receives the most satisfying support possible.  Giving others choices for how they can serve will foster their desire to gladly help on a regular basis.
  4. Deliver Greatness and Compassion in Equal Doses.  Become the inspiring caregiver that people cheer for and gladly support in meaningful ways.  Let your compassion shine through in all actions as you support your loved one.  Devote equal time for self-care so you have the energy to let your best shine through even during tough times.
  5. Magnetize and Motivate Talent. Create an atmosphere that attracts and retains the best people to join your loved one’s care team and experience brilliant performance.  Stay positive and open to the opinions of others so you can facilitate options for the best care and support.
  6. Access Intuition.  Trust your instincts and let your care and dedication guide your decisions.  Share any concerns and questions with key support professionals.  It is better to explore a concern that proves to be okay rather than ignore something that could be life threatening.
  7. Put Chocolate in Your Pill Box.  Find ways to fuel your soul so you can thrive during the caregiver journey and develop the passion and purpose for your life beyond caregiving.  Dose yourself regularly to avoid burnout while creating enduring satisfaction and success.

About Certified Professional Coach and Energy Leadership™ Master Practitioner A. Michael Bloom

Since 2011, A. Michael Bloom has revitalized the careers of hundreds of family and professional caregivers with practical, tactical soul-saving coping strategies that support them in saving lives – including their own.  An in-demand New England speaker, workshop leader, and coach, Bloom has influenced hundreds of caregivers to follow a roadmap to avoid burnout and recharge their caregiving energy.  The author of the forthcoming book, The Accidental Caregivers Survival Guide: Your Roadmap to Caregiving Without Regret, Bloom welcomes media interviews, speaking engagements, and the opportunity to inspire caregivers around the world via his monthly Caregiving Power Hours.  Learn more at http://www.bloomforcoach.com/powerhour/.

Betty White’s “Off Their Rockers” TV Show Is Demeaning to Older People, Says Octogenarian Anti-Aging Expert Barbara Morris

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Betty White’s “Off Their Rockers” TV Show Is Demeaning to Older People, Says Octogenarian Anti-Aging Expert Barbara Morris

ESCONDIDO, Calif., May 2, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — While everyone loves Betty White, not everybody loves her TV show, “Off Their Rockers” according to octogenarian anti-aging expert Barbara Morris, editor, and publisher of the online Put Old on Hold Journal and e-Magazine.

(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130502/PH05987-a )
(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130502/PH05987-b )

Morris, author of Put Old on Hold, a book acclaimed by Florence Henderson and other celebrities for its non-traditional approach to aging, says that while she admires Betty White’s energy and creative ability, the premise of “Off Their Rockers” is so distasteful that Morris doesn’t understand why Betty can’t see that she is not doing old people a favor with the show’s premise of seniors pulling pranks on unsuspecting folks. The “unsuspecting folks” are usually embarrassed young people. “The whole idea is embarrassing to a lot of us older folks, too,” says Barbara Morris.

“Why did Betty decide to do this show?” asks Ms. Morris. “Is it because she is so confident and so vibrant that she can’t understand that most of her audience doesn’t grasp that she is trying to spoof the pathetic stereotype of “old” and see it as confirming it instead? Maybe she is so focused on getting a laugh that she doesn’t see the damage she’s doing.”

“Regardless of her reason to create this misguided show and no matter how good her reason, it’s still damaging to all of us who ever get old enough to fall prey to the ‘old people eventually lose it’ stereotype,” asserts Morris. “She is undoing the very thing that we love her for–being vibrant and funny and “with it” in her 90’s.”

Morris continued, “We appreciate and applaud Betty White. But she needs to give us respect in return. Participating in a show that’s demeaning to older people is simply not the right thing to do. In so many ways Betty could use her talent, energy, and experience to choose projects that more accurately reflect the caliber, talent and continued competence of old people.” In the meantime, says Morris, “It’s time to retire “Off Their Rockers.” It never belonged on the air in the first place.”

Barbara Morris, 84, is a pharmacist, writer, and anti-aging expert who lives the productive lifestyle she advocates. In addition to her monthly Put Old on Hold Journal and e-Magazine her books include Put Old on Hold, No More Little Old Ladies, Why, Boomer Women Become Their Mothers, and I’m Not Goin’ There!  Click here for the full critique of “Off Their Rockers

Caring.com’s New Referral Program Supported by Leading Assisted Living Operators

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Caring.com’s New Referral Program Supported by Leading Assisted Living Operators

Caring.com Named Preferred Provider by Assisted Living Federation of America (ALFA)

SAN MATEO, Calif., May 6, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — A group of the nation’s largest senior living providers — including Brookdale Senior Living (NYSE: BKD), Emeritus Senior Living (NYSE: ESC), Benchmark Senior Living, and Senior Star — have chosen Caring.com as their agency of record for national buying of Internet leads for families looking for housing and care for their elderly loved ones. Separately, the Assisted Living Federation of America (ALFA) named Caring.com as its preferred partner for Internet marketing services.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20070921/AQF020LOGO)

With surging demand in the U.S. senior housing market, more Americans than ever before are turning to the Internet and online word of mouth to find and select the best senior living providers for their senior loved ones. About 30-50% of the senior living industry’s leads are coming from the Internet and that number is expected to rise, as tech adoption among baby boomers and seniors alike continues to increase. Whether seeking independent livingassisted living, or memory care, about two million consumers every month turn to Caring.com to find expert guidance about their options, research local providers, and get help in making well-informed selection decisions.

The country’s top senior living providers have chosen Caring.com to increase visibility of their senior living communities, optimize inquiry-to-visit rates, and leverage Caring.com’s resources to better nurture leads from the moment the search begins, through the research and decision-making phases, all the way to community selection and move-in.

In Q4-2012, Caring.com expanded its service offering with the launch of a new toll-free referral help line. Available seven days a week to those seeking senior housing, Caring.com’s family advisors explain different types of senior living options, help identify local senior communities matched to the prospective resident’s needs and preferences, schedule tours, share and encourage consumer reviews, and answer a range of senior living questions. With this added consumer support infrastructure, as well as other new and expanded capabilities for lead qualification and nurturing, the group of senior living community partners announced Caring.com as the agency of record for lead qualification and development, starting January 1. The help line is now referring nearly four thousand prospective residents per week.

“Caring.com has been great to work with as they’ve added the referral model to their business,” said Jayne Sallerson, executive vice president of sales and marketing at Emeritus Senior Living. “Emeritus wanted to consolidate our Internet lead buying with a company we could trust, and Caring.com has demonstrated their commitment to consumers, to us, and to the industry. Their new program is showing positive signs of increased tours and conversions.”

“Caring.com has proven themselves to be a strong partner for Brookdale,” said Jim Pusateri, senior vice president of sales at Brookdale Senior Living. “Working with fewer Internet lead sources has improved our operational efficiencies, lowered our marketing costs, and improved consumers’ experience with Brookdale Senior Living.”

Separately, ALFA, the largest national association of providers of professionally managed communities for seniors, signed Caring.com as its preferred provider for Web-based lead services as well as to power the organization’s new ALFA Senior Living Community Directory.

“Caring.com is our preferred provider of Web-based services because they are an exceptional online resource,” said Richard P. Grimes, president and CEO of ALFA, which is the largest national association exclusively dedicated to professionally managed, consumer-driven senior living communities. “Caring.com’s high-quality content, easy-to-use directory, and online reviews help prospective residents and their families find the right solutions for their needs — this is good for consumers and good for senior living.”

“From the beginning, we’ve focused on building the most comprehensive and most credible online resource to help those caring for a senior parent, spouse, or other loved one,” says Andy Cohen, co-founder and CEO of Caring.com. “Unlike some other Internet resources that will only share information about those providers who pay them, we’ve stayed true to our social mission and help connect consumers to a variety of quality resources for their needs. Working with ALFA and the leading senior living communities helps enable our ability to best serve those in need of senior care — and we continue to offer referral to free and low-cost support resources as well.”

More information for senior living providers interested in partnering with Caring.com is available here: http://providerinfo.caring.com/ProviderGetListed.html Consumers can begin their search for senior housing here: http://www.caring.com/local

About Caring.com
Caring.com is the leading website for family caregivers seeking information and support as they care for aging parents, spouses, and other loved ones. Caring.com provides helpful caregiving content,online support groups, and the most comprehensive Senior Care Directory in the United States, with 35,000 consumer ratings and reviews and a toll-free senior living referral line (1-866-824-8174). In January 2012, Caring.com launched the Caring Stars award program recognizing America’s best assisted living communities based on consumer reviews. This year, 383 communities in 40 states were named the Caring Stars of 2013. Based in San Mateo, California, Caring.com is a private company funded by DCM, Intel Capital, Shasta Ventures, and Split Rock Partners. Connect with Caring.com onFacebookTwitterGoogle+, PinterestLinkedIn and/or YouTube.

CONTACT: PR@caring.com, 650-762-8190

Advocacy Service for People 50 Plus

April 22, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events 

Advocacy Service for People 50 Plus

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif., April 18, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — 50 Plus Disability is an advocacy service for people 50 years of age and older who want their Social Security disability benefits. 50 Plus Disability is the only organization in the United States that provides this kind of advocacy only for individuals 50 years of age and older.

50 Plus Disability is a service organization and comprehensive disability resource for people 50 years of age and older. The purpose of this organization is to obtain Social Security disability benefits for people 50 years of age and older. 50 Plus Disability is headquartered in Beverly Hills , California . The organization services individuals in California and throughout the United States .

50 Plus Disability is comprised of highly experienced advocates and top-level executives. These individuals work in teams to prepare the strategy needed to obtain Social Security disability benefits for people 50 years of age and older. 50 Plus Disability’s goal is to obtain Social Security disability benefits without the need for a hearing. However, if a hearing is required, one of the seasoned advocates will be present with you and for you at your hearing.

50 Plus Disability recognized the special needs of individuals 50 years of age and older. This recognition has had a large influence on all aspects of the organization. The philosophy of the organization is one of service to individuals 50 years of age and older.

50 Plus Disability makes it easy for individuals 50 years of age and older to obtain valuable income and medical benefits.

For more information, contact Alex Hughes, Director of Public Assistance for 50 Plus Disability, at 1-800-PLUS-FIX.

ConnectMyFolks iPad App Offers New Way For Tech-Resistant Seniors To Connect With Family, Friends

April 22, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events 

ConnectMyFolks iPad App Offers New Way For Tech-Resistant Seniors To Connect With Family, Friends

EUGENE, Ore., April 18, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — A new iPad app that’s free to download and use will keep technologically challenged seniors in safe, simple and easy electronic touch with their friends, children and grandchildren. ConnectMyFolks delivers email, texts, photos and videos instantly to technophobes of all ages, although it’s designed to be used by people 65 and older. It is now available in the App Store.

Email and texting have replaced letter writing and phone calls for most people, and that leaves seniors out of the loop, says ConnectMyFolks co-founder Steve Lee. “If someone’s not able to get email or texts, they can end up isolated from their own family,” Lee says. “These days if you’re not receiving emails or texts, you’re left behind.”

Although the nation’s tech-savvy population is aging and bringing its expertise with it, the 85-year-old and up age category is the fastest growing demographic in the United States . Many of these seniors never acquired tech skills and are often intimidated by computers and smart phones.

ConnectMyFolks is simple and secure. Only people on the senior’s approved list can communicate through the app. That eliminates spam, scammers and other threats. “Whether it’s a nephew who’s always asking for money, or it’s a random phishing attempt, those emails won’t get through,” Lee says.

Housed on the intuitive iPad, ConnectMyFolks is designed for people easily overwhelmed by traditional tech devices. It launches with three big buttons – one for mail, one for pictures and one for videos. Forward, back and home buttons make navigation simple. “You absolutely cannot get lost in this app,” Lee says. “You can’t break it. When it doubt, just ‘go home.'”

A key feature is the simple web-based admin panel, where a designated friend or relative can set up the senior’s approved ConnectMyFolks sender list, select reply options based on the senior’s needs (pre-set replies, typed emails or voice recordings) and make adjustments to font sizes and other interface settings.

The app is expected to be popular in part because families are so geographically scattered. Even grown children who take care of their folks are often helping from afar, according to the US Census Bureau, which reports 7 million to 10 million adults care for their aging parents long distance.

ConnectMyFolks was developed by In the Loop, a Eugene , Oregon , company devoted to the use of technology to solve everyday challenges faced by modern families. Learn more at www.connectmyfolks.com.

AARP: George Davis Appointed AARP State President

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

George Davis Appointed AARP State President

African-American Business Executive is Top Advocate for AARP’s 3.1 million members California

PASADENA, Calif., April 3, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — George Davis of Los Angeles, CA, has been appointed AARP California State President. Prior
to his appointment, Davis was acting state president and served for two
years on the state’s Executive Council, a five-member council that provides
direction and leadership in carrying out AARP’s strategic priorities in
California.

Davis came to AARP as a distinguished executive in the broadcasting and
entertainment industry.  He is currently Principal of Davis Broadband Group, a Culver City based consulting firm that advises media and entertainment
companies on digital content distribution.  Earlier in his career, Davis was
managing television technical operations in the US and Asia at Technicolor
and Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Throughout his career, Davis has been actively involved in
community and public service.  In 1999, he was appointed by Governor Pete
Wilson to the board of the California African American Museum.  A few years
later Davis was appointed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to represent the
public as a member of the Board of Governors of the California State Bar.  He
is also a board member of New Directions, a nonprofit organization that helps
homeless veterans.

As volunteer state president, Davis will lead the California Executive Council and work in partnership with State Director Katie Hirning and in collaboration with other volunteers and staff to achieve AARP’s strategic priorities in the state.

“We are thrilled to have George as our new state president,” said State Director Katie Hirning. “He’s a long-time advocate for small businesses and a strong supporter of
technology and outreach to diverse populations.  His knowledge and experience
in these areas will greatly benefit AARP’s more than 3 million California
members.”

Davis is an avid hiker and enjoys collecting rare books when traveling abroad.  He resides in Los Angeles and has two adult daughters and a son attending college.

AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, with a membership of more than 37 million, that helps people turn their goals and dreams into real possibilities, strengthens communities and fights for the issues that matter most to families such as healthcare,
employment security and retirement planning. We advocate for consumers in the
marketplace by selecting products and services of high quality and value to carry the AARP name as well as help our members obtain discounts on a wide range of products, travel, and services.  A trusted source for lifestyle tips, news and educational information, AARP produces AARP The Magazine, the world’s largestcirculation magazine; AARP Bulletin; www.aarp.org

AARP TV & Radio; AARP Books; and AARP en Espanol, a bilingual news source.  AARP does not endorse candidates for public office or make contributions to political campaigns or candidates.  The AARP Foundation is an affiliated charity that provides security, protection, and empowerment to older persons in need with support from thousands of volunteers, donors, and sponsors. AARP has staffed offices in all 50 states, the District of
Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Learn more at www.aarp.org

.

CFP Board Releases Guide for Protecting Older Americans from Financial Abuse

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

“Financial Self-Defense for Seniors” Describes “Red Flags” and Tips For Avoiding Scams

Older Americans are too often victims of financial fraud and abuse.  Recognizing this unfortunate trend, Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. today released a free guide, Financial Self-Defense for Seniors, which is informed by recent survey data on senior financial exploitation, to help older Americans and their families identify the warning signs of financial abuse and to better protect themselves and their loved ones.

“CFP Board remains deeply concerned about incidents of consumers – particularly senior citizens – being misled by those claiming to be trusted financial professionals,” said CFP Board CEO Kevin R. Keller, CAE.  “This guide to financial self-defense will help protect seniors from abusive, fraudulent and unethical financial practices.”

Financial Self-Defense for Seniors was written by CFP Board Consumer Advocate Eleanor Blayney, CFP®. It describes 10 “Red Flags” – common situations in which older Americans are vulnerable to financial abuse – and provides warning signs of financial abuse; real-life situations in which seniors are often taken advantage of; and advice for guarding against such abuse.

The 10 fundamental tips for seniors confronting typical “Red Flags” include:

  1. Look beyond the letters after a financial adviser’s name.
  2. If you don’t understand what’s being sold, don’t buy it.
  3. There’s no such thing as a free lunch.
  4. Just because a so-called expert recommends it, doesn’t mean it is right for you.
  5. If it sounds too good to be true, it’s probably not legitimate or safe.
  6. Don’t confuse familiarity with trust.
  7. The final sign-off should always be yours.
  8. Make sure the money others are making isn’t yours.
  9. Get the full story: who gains the most – you or the financial professional?
  10. You have rights as a homeowner.  Know them.

The guide draws upon CFP Board’s 2012 Senior Financial Exploitation Survey of more than 2,600 CFP® professionals, which found that more than half had personally worked with an older client who had been subject to unfair, deceptive or abusive financial practices in the delivery of financial advice or the sale of financial products.  Participating CFP® professionals estimated that only five percent of senior citizens actually report such financial abuse.

The survey also found that CFP® professionals were aware of a variety of abusive practices in the delivery of financial advice or the sale of financial products, including some practices that could violate state and federal regulations:

  • Nearly three-quarters (73%) were aware of older investors who have been invited to “free meal” seminars that were actually sales pitches;
  • 58% were aware of older investors who have received unsolicited pitches for financial products or services;
  • Nearly three-quarters (74%) of CFP® professionals were aware of older investors who have been offered unsuitable financial products; and
  • 58% were aware of older investors who have been subject to omission of material facts about financial products.

“CFP Board wants to shine a bright light on those who seek to abuse older Americans so that all seniors and their families can defend themselves against scammers,” Blayney said.  “Seniors have contributed so much to our families, communities and our country. We owe them our thanks, but also our protection, so that they may live out their remaining years in financial security.”

Financial Self-Defense for Seniors is part of CFP Board’s series of financial self-defense guides, including the Consumer Guide to Financial Self-Defense, released in 2010. The U.S. General Services Administration’s (GSA) will include the guide in its Fall 2013 Consumer Information Catalog. The public can access an online version by visiting www.cfp.net/financial-self-defense-for-seniors or requesting a hard copy by sending an email to mail@CFPBoard.org or calling 800-487-1497.

ABOUT CFP BOARD

The mission of Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. is to benefit the public by granting the CFP® certification and upholding it as the recognized standard of excellence for competent and ethical personal financial planning. The Board of Directors, in furthering CFP Board’s mission, acts on behalf of the public, CFP® professionals and other stakeholders. CFP Board owns the certification marks CFP®, Certified Financial Planner™, CFP® (with plaque design) and CFP® (with flame design) in the U.S., which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements.  CFP Board currently authorizes more than 67,000 individuals to use these marks in the U.S.

 

CONTACT: Dan Drummond, Director of Public Relations P: 202-379-2252 M: 202-550-4372 E: ddrummond@cfpboard.org Twitter: @cfpboardmedia

CVS Caremark Emphasizes Commitment to Older Americans at Annual American Society on Aging Conference

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Company highlights the importance of medication adherence in helping seniors on their path to better health

CVS Caremark (NYSE:CVS) will highlight how medication adherence plays a vital role in helping older Americans on their path to better health at the 2013 Annual American Society on Aging Conference, which is being held in Chicago this week.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20090226/NE75914LOGO )

CVS Caremark, a Titanium Sponsor of the conference, will also be participating in a number of general sessions and panels and will highlight its efforts to ensure customers and patients receive quality care and guidance as they age. David Casey, the company’s Vice President of Workforce Strategies and Chief Diversity Officer, will open the March 12 General Session: Mysteries of Population Aging.

As a pharmacy innovation company, CVS Caremark is committed to developing new ways to lower costs and improve health. By advancing the understanding of medication adherence through research collaborations, the company is gathering important information about why some patients take their medications as prescribed and why others do not. CVS Caremark is also refining the ways it interacts with patients through proven programs, such as Pharmacy Advisor and Maintenance Choice, that help patients stay on their medications and improve health outcomes.

“People age 65 and older typically take two or three times as many medications as younger Americans,” said Casey. “As we reinvent pharmacy care, we will continue to be a trusted health care partner to all of our customers, but particularly to aging Americans who are more likely to have chronic conditions and require more guidance.”

CVS Caremark is not only committed to its older customers and patients, it is also committed to recruiting mature workers and supporting older colleagues who are already part of the company.

“At CVS Caremark, we believe talent is ageless. Our mature colleagues’ knowledge and experience are important assets to our company. They provide us with insight into the best ways to serve our mature customers and sometimes become mentors to their younger colleagues,” added Casey.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 4.7 percent of the nation’s workforce is age 60 and over. Currently, 6.9 percent of CVS Caremark’s workforce is age 60 and over, higher than the national rate. The number of CVS Caremark colleagues who are age 50 and over has grown from approximately 6 percent in 1990 to nearly 20 percent in 2013. To continue this upward trend, CVS Caremark is cultivating public and private partnerships at the local, state, and national level with the goal of recruiting more mature workers into all areas of its workforce.

About CVS Caremark

CVS Caremark is dedicated to helping people on their path to better health as the largest integrated pharmacy company in the United States. Through the company’s more than 7,400 CVS/pharmacy stores; its leading pharmacy benefit manager serving more than 60 million plan members; and its retail health clinic system, the largest in the nation with more than 600 MinuteClinic locations, it is a market leader in mail order, retail and specialty pharmacy, retail clinics, and Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans.  As a pharmacy innovation company with an unmatched breadth of capabilities, CVS Caremark continually strives to improve health and lower costs by developing new approaches such as its unique Pharmacy Advisor program that helps people with chronic diseases such as diabetes obtain and stay on their medications.  Find more information about how CVS Caremark is reinventing pharmacy for better health at info.cvscaremark.com.

Contacts:

Jeff Ventura
Corporate Communications
(401) 770-1990
Jeffrey.Ventura@cvscaremark.com

The Vision Council Launches Online Resource for Low Vision and Saving Sight

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

The Vision Council is pleased to announce the launch of www.whatislowvision.org — a new web site created to educate the public on low vision, its symptoms, and the resources available to help.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130228/PH61076LOGO-a )
(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130228/PH61076LOGO-b )

As America’s baby boomers enter their senior years, they may notice a gradual loss in some areas of sight. Loss of peripheral or central vision could indicate low vision, a visual impairment that cannot be corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses, pharmaceuticals or surgery. More than 2.9M people in the U.S. suffer from low vision and it is most common in people age 60+.

What is low vision?
“More likely than not, everyone knows someone with low vision — maybe a mother, sister, neighbor, or co-worker,” said Dr. Paul Michelson, Chair of The Vision Council’s medical arm — known as the Better Vision Institute — and  a low vision consultant.  “Recognizing the symptoms of low vision early and taking the proper actions may help preserve sight and in some cases, lessen the advance of low vision.”

Low vision can impair the ability to complete activities of daily living or follow routines and enjoy pastimes — such as reading — that people take for granted.

Symptoms
At first, people might notice a bit of distortion in their vision.  An object that is straight in reality — a telephone pole, for example — may appear curved or wavy to a person with low vision.  A low vision diagnosis is often the result of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, or another aging eye disease.

Low vision differs from presbyopia, which is when the ability to focus on near objects diminishes. Presbyopia, which can be corrected with reading glasses or other optical solutions, typically emerges between ages 40 and 45.  Signs of low vision are broader than presbyopia and include:

  • Areas of blurred or distorted vision or spots and blotches in your vision
  • Shadowed or darkened field of view or noticeable loss of peripheral vision
  • A gradual loss of central vision
  • Cloudy and blurred vision or exaggerated “halos” around bright lights
  • Blind spots in your field of view

Preventive Measures and Resources
Seeing an eye doctor at the first sign of any visual changes can help to detect the diseases that result in low vision.  In general, seeing an eye doctor is an important step in maintaining eye health.  The onset of low vision is a slow progression of symptoms and the ultimate goal is to maintain remaining sight and prevent further deterioration in vision.

Sometimes, a pharmaceutical or surgical solution may stop further development of one of the diseases associated with low vision, but there are also eye care providers who specialize in low vision.  These specialists can introduce patients to low vision devices such as stand magnifiers, closed-circuit TVs, and telescopic lenses that help people affected by low vision maintain independence and improve their ability to perform daily tasks.

Dr. Michelson continued, “We urge people to check on family, friends, and neighbors who might be experiencing some of the signs of low vision. Vision training, vision rehabilitation, and low vision devices can help people maintain and optimize visual function, and preserve as much sight as is possible.”

At the onset of any symptoms of low vision, The Vision Council reminds people to:

  • Seek an accurate diagnosis and develop a good relationship with an eye care provider
  • Know the risk factors of not maintaining sight and the overall prognosis

To learn more about low vision and find resources, visit www.whatislowvision.org.

”The information and resources on this new website can teach people more about the changes they are experiencing and help them make the most of their remaining vision — which can lead to increased independence and quality of life,” said Dr. Michelson.

About The Vision Council
The Vision Council is the global voice for vision care products, practices, and services.  We represent eyewear manufacturers and suppliers in the optical industry by providing education, consumer outreach and advocacy.  The Vision Council also serves as a resource to the public who want to learn more about options in glasses and sunglasses, eyewear trends, and advances in technology.  Learn more at www.thevisioncouncil.org or find us on Facebook.

 

CONTACT: Erin Hildreth, The Vision Council, +1-703-548-5089; or Susan Caldwell, Access Public Relations, +1-540-204-4033

Financial Solution for Baby Boomers is to Start Their Own Businesses, Says Founder of Bizstarters

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Jeff Williams proclaims the benefits of starting a business at the age of 50 or older 

CHICAGO, Jan. 9, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Americans over age 50 face a profound dilemma today – the vast majority want to keep working well into their sixties but fewer and fewer of them are welcome in the corporate world, often because of their age. But, according to Chicago-based business start-up expert Jeff Williams, running a business today is a relatively low risk, high reward alternative to a corporate job for these individuals.
Jeff Williams is the CEO and Chief Coach for Bizstarters.com, a nationally known coaching company helping individuals age 50 and over start their own businesses.
Over the past seven years Williams has seen a boom in business startups by people over 50, but he says: “Many, many more older boomers need to seriously look at starting a business if they want to continue to work. And, many will if they understand the new lower cost, higher profit version of small business that’s possible today.”
Williams suggests seven reasons why starting a business is “THE way to work today” for 50+ boomers:
• Your age doesn’t matter when you run your own business. Your customers don’t care how old you are. They only care that you deliver what you promised when you promised it.
• Technology lets you look big when you’re small. Thanks to technology, more and more business owners are working from home, earning $100,000 or more per year.
• New businesses last longer than new jobs. More than 50% of new hires today only last 18 months in the job. More than 55% of new businesses last at least two years, with many running five years or longer.
• You have a lot of people near your age to sell. You have 78 million boomer peers to sell to – they see you as a “sister or brother.” You have 42 million people over age 70 to sell to – they see you as a “son or daughter.”
• It’s never been cheaper to run a business. Many highly profitable businesses today cost less than $500 per month to run.
• You determine your financial progress. You set financial goals as you wish and create plans to achieve them. You are the “boss.”
• You can continue to run your own business for as long as you wish. In fact the IRS gives you a number of ways to legally put away up to 40% of your salary in deferred retirement accounts.
Jeff Williams is widely quoted in articles on boomer entrepreneurs and spoke on the topic at the recent AARP convention held in New Orleans. He offers tips for starting a successful business in his new free digital e-book: “10 Keys to Starting a Profitable Business After 50” available at www.bizstarters.com.
Contact: Jeff Williams, 847-305-4626, cell – 224-300-1820, jeff@bizstarters.com, www.bizstarters.com.

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!