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program director | Nevada Senior Guide

Niche Marketing Strategies For Tutoring Businesses Looking To Attract Senior Citizens by SK Tilton

April 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

For years, we’ve heard about the graying of our population from the baby boom  years. Our current class of senior citizens inductees (the population born  during the Baby Boom after World War II from 1946 to 1964) is going to make up  close to 20% percent of the total US population by 2029 according to the US  Census Bureau. What often goes unmentioned is that this mature population also  controls one of the largest percentages of disposable income. As a group, senior  citizens are and will be for some time the most affluent Americans. They hold  about three quarters of the nation’s financial assets worth approximately $1  trillion in disposable income annually.

Again, that is $1 trillion dollars in disposable income annually.

Many product and/or service oriented businesses have taken the long view and  begun marketing various products and services geared specifically to the older  consumer. Despite this recognition on the part of a few marketers, this  financially secure, mature group of consumers remains largely untapped by  educational companies and services. Take for instance the onslaught of new  technologies that seem to pop up like daisies in the spring, out of all consumer  groups, our seniors, are usually the last to be courted. While it may be true  that certain technologies are better suited for younger tech savvy consumers (I  am reminded of my elderly grandmother who purchased an unlimited text messaging  package on a small phone without text messaging capability and did I mention she  had arthritis), it doesn’t mean that this market is entirely unsuited for those  educational businesses and services that use technology to deliver their product  or service.

For a supplemental education service tutoring provider, this mature consumer  group is wide open with far less competition and minimal requirements in the way  of overhead expenditures. Two of the much-needed services that senior citizens  in particular lack are computer training and technology acclimation. Many of the  services supplemental education companies can provide, are the ones that are  most often overlooked or taken for granted, i.e. using the internet, opening up  an email account, social networking account registration, etc. If you are  reading this article, you can definitely offer those services and more. Suppose  for a moment you feel uncomfortable with your level of competence in offering a  few of these services, let me repeat what I said in my previous article, Niche  Marketing Strategies for Tutoring Businesses Looking To Attract Parents of  Students Taking State Standardized Tests, you do not have to be an expert in the  subject matter in order to provide supplemental services in the subject matter,  you just need to hire people with thorough experience related to the field.

The reason for the lack of competition in this age group is precisely because  this mature audience is a bit more discerning with their spending habits and a  more sophisticated approach is required to gain their attention, loyalty, and  dollars. However, it is for this very reason that supplemental education service  providers should dive into this market with fervor and enthusiasm. Education is,  and has always been a cornerstone for any age group. The value that the 50 and  over age group places on education should not go unnoticed. Along with  education, communication plays an important role in everyone’s lives and its  role only expands as one gets older. In the past, many grandparents would send  letters to their grandchildren and eagerly await their response. Grandparents  yearn to be a part of their grandchildren’s lives. Why not offer the ability to  stay in touch while simultaneously helping an older population learn and acquire  new skills? Imagine grandma’s joy every time she logs on to her e-mail account  and sees a message from her grandchild or when she receives a tweet. It’s truly  a win-win proposition!

Of course that’s just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the type of  services supplemental education providers can offer up in addition to computer  training. Curriculum and/or activities marketed to senior citizens can range  from learning a new language to scrap booking to ballroom dancing. If you’re  looking for ideas on what senior citizens are interested in learning, you can  find a compiled starter list below. Since most of your organized activities and  programs will consist of a variety of group sizes, you will have the ability to  market age specific specials and discounted tuition fees accordingly. Remember,  you run a supplemental education service business that should be able to teach  and tutor in multiple disciplines. You do not need to have any expert knowledge  in any of these areas, just hire someone who does. It is highly unlikely that  Sam Walton knew how to repair the diesel engines of every tractor-trailer that  brought in a load of merchandise to his stores, but his business (Walmart) hired  people who did have that expertise.

The best part about marketing to this age group is that they are fairly  accessible if you know where to look. Putting up postings/flyers at local  community church bulletins, visiting the adult education departments of local  community colleges, and contacting the Facility Director or Onsite Coordinator  at various assisted living facilities to propose your computer training or other  services to their residents, is a good way to start. If interested, there are  plenty of online directories that list full contact information for assisted  living facilities narrowed by zip code or state.

How about the Bingo nights? They are usually held at lodges, halls, churches,  and schools/community colleges.

Hold the presses! Yet another great source that has been largely abandoned by  the younger generation is the newspaper. Here’s a little known fact about the  newspaper industry – 65% of its readers are over the age of 55. By advertising  in this medium you are reaching over half of the newspapers readers – Now that’s  worth another read!

When it comes to reaching senior citizens, let your creativity lead the way,  your opportunities are limitless. For the astute, forward thinking individual,  this is a unique opportunity to service an undeserved demographic and separate  your business from the competition. Remember, thinking outside the box never  gets old!

Activity Ideas for Senior Citizens: · Computer Training  · Dance   · Yoga  · Painting  · Sewing · Journal Writing · Knitting or  crocheting  · Photography · Discussion Groups  · Exercise  ·  Knitting  · Foreign Language Conversation · Needlepoint  · Pinochle   · Quilting  · Tai Chi  · Writing workshops  · Crafts  ·  Bowling  · Bridge

S.K. Tilton has served as a program director, site coordinator, area  director, and as a SES business consultant to various SES (Supplemental  Education Services) tutoring companies across the United States. S.K. Tilton has  written numerous business plans for SES start ups and filed many approved  applications on behalf of SES tutoring companies. As a consultant, S.K. Tilton  has been responsible for presenting and implementing successful marketing plans  and helping first year start ups achieve success normally enjoyed by seasoned  SES veterans. S.K. Tilton’s latest work combines practical experience of the  best and worst SES practices to bring you the only SES success guide book  available. For further information on the SES Made Easy book and the author,  please visit http://www.sestutoringbiz.com.

Stay informed on the latest information regarding supplemental education  service tutoring at http://sestutoringbiz.com/category/Blog/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=SK_Tilton

 

Five Physicians Honored for Outstanding Care of Patients Near the End of Life

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Leaders who develop palliative care best practices receive 2013 Hastings Center Cunniff-Dixon Physician Awards.

(Garrison NY, January 15, 2013) Five physicians who have distinguished themselves in caring for patients near the end of life have been named recipients of the 2013 Hastings Center Cunniff-Dixon Physician Awards.

“The Hastings Center Cunniff-Dixon Physician Awards are in their fourth year, and the winners continue to exemplify excellence in doctoring for people with advanced illness,” said Richard Payne, M.D., Esther Colliflower Director of the Duke Institute on Care at the End of Life and a member of the selection committee. “They serve as beacons in their communities by being role models of quality comprehensive care.”

The awards were made in three categories: a senior award and a mid-career award of $25,000 each and three early-career awards of $15,000 apiece. Each recipient has been exemplary in one or more of four areas: medical practice, teaching, research, and community.

The Cunniff-Dixon Foundation, whose mission is to enrich the doctor-patient relationship near the end of life, funds the awards. The Hastings Center, a bioethics research institute that has done groundbreaking work on end-of-life decision-making, cosponsors the awards. The Duke Institute on Care at the End of Life oversees the selection process.

“Establishing high-quality end-of-life care has been a priority for The Hastings Center during its four-decade history,” said Mildred Z. Solomon, president of The Hastings Center. “The outstanding work of these physicians illustrates what we aim to promote in the care of all patients with advanced illness throughout the nation. The compassion and skill of these doctors are making a profound difference to patients and families, and we are enormously proud to honor them.”

The 2013 recipients are:
Senior Physician Award: Charles G. Sasser, M.D., FACP, FAAHPM, director of palliative care services at Conway Medical Center in Conway, S.C. He is a pioneer in palliative care who has been a model and mentor to generations of palliative care providers. Under his leadership, Conway established the first interdisciplinary team for palliative care services in South Carolina – a team that included nurses, social workers, pastors, and physicians. Colleagues praise the value he places on doctor-patient discussions and his mentorship of colleagues from all specialties and practices of medicine.

Mid-Career Physician Award: Daniel C. Johnson, M.D., FAAHPM, national physician lead for palliative care at Kaiser Permanente’s Care Management Institute, as well as director of Palliative Care Innovations and Development at Kaiser Permanente-Colorado and director of the Life Quality Institute in Denver. Dr. Johnson led the expansion of services at Kaiser Permanente-Colorado, partnering with local organizations to more than quadruple patient and family access to end-of-life care. At the Life Quality Institute, an organization dedicated to advancing palliative care through education, he oversaw the development of its award-winning education program for medical students, residents, and other health professionals.

Early-Career Physician Awards:
Drew Rosielle M.D., a palliative care physician and program director for the Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellowship at the University of Minnesota Medical Center in Minneapolis, for his commitment to evidence-based palliative and end-of-life care and education.

Jane de Lima Thomas, M.D., a palliative care physician and associate director of the Harvard Palliative Medicine Fellowship Program at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, for her leadership and impact on the development of the field of palliative care through training and modeling excellence in palliative care practice.

Alen Voskanian, M.D., regional medical director, VITAS Innovative Hospice Care, Torrance, Calif., for his effort to expand and develop innovative models of ambulatory palliative care and to raise awareness of the benefits of palliative and end-of-life care through work with government agencies and professional organizations.

The prize recipients were selected by a committee convened by The Hastings Center. In addition to Dr. Payne, the committee consisted of Thomas P. Duffy, M.D., of Yale University; Kathleen M. Foley, M.D., of Weill Medical College of Cornell University and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; and Larry R. Churchill, Ph.D., of Vanderbilt University.

Early Lung Cancer Detection component of the Worker Health Protection Program (WHPP) for former Nevada Test Site workers

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

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Announcing the introduction of the Early Lung Cancer Detection component of the Worker Health Protection Program (WHPP), a medical screening program for former Nevada Test Site workers. The new component of the program will introduce low-dose CT scans to at-risk former NTS workers with the primary goal of detecting lung cancer early, when treatment is more likely to be effective.

The official opening ceremony was on Wednesday, August 8th at 11:00 a.m. at the Atomic Testing Museum, 755 East Flamingo Road, Las Vegas, NV. The ceremony featured brief remarks by key program stakeholders, including government, union, medical and former worker representatives.

The Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized that workers in DOE facilities were exposed to lung carcinogens such as radiation, silica, asbestos and beryllium. In 2011, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) published a study confirming a reduction in mortality in high-risk individuals who were screened for lung cancer with a low-dose CT scan as compared to those screened with chest X-rays. This landmark study has increased DOE support and has allowed us to implement the use of low-dose CT scan program for at-risk former NTS workers. The medical screening program is operated by Queens College of the City University of New York, with funds provided by the DOE.

Also, please find a link to the NCI study below:
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1102873

If you have any questions at all, need more information or would like an interview with our program director, Dr. Lew Pepper, please be in touch to my contact information below.

Regards,

Jonathan Corbin, MPH
Outreach Coordinator
Worker Health Protection Program
CBNS, Queens College
718-670-4228 (Phone)
718-670-4167 (Fax)
www.worker-health.org

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Volunteer Opportunities – Rural Nevada

Nevada Rural Counties RSVP Inc.

2621 Northgate Lane, Suite 6

Carson City, NV 89706, 775-687-4680

tcausey@rsvp.carson-city.nv.us

www.nevadaruralrsvp.org

 

Nevada SMP – Senior Medicare Patrol

(702) 486-4341, Please call for information

 

Senior Companion Program of

Northern Nevada

1380 Greg Street, Ste. 212, Sparks, NV  89431

775-358-2322, Mary Brock, Director

Lyon, Churchill, Douglas & Carson County

Nevada-Senior-Guide Medical and Health Services Directory – Northern Nevada Rural

City of Pioche – County Social Services
Information

(775) 728-4477 Lincoln County

www.co.lincoln.nv.us

Provides various essential programs, services,  benefits to assist qualified, needy families,  individuals achieve their highest level of
self-sufficiency, Transportation

Elder Protective Services (EPS)

State of Nevada – Aging & Disability
Services Agency – Northern Nevada

(775) 688-2964 Washoe County

Elder Protective Services for persons 60 years

old and older who may experience abuse,

neglect, exploitation, or isolation. Elder

Protective Services serves all of Nevada

 

Eureka Senior Center

20 W. Gold Street, Eureka NV 89316

(775) 237-5597
www.co.eureka.nv.us/county/senior.htm

Referral Services for Low Income Energy

Assistance, USDA, and Medicare

Fallon Paiute Shoshone Tribe Senior Center

1885 Agency Rd., Fallon, NV 89406

(775) 423-7569 Churchill County

www.fpst.org/programs/seniorcenter.htm

Offers meals, trips, traditional crafts, and

other cultural events, caregivers, food bank,

national relief charities program

Kids to Seniors Korner – Saint Mary’s

Community Wellness, Community

Based Outreach

(775) 770-6177 Washoe County

www.saintmarysreno.com

Kids to Seniors Korner assists vulnerable                           individuals and families, with special
emphasis on homeless children and seniors,                          by linking and providing them with community               resources through a collaborative community                    partnership to increase quality of life 8am-5pm

Lyon County Human Services

1075 Pyramid St., Silver Springs, NV 89429

(775) 577-5009 Lyon County

www.lyon-county.org

All emergency services, Senior Services,

Low Income, Employment. 8am-5pm

 

Nevada Rural Counties Retired & Senior                              Volunteer Program (RSVP)

Pahrump, Amargosa, Beatty, Crystal

2621 Northgate Lane, #6

Carson City, NV 89701

775-687-4680, treebanks@pahrump.com

RSVP Program provides free local transportation                           to doctors, shopping, bank, Respite Care,     Caregiver Program (4 hours at a time), Pro                           Bono Legal Services, Resistance Exercise

Training, Coupons for Farmers Market
(Call program director for information)

 

NYE/Esmerelda County Community

Health Nursing

1 Frankee St., Tonopah, NV 89049

(775) 482-6659. Referral Service, Immunization
flu shots, counseling for women’s/men’s
health, cancer screening

 

RSVP Program – NV Rural Counties

Homemaker Companions, Donations Welcome

Senior Daybreak Program

Washoe County Senior Services

(775) 328-2575 Washoe County

www.co.washoe.nv.us/seniorsrv

Daycare for adults age 18 years or older as
alternative to institutionalization, Provides                        respite care, nursing, day care and social
opportunities for the disabled adult,

Offers group care during the day

 

Senior ID Card – Douglas Cty Nevada TRIAD

(775) 782-9858 Douglas County

This card is wallet size and should be carried                     at all times. It contains information that could
save your life in case of an emergency.
CARE TRAK Program.

 

The Continuum Outreach Program

Nevada Care Connection Partner

3700 Grant Dr., Ste A, Reno, NV 89509

(775) 829-4700 Washoe County

www.thecontinuum-reno.com

Adult day care, therapy and rehab

 

Douglas County Nevada TRIAD

Dementia/Senior and Elderly Services

The Evacuation Disaster Program

(775) 782-9858 Douglas County

For those who live alone or are disabled:
in the event of a disaster and would not be                           able to evacuate without assistance. This                  program signs you up for immediate
assistance to come to your aid in the event                            an evacuation request is issued.

Contact for Magnet that holds health info.

 

Washoe County Senior Services Law Project

1155 E. 9th St., Reno, NV 89512

(775) 334-3050 Washoe County

Assists seniors of Washoe County with
Social security, supplemental security income,                   Medicare, food stamps, county assistance,                                 public housing and Foreclosure Info.

Call for hours. 60+

WEARC Program (Waiver for the Elderly in

Adult Residential Care)

State of Nevada – Aging & Disability
Services Agency – Northern Nevada

(775) 688-2964 Carson City County
www.nvaging.net

A home and community based waiver for                  the elderly in group care that offers individuals                   a less expensive alternative to supervised                              care in a residential setting

Nevada-Senior-Guide KNPR 88-9 Radio – Las Vegas

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Leisure 

http://www.knpr.org/

NSG_FebMarApr_2014_Web16

Nevada Public Radio KNPR

Radio Reading Service
Nevada Public Radio
 Do you know someone who has a problem reading?Let Nevada Public Radio Help.The Radio Reading Service offers free reading broadcast 24 hours a day, seven days a week for people who are visually and print impaired.Statewide newspapers including the Review-Journal, Las Vegas Sun and Reno Gazette-Journal
National publications including Newsweek and the Wall Street Journal
Best-selling and critically-acclaimed booksSpecial radio receivers are provided free of charge for the broadcasts.

For an application, call Jay Bartos at
702-258-9895

KNEWS 970am

970 AMKNUU Las Vegas

Business & Financial Talk

Your money

Your life

Your radio station

News, Traffic & Weather throughout the day

Community shows on finance and lifestyle

Plus Paul Harvey, Ray Lucia

Bruce Williams, Lou Dobbs,

Wall Street Journal Reports

Donald Trump & Andy Vierra

Streaming on the web 24/7

970KNUU.com

Frequently Asked Questions About Nevada Public Radio
  • Privacy Policy
  • Mailing List Policy
  • Membership Information
  • Prize Giveaway Guidelines
  • Annual Report
  • Contact
  • Programs
  • Features
  • Radio Reading Service
  • Sponsors
  • Transmitters
  • Jobs
  • Auto Donation
  • E News
  • HD Radio
“Nevada Public Radio will be recognized as the leading independent source of information and cultural expression, and a catalyst for civic engagement.”

Our history…

Nurtured in its formative years by the Clark County Library District, Nevada Public Radio was incorporated in December, 1975 as an independent, Nevada non-profit corporation. Its flagship station, KNPR signed on the air March 24, 1980 as Nevada’s first National Public Radio (NPR) affiliated station.

Nevada Public Radio operates a non-commercial, radio broadcast network comprised of seven stations, KNPR Las Vegas (88.9), KCNV Las Vegas (89.7), KTPH Tonopah (91.7), KLNR Panaca (91.7), KWPR Lund/Ely (88.7), KSGU St. George (90.3), KLKR Elko (89.3), plus five rural translators. It is overseen by a volunteer Board of Directors including founder and Director Emeritus, Lamar Marchese.

The staff includes full-time staff of 30, plus part time and contract employees, and dozens of administrative and fundraising volunteers. More than 9,000 members and 50 corporations and foundations support the stations.

KNPR broadcasts with 100,000 watts (ERP), at 88.9 FM. It programs a 24 hour service of National Public Radio (NPR) news and information, with specialty shows like A Prairie Home Companion and Car Talk. (See our program schedule.)

Nevada Public Radio produces 10 hours a week of original content. KNPR’s State of Nevada is a national award-winning public affairs program supported by a dynamic web site.  Launched with a $500,000 grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, KNPR’s SoN has been honored locally and nationally for program excellence including the ACE Award from the Public Radio Program Directors Association.

Independent research shows the combined Nevada Public Radio weekly audience is more than 200,000 listeners, our website attracts approximately 240,000 visitor sessions each month and more than 200,000 audio downloads of original content.

To serve residents of Nevada and adjacent states, Nevada Public Radio operates a series of transmitters extending service to more than 150,000 residents within its 49,000 square miles coverage area, including Tonopah, Panaca, Ely, Mesquite, Laughlin and Scotty’s Junction, NV, plus Death Valley and Ridgecrest, CA, Lake Havasu City, AZ and St. George, UT.

In 1993, responding to another unmet need, Nevada Public Radio established the state’s first and only Radio Reading Service. This closed-circuit, 24 hour reading service delivers timely, original information totally free of charge to blind and visually-impaired listeners throughout the coverage area. With the cooperation of KUNR-Reno and KNCC-Elko, the service is available to 98% of the Nevada population.  It is also available online.

After many years of effort in 2003, Nevada Public Radio signed on a new full-service station in Las Vegas, Classical 89.7, which provides 24-hours a day classical music.

Our newest, full-service station is in Elko, NV – News 89.3 KLKR, which provides 24-hours a day news and information.

Nevada Public Radio operates on an annual budget of $4.7-million. See our latest Annual Audited Financial Statement  and our latest Form 990.

This on-line Annual Report informs members, underwriters, grantors and other community shareholders about the financial health of Nevada Public Radio, including investments, station goals and objectives.  The member recognition includes profiles of some the supporters of Nevada Public Radio.

In 1996, Nevada Public Radio was one of seven applicants, out of 1,300 candidates, to receive a grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation. NVPR received $4.5 million dollars to construct and equip a new permanent home for KNPR.

Endowment

In accepting the Reynolds award, the Board of Directors committed itself to raising a minimum of $1.5 million in endowment funding. That commitment has increased to $2.2 million. The endowment campaign received a lead gift from the L. J. Castle family, along with early contributions from the Boyd Foundation, the Nevada Arts Council, the Lincy Foundation, Frances Saxton, Jim Rogers, J. A. Tiberti, John Klai, the Laub family (Bill Sr., Mary and Bill Jr.), Louis Castle and Westwood Studios, The National Endowment for the Humanities, the Union Pacific Foundation, as well as individual contributions from the listeners, staff and Board of Directors of Nevada Public Radio.

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!