Warning: trim() expects parameter 1 to be string, array given in /home/nvsenior/public_html/wp-content/plugins/custom-post-order-category/wp-customcategorypostorder.php on line 492
profession | Nevada Senior Guide

Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias

June 12, 2016 by · Comments Off on Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias
Filed under: General 

Australian business is starting to see the light when it comes to their hiring policies for mature aged employees, and the positive impact they can have on the workplace. A brief visit to main street shopping centre and you will begin to see a few more weathered faces at work than you would have seen a few years ago.

However, if you scratch below the surface, you begin to see this trend still has a long way to play out. A few older workers get hired into the senior ranks where experience and maturity are greatly valued, more older workers are now being hired at the lower end of the corporate scale into unskilled roles, however the numbers being hired into the mid tier ranks remains low.

This barbell approach to hiring mature workers at the top and bottom of an organisation reflects an ongoing bias that remains difficult to overcome. A company is a microcosm of society, and in a perfect world employers should (within reason) seek diversity in the workplace and value skill, experience and aptitude, regardless of age, race or gender.

Unfortunately, we live in a far from perfect world. When it comes to mature aged workers they tend to be penalised on two fronts. Often the first to be made redundant in uncertain economic times, this setback is then compounded when they are regularly overlooked for someone younger as they begin searching for a new job.

As a result of these two biases towards mature aged job seekers, once out of work, the journey back can often be long and arduous. This is reflected in RBA statistics which indicate long-term unemployment at approximately 40% for those aged 45-64, compared to about 25% for those aged between 25 and 44.

So what are the reasons employers provide for not hiring mature aged workers? Typically, reasons include being overqualified or over-experienced. Taken at face value being overqualified or experienced might not seem so bad, but when you hear the same reason trotted out time and again, it becomes less palatable.

Openly negative feedback from employers tend to include perceptions that mature aged workers are not as IT savvy, do not possess the latest skills, or are not as flexible as their younger counterparts. While these reasons may hold true in many instances, many of the older job seekers I speak to, believe these are often used as convenient excuses to exclude them.

Employer feedback that you are not likely to hear include concerns about health (and subsequent cost) or worse insecurity. There are many poor managers in the workplace that may be intimidated by the experience a mature applicant brings to the role. Rather than leveraging the knowledge and experience an older worker can bring to the workplace, the insecure hirer is concerned about the potential competition, and the presence of someone who may know more than they do.

Dealing with many of these preconceived concerns and fears remains an ongoing challenge for the mature aged job seeker. Perhaps the following facts should be mandatory reading for hiring managers. These facts debunk many of the concerns and myths that persist in the workplace relating to mature aged workers;

    • Mature aged workers can deliver cost savings to employers through increased retention rates. For example, workers over 55 are five times less likely to change jobs compared to workers aged 20-24, reducing both recruitment and training costs. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006)Labour Mobility Survey,
    • Mature workers can deliver an average net benefit of $1956 per year to their employer compared to other workers due to high retention rates, lower rates of absenteeism, decreased recruitment costs and greater return on investment.Business, Work and Ageing (2000) Profiting from Maturity: The Social and Economic Costs of Mature Age Unemployment
    • Australians are living longer and are healthier.2005 ABS survey found the proportion of Australians aged 55-64 reporting their health as ‘good’, ‘very good’ or ‘excellent’ was 75.5% – an increase of four per cent since 1995. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006) National Health Survey: Summary of Results, 2004-05
    • Mature workers were the least likely group to take days off due to their own illness or as a carer. In the two week period prior to the survey nearly half the number of mature workers had days off compared to workers aged 25-34. ibid
    • ABS data shows that Australians aged 55-64 are the fastest growing users of information technology. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2005) Year Book Australia,
  • Australian Health Management which examined the daily work habits of 4000 employees found that workers aged 55 years and over performed at their best for approximately seven hours out of an eight-hour day-an achievement that other workers in the study were unable to match. Australian Health Management (2006), Baby boomers give employers a bang for their buck

While government has been doing its part to address mature aged unemployment through initiatives like DEEWR Experience+, the introduction of the Age Discrimination Act (2004) and appointment of an Age Discrimination Commissioner, it remains imperative that older job seekers directly address some of these age bias issues themselves if they are to enhance their prospects for employment.

Following are some helpful hints that mature aged workers can utilise to make themselves more appealing to employers and thus improve their chances of a speedy return to the workforce;

Government or Community Assistance– Take advantage of government or community based initiatives and assistance. There is a considerable amount of free information and assistance available, and I would strongly recommend looking into these resources. For example, the DEEWR “Experience+” initiative provides free career planning and advice for over 45’s until June 2016, along with an Assistance Program delivering refresher and basic training in IT and social media applications.

Value Proposition– Whether writing your resume or cover letter, or sitting in an interview, ensure the focus of discussion clearly remains on the value that you can bring to an organisation. Discuss how you can help, what you have done in the past and what you can deliver going forward. Outline how your experience might bring special insights and perspectives that other candidates may not possess.

Training– Undertake relevant training or up-skilling. Keeping ‘up to date’ is critical if you expect serious consideration for any position, especially if there is a technical element. The benefit will be that an employer will see that you have not fallen behind and therefore will not require retraining, along with any associated cost.

Resume– You will need a properly structured and well written resume to be considered for most roles. Use an appropriate resume style that is tailored to your strengths, skills and experience. Also ensure primary focus of your resume is on the last 5-10 years (include older information where pertinent). Think about getting assistance from a professional resume writer, whocan add significant value if you are looking to ‘get it right the first time’.

Age Bias – To counter potential impact of age bias, you will need to carefully address the following with any potential employer;

Health– Don’t hesitate to communicate your good health and fitness to potential employers at opportune moments. Inform them if you play sport, run, walk or go to the gym regularly. This should allay any potential concerns about health.

IT Savvy –Take every opportunity to indicate your IT capability. Whether it’s your ability to use specialised systems, the MS Office suite or even your use of Facebook or Twitter, this will highlight your ability to embrace new technology.

Adaptability – Highlight your adaptability in the workplace, providing actual examples where appropriate. If you don’t know something, indicate you are keen to learn (and not that you wouldn’t know where to start). Highlighting your adaptability will help to dispel concerns of rigidness and inflexibility.

Team Player –Communicating that you work well as part of a team is critical. It shows a willingness to take direction and work for the common good, and can present you as less threatening, especially if the hirer feels concerned by a mature more experienced candidate.

Be Positive –Though you need to be fully prepared to discuss negative issues, make every attempt to keep the discussion on a positive footing. Unless specifically requested, there is no need to volunteer information of a negative nature.

While industry is beginning to see the light when it comes to acceptance of mature aged workers, the pace of change remains slow. While providence is on the right side due to the ageing Australian population and the inevitable necessity to hire older workers, the fact remains that age discrimination is still entrenched in much current thinking.

As a result, dealing with age bias will continue to be a challenge for the foreseeable future. However with the combination of positive government policy, changing attitudes and a proactive attitude to making oneself more appealing to employers (as outlined above), the situation is not without promise.

Honing your individual approach and message will take time and effort. To strike the right balance the mature job seeker will need to walk a fine line between sounding experienced, but not old, adaptable, but not inflexible and appear keen, not desperate. There is no magic formula for success except practice, perseverance and occasionally seeking help where necessary.

A.J. Bond, is the proprietor of Absolute Resume Writing Services ( http://absoluteresume.com.au ), an Australian based consultancy specializing in the provision of Resume and Cover Letter writing services.

Absolute Resume assists a broad range of job seekers to find their preferred roles, including mature aged job seekers, individuals out of work for a period of time and those made redundant.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7334746

Aging And Anti-Aging Products

May 16, 2016 by · Comments Off on Aging And Anti-Aging Products
Filed under: General 

As you age, different processes in your skin change its appearance, activity and structure. The aging skin has reduced cellular activity, less collagen production, lowered epidermal turn over and damage accumulation as a result of free radicals from UV exposure. All these changes contribute to the aging process and leave you with apparent signs of aging such as wrinkles, fine lines and dark spots. They come about because the skin loses moisture and elasticity from all the aging changes. Using anti-aging cream can help fight the signs because a good cream reduces the wrinkles by improving skin elasticity and also offers deep skin renewal and cellular rejuvenation by enhancing collagen production.

Causes of premature skin aging

What most people don’t know is that the aging process can actually be slowed by living healthy lifestyles. This way, you won’t have to start using anti-aging products until much later in life. When you take good care of the skin, you will prevent premature aging, which results from things such as;

· Psychological stress

· Unhealthy diets

· Nicotine

· Excessive alcohol consumption

· UV radiation

All these factors put you at risk of free radical formation leading to premature skin aging. A few lifestyle changes might be all you need to maintain a youthful look before it is time to use a wrinkle cream. To block out sun damage, you can use a day cream and sunscreen.

Using Anti-Aging Creams

Skin aging processes can start at different times for different individuals depending on the factors. Skin professionals advise that you start giving the skin some protection from aging between the age of 25 and 30. Anti-aging creams with hyaluronic acid and creatine are some of the best in protecting the skin from harmful UV rays. Today, it is easy to choose the best anti-aging creams since you can choose for your specific skin type or your age. You will find anything from anti-aging 20s cream to anti-aging cream 50+ products. The categorization is important because skin at different ages require different treatments for the best results to be enjoyed.

As for eye creams, you can start using them as soon as you see signs of aging around this thin skin. Even younger people have issues of dark circles as well as puffiness and wrinkles around the delicate skin eye. It can be beneficial to use eye creams before turning thirty.

When using ant-aging creams, most people expect instantaneous results. However, it is important to remember that your results will depend on your type of skin and the condition of the skin when you start using the products. Regularly using your products will of course hasten the process but it is also important to adhere to the given directions of use for best results. When using quality anti-aging creams, you will feel a change in your skin texture after a few days and you should see improvements as with the appearance of the wrinkles and fine lines as you continue using them. Choose quality products and be consistent with your use.

Anti-aging cream 25 year old [http://www.amazing-anti-aging-cream.com/] beginnings can help a lot in maintaining a youthful beautiful skin. Choosing quality products is however also paramount in pushing you closer to the expected results.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9067111

Take a Number: Five Ways to Look at Age

April 24, 2016 by · Comments Off on Take a Number: Five Ways to Look at Age
Filed under: General 

One for the Ages

Satchel Paige was a great baseball pitcher, one of the greatest of all time. He was an African-American and, due to the racial discrimination of the time, most of his outstanding career was not spent in the (white) major leagues. However, after the historic breakthrough by the courageous and talented Jackie Robinson (Mr. Paige’s junior by about 14 years), Satchel Paige pitched in the major leagues for a number of years. In fact, he was still able to get major league batters out at the age of 60! (Mr. Paige’s age at his retirement from baseball is not known for certain because no one, probably including Mr. Paige himself, knew his exact year of birth; some thought he was older than 60). Mr. Paige revealed a mind as sharp as the break on his curve ball when he asked this profound question for the ages:

“How old would you be if you did not know how old you are?”

These writings are dedicated to the memory of Satchel Paige and to all the so-called “over-the-hill” guys and gals in every sport and in every area of life, from Churchill and Reagan in politics to Jessica Tandy in acting and Paul McCartney in fatherhood. They and many like them in the past and present will be joined by many more in the future who are not really “over the hill” because they are too busy taking the hill.

Five Ways to Look at Age

Chronological Age

The most common way to look at age is the Chronological. This is the one that everyone is familiar with. It is simply the time that has passed since your date of birth to today. It is the one that governments and insurance companies require of you and that your Doctor knows, even if your boy friend doesn’t. It is a unidimensional measure because it considers only time. It is uniform because everybody who is 48 years, 6 months, and 3 weeks old is exactly that, chronologically. People who view age only from the chronological perspective are somewhere between dumb and dumber.

True Age

True Age is another and better way to look at your age. True age is basically what a measurement of all the biomarkers of aging would reveal about you. Here’s four points about true age. One, if a well-trained physician did NOT know how old you are but reviewed a print-out of your biomarkers, she or he could accurately estimate your true age. Two, your true age is not uniform but varies by individual: you can be younger or older than your chronological age. Three, true age is multidimensional rather than confined to time. Four, absolutely nothing can be done about chronological age because it is fixed, but a great deal can be done about true age.

Appearance Age

Appearance Age is the age you appear to be to others. It no doubt has some relationship to both chronological age and true age. Yet it is different. This is because it is heavily influenced by a number of factors outside the scope of biomarker measurement, not the least of which is attitude. We all know people that appear to be quite a bit younger or older than their chronological age. But the only scientific way to measure a person’s appearance age would be to have a representative sample of the population observe a person for at least a few minutes. A quick glance is not sufficient because appearance age includes factors such as movement of the body and alertness, not just a frozen face. Then the estimates from all members of the representative sample would be gathered, simple statistical measures applied, and Voila! You have the person’s appearance age. Of course, unless we are part of a study, none of us will ever get this scientific about it. We will just have to rely on random comments from friends, family, and nice or mean strangers to estimate our appearance age; and usually it’s a pretty good estimate.

NEAT Age

A new way to look at age, which occurred to me awhile back, is what I call one’s N.E.A.T. age. This is simply one’s time left on the planet from right Now to the time of death. This age is unknowable by readers or anyone, except those committed to imminent suicide (and these poor folks are no more likely to take the short time remaining to do age calculations than they are to be caught dead reading an article about lively longevity). The best we can do is make a calculated estimate based on what we know about the general population and factor in any pluses or minuses that apply to us individually.

The N in NEAT of course stands for Now since the calculation is from the present, today, right now. E is for Elusive because I believe moments of time are elusive. As we humans try to hold or capture a moment of time it eludes us because the next moment is here, and then the next. Time and life are a flow.

The A in NEAT is for Allotted. Everyone who has ever lived has only so much time to live. Some have short lives, some have long lives, and some have lives neither particularly long nor short. But human life is finite and almost certainly will remain finite into the distant future if not forever. We do not need to take sides in the age-old debate about whether or not our allotted time is predestined by God in order to recognize that the amount is finite.

Of course, T is for Time. Time remaining is what it is all about. As has been oft noted: a millionaire on his death bed would gladly exchange his riches for a little more time, say one more day of healthy living.

So one’s NEAT age is one’s Now Elusive Allotted Time. It is a concept that provides a different perspective on aging and on life. For example, let’s suppose there was a 30-year old person named Terry and a 60-year old person named Sydney living in the same town in 1960. Conventional wisdom and simple arithmetic agree that Sydney was twice as old as Terry at that time. Such wisdom carries the (usually) unstated assumption that Terry is about 30 years further from the grave than Sydney. Statistically, this is difficult to argue with. But statistics are oft off for an individual and sometimes by a wide margin.

Let’s suppose that Terry had a lifetime of very bad health habits and, never having had the opportunity to read my writings, continued the very bad habits. Poor Terry expired a little shy of 40. (The same fate could have befallen Terry due to a dreaded disease or tragic accident.) Sydney, on the other hand, decided at some point to lead a health-conscious life. Sydney made good choices and stuck with them. Sydney enjoyed basically good health beyond age 100 before passing on. When Sydney was 60 and Terry was 30, Sydney had a NEAT age of 40+ and Terry had a NEAT age just under 10. So way back in 1960, who was younger: the one with less than a decade of life left, or the one with more than four decades of vibrant life left? One of the neat things about the NEAT age is that the bigger this age number the better.

Ideal Age

The fifth and final way that we will look at age is one’s Ideal Age. Your ideal age is your age of choice, your preferred age. The concept of ideal age brings us back to Satchel Paige’s question:

How old would you be if you did not know how old you are?

In a sense, perhaps most of us do NOT know how old we are anyhow. Sure we know our chronological age, and some of us have a rough gauge of our appearance age. But few of us know our true age, and none of us knows our NEAT age. So it should not be so difficult to put chronological age aside for a few moments and answer Mr. Paige’s question.

Before leaping to an answer like 21, keep in my mind that successful living usually involves a combination of physical vigor, mental acuity, and wisdom. Personally, my ideal age is 37; thus even at my next birthday I will still be one year younger than all the women over 40.

What about you? What’s your number? What’s your ideal age? The way my anti-aging program works for you is that after reflection you establish your ideal age. Then we work with all the tools and techniques of the program to bring your true age into ever closer alignment with your ideal age. There is a balance to be struck. A 90-year old reader shooting for an ideal age of 19 is setting up way too much of a challenge and thus is setting up for failure. A 50-year old reader settling for an ideal age of 45 is not challenging herself or himself enough.

Take a number.

Satchel Paige was the impetus for me to write the close to this article:

When it comes to matters of age,

It is best to take a page out of Paige,

And move forward with grace,

Paying no mind to this myth of the human race.

Gary Patrick is a certified anti-aging professional (Giovane Medical Services). He is also an author, hypnotist, personal trainer, and speaker. Free stuff is available for a limited time at his web site: [http://rapidresults.biz]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Gary_Patrick/18668

Tropicana Palms Las Vegas – Nevada Senior Guide

February 14, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Las Vegas, Single Family Homes 

www.cal-am.com

nsg_novdecjan_2016-17_web-1


nsg_novdecjan_2016-17_web-6 nsg_novdecjan_2016-17_web-7

6420 E Tropicana Ave, Las Vegas NV 89122

Amenities

• Billiards • Bingo
• Clubhouse • Courtesy Patrol
• Exercise Classes • Fitness Center
• Heated Pools and Spa • Horseshoe Pits
• Hot Tub • Jewelry Making
• Large Screen TV • Lighted Tennis Courts
• Monday Night Bingo • On site Home Sales
• Ping Pong • Planned Activities
• Putting Green • RV and Boat Storage
• Sauna • Shuffleboard Courts
• Themed Events

 

 

Welcome to Tropicana Palms… Your Oasis in the Las Vegas Desert

Quench your thirst for the good life at Tropicana Palms!

If billiards or cards is your game, then our in-community leagues are what you are looking for! Begin your day with a game of tennis or a work out in our well-equipped fitness centers.

Tropicana Palms offers you easy access to all the southwest has to offer. Enjoy the crystal blue skies of Nevada as you explore breathtaking hiking and biking trails just minutes away. Pick up your clubs and take a swing at some of the best professional golf courses in the country. How does a day on the lake racing around or just relaxing by the shore with a pole in your hand sound? Lake Mead is just a short drive from Tropicana Palms and offers the best in water sports.

Enjoy the Area

Ready to take on the Las Vegas nightlife? Ready for the best in entertainment? Restaurants? Gaming? Then get ready to experience the glamour that is second to none. Explore the ever changing social life that is the Las Vegas strip that is waiting for you.

Tropicana Palms………Where you’ve got it made in the shade.

Shopping
Albertsons
Home Depot
Antiques at the Market
East Valley Plaza

Hospitals
Desert Springs Hospital
Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center

Entertainment
Las Vegas Strip
Royal Links Golf Course
Century 18 Sam’s Town
Cox Pavilion
Horseman and Dog Fancier’s Park

 

Nevada Senior Guide – Shumway & Van Attorneys

April 29, 2015 by · Comments Off on Nevada Senior Guide – Shumway & Van Attorneys
Filed under: Las Vegas, Support Services 

http://www.shumwayvan.com

NSGMayJuneJuly2015_Web38 NSGMayJuneJuly2015_Web39

The law firm of Shumway Van has a regionally known and respected litigation practice and a first-class business and transactional practice that is quickly gaining national presence. These general practices are divisible into the more specific practice areas identified to the right. Each practice group is designed to serve each and every client in the most effective and efficient manner possible. To ensure an optimal result, professionals work across disciplines and collaborate together to resolve a matter.

Las Vegas, Nevada

8985 South Eastern Ave. #100,Las Vegas, Nevada 89123

Phone: (702) 478-7770

Fax: (702) 478-7779

http://www.shumwayvan.com

Free Senior Safety Fair – Seniors And Law Enforcement Together – (S.A.L.T.) Council and the Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)

March 18, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

The Seniors And Law Enforcement Together – (S.A.L.T.) Council and the Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP) are asking for support at an important annually sponsored event.

 

The SALT Council and SMP will be holding it’s free “Senior Safety Fair” on Wednesday, May 14th 2014 at Clark County’s Paradise Community Center located at 4775 South McLeod Drive 89121.

The SALT Council is comprised of core members to include but not limited to the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police, North Las Vegas Police Department, State of Nevada Elder Protective Services, Southern Nevada Senior Law Program, Nevada Senior Services, Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP), Nevada State Attorney General’s Office, City of Las Vegas, Clark County, City of Henderson, Clark County District Attorney, ITN Las Vegas Valley, S. Nevada Transit Coalition, Nevada 2-1-1, Social Service Providers, Professional Senior Service Providers, and Volunteer Senior Citizens and Clark County Coroner and Medical Examiner’s Office just to name a few.

 

S.A.L.T. is a full non-profit 501c3.

 

The group is looking assistance in getting the word out to all southern Nevada senior citizens about this free safety event to help increase all safety and prevention methods for our seniors residents.

 

If you have any questions please contact Kim Harney-Moore (SMP) or Carol Ferranti (LVMPD) (contact info are listed below):

 

Kim Harney-Moore; SMP Director
Nevada Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)
Empowering Seniors to Prevent Healthcare Fraud
702-486-4323
kkharneymoore@adsd.nv.gov

 

OR

 

Carol Ferranti; Crime Prevention Specialist
Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department – South Central Area Command (SCAC)
4860 Las Vegas Blvd. South
Las Vegas, NV 89119
Office: 702-828-8163
C7859F@lvmpd.com

Coalition to Protect Retirement Launches Campaign to Safeguard Retirement Savings Incentives

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Nearly 9 in 10 Americans Say Retirement Savings Accounts Should be “Off Limits” As a Source of New Tax Revenue – Part of National Campaign to Raise Awareness About Benefits of Tax Deferral

WASHINGTON, Nov. 7, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Americans overwhelmingly – by a margin of 4 to 1 – oppose changing tax rules for retirement savings accounts, according to a new survey released today by the Coalition to Protect Retirement, a group of America’s leading supporters of retirement savings plans.

The research shows widespread support across political parties for maintaining the current tax treatment for retirement savings vehicles, such as 401(k) plans, 403(b) plans, and traditional IRAs.  According to the survey, which was conducted in mid-October, 87 percent of all Americans and 95 percent of those who have a tax-deferred 401(k)-like retirement plan accounts believe retirement savings should be “off limits” to Congress and not a source of new revenue for the government.

Today’s release of the survey coincides with the Coalition’s launch of a national education and advocacy campaign to preserve the current tax incentives for retirement savings.  The campaign will raise awareness about how current tax deferral rules are helping millions of Americans prepare for their own retirement, and will urge workers and their employers to tell Congress not to change or limit these incentives to save.  Visitors to the Coalition’s website www.HowAmericaSaves.com will be able to send letters to their elected officials and follow developments in Congress.

“Retirement savings incentives play an essential role in encouraging Americans to save and employers to sponsor retirement plans,” said Hank Jackson, President and CEO of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) on behalf of the Coalition.  “This isn’t just smart tax policy – it’s proven good sense.”

Tax Incentives Help Americans Save for Retirement
The current tax incentives have succeeded in helping Americans save for retirement and have increased the number of workers who are covered by retirement plans.  According to the latest available data, more than 67 million people participate in private-sector defined contribution plans alone.  All told, Americans have $20.9 trillion in assets earmarked for retirement.

All Income Levels Benefit from Retirement Plan Tax Incentives
Individuals at all income levels have benefitted from these incentives, particularly middle-income earners.  More than 70 percent of American workers who earn between $30,000 and $50,000 a year contribute to a retirement savings plan when one is offered at work.

“Given the vast numbers of baby boomers who reach retirement age every day, retirement savings incentives are needed more than ever,” said Kenneth E. Bentsen, Jr., President of the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (SIFMA).  “They are doing what they were intended to do – helping people who need them most to take responsibility for their own retirement security.”

The Coalition noted the important role employers play in helping workers prepare for retirement.  Between 2000 and 2009, employers contributed almost $3.5 trillion to public and private retirement plans.  Changes to current incentives could adversely affect employer-sponsored plans, contributions, and the retirement security of millions of Americans.

“Raising new revenue should not come at the expense of Americans’ retirement savings, not now or in the future,” said Brian Graff, CEO and Executive Director of the American Society of Pension Professionals & Actuaries (ASPPA).  “If Congress reduces the benefits of offering and contributing to retirement savings, fewer people will save.  The result: more of tomorrow’s retirees will need to turn to the government for help, and that will mean more federal spending.”

Media Availability
Representatives of the Coalition to Protect Retirement and of Juncture Strategies/ORC International will be available to answer questions and discuss the national survey on Thursday, November 7 from 1:30 – 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time. 
Call-in number:  1-800-745-6370        Passcode:  5356061

About the Coalition to Protect Retirement
The Coalition to Protect Retirement believes that Congress should encourage retirement savings for American workers through the preservation of current tax incentives.  The Coalition is composed of the following associations:  American Benefits Council, American Council of Life Insurers, American Society of Pension Professionals and Actuaries, The ERISA Industry Committee, ESOP Association, Insured Retirement Institute, Investment Company Institute, Plan Sponsor Council of America, Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association, and the Society for Human Resource Management.

The Coalition’s website www.HowAmericaSaves.com was created to raise awareness among workers, employers, policymakers, and the public about the important role that tax deferral plays in helping people plan for their own retirement security.  The site provides tools for individuals and organizations to make their views known to elected officials and to stay informed about proposals being debated in Congress.  To learn more, visit:  www.HowAmericaSaves.com.

About the Survey
Juncture Strategies/ORC International conducted a national on-line survey of 1,011 adults, 18 years of age or older, during October 14–16, 2013.  A summary of the survey results is available at: http://bit.ly/retresearch.

Contact: Bill Maroni BMaroni@howamericasaves.com / 301 802-3375

National Report: Oral Health of Older Americans In A ‘State of Decay’

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Oral Health America Launches First-of-its-Kind Website to Connect Older Adults to Affordable Dental Care and Resources

The oral health of older Americans is in a state of decay, according to a new national report released today by Oral Health America (OHA).  A State of Decay, a state-by-state analysis of oral healthcare delivery and public health factors impacting the oral health of older adults, reveals more than half of the country received a “fair” or “poor” assessment when it comes to minimal standards affecting dental care access for older adults. Florida and Arizona, areas with large older adult populations, rank in the bottom five states due to a shortage of oral health coverage, a strained dental health work force, and deficiencies in prevention programs.

“While we are seeing improvements in certain areas of older adult dental care, there is still a lack of progress in advancing the oral health of such a vulnerable population,” said Dr. Ira Lamster, Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, ColumbiaUniversity, Mailman School of Public Health. “Older adults face significant health challenges if their oral health is poor, and there is no coordinated program to help fund necessary services.”

A State of Decay gave a rating of “fair,” “poor,” “good,” or “excellent” based on state level data analyzing five variables impacting older adult oral health: adult Medicaid dental benefits, inclusion of older adult strategies in state oral health plans, edentulism (loss of teeth), dental health professional shortage areas, and community water fluoridation.

The final evaluations in the report for each state are mixed, with several states performing well in some variables, but still in need of improvement in other important areas. The top findings of this report that require scrutiny and action are:

  • Persistent lack of oral health coverage across much of the nation. Forty-two percent of states (21 states) provide either no dental benefits or provide only emergency coverage  through adult Medicaid Dental Benefits.
  • Strained dental health work force. Thirty-one states (62 percent) have high rates of Dental Health Provider Shortage Areas (HPSAs), meeting only 40 percent or less of dental provider needs.
  • Tooth loss remains a signal of suboptimal oral health. Eight states had strikingly high rates of edentulism, with West Virginia notably having an adult population that is 33.8 percent edentate. Photo – PRN Photo Desk, photodesk@prnewswire.com
  • Deficiencies in preventive programs. Thirteen states (26 percent) have upwards of 60 percent of their residents living in communities without water fluoridation (CWF), despite recognition for 68 years that this public health measure markedly reduces dental caries. Hawaii (89.2 percent) and New Jersey (86.5 percent) represent the highest rates of citizens unprotected by fluoridation, an unnecessary public peril.

Daily, 10,000 Americans retire and only 2 percent do so with a dental benefit plan. The State of Decay analysis provides a tool for states to use in addressing shortfalls in oral health status, dental professional access sites, dental benefits for low-income adults, and population-based prevention, all of which affect the oral health of older adults, the fastest growing segment of the American population.

To help older adults and their caregivers address oral health needs and overcome many of the barriers to accessing affordable dental care, OHA launched toothwisdom.org. The website is a first-of-its-kind online tool that connects older adults to dental care and educates on the importance of maintaining oral health with age. The American Dental Hygienists’ Association (ADHA) and Special Care Dentistry Association (SCDA) supported OHA and the launch of the website by encouraging their members to provide meaningful articles for the toothwisdom.org.

“Dental Hygienists have the opportunity to assist older Americans with the oral health challenges they may face as they age,”” said Ann Battrell, Executive Director, American Dental Hygienists’ Association. “We’re all committed to sharing the message that oral health matters and changing the common misperception that with age comes a decline in oral health.”

Few websites focus on oral and systemic health topics, and even fewer provide resources for older adult oral health. Toothwisdom.org offers oral care resources by state – including direct links to dental care, caregiving support, financial tools, social services, and transportation. It also shares the latest news and reliable health information from dental experts across the country on relevant oral health issues, the importance of continuing prevention with age, and the impact of oral health on overall health.

“My dental procedures have been very costly and I had to contact a social worker to help me understand my bills. Dental care should be more available and affordable because we know poor dental care affects overall health, which is particularly important for seniors,” said senior Patricia Cosgrove, a client of The Carter Burden Center for the Aging, Inc.  “Toothwisdom.org can help me find a community health center so I can finally get an affordable check-up and stay up-to-date on oral health information.”

A State of Decay and toothwisdom.org are part of Oral Health America’s Wisdom Tooth Project™, an initiative designed to meet the oral health challenges of a burgeoning population of older adults with special needs, chronic disease complications, and a growing inability to access and pay for dental services.

Links to the 2003 and 2013 editions of A State of Decay can be viewed on toothwisdom.org.

About OHA’s Wisdom Tooth Project
For 55 years, Oral Health America has been the leading national non-profit dedicated to improving the oral health and well-being of Americans throughout the entire spectrum of life. Over the decades, the organization has evolved and adapted to the dynamic nature of our country’s demographics and specific health needs. The Wisdom Tooth Project was born in 2010 due to the current and future implications of an aging population and the need for oral health resources for them mean that we must take meaningful action now.

About Oral Health America
OHA is a national, non-profit association dedicated to changing lives by connecting communities with resources to increase access to oral health care, education, and advocacy for all Americans, especially those most vulnerable. For more information about Oral Health America, please visit www.oralhealthamerica.org.

AARP Report Highlights Need for Innovative Long-Term Care for the Aging Baby Boomer Population; Japan’s Technological Secrets May Hold the Answers

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

A newly published AARP report illustrates a profound demographic shift that will have consequences for decades to come, particularly in the senior living and long-term care industry. Baby boomers are entering their retirement years, while the ratio of potential family caregivers to those who require long-term services and support is beginning to drop. Fewer available caregivers will mean the senior living industry must rapidly adapt to a surging market. The AARP’s full report is available here: http://bit.ly/156phYi

Family caregiving is a low-cost but often burdensome approach to elder care. Becoming a primary caregiver often involves leaving behind a career, among other sacrifices. Plus, these well-intentioned caregivers may not have the expertise necessary to provide the level of care needed by an aged parent. Adults in these roles often feel enormous pressure and stress, sometimes even resentment. At any rate, the nation’s changing demographics will make today’s family caregiving situation far different in the near future.

Between 1990 and 2010, there were about 7 potential caregivers for every one person aged 80-plus. That ratio is at the start of a freefall that will force society to change the way it cares for its elderly members. By 2030, the ratio of caregivers to elderly will be 4 to 1. All remaining baby boomers will have reached their years of highest risk (80+) by 2050, when the caregiver ratio will have plummeted still further to 3 to 1.

Kevin Williams, president of SeniorMarketing.com, suggests innovative thinking will be required to bridge this care gap: “Naturally, with fewer family caregivers available, the responsibility will largely shift to senior living communities, care agencies and already overextended government programs. But it will take more than simply building more communities or training more staff—assuming an adequate number of candidates are even available. Technological innovation may be the silver bullet to raise the standard of living for aging boomers, improve efficiency, and reduce costs.”

The nation of Japan, which has the greatest life expectancy and one of the oldest average populations in the world, has recently experienced a demographic transition of its own. Recently, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare put out a call for 2 million new professional caregivers, but only received 1.3 million eligible candidates. With low birth rates being the norm, that shortfall will only increase. A tech-savvy society to begin with, the Japanese have embraced robotics and automation as a solution to the elder care issue. Motorized, assistive devices can help older individuals perform tasks themselves, while automated pill dispensers can prevent dangerous medication mistakes. A recent blog post on The Economist explained Japan’s inventive approach to the elder care dilemma: http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2013/05/automation-elderly

Williams concluded: “This demographic shift is a great challenge but also a great opportunity. Forward-thinking, entrepreneurs will be leading the way in this new environment. Technology to assist with daily tasks, provide medical care, monitor, and connect seniors to loved ones is advancing at a faster pace every year. It’s not unreasonable to predict that the future will witness even better care for our future seniors.”

About SeniorMarketing.com

Baltimore-based SeniorMarketing.com was created with twin goals in mind. First, the company helps connect caregivers and seniors with local, affordable care options. Second, the company increases income for senior living communities and health care agencies.

Contact:

Kevin M. Williams, President
SeniorMarketing.com
5024 Campbell Blvd., Suite D-3
Baltimore, MD 21236
Phone: 1-888-523-3311

Medicare Annual Open Enrollment Changes Are Expected, Allsup Explains

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Medicare Annual Open Enrollment Changes Are Expected, Allsup Explains

New Medicare plan options for 2014 will be available Oct. 15, but Health Insurance Marketplace enrollment could confuse beneficiaries 

There are only a few weeks before the Medicare annual open enrollment period begins Oct. 15. This year’s Medicare season crosses calendars with the rollout of the Health Insurance Marketplace, so it’s important Medicare-eligible beneficiaries understand the differences between the two government programs, according to Allsup, a nationwide provider of Medicare plan selection services.

During the Medicare annual enrollment period, Oct. 15 to Dec. 7, all Medicare beneficiaries have the option to change their Medicare plans for the coming year to better match their needs. This includes anyone using original Medicare, Medicare Advantage or Part D prescription drug plans.

“Because the federal and state-run health insurance exchanges open for business just two weeks prior to Medicare enrollment, some people may be confused,” said Paula Muschler, manager of the Allsup Medicare Advisor®, a Medicare plan selection service offering personalized help that includes customized research and enrollment assistance.

“Medicare beneficiaries may falsely think they need to enroll in an exchange plan to avoid penalties. Or, they may be so flustered that they don’t carefully evaluate their Medicare plan options for 2014, which could be detrimental if their plan or their needs have changed,” Muschler said.

Another potential area of confusion is for those individuals turning 65 during Medicare annual enrollment. “Because some seniors become Medicare eligible during this time period, they need to look at their Medicare selections for coverage that takes them through year-end 2013, as well as coverage that will begin Jan. 1, 2014,” Muschler said. “These first-time enrollees can benefit from the help of a Medicare specialist like Allsup when it comes to navigating their Medicare plan decisions.”

What to Expect: Medicare Coverage 2014

Nearly 50 million people are enrolled in Medicare. Each year, annual open enrollment brings with it changes that can affect their Medicare plan selections.

Following are factors to keep in mind for 2014 coverage:

Medicare is not part of the Health Insurance Marketplace. Anyone with Medicare is considered covered and won’t face penalties for being uninsured under provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Medicare annual open enrollment runs Oct. 15 to Dec. 7. (Note: Health Insurance Marketplace enrollment is from Oct. 1, 2013, through March 31, 2014, according to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS).)

Medicare recipients reaching the drug donut hole will benefit from lower costs. The gap in prescription drug coverage starts when someone reaches the initial coverage limit, estimated at $2,850 in 2014. It ends when they have spent $4,550, when catastrophic coverage begins. (These are reductions of $120 and $200, respectively, from 2013.) During the donut hole, all costs are covered by individuals out of their own pocket. In 2014, those who reach the donut hole can receive a 52.5 percent discount on brand-name drugs and 28 percent discount on generic drugs (an increase from 21 percent in 2013).

Under catastrophic coverage, they are responsible for a co-pay of $2.55 for generic or preferred multisource drugs (down from $2.65 in 2013) with a retail price up to $51 and $6.35 for all other drugs (down from $6.60 in 2013) with a retail price up to $127. For 2014, however, beneficiaries are responsible for a 5 percent cost-sharing fee for drugs over those retail prices.

Medicare Part B premium changes are expected. In each of the past three years, Part B premiums have increased. The 2013 monthly premium for Medicare Part B (medical insurance) was $104.90, an increase from $99.90 in 2012. In addition, because Part B premiums are based on the beneficiary’s income and those income levels are frozen at 2010 levels, more individuals could see their premiums change. Information on the standard Part B premium for 2014 should be available by the time Medicare annual open enrollment begins Oct. 15.

Prescription drug Part D plans will see slight changes in deductible and premiums. The Part D initial deductible decreases by $15 to $310. HHS also recently reported the Part D monthly premiums will remain relatively stable, at $31 for a basic prescription drug plan in 2014. This is close to the reported average premium of $30 for the past three years (2011-13). Part D premiums are subject to the same income-based thresholds as Part B.

Changes anticipated for Medicare Advantage plans. Not all plans change every year, but common changes include costs, such as premiums, deductibles and co-pays, and changes to covered procedures, tests, medical facilities and other provisions. Some plans may be eliminated, which means beneficiaries will need to select a new plan or default to original Medicare Part B. Enrollment in Medicare Advantage plans continues to grow with 14.4 million people enrolled, an increase of more than 1 million from 2012, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Most Medicare participants will receive their Annual Notice of Change (ANOC) and Evidence of Coverage (EO) from their current Medicare Advantage and Part D providers by Sept. 30, according to Muschler. “It’s crucial people review materials as soon as they receive them and asses their current healthcare needs,” she said.

“Healthcare costs are a critical line item in most people’s budget, and especially so for seniors and people with disabilities,” Muschler added. “Believing your current plan will continue to cover your needs in the same way can lead to unexpected and costly surprises.”

Medicare specialists such as Allsup are available to help consumers and their family members review Medicare plans and choices for 2014 coverage, Muschler added.

“For many people, this can be a time-consuming, confusing and complex evaluation process, especially when comparing Part D plans or Medicare Advantage plans,” Muschler said. “Many Medicare beneficiaries are pleased to find out there are Medicare specialists like Allsup who look at the comparative details of the plans, and then provide them the assistance they need to make choices that suit their needs and budget in the coming year.”

The Allsup Medicare Advisor is an affordable, flat-fee based service for Medicare-eligible individuals.

For an evaluation of Medicare options, call an Allsup Medicare Advisor specialist at (866) 521-7655 or visit Medicare.Allsup.com to learn more about the service.

The Allsup Medicare Advisor also has features that help financial advisors guide their clients to the Medicare plans that match their specific lifestyles and healthcare needs. Employers also use Allsup Medicare Advisor for their employees who are retiring and transitioning to Medicare. For more information, go to FinancialAdvisor.Allsup.com, or call (888) 220-9678.
ABOUT ALLSUP

Allsup is a nationwide provider of Social Security disability, veterans disability appeal, Medicare and Medicare Secondary Payer compliance services for individuals, employers and insurance carriers. Allsup professionals deliver specialized services supporting people with disabilities and seniors so they may lead lives that are as financially secure and as healthy as possible. Founded in 1984, the company is based in Belleville, Ill., near St. Louis. For more information, go to http://www.Allsup.com or visit Allsup on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/Allsupinc.

The information provided is not intended as a substitute for legal or other professional services. Legal or other expert assistance should be sought before making any decision that may affect your situation.

# # #

Contact:
Rebecca Ray, (800) 854-1418, ext. 65065, r.ray@allsupinc.com
Mary Jung, (773) 429-0940, mtjung@msn.com

Treat them like a person, not a patient

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Treat them like a person, not a patient

New living systems developmental model of care shifts the focus of treating Alzheimer’s disease and other debilitating illnesses

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. – Donald H. Ford observed that advanced Alzheimer’s patients, like his mother-in-law, are typically bored and lonely, and often depressed, frightened or angry.  His professional knowledge convinced him it didn’t have to be that way.  When Alzheimer’s struck his wife, he created a scientifically based alternative form of Alzheimer’s care that enabled her to still have a satisfying life.
Ford shares this revolutionary plan he used with his wife, Carol in the new book Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey: Treat Them Like a Person, Not a Patient. He is an experienced psychology professional and developed a living systems developmental model for care that incorporates an individual’s humanity. It helps patients live a meaningful and pleasurable life, despite their limitations. Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey is a guide for caregivers of senior citizens with serious limitations to improve their care receivers’ quality of life.
“Traditional medical model caregiving focuses on what’s wrong with a person and tries to fix it. However, when what is wrong can’t be fixed, the caregiver can’t succeed and that’s discouraging,” Ford says. “In Our developmental model of care, the focus is on what the person can still do and on designing experiences from which they get satisfaction.”
As people continue to gain more awareness of Alzheimer’s disease and other seriously debilitating diseases, plans like the model in Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey become more relevant. Based on his professional research, Ford believes that a person always functions as an integrated unit, so a model was needed that combined the biological, psychological, behavioral, social and contextual aspects of a person’s patterns of behavior when planning for elder care. Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey asks society to adopt the view that it is not enough to focus on keeping senior citizens alive and “warehousing them” until they die.
Ford’s plan in Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey is a person-centered quality of care focus.  It replaces the traditional medical emphasis on what is wrong with the person with a positive emphasis on using their remaining capabilities to create a satisfying life, despite limitations.

 

Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey: Treat Them Like a Person, Not a Patient
By Donald H. Ford
ISBN: 978-1-3008-0321-8 (sc); 978-1-3009-9178-6 (e)
Softcover, $26.55
Ebook, $8.99
Approximately 564 pages
Available at www.LuLu.com, www.amazon.com and www.barnesandnoble.com.

 

About the author
Donald H. Ford earned a Bachelor of Science, Master of Science and doctorate degrees in mathematics and psychology from KansasState and PennsylvaniaStateUniversities.  He spent the first 10 years of his career creating a new kind of psychological and developmental services program at PennState for students and their families.  Then PennState asked him to create a new kind of college called Health and Human Development.  It stimulated other universities to develop similar colleges.  After 10 years as Dean, he resigned and returned to his first love of teaching, scholarly and professional work.  He published seven books about psychotherapy and human development.

Debt and Senior Citizens by David Cunningham

August 28, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

dddddddddddddddd

We are in a consumer driven world. There are so many things all around us that make our lives easier and, in a way, influence us to think that we must have them. There are always things that we want which we simply cannot afford. As banks and credit card companies mushroom out of control, we are barraged with opportunities to accept so-called help from these financial institutions just so we can buy more merchandise we want but do not need.

The best part is that you do not even have go to them asking for the credit that you want. They will be at your beck and call offering credit cards, store credit cards (from those stores you wanted to purchase from anyway), merchandise cards (you’re given hundreds of dollars in credit to purchase from the company’s specific catalog), and leasing arrangements that allow you to pay over time.

The only problem with buying on credit is paying it off. Using an analogy, it is easier to step into quicksand than it is to get out. There isn’t always a branch lying around attached to a willing helper. Credit may be no problem if your current job earns enough money to repay your debts completely each month. It simply becomes part of your overall expenses. What happens, though, when your debt overextends your pay check?

Unfortunately, retired senior citizens are more susceptible to this pitfall. In prior years, they worked and earned a certain amount of money, but upon retirement are saddled with little more than Social Security – definitely a blow to the pocket book. Their income is not as flexible as it once was. There are solutions, however, from which seniors can benefit. Some are even geared specifically toward them.

As a senior citizen, you can request the help of a professional. Financial advisors are available to help tackle your problems. Asking for the aid of one such professional can save you a great deal of anxiety, credit ruin and, more importantly, stress. Your financial advisor can act as a mediator between you and creditors to develop “payoff amounts” that won’t leave you destitute – and usually at a fraction of your current payments. If you feel that you’re drowning financially, you shouldn’t wait until the water is over your head. Contact a financial advisor now for assistance.

Before meeting with an advisor, there are steps you should take to be best prepared for the discussion. Grab a notebook and pen to list all your creditors. List them in order of importance, starting with your mortgage (or rent or community fees, etc.) and ending with small payments like store credit cards. List their amounts as well. If you owe $50,000 on your home then list $50,000 and your current monthly payment. For example:

ABC Mortgage Company $50,000 (debt), $775 (monthly payment)

Listing the information this way will show your credit advisor that you are serious about getting your debt in order. It also is incredibly useful for the advisor in contacting your creditors since your financial advisor can then, at a glance, see what you owe and to whom. A sample short list follows below.

It is important that you have a clear comprehension of your financial situation. The best solution to debt is to not get into any that you cannot handle. However if you have already reached that “destination,” especially as a retired senior, then utilizing a financial advisor is certainly a great option to help rid yourself of the burden.

And now, the sample I promised:

John Smith

Total Monthly Income: $1200

DEBTS / MONTHLY PAYMENTS

ABC Mortgage $50,000 (debt), $750 (monthly payment)

Car Payment $20,000 (debt), $450 (monthly payment)

Credit Bank #1 $3,000 (debt), $25 (monthly payment)

Credit Bank #2 $1,200 (debt), $15 (monthly payment)

Store Credit Card #1 $5,000 (debt), $75 (monthly payment)

House Phone $50 (monthly payment)

Cell Phone $55 (monthly payment)

Total Debt $79,200

Total Monthly Payments $1,400

As you can see from this example, this person is losing $200 every month ($1400 monthly payments minus $1200 income). A financial advisor can usually negotiate with the credit card companies. They may even suggest that this person discontinue either their home phone or cell phone, for example, as most can probably get along with just one or the other.

For practical debt & credit assistance [http://www.debt-credit-assistance.com/credit_card_debt_solutions.shtml] information, please visit [http://www.debt-credit-assistance.com], a popular site providing great insights concerning how to address your issues and worries related to nagging debt struggles [http://www.debt-credit-assistance.com/usa_debt_management.shtml].

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Cunningham

 

Health Care for Senior Citizens – About Arthritis by KV Gopalakrishnan

August 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

images

Once you cross the threshold of fifty years, it is best to be aware of some typical diseases which have the potential to diminish your enjoyment of everyday living. Arthritis is certainly one of the ailments that falls into this class. This article offers you, in a nutshell, information about the disease, as well as the lifestyle modifications, which might enable you to prevent it and address it if needed.

What is Arthritis?

Arthritis is typically the swelling and infection of one or more body joints, where a pair of bones meet. Arthritis develop when the cartilage, which protects a joint and enables it to move freely, gets affected. Since the cartilage facilitates in absorbing impact when stress is exerted on the joint like when you walk or jog, its damage affects movement of the joint. When the normal quantity of cartilage material diminishes, the bones may begin rubbing with each other, triggering discomfort, swelling (inflammation), and rigidity, resulting in Arthritis.

Causes for Arthritis

The damage to the cartilage and joint soreness can occur due to a variety of factors. This impairment to the cartilage can occur due to normal wear and tear of joints, a damaged bone, infection in the region caused by bacteria or virus, and in some cases due to an auto-immune condition wherein body immune system erroneously assaults healthy tissues. Generally Arthritis gets cured once the particular trigger goes away or is addressed. At times the disease does not get cured. When this occurs, it is called chronic Arthritis.

Signs and symptoms of Arthritis

The indicators of this illness include joint ache, joint inflammation, restricted movements of one’s joints, soreness on the skin close to a joint, stiffness especially in the early morning and warmth all-around a joint. An early on diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis is definitely a crucial factor in treating it and also preventing it from turning into acute.

Treatment options for Arthritis

The healthcare specialist treating Arthritis is referred to as a Rheumatologist. The comprehensive treatment solution of Arthritis consists primarily of life-style modifications, physical exercise program, and if needed medicines, dietary supplements and surgical procedure. Immediate therapy include things like, heating or cooling, Orthotics (splints) support, water treatment and massage therapy. The objective of treatment is usually to minimize suffering, enhance function, and prevent further harm to the joint. Nevertheless, in a few instances, the root cause can not be remedied.

Cure for Arthritis – Lifestyle changes

Life-style modifications are the favored treatment solution for Arthritis as well as other types of joint inflammation. Primarily, it is important to get rid of any excess weight to reduce the stress on the affected joints. Physical exercise may help alleviate stiffness, minimize suffering and fatigue, and boost muscle and bone strength. It is best to seek advice from your therapist to design a workout plan that may suit your needs.. Work out plans may also incorporate low impact aerobic activity, flexibility workouts and power training for muscular tissues. If necessary, the therapist can recommend usage of some unique devices to help you to drive, dress and do other everyday activities.

Other tips which can enable you to get relief include:

 

  • Having 8-10 hours of sleep,
  • Avoiding remaining in one position.
  • Avoiding extra pressure on joints and
  • Practicing yoga and meditation.

 

So far as nutrition is concerned, it is best to eat healthy diet which include:

 

  • Substantial amount of fruits and veggies,
  • Omega three rich foodstuff such as fish, soybeans and walnuts.
  • Complex carbohydrates with minimal salt, sugar and fat
  • Green tea is claimed to scale back inflammation and degradation of cartilage.

 

Prevention of Arthritis

For prevention of Arthritis, please take care to avoid strain or injury to joints and also to have timely cure of infections in the region of joints. It might be far better to stay away from jogging after you cross fifty years of age mainly because it can result in weakness to knee joints and lower back.. Swimming is an effective alternative for jogging.

The lifestyle adjustments and the dietary recommendations described in the section ‘Cure for arthritis – Lifestyle changes’ are equally relevant in preventing it.

The goal of this short article is to present you with basic information about Arthritis as well as emphasize the significance of lifestyle modifications for curing and preventing it. Having said that, you should invariably seek the advice of a healthcare professional to treat the ailment.

Senor Citizen Consultant

Retired from Government service and enjoying life.

My aim is to help senior citizens by giving useful tips to enable them to enjoy health, wealth and happiness.

http://enjoyafter50.com/ <-Visit this website for tips and tricks to make your retirement life happy and enjoyable.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=KV_Gopalakrishnan

Sunscreen on Your Feet?

July 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Sunscreen on Your Feet?
Doctors Urge Sunscreen Use and Exams to Prevent Skin Cancer on Feet

CHICAGO—July 8, 2013 Many people do not think about their feet when applying sunscreen, but did you know that the skin on your feet is highly susceptible to melanoma and other forms of skin cancer? The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) warns that skin cancer of the foot is prevalent and can even be fatal if not caught early.

While all types of skin cancer, including squamous cell and basal cell carcinoma, can be found on the foot, the most common is the most serious form, melanoma. Symptoms can be as subtle as an abnormal-looking mole or freckle found anywhere on the foot, and often go unnoticed without routine foot exams.

The foot and ankle surgeons of ACFAS offer these tips to keep your feet safe this summer:

  • Lather up with sunscreen from head to toe—literally—when at the pool or beach to protect your skin from the harmful rays of the sun.
  • Check your feet and toes regularly for symptoms such as an abnormal-looking mole or freckle anywhere on the foot – even under toenails and on your soles.
  • Look for moles or freckles that change in size or shape. If you notice anything suspicious, promptly schedule an appointment with your foot and ankle specialist to have the mark examined.
  • Schedule routine exams with your foot and ankle specialist so he or she can keep track of suspicious, changing marks.

According to Boston foot and ankle surgeon Thanh Dinh, DPM, FACFAS, early diagnosis is key to effective treatment for the condition. But because people aren’t looking for the early warning signs or taking the same precautions they do for other areas of the body, often times skin cancer in this region is not diagnosed until later stages.

For more information on skin cancer of the foot or other foot and ankle health information, visit the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeon’s patient education website, FootHealthFacts.org,

# # #


The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of over 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons. Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research, provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its patient education website, FootHealthFacts.org.

Ophthalmologists Warn that Fireworks-Related Injuries Can Cause Permanent Vision Loss

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Ophthalmologists Warn that Fireworks-Related Injuries Can Cause Permanent Vision Loss
American Academy of Ophthalmology and Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology urge parents to closely supervise children when around fireworks

LAS VEGAS – June 26, 2013 – As the Fourth of July holiday approaches and Americans make plans to celebrate the stars and stripes with a little red glare from celebratory rockets, the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology urge the public to take important steps to prevent fireworks-related eye injuries. The academies ask parents and other adults to be especially cautious when children are in the presence of fireworks.

Of the more than 9,000 fireworks injuries that occur in the United States each year, [I]approximately 45 percent are sustained by children age 15 and under.[II] Eyes are among the most injured body parts,[III] and one in six fireworks-related eye injuries results in permanent vision loss or blindness.[IV]

All fireworks are dangerous if not properly handled; however, sparklers cause the most injury and are particularly dangerous since many children handle them on their own. Sparklers typically burn at 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit. That temperature is nearly 1,000 degrees hotter than the boiling point of water, double the heat required to burn wood, hot enough to melt glass and cause third-degree burns to the skin.[V] Out-of-control bottle rockets also cause some of the most serious eye injuries, including corneal abrasions, traumatic cataract, retinal detachment, optic nerve damage and rupture of the eyeball – all of which can lead to potential blindness.

Both Academies advise the public that the best way to avoid potentially blinding injuries is to attend a professional public fireworks display instead of using consumer fireworks. For those who still decide to use legal consumer fireworks, the Academy recommends they follow these safety tips to prevent eye injuries:

  • Never handle fireworks without protective eyewear and ensure that all bystanders are also wearing eye protection.
  • Never let young children play with fireworks of any type. If older children are permitted to handle fireworks, ensure they are closely supervised by an adult and wear protective eyewear.
  • Clear the area of flammable materials and view fireworks from at least 500 feet away.
  • Leave the lighting of professional-grade fireworks to trained pyrotechnicians.

For those who attend professional fireworks displays and/or live in communities surrounding the shows:

  • Respect safety barriers at fireworks shows.
  • Do not touch unexploded display (show) fireworks; instead, immediately contact local fire or police departments to help.

“It’s vital that the public take seriously the dangers of using consumer fireworks. If mishandled, devastating injuries can occur – particularly to the eyes,” said Adam J. Rovit, M.D., president of the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology. “We urge parents and adults to be on high alert about these risks, especially if children are in the presence of fireworks, and take these safety measures to reduce the risk of eye injury.”

The Academy and the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology believe these tips can help to ensure safe Independence Day observances for everyone. If, however, a fireworks-related eye injury occurs, call 911 and seek medical help immediately. These injuries typically need advanced care by an ophthalmologist, a medical doctor who specializes in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

For more fireworks safety tips and additional information on how to maintain healthy vision, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology
The mission of the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology is to promote and advance the science and art of medical eye care. The Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology’s members are dedicated to treating and preventing eye diseases for all patients.  Learn more at Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide.  Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org.

About EyeSmart
The American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.orgto learn more.

###


[I] Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2011 Fireworks Annual Report, accessed at http://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/113888/2011fwreport.pdf

[II] Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Fireworks-Related Injuries to Children, accessed at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/108/1/190.full

Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2011 Fireworks Annual Report, accessed at http://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/113888/2011fwreport.pdf

[IV]  British Journal of Ophthalmology, Ocular firework trauma: a systematic review on incidence, severity, outcome and prevention, accessed athttp://bjo.bmj.com.proxy1.library.jhu.edu/content/94/12/1586.full#ref-11

[V] National Fireworks Protection Agency fireworks tips, accessed at http://www.nfpa.org/assets/files/pdf/public%20education/fireworkssafetytips.pdf

Northern Nevada Medical Center Announces New CEO, Alan Olive

Northern Nevada Medical Center Announces New CEO, Alan Olive

OliveBldg

(Sparks, NV) Northern Nevada Medical Center welcomes Alan Olive, MPH, MHA, as new CEO for the 108-bed hospital in Sparks, NV.

Born and raised in Reno, Olive has 19 years of healthcare leadership experience. He has served as CEO at northern Nevada hospitals including Carson Tahoe’s Sierra Surgical Hospital in Carson City and Renown South Meadows Medical Center in south Reno. He was also previously an executive with Providence Health and Services, based in Portland, Ore, and MountainView Hospital in Las Vegas, NV.

“Alan is an experienced health care professional with expertise in integrated health systems, project management, health plan partnerships, hospital operations, and physician relations,” said Karla Perez, Regional Vice President for Acute Care at Universal Health Services. “His experience and history in the Reno/Sparks area will greatly benefit Northern Nevada Medical Center and healthcare in the community.”

OliveHeadshot

Alan earned a Bachelor of Science in Sociology from Brigham Young University and a Master of Public Health – Hospital Administration and Master of Healthcare Administration from Loma Linda University.

OliveLobby

Northern Nevada Medical Center is a 108-bed acute care hospital located in Sparks, Nevada. NNMC’s tradition of providing quality healthcare in a comfortable, accessible environment means peace of mind for the thousands of patients served by the hospital each year.

 

NNMC is the only hospital in Nevada certified by The Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center as well as knee replacement, hip replacement and spine surgery. NNMC is also the first program in the nation certified by The Joint Commission in low back pain and is also an Accredited Chest Pain Center by the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care. Northern Nevada Medical Center is owned and operated by a subsidiary of Universal Health Services, Inc.(UHS), a King of Prussia, PA-based company, that is one of the largest healthcare management companies in the nation.

Headed to the Beach? Don’t Let Your Feet Ruin Your Vacation

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Headed to the Beach? Don’t Let Your Feet Ruin Your Vacation

CHICAGO—July 2, 2013 As millions of Americans hit the beach this summer, the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons offers these foot safety tips:

  • Wear shoes to protect your feet from puncture wounds and cuts. Sea shells, broken glass and other sharp objects when stepped on can ruin your day at the beach. Avoid the water if your skin gets cut – bacteria in oceans and lakes can cause infection. If you do suffer from a puncture wound, have it treated by a foot and ankle surgeon within 24 hours to avoid complications.
  • Feet get sunburned, too. Rare but deadly skin cancers, such as melanoma, can occur on the foot. Prevent skin cancer on your feet by lathering up with sunscreen. Don’t forget to apply to both the tops and bottoms of your feet!
  • Wear shoes to protect your soles from getting burned as you walk on blistering-hot sand, sidewalks and pavement. Take extra precaution if you have diabetes.
  • Be careful with your footing while playing beach sports such as Frisbee or volleyball – walking, jogging and playing sports on soft, uneven surfaces frequently leads to arch pain, heel pain, ankle sprains and other injuries. It’s best to wear supportive shoes while playing beach sports. If injuries occur, use rest, ice, compression and elevation to ease pain and swelling. Any injury that does not resolve within a few days should be examined by a foot and ankle surgeon.
  • Remember jellyfish stings can still occur even if it’s washed up on the beach. Remove any tentacles that may stick to the foot or ankle, and protect your hands. Vinegar, meat tenderizer or baking soda reduce pain and swelling. Most jellyfish stings heal within days, but if they don’t, see a doctor.
  • Diabetes Risks: People who have diabetes face serious foot safety risks at the beach. The disease causes poor blood circulation and numbness in the feet. A person with diabetes may not feel pain from a cut, puncture wound or burn. Any type of skin break on a diabetic foot has the potential to get infected and ulcerate if it isn’t noticed right away. People with diabetes should always wear shoes to the beach, and remove them regularly to check for foreign objects like sand and shells that can cause sores, ulcers and infections.

For more information on foot and ankle health, visit the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeon’s patient education page at FootHealthFacts.org.


About ACFAS

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of more than 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons. Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research and provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its consumer website, http://FootHealthFacts.org.

RENOWN HEALTH WELCOMES 71 NURSE GRADUATES

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

RENO, Nev. (July 5, 2013) – Renown Health is excited to welcome 100 new
employees, including 71 local registered nurse (RN) graduates, several
experienced RNs, and 20 more employees in front-line patient care and other
roles. The new hires will meet for their first day of orientation at Renown
Regional Medical Center on Monday, July 8.

“We are pleased that so many of the area’s graduates choose Renown as the
place to build their career. Renown nurses and other healthcare
professionals have a tremendous opportunity to develop skills in multiple
areas. The Renown Health network includes three acute care hospitals, a
rehabilitation hospital, a skilled nursing facility and a large physician
practice,” said Michelle Sanchez-Bickley, Vice President Human Resources.
“With the wide range of clinical services we offer at Renown, employees have
a wealth of options to explore.”

As a private employer, Renown has developed programs to train healthcare
professionals and works closely with the university and community colleges
to offer residencies, clinical rotations, mentoring programs and local
faculty. The newly graduated RNs will participate in Renown’s nurse training
programs, which provide clinical support, education and mentoring. According
to Sanchez-Bickley, “Our residency and preceptorship programs are extremely
beneficial for new nurses they transition from the classroom to the
bedside.”

Renown is the region’s largest private employer and according to a recent
report from the Center for Regional Studies at University of Nevada, Reno,
the healthcare sector is a chief driver of western Nevada job growth. In
fact, healthcare employment grew by 9.6 percent over the past five years
while other sectors experienced a decline in jobs.

“We are committed to hiring, developing and retaining local employees,” said
Sanchez-Bickley. “To have a recruitment class of this size is very exciting
for Renown, and I hope for the new employees as well.” In total, Renown
employs 5,200 people and more than 1,400 of those are RNs.

Renown is a strong supporter of regional nursing programs, partnering with
the University of Nevada, Reno Orvis School of Nursing, Truckee Meadows
Community College, Western Nevada College and Carrington College. “Through
these partnerships,” said Sanchez-Bickley, “we are able to strengthen our
community ties, helping to provide education and support to individuals who
are looking to enter into the healthcare industry.”

# # # #

About Renown Health
Renown Health is Reno’s only locally owned, not–for–profit integrated
healthcare network. As the region’s largest private employer with a
workforce of more than 5,000 members, Renown provides more services than all
other local healthcare networks combined. It is comprised of three acute
care hospitals, a rehabilitation hospital, a skilled nursing facility, the
largest medical group and urgent care network and the region’s largest and
only locally owned not-for-profit insurance company, Hometown Health. Renown
also carries a long tradition of being the first in the region to
successfully perform the most advanced procedures.

Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center
recently achieved the Pathway to Excellence® designation, becoming the first
and only hospital in Nevada to receive this designation by the American
Nurses Credentialing Center. As a Pathway to Excellence designated
organization, Renown is committed to nurses’ satisfaction.

Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads

June 5, 2013 by · Comments Off on Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads
Filed under: Articles 

Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom Shares Coping Strategies to Support Accidental Caregivers Tending to Ailing Moms and Dads

BOSTON, May 2, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Mother’s and Father’s Day celebrations are approaching, yet millions of adult children care for parents year round while on the brink of burnout.  Catapulted into the accidental caregiver role without warning, stressed-out kids are doing their best to hold life together when everything seems to be falling apart.

Boston Elder Care Expert A. Michael Bloom issues a timely warning. “You must seek support as a caregiver.  The life you save may be your own.”

Bloom offers practical coping strategies to help family caregivers recharge their energy and avoid burnout during a free monthly Caregiving Power Hour.  During these tele-sessions, caregivers get tactical solutions to get through the week ahead.  Bloom wants to inspire and train caregivers to provide quality support for their loved ones while fully living their own lives.

“It’s coaching, community, and caring in the gift of an hour of sacred time that can really make a difference,” Bloom says.

Bloom knows the stressful caregiving journey well.  He served as the primary, live-in caregiver for his parents during their final years.  His father passed away in 2009 and, after a courageous battle with cancer, Bloom’s mother passed away in his loving arms on Mother’s Day 2012.

“Caregivers put the well-being of loved ones first which can mean putting their own needs and plans on the back burner.  The regret for career or life enhancing opportunities not taken can be a bitter pill to swallow,” Bloom says.

He honors the legacy of his parents by sharing key steps along the roadmap to caregiving without regret.

  1. Release Crisis Mode. Stop being a victim to circumstances so you feel stronger and become laser-focused to meet your family’s needs.  Supporting loved ones through medical challenges is overwhelming and scary.  When you become aware that feeling like a victim or in a state of crisis is a mindset, you can successfully shift back into taking control and positive action.
  2. Overcome Conflict.  Communicate and cope with calm and clarity. Otherwise, you will crash while riding the emotional roller coaster associated with disability or disease. Mastering your own trigger points for anger and frustration will lead you to deal effectively with the most challenging people and circumstances in your life.
  3. Achieve Buy-In. Motivate others to contribute based upon their individual abilities, preferences, and talents so your loved one receives the most satisfying support possible.  Giving others choices for how they can serve will foster their desire to gladly help on a regular basis.
  4. Deliver Greatness and Compassion in Equal Doses.  Become the inspiring caregiver that people cheer for and gladly support in meaningful ways.  Let your compassion shine through in all actions as you support your loved one.  Devote equal time for self-care so you have the energy to let your best shine through even during tough times.
  5. Magnetize and Motivate Talent. Create an atmosphere that attracts and retains the best people to join your loved one’s care team and experience brilliant performance.  Stay positive and open to the opinions of others so you can facilitate options for the best care and support.
  6. Access Intuition.  Trust your instincts and let your care and dedication guide your decisions.  Share any concerns and questions with key support professionals.  It is better to explore a concern that proves to be okay rather than ignore something that could be life threatening.
  7. Put Chocolate in Your Pill Box.  Find ways to fuel your soul so you can thrive during the caregiver journey and develop the passion and purpose for your life beyond caregiving.  Dose yourself regularly to avoid burnout while creating enduring satisfaction and success.

About Certified Professional Coach and Energy Leadership™ Master Practitioner A. Michael Bloom

Since 2011, A. Michael Bloom has revitalized the careers of hundreds of family and professional caregivers with practical, tactical soul-saving coping strategies that support them in saving lives – including their own.  An in-demand New England speaker, workshop leader, and coach, Bloom has influenced hundreds of caregivers to follow a roadmap to avoid burnout and recharge their caregiving energy.  The author of the forthcoming book, The Accidental Caregivers Survival Guide: Your Roadmap to Caregiving Without Regret, Bloom welcomes media interviews, speaking engagements, and the opportunity to inspire caregivers around the world via his monthly Caregiving Power Hours.  Learn more at http://www.bloomforcoach.com/powerhour/.

Caring.com’s New Referral Program Supported by Leading Assisted Living Operators

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Caring.com’s New Referral Program Supported by Leading Assisted Living Operators

Caring.com Named Preferred Provider by Assisted Living Federation of America (ALFA)

SAN MATEO, Calif., May 6, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — A group of the nation’s largest senior living providers — including Brookdale Senior Living (NYSE: BKD), Emeritus Senior Living (NYSE: ESC), Benchmark Senior Living, and Senior Star — have chosen Caring.com as their agency of record for national buying of Internet leads for families looking for housing and care for their elderly loved ones. Separately, the Assisted Living Federation of America (ALFA) named Caring.com as its preferred partner for Internet marketing services.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20070921/AQF020LOGO)

With surging demand in the U.S. senior housing market, more Americans than ever before are turning to the Internet and online word of mouth to find and select the best senior living providers for their senior loved ones. About 30-50% of the senior living industry’s leads are coming from the Internet and that number is expected to rise, as tech adoption among baby boomers and seniors alike continues to increase. Whether seeking independent livingassisted living, or memory care, about two million consumers every month turn to Caring.com to find expert guidance about their options, research local providers, and get help in making well-informed selection decisions.

The country’s top senior living providers have chosen Caring.com to increase visibility of their senior living communities, optimize inquiry-to-visit rates, and leverage Caring.com’s resources to better nurture leads from the moment the search begins, through the research and decision-making phases, all the way to community selection and move-in.

In Q4-2012, Caring.com expanded its service offering with the launch of a new toll-free referral help line. Available seven days a week to those seeking senior housing, Caring.com’s family advisors explain different types of senior living options, help identify local senior communities matched to the prospective resident’s needs and preferences, schedule tours, share and encourage consumer reviews, and answer a range of senior living questions. With this added consumer support infrastructure, as well as other new and expanded capabilities for lead qualification and nurturing, the group of senior living community partners announced Caring.com as the agency of record for lead qualification and development, starting January 1. The help line is now referring nearly four thousand prospective residents per week.

“Caring.com has been great to work with as they’ve added the referral model to their business,” said Jayne Sallerson, executive vice president of sales and marketing at Emeritus Senior Living. “Emeritus wanted to consolidate our Internet lead buying with a company we could trust, and Caring.com has demonstrated their commitment to consumers, to us, and to the industry. Their new program is showing positive signs of increased tours and conversions.”

“Caring.com has proven themselves to be a strong partner for Brookdale,” said Jim Pusateri, senior vice president of sales at Brookdale Senior Living. “Working with fewer Internet lead sources has improved our operational efficiencies, lowered our marketing costs, and improved consumers’ experience with Brookdale Senior Living.”

Separately, ALFA, the largest national association of providers of professionally managed communities for seniors, signed Caring.com as its preferred provider for Web-based lead services as well as to power the organization’s new ALFA Senior Living Community Directory.

“Caring.com is our preferred provider of Web-based services because they are an exceptional online resource,” said Richard P. Grimes, president and CEO of ALFA, which is the largest national association exclusively dedicated to professionally managed, consumer-driven senior living communities. “Caring.com’s high-quality content, easy-to-use directory, and online reviews help prospective residents and their families find the right solutions for their needs — this is good for consumers and good for senior living.”

“From the beginning, we’ve focused on building the most comprehensive and most credible online resource to help those caring for a senior parent, spouse, or other loved one,” says Andy Cohen, co-founder and CEO of Caring.com. “Unlike some other Internet resources that will only share information about those providers who pay them, we’ve stayed true to our social mission and help connect consumers to a variety of quality resources for their needs. Working with ALFA and the leading senior living communities helps enable our ability to best serve those in need of senior care — and we continue to offer referral to free and low-cost support resources as well.”

More information for senior living providers interested in partnering with Caring.com is available here: http://providerinfo.caring.com/ProviderGetListed.html Consumers can begin their search for senior housing here: http://www.caring.com/local

About Caring.com
Caring.com is the leading website for family caregivers seeking information and support as they care for aging parents, spouses, and other loved ones. Caring.com provides helpful caregiving content,online support groups, and the most comprehensive Senior Care Directory in the United States, with 35,000 consumer ratings and reviews and a toll-free senior living referral line (1-866-824-8174). In January 2012, Caring.com launched the Caring Stars award program recognizing America’s best assisted living communities based on consumer reviews. This year, 383 communities in 40 states were named the Caring Stars of 2013. Based in San Mateo, California, Caring.com is a private company funded by DCM, Intel Capital, Shasta Ventures, and Split Rock Partners. Connect with Caring.com onFacebookTwitterGoogle+, PinterestLinkedIn and/or YouTube.

CONTACT: PR@caring.com, 650-762-8190

Top 10 steps to prepare for a remodel

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Top 10 steps to prepare for a remodel

NARI offers tips in honor of National Home Improvement Month.

  

Des Plaines, Illinois, May 8, 2013—In honor of National Home Improvement Month this May, the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) advises homeowners of the 10 most important steps to take before the remodeling project starts.

“The planning and researching phases of a project are the most critical steps in the remodeling process,” says NARI National President Art Donnelly, MCR, CKBR, Legacy Builders & Remodelers Corp., based in Mount Sinai, N.Y. “The more knowledgeable and prepared a homeowner is, the more they protect themselves.”

What can a homeowner do to prepare for a remodel? NARI provides a top 10 list of steps homeowners should take before breaking ground on their next remodel.

  1. Research your project. Taking time to research projects on the Internet and NARI.org will provide a good sense of what is involved such as price, scope of work, return on investment and new product/material options. Also, research property values in your neighborhood to make sure your project is in line with other homes in the area.
  2. Plan project around the long-term. How long do you plan to stay in your home? How might your family structure change over time? Life can change quickly—these questions should be answered early on to ensure your project will fit your lifestyle long after it’s complete.
  3. Set your budget. Deciding on a realistic budget and arranging finances to support your project are essential. This number needs to include everything—the project, products, contingencies, etc. Don’t be afraid to share this with your remodeler; professionals are respectful of a client’s budget and will create a plan around it, not over it.
  4. Use advanced search for professionals. The online world makes it easy to gather information about strangers. Ask friends, family and neighbors for referrals and then spend time researching that person online. Professional remodelers take their reputation seriously and hold credentials beyond licensing, such as certifications, memberships in trade associations and additional training. Look for examples of press coverage or involvement in industry presentations or events. Check online reviews and social media to see how they interact with past clients and peers.
  5. Ask the right questions. Time and cost are important, but getting the right information requires the right questions. Ask your professional remodeler about his educational background, training, specialties or past issues with clients. Ask about how the remodeling process will work.
  6. Verify your remodeler. Don’t take their word for it. Check the information given to you such as references, license numbers, insurance information and certifications by calling providers to verify. Request a visit to an active client’s jobsite. Make it known that you are checking on him—a true professional considers that as a positive sign to working with a homeowner.
  7. Review contracts word-by-word. A remodeling contract protects you and your remodeler. Homeowners should review this carefully. Professional remodelers have done this before, and know what should go in a contract. Homeowners are not as familiar with remodeling and should ask about terms if they don’t understand. Pay attention to details about change orders, payment, additional fees, timeline and responsibilities. If it’s not in the contract, it doesn’t exist.  
  8. Keep design in mind. Your design guides the entire project. Think about what you dislike about your current space and the intended use of the new space. Use Websites such as Pinterest.com and Houzz.com to gather design ideas. Make sure you can articulate specifically what you like about that design when talking to your designer. Professionals don’t recreate a photo—they incorporate accessibility, functionality, ease of modification, style and value into your design.
  9. Make your selections. Deciding on products and materials is a larger process than most imagine. With so many options to choose from, product selections are one of the primary reasons for project timelines to get extended. Base decisions on quality, function, price, style and availability. Include selections in the contract to lock down pricing and keep your budget intact.
  10. Create a communication plan. A common downfall in remodeling is lack of communication between homeowners and remodelers. Your remodeler should lay out a communication plan at the beginning of the project. If not, ask them to do so. This plan should clarify roles of everyone involved, communication methods, availability, and frequency of communication that is expected.

As an industry that struggles with a persistent negative perception of remodeling contractors, these tips serve both the industry and consumers in elevating real professionals from the pack.

The first step to hiring a professional is through NARI, whose members are vetted and approved by industry peers to ensure they live up to the professional standards that NARI sets. “NARI members are proud of their affiliation and commitment to professionalism, and it’s a reputation they work hard to protect,” Donnelly says.

Consumers may visit www.NARI.org to find a qualified professional who is a member of NARI or call NARI National at (847) 298-9200 and request a free copy of NARI’s brochure, “How to Select a Remodeling Professional.”

Click here to see an online version of this press release.

EDITOR’S NOTE: NARI can provide hi-res digital photos of award-winning projects to accompany your story. Contact NARI with your photo request at marketing@nari.org or ask for Morgan Zenner at (847) 298-9200.

# # #

About NARI: The National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) is the only trade association dedicated solely to the remodeling industry.  The Association, which represents member companies nationwide—comprised of 63,000 remodeling contractors— is “The Voice of the Remodeling Industry.”™ To learn more about membership, visit www.NARI.org or contact national headquarters, based in Des Plaines, Ill., at (847) 298-9200.

Health Insurance for Senior Citizens – How to Get the Best Rate by Brian Stevens

May 31, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As a senior citizen, you may find yourself in a health insurance crisis – no longer covered by an employer’s health insurance policy but needing health insurance more than you ever did before. Of course, Medicare covers some of your medical expenses, but how can you get the best rate on health insurance to cover the gaps Medicare leaves?

What Medicare Covers

Once you are 65 years old, you’re eligible to enroll in Medicare. Medicare can include several programs:

* Medicare Part A, which helps cover inpatient hospital care, nursing home care, hospice care, and some home health care. Most people pay for this coverage through taxes, so they do not pay a deductible or monthly premium.

* Medicare Part B, which helps cover doctors’ services, outpatient hospital care, medical equipment, physical and occupational therapy and some home health care. Most people pay an annual deductible and a monthly premium for this health plan.

* Medicare Part C, Medicare Advantage Plan, which offers you more choices among health plans and extends your benefits.

* Medicare Part D, prescription drug coverage.

In addition, you may need MediGap coverage, which is health insurance that covers what Medicare does not.

Affordable Health Insurance for Senior Citizens

As you can see, health insurance for senior citizens can be confusing. Fortunately, insurance comparison websites can help you gain a clear picture of what health insurance you need, as well as help you find that insurance at a reasonable rate.

All you need to do is go to an insurance comparison website and complete a simple form with information about yourself and your insurance needs. Once you submit the form, you will soon receive quotes for affordable health insurance from multiple A-rated insurance companies. And at the best insurance comparison websites, insurance professionals are standing by to talk with you and answer any health insurance questions you have. (See link below.)

Visit http://www.LowerRateQuotes.com/health-insurance.html or click on the following link to get health insurance quotes for senior citizens from top-rated companies and see how much you can save. You can also get more insurance tips there.

The authors, Brian Stevens and Stacey Schifferdecker, have spent 30 years in the insurance and finance industries, and have written a number of articles on health insurance for senior citizens.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Brian_Stevens

Final Expense Life Insurance: Life Insurance Agent Lures Senior Citizen Inside A Decaying Casket by Donald Yerke

May 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

The sale of final expense life insurance opens up dormant prospects. Final expense life insurance representatives employ intense selling techniques  with a senior.

Looking confident but insecure, the sales agents feature dollar symbol  tattoos etched upon their chests. Typically enlarged eyes like low-cost red neon  glare as their looks show signs of being famished. In spite of this, these  indicated company agents resemble an assassin centering in on the newly  generated money target… a senior citizen.

Just about any older senior citizen has gained ample deep-rooted ability by  encounters with nonstop sellers. Stricken by a sales figure quota, the sales  agent keeps trying to hack continuously for sales closings. Stabilizing in for  improved position gets him shifting backward, bordering on dropping back just  like a gunshot hare.

The sales agent gives his best presentation. All the same, in all certainty  this is absolutely not a quick game, yet this still is an important matter of  life and death..By this time many newer career agents get raindrops of anxiety  arising swifter than the countless stars in the sky.

The retired weakened senior catches his breath and then takes an object out  of his new sweater zippered pocket. Out from an undersized vial of  prescriptions, he removes a singular one, more shrunken than an upsetting bug.  Without water to drink, the speck of the potent nitrate is centered then below  his tongue.

Wonder overwhelms the representative, now aware that this is absolutely  without doubt no chunk of sweet stuff. Making a response, the senior citizen  starts commenting in a gentle scratchy vocal tone. He replies it was a nitrate  pill as previously he had sustained a congestive heart stoppage. Flowing words & phrases bring figures of a full-length account of health circumstances.  Then a smile glows, as a gesture to the agent to dismiss the final expense life  insurance.

No doubt he had completely been outdone. How could this retiree still be  persuaded even if he rips the paperwork form from the agent’s possession?   His  plans of a high demanding canned sales recital turns to a grinding halt. The  newer agent is mum. And then finally he knows that letting a client feel being  in a burial place is absolutely cold.

On this occasion with the mild light wind, the conversation adjusts to one of  interactive mutual interest. The topic is fishing.. This improved topic  activates passion, even if at points the vastness of trophy fish landed most  certainly appeared to be expanded.

This newer agent notices how swiftly the chitchat among the two flows back & forth. Maybe securing the respect of the potential purchaser to approve of  you is much more gainful than fighting disputes? Perhaps confidence evolves into  being as potent as facts and results?

Closely after comes a move surprising the agent, similar to a creepy  cockroach unveiled to a spotlight. The older senior citizen pulls from inside  his wallet a picture of his individual grandchild. Next gently nudging the sales  agent he asks, “Will you tell me of the final expense life  insurance?”

The company agent holds to  his very greedy wants only,. Not at any time does  he inform the senior that the final expense life insurance coverage will  absolutely be turned down. Still, much like a crafty rat in an infested attic,  he scurries finding the insurance application. The good man even asks for being  insured for the greatest amount. Not even finishing the all-important paperwork  form, the trustworthy big-bellied new buyer goes into a far end passageway.  Reappearing, his fist is skintight encircling a roll of cash.

Close to drooling, the agent needs this newest purchaser to merely sign the  policy application. Arriving at the office later, the agent knows the final  expense life insurance application is not truly guaranteed issue. Quickly he  makes an unusual decision. The sales agent, very low on funds, decides to  swindle the $700.00 and destroy the application form.

Two years later to the day, the senior has his bright light turn to final  darkness. After the burial and coupled with grief, the grandchild finds he does  not receive one dime.

Case shut… but not completely. That precise identical time, a young chronic  drunk rams through the metal barrier aside a hill. Someone with identity  comparable to the former agent’s likeness is at once being engulfed in glowing  flames. After his instant cremation, no life insurance coverage is ever  located.

Final Expense Life Insurance was written by professional insurance business  writer, Donald Yerke. His writings will likely be launched right here, and  published in many locations. Find important material at Agents Insurance  Marketing, [http://www.agentsinsurancemarketing.com] right now. During the time  there steal your complimentary personal copy of “The Science of Getting Rich,”  as long as supplies last.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Donald_Yerke

Incremental Retirement – Sensible Advice For Senior Citizens by Jerry Elrod

May 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many senior citizens just won’t retire. They are ambitiously alive. They stay  busy. They love what they do. They are not putting off retirement because of  economic issues. They either own their business or are in a situation in which  their business gives them so much permission that the business can do quite well  without them. That is, of course, a fortunate place to be. They are in  incremental retirement. They are doing it in stages. For the most part, they  don’t keep rigid or strict hours. They are fully aware of what’s going on in  their business or their lives, but they don’t obsess over it. An acquaintance  is, at 70, building a new office and expanding his business. It is not to “make  more money” for himself. He gives it all away to his family and causes he  believes in.

Another person travels a great deal, sometime in a humongous motor home. He  is quite well off, but he chases around Texas doing what he does for his  business.

Still another is a retired judge, but still a practicing lawyer. He and his  spouse spend enormous time enjoying themselves with frequent travel forays and  maintain an elegant antebellum home in East Texas. When home, he still keeps a  busy roster of clients.

Incremental Retirement, whether continuing to pursue business or professional  interests, is a healthy way to retire. It doesn’t have to happen all at once.  One need not surrender the things of ones previous life all at once. Keeping up  with events and excitement in ones “career” world is a healthy way to stimulate  body, mind and soul.

Incremental Retirement means you may do it on your own terms. You can plan to  have a three-month hiatus, while the wheels keep turning. You can generate new  excitement and energy for living. You can even expand your career interests in  ways that will provide further for family, charity, a foundation, and a life of  absolute satisfaction.

So, look at Incremental Retirement, if you are fortunate like many senior  citizens, which may round out your life in enormously gratifying ways.

Article provided by Dr. Jerry D. Elrod. Dr Elrod, and his wife, Dr Sharon  Shaw Elrod, manage Senior Citizen Journal online. For information on retirement,  Baby Boomers and everything related to Seniors, please visit my blog at http://www.seniorcitizenjournal.com/. Links to  other Senior Citizen Journal pages can be found on the blog.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jerry_Elrod

 

Advocacy for Senior Citizens: Getting Your Loved One the Best Care Available by Matthew G Young

May 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

A senior care consultant can play a very helpful role in your loved one’s  care. There is no set requirement for the professional background of a senior  care consultant; they can be nurses, doctors, or even experienced caregivers.  The main thing that this profession needs is a good idea of all the options  available to a senior citizen in need. Senior care consultants are advisers to  families with a loved one that needs help. They handle all sorts of issues that  might arise. In short, a senior care consultant is a catch-all position for  keeping senior citizens happy and healthy.

Consultants don’t help just senior citizens. They are there for the support  of families and caregivers as well. A senior care consultant, then, needs to be  very well versed in the issues that affect all of these folks. Families often  have many needs, some of which they might not even know about. A consultant can  help you address any problems that might occur, even the ones that you are not  anticipating.

Why should you go with a senior care consultant? There are many reasons, but  the most important of these is that they will act as an advocate for your loved  one and your family. These people have your best interests in heart, and they  will find the very best options for your family. Rather than settling for any  old service, you will have the very best options arranged easily for you and  your family’s needs. As an advocate, the senior care consultant will make sure  that the care they receive is top notch. For example, if you cannot decide which  in home care provider to go with, the senior care consultant will have had  experience dealing with the providers in your area and will have a good idea of  which provider is best for your family’s situation. There are many good in home  care providers; a consultant can help you find not only a good one, but the best  one.

There are also other types of things that a senior care consultant can take  care of. Nutrition is another big area of concern. Having a proper diet is  crucial for maintaining proper health and weight. People tend to lose weight  when they get older because they are not getting the proper nutrients in their  diet. A consultant can have connections or the know how to provide the proper  amounts of nutrients to your loved one’s diet. Age related weight loss can  result in illness or weakened bones; this makes everything that is put into our  bodies extremely important. A good consultant will know exactly which foods and  vitamins will help your loved one out in the most effective manner.

Matthew G. Young is a freelance writer who specializes in financial, sports,  and health-related topics. To learn more about in home health care visit Paradise In Home  Care

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Matthew_G_Young

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!