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Life Extension: The Modern Anti-Aging Movement – Are We Standing at the Threshold of Immortality?

July 17, 2016 by · Comments Off on Life Extension: The Modern Anti-Aging Movement – Are We Standing at the Threshold of Immortality?
Filed under: General 

Why is skincare the focus of longevity research? I guess a cell is a cell, and if you can crack the code for one human cell, it is only a matter of time to solving the puzzle with different types of cell – and skin is without doubt the most visible cells each of us have. And it’s our faces in particular we often judge ourselves and others by, and we are in turn quickly scrutinized, and often opinions reached in a fraction of a second. Our faces often show the most visible signs of aging, and for many in modern society age is by nature “bad” and young or looking young is the ideal. That is why billions and billions of dollars each year are poured by consumers into all sorts of treatments to minimize wrinkles, to push back the effects of gravity, and to turn back the hands of time. And with that much money to be spent by consumers, there are many manufacturers eager to find the next step in arresting Father Time – and at least detaining him until the next stagecoach arrives, where hopefully he can be encouraged to move on before too much damage can be done.

The Entire Issue Explained – In A Pair of Shoelaces

Some time ago a friend gave me a simple analogy that puts this entire issue in perspective. The science may not win a Nobel Prize, but it gave me the necessary ah-ha moment.

The double helix of the DNA strand – our most basic foundation for life – is held together at each end by things that act in the same way as the hard plastic bits on the end of shoelaces do – preventing the DNA from unraveling, and the individual chromosomes scattering across the floor like dropping a string of pearls down a marble staircase. These things are called telomeres.

Somewhere programmed into these tiny telomeres is the entire basis to how long the DNA stays intact – and by inference these are the keys to the length of life of the organism. Somewhere written into the telomere is a great musical score but like all musical scores it has a double bar somewhere to signify the end; but is it to be a minuet or a Wagnerian epic? But sure enough, when the time comes, and the telomeres blow the full time whistle, the DNA strand will unravel and die – and the circle of life begins again. Telomeres govern how often our skin cells are replaced; why a puppy and a child born on the same date may age exactly the same chronologically, but the puppy has become a geriatric before the child reaches puberty.

Telomeres, my friend explained, occasionally go on the fritz (that must have a very specific scientific meaning). One of the ways this occurs is they may forget their programming to release and unravel, and they just hang on, allowing the cells thus affected to multiply again and again without dying. In fact, when this occurs often they become very difficult to kill and to all intents and purposes once the telomeres act in this way, the cell – and those it propagates – are effectively immortal.

This condition has a name which we all know. Cancer.

But, what if we were able in some way to persuade the telomeres within a cancer to behave normally – would that not be the “magic bullet” cure for cancer? And the other side to that equation – if the telomeres in healthy cells could be persuaded to act as they do in a cancer – then is this the recipe for a healthy cell that does not die? Does the cure for cancer and immortality hang on just this one thread?

Whatever your views may be, the reality is that some of the world’s finest research scientists are working on that exact question and some would say it is only a matter of a decade or two before this is neither conjecture nor science fiction, but a reality to face up to. The changes that would take place in society even if life expectancy were to take a leap forward by say 10 or 20 years are enormous, but we should all be thinking that this is a distinct possibility.

From the dab of lanoline a generation ago to what I know hold in my hand as an anti aging skincare treatment is more than just a revolution – and I have no doubt in a few years I will be saying this cream will not just slow the aging process and reduce the visible signs of aging, making your face appear younger – but it will actually be younger.

But before that, let’s look back at how this whole engagement with life extension and anti-aging started. Mankind has always striven for longevity and mused about immortality – but the past 50 years has seen some dramatic steps in reality toward this goal.

Genesis

The thought of extending life has been on the mind of mankind for millennia. References to the search for ways to prolong life can be found as far back as the Epic of Gilgamesh.

Gilgamesh was reputedly the fifth king of the kingdom of Uruk, the modern-day Iraq, around 2500 BC. According to the Sumerian list of kings, he reigned for 126 years. The Torah or Old Testament records Methuselah as living over 900 years, with life spans measured in centuries apparently commonplace before the time of Noah.

Throughout the development of scientific thought from the Reformation onwards, scholars have applied themselves to solving this riddle and these endeavors continue today at the very leading edge of scientific progress.

Unraveling Secrets

As the secrets of our existence are unraveled in ever more minute detail, we are beginning to understand what it is that makes us grow from tiny babies into adults. We now know, for example, that cell functions slow down as the body ages and that production of certain substances required by the body to regenerate decrease or cease completely.

Skin, for instance, needs two substances to retain strength and firmness.
The production of these substances namely collagen (strength, tightness) and elastin (flexibility) decreases with age. The decreases in production together with other factors that include the threat of free radicals make the skin age and become wrinkly. Free radicals are essentially incomplete oxygen molecules causing destructive chain reactions within cells.

The same kind of thing happens in every cell, every tissue and organ around the human body. For example, people develop frown lines, crow’s feet and wrinkles. Nutrients are no longer absorbed easily and vital cell functions, hormones and other substances are produced at decreased rates resulting in the body aging.

A Brief History of the Life Extension Movement

Science has been looking for ways to slow down this process for centuries. The forming of life extension movements, however, did not really begin until around 1970.

➢ In this year, Denham Harman, the originator of the so-called ‘free radical theory of aging’, decided that an organization dedicated to the research and information sharing between scientists working in biogerontology (the field of science concerned with the biological aspects involved in the aging process) was needed. As a result, the American Aging Association was formed.

➢ In 1976, two futurists, Philip Gordon and Joel Kurtzman wrote a book on the research into extending the human lifespan. This popular volume was titled ‘No More Dying. The Conquest Of Aging And The Extension Of Human Life’.

➢ Kurtzman was then invited to speak at Florida’s House Select Committee (HSC) of Aging, which was chaired by Claude Pepper, an American politician and spokesman for the elderly. The aim of this talk was to discuss the impact on Social Security by life extension.

➢ In 1980, Saul Kent, a prominent activist in the field of life extension, published the book ‘The Life Extension Revolution’ and founded the nutraceutical (from ‘nutrition’ and ‘pharmaceutical’, in other words, a nutrition supplement) firm known as ‘The Life Extension Foundation’.

This foundation is a non-profit making organization promoting dietary supplements and publishing the periodical ‘Life Extension Magazine’. Kent was later involved in work relating to cryogenics. He was jailed in the course of this work over a dispute at one point, although charges were dropped at a later stage.

➢ In 1982, American health writer and life extension advocate Sandy Shaw and her co-writer, Durk Pearson, popularized the term ‘life extension’ even further with the bestseller ‘Life Extension: A Practical Scientific Approach’.

➢ Roy Walford, a gerontologist and life-extensionist, published ‘Maximum Lifespan’, another popular book on the subject. He and Richard Weindruch, his student, followed this up in 1988 with their summary on the research they had conducted into the ability to prolong the life of rodents through calorie restriction. The title of this book is ‘The Retardation of Aging and Disease by Dietary Restriction’.

Although this ability to extend life with calorie restriction had been known since the 1930’s, when gerontologist, biochemist and nutritionist Clive McCay did some research into the subject, it was the work of Walford and Weinbruch that gave solid scientific grounding to the McCay’s findings.

Walford’s scientific work was driven by a personal interest in life extension. He practiced calorie restriction as part of his own life and eventually died at the age of 80. The cause of his death was amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a progressive motor neuron disease.

➢ A4M, the ‘American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine’ was founded in 1992 to create a medical specialty for anti aging that was distinctly separate from geriatrics. This allowed scientists and physicians interested in this particular field of science to hold conferences and discuss the latest developments.

➢ The sci.life-extension, a Usenet group, was created by California-born author, philosopher and translator Brian M. Delaney. This represented an important development within the movement of life extension. It made it possible, for example, for the CR (Calorie Restriction) Society to be created.

➢ A more recent development is the proposal of Dr A. de Grey, a biogerontologist at Cambridge University. This proposal suggested that damage to cells, macromolecules, organs and tissues can be repaired with the help of advanced biotechnology. This is evident in hair restoration products, for instance.

More than Books

Although it would appear that most of the work revolving around life extension has been done solely by writing books or founding societies or organizations of some kind or another, the reality is that these books were written in response to or based on very specific, detailed scientific research that have yielded positive results.

They are no longer the works of hopeful minds, but the works of dedicated scientists who have spent their lives working on discovering facts about aging and trying to find ways to slow down, or even reverse the process.

Many breakthroughs have been made, and in many ways, we are already able to extend lives to a certain extent. The average lifespan of a human being is already far greater than it used to be as a result of medical, pharmaceutical and nutritional advances brought about by research and development.

The work continues, and scientists around the world are continually conducting research, comparing results, discussing options and making advances on our behalf.

Driving Forces behind the Development of the Life Extension Movement

What factors are driving this movement into ever greater efforts to find solutions to the extension of Life? The answer to this question actually includes a whole range of factors.

Expectations Have Risen

As the ‘baby boomer’ generation (born between 1946-1964) enters retirement age, expectations of this group are dramatically different from those of the preceding generations. They have greater expectations and desires to enjoy their life as pensioners to the fullest and for as long as is possible. This expectation covers not only length of life, but quality of life as well and this is not a passive request but an active and strident demand in many cases.

Pharmacology

Progress in pharmacology has led to a wide selection of drugs that allow people to live longer and fuller lives being developed over the last two decades or so. The work is still very much in progress and many more drugs are being developed daily.

One of the classic examples of a drug raising the quality of life for older individuals are erectile dysfunction treatments – notably Viagra, Cialis and Levitra. These drugs have dramatically reduced the number of fatalities or serious injury resulting from elderly men rolling out of bed, as well as a number of more qualitative benefits.

Advances in Genetics

Some of the latest scientific research and subsequent advances made in biotechnology and genetics are providing some hope that it may be possible to hold back some of the fundamental causes of aging.

As we outlined previously, chromosomes containing DNA strings are essentially capped with a binding substance known as telomeres. In effect, the telomeres are consumed during cell division and over time, they become shorter and shorter.

This was first observed by a scientist called Leonard Hayflick, and the process of limited cell division was subsequently named the Hayflick Limit. Advocates of life extension work on the thought that lengthening the telomeres through drugs or gene therapy may ultimately extend the Hayflick Limit and thereby fool the cells, and as such the body, into ‘thinking’ it is younger than it actually is.

Developments in Precision Manufacture

Advances made in the fields of nanotechnology, miniaturization, computer chips and robotics also provide hope for potentially life extending solutions.

In the 1970’s, a popular TV series starred Lee Majors as the ‘Six Million Dollar Man’? Science fiction then. Today, it is science fact. Millions of people now walk through life with artificial ankle, knee and hip joints and healthy feet. A generation ago, mass production of this kind of technology was a distant dream.

The same applies to many individuals with artificial limbs. Artificial legs used to be crude wooden contraptions that were just able to keep a person balanced. Today’s artificial limbs are almost fully functional.

The Blessings of Medical Progress

Who would have thought even 50 years ago that it would become possible to bypass a coronary artery, or even replace a heart completely? Yet there are hundreds of thousands, if not millions of individuals enjoying their lives after having this kind of surgery – few of whom would be alive just half a century ago.

Millions of people no longer have to wear glasses, because of the availability of laser surgery. This, too, was science fiction just a few years ago. Today, it is advertised next to shampoo in magazines and on TV.

In other words, science is moving rapidly towards not only extending life, but making the quality of these extra years better as well.

Is it Science, Science Fiction or Lunacy?

What should the average person believe? This question is almost as difficult to answer as finding solutions to extended life. Even among scientists, opinions are divided. Some do believe that extending the quality of life is as possible as extending life in general.

Others brush off the thought as un-scientific nonsense. This is often simply based on the fear of anything ‘new’ disturbing the status quo of established limits. Fortunately, real scientists do keep on looking, because if every single scientist had decided that some of the advancements already in medical, pharmaceutical and technological fields could not be possible, we would all still be dying at 30.

So where does that leave us?

There is no doubt what-so-ever that there are many charlatans out there trying to make a quick buck out of people’s desire to retain their youth. Even today, many products being sold in their millions are essentially non-effective – often given fantastic names and have the most bewildering ingredients to make them look scientific to consumers and justify their cost.

But the facts are while many advancements are being made and research points to the possibility of eventually finding the key to maintaining youth for longer, the scientific community is still warning the public that many of the products being sold today are unreliable to say the least.

➢ Although food supplements may assist in keeping a body healthier – something that can often be achieved by simply adopting a healthier life style and diet – there is as yet no categorical and undeniable proof that they slow down aging as such.

➢ The same goes for many hormone treatments. Although they may have a short term effect of some kind, it is not yet scientifically proven that they will actually work in the long run. The fear that it may not work is based on the fact that taking hormones, a good example is the hormonal acne treatment, will ultimately actually slow down the body’s own production of these hormones.

In addition, many treatments may have potential (and yet unknown) side effects in the long run that could be harmful to the user’s health. This includes the fears that such hormone treatments could increase the risk of cancer, diabetes and other major illnesses.

➢ Other ideas, like the calorie restriction method, are working for rodents. In fact, studies conducted with rats on 30 to 50 per cent restricted diets have shown to almost double the life span of rats.

Similar studies conducted on primates have also shown tendency to extend life to a certain extent and prevent a list of age related illnesses. There are as yet no studies on humans, although some are actually living on calorie restricted diets. Whether this will prolong their lives, however, is a question of having to wait and see.

The theory is that by reducing calorie intake, the metabolism of the body is slowed down, thereby slowing the aging process as well. Nutritionists say there is a certain amount of calories a body of a certain size and weight needs to have to maintain health. Reducing this amount by up to 50 per cent is hardly a good idea in the long term.

Time will tell, as they say, but how will anyone be able to tell the difference? If a person lives to the age of 80, is this because they are on this diet or would they have lived to this age anyway?

Where Will This Lead?

Many believe there is realistic hope and expectation of making significant strides in the area of longevity within the next two decades. This group typically believes the answer will ultimately lie within genetics and biotechnology. It is too early to make definite predictions, but the research so far shows promise and, as mentioned earlier, some of the results of this research are already being used in certain treatments to improve patients’ lives.

At present, overall aging is difficult to slow down, to say the least. Some products indicate they will assist in maintaining overall health/longevity, but the area we are seeing the first commercial products being developed is in the area of skin care and given the size of this market, it is likely that this will continue to be the weather-vane of longevity treatments.

Science or Snake Oil?

It will be difficult to tell these two apart for many years. Charlatans are likely to about, because it is difficult to disprove many theories easily. Equally difficult will be positive proof from those with an ethical perspective on the trail of a real breakthrough, as products based on valid research and using technology or ingredients that will actually have an effect rarely promise overnight results. This is something that anyone looking to find improved youthful looks, etc, will have to bear in mind. None of these products can perform miracles. Even the best of them will take time and regular use in order to achieve the desired effect.

The bottom line is that where we stand now, we can be sure there are some things which are ineffective or even harmful; there are some that show some promise and there are some that are starting to cross the line of being able to demonstrate results – albeit modestly at this point.

In the meantime, it is wise to research products very carefully and to refuse to be baffled by weird and wonderful sounding ingredients or fantastic sounding promises of instant youth. Regeneration will take time – let’s face it, it has taken a lifetime to get to this point, turning back the clock can never be possible over night.

Skin Care and the Life Extension Movement

One may well ask just what all this, and in particular the life extension movement as such, could possibly have to do with skin care, health and beauty products. The fact is, much of the research into life extension is resulting in new approaches to skin care as a kind of by-product.

A greater understanding of how genetics and cellular processes affect the aging and condition of skin allows these research and development teams to investigate different compounds, their compatibility with human cells and genetic make up.

Many compounds found in nature are not just compatible to human skin but in fact the skin cells actually have natural receptors for these compounds. Because life extension research has discovered these receptors, skin care developers can now use this knowledge and create the formulae for their products to provide maximum effect.

Another skin care ‘by-product’ of life extension research is the use of nanotechnology. The use of nanotechnology, or, to be more precise, nanoparticles, has had a huge impact on the way nutrients and other components of skin care products are being delivered to the skin cells. In some ways, nanotechnology has already revolutionized skin care. It is now possible to use active ingredients previously difficult to effectively deliver to the skin, as well as making old, proven ingredients even more effective. Some ingredients used in cosmetics for hundreds, if not thousands of years by certain cultures can now be even more effectively used to improve skin condition and maintain a healthy, youthful look.

Even the moisturizing effect of skin care products can be improved with nantechnology. For this effect, so-called nanosomes are used. Nanosomes are small, pocket-like particles that melt or disintegrate on skin contact. By doing this, the moisturising effect is accelerated, assisting the skin faster and more efficiently.

Nanotechnology plays a key part not only in slowing the aging of skin, but is believed to actively assist in repairing and healing skin cells and tissue.

Another breakthrough in life extension research that is beginning to make itself felt in skin care products is the research into stem cells. Stem cells are elements of all life, plant, animal and human. Stem cells have two properties other cells do not have. These properties are the ability to develop into any kind of cell type and the ability to divide almost indefinitely. The use of plant stem cell extracts in skin care is likely to become one of the next ‘big things’ in the industry. And prepare for the debate when human stem cells are proposed as part of an anti-aging skincare regime, as will inevitably occur!

One thing we can be certain of, is that science will continue to search for answers to the question of life extension, and business will drive the commercialization of discoveries. But whether these lead us to a utopian future or potentially a minefield of strife as we debate who will use and who will benefit from these new godlike powers. In the meantime, at a practical level in the skincare, health and beauty industry we remain hopeful and expectant we will see the emergence of products that not only promise results, but produce them.

David Christensen is a veteran of Asia Pacific business, currently residing in Bangkok, Thailand and heading up the business he was a co-founder of, Royal Siam Natural Health & Beauty – who can be located at [http://www.royalsiam.asia], and the information supporting site at [http://www.royalsiam.info]. Royal Siam was established after careful planning in early 2011, spending 2011 concentrating on building the necessary business infrastructure and concentrating on the domestic Thai market. Early in 2012 Royal Siam launched its international website and online store, and in April 2012 publicly declared the ambition to be among the world’s top 20 premium health and beauty brands by the year 2020. Royal Siam is a unique business, operating in the premium skincare, anti aging, and related fields. At its core, one mission is to commercialize and bring to a global market the immense wealth of knowledge about the healing and beneficial properties of Thai and South East Asian plants – a knowledge base carefully built up over the last thousand years. At the same time, the mission is to bring to market the very latest in scientific advances in the area of anti aging… resulting in the unique position of having a Thai heritage and offering the best of nature, tradition, and science.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/David_D_Christensen/1317312

How to Choose the Best Anti Aging Cream?

June 26, 2016 by · Comments Off on How to Choose the Best Anti Aging Cream?
Filed under: General 

As we become old, the skin renews itself much more slowly than when you are young because the production of collagen, natural proteins that provide the firmness of the skin begin to fall, causing dehydration of the skin and wrinkles.

When you reach 30/40 years, a regular moisturizer will not be enough for your skin, you should start using anti-wrinkle cream (anti-aging) to slow the signs of aging.

Fortunately, there are now a range of anti-aging products designed for every skin type, for all ages and for different needs.

There are wrinkle creams, serums, masks, creams around the eyes, neck, hands, face, etc..

The advantages of using anti-aging creams

– Gives a brightness and youthful glow to the skin
– Eliminate and reduce wrinkles
– Strengthen and firm the skin
– Reduces the appearance of fine lines
– Check and neutralize free radicals
– Moisturize and nourish the skin
– Rejuvenate and firm the skin
– Stimulates the production of collagen and elastin
– Harmonize the pigmentation of the skin
– Stimulates cellular activity and firm the skin
– Prevent the appearance of new wrinkles
– Helps rebuild the skin texture
– Redefine the skin of the cheeks and neck
– Helps repair signs of loosening around the neck and chin
– Renouvelent the elasticity of the skin by stimulating its natural healing processes
– Satisfies wrinkles

How do anti-aging creams?

Most anti-aging products contain retinol, collagen, alpha hydroxy acid, minerals and vitamins. These elements are known for their power to stop the signs of aging and reduce wrinkles and fine lines.

Once the anti-aging cream is applied to the skin, the components therein inhibit muscle movement and to reduce wrinkles and prevent their further training.

Substances penetrate the outer layer of the skin and repair. They also stimulate the production of collagen and elastin in the skin.

Other wrinkle operate by separating the upper layer of the skin, allowing healthy new cells of the skin to appear (that are generally products containing alpha-hydroxy acids).

You should know that all anti-aging products can remove wrinkles or fine lines after the first few days of use.These products gradually smooth your skin and the results are usually seen after a month or two.

How to choose the best anti-aging cream for the face to you?

Today, anti-aging creams are specially designed for specific skin problems: some creams treat crow’s feet, dark circles around the eyes and fine lines around the mouth, others are designed to revitalize the skin, reducing the depth of wrinkles and firm the neck.

There are even anti-aging creams for the hands, neck and neckline.

There are anti-wrinkle products for each skin type: for those who are fat, dry or sensitive.

One of the most important rules when choosing the best anti-aging product for your skin is to look at the components of the product.

It is essential to choose an anti-aging cream that suits your skin type and needs.

If your skin has a lot of wrinkles around the eyes, you should consider buying an anti-aging cream for the eyes that treats crow’s feet and dark circles around the eyes.

During the selection of anti-aging cream make sure it is not too hard or very greasy as it can clog pores and cause a problem if it is left on overnight.

It is essential to choose a product that offers good sun protection (SPF of at least 15 or more) to protect your skin from harmful sun rays that cause premature aging of the skin.

Today, most anti-aging creams available and contain antioxidants that neutralize free radicals associated with excessive exposure to the sun can cause serious skin problems.

Common components of anti-aging creams

Retinol (vitamin A)

Vitamin A is a powerful antioxidant that neutralizes free radicals that cause premature aging usually (Free radicals break down skin cells and collagen in the skin).

Retinol is also known as vitamin A, retinoic acid and retinoid.

Vitamin A is probably the most component used in anti-aging creams, serums and toners. It reduces wrinkles, fine lines and discoloration of the skin and stimulates collagen production. Vitamin A is also known for its ability to tighten pores and minimize sun damage.

Retinol is widely used to treat severe acne and rosacea.

The kinetin

The Kénitine a natural component that helps the skin retain natural moisture and stimulates collagen production.

It is a powerful antioxidant that can also fight against uneven pigmentation. It restores the function of the natural moisture of the skin, helps to preserve and soften the skin without side effects and provides protection for the skin against free radical damage.

Α-hydroxy acids (AHA or)

AHAs are widely used in the cosmetic industry because they remove the top layer of dead skin cells and stimulate the growth of healthy new cells.

Α-hydroxy acids work come exfoliating agents, they have a cooling effect on the skin and improve its overall appearance.

Α-hydroxy acids generally used include: glycolic acid, lactic acid and salicylic acid.
Α-hydroxy acids act as deep into the dermis and stimulate the production of collagen and elastin fibers which are essential for healthy skin.

You should know that all types of α-hydroxy acids increase susceptibility to the harmful effects of the sun and it is essential to use sunscreen daily to avoid sun damage.

Α-hydroxy acids are present in a variety of products including skin care moisturizers, cleansers, eye cream, sunscreen, and foundation.

Coenzyme Q10

Coenzyme Q10 is a fat-soluble vitamin-like substance found in every human cell and that neutralizes free radicals (acts as an antioxidant) and reduces fine lines and wrinkles. It prevents sun damage and skin discolorations.

Coenzyme Q10 is commonly used in anti-wrinkle creams and serums because it prevents damage to collagen and elastin production process and help prevent fine lines and wrinkles.

Copper peptides

Copper peptides are widely used in anti-aging creams, because they stimulate the production of collagen.Copper peptides also enhance the action of antioxidants and enhance wound healing.

Copper peptides are effective against various forms of skin irritation, mainly because of their anti-inflammatory effects. Copper peptides also stimulate the formation of elastin and reduce sagging and wrinkles.

Vitamin A

Vitamin A is a powerful antioxidant that helps reduce the appearance and depth of wrinkles. It stimulates cellular renewal of the skin.

There are different forms of vitamin A: retinol, retinyl palmitate and retinyl linoleate. Lack of vitamin A can cause dryness and hardening of the skin.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is an antioxidant with a brightening effect of the skin.

It is a common component in products skin care as well as makeup products because it gives the skin a youthful and stimulates blood circulation.

Vitamin C also keeps the skin elastic and prevents premature aging of the latter.

When combined with vitamin E reduces the signs of aging: wrinkles, fine lines, brown spots and age spots.

Vitamin C is also known as ascorbic acid.

Vitamin E

Vitamin E provides natural protection against harmful UV rays.

Vitamin E creates a moisture barrier and prevents the discoloration of the skin. It helps the skin to repair itself.

Antioxidants

The most common are vitamin A, vitamin C and vitamin E. Antioxidants neutralize free radicals and prevent premature aging of the skin.

Many beauty products: the facial cleansers, moisturizing lotions, tonics, claim to contain antioxidants.

Antioxidants are added to cosmetic products containing fat such as lipstick and moisturizers to prevent rancidity.

Tea extracts

Tea extracts (green tea, black tea, white) are usually found in anti-aging creams, serums, masks and lotions.

The tea extracts act as antioxidants in the fight against free radicals. They have anti-inflammatory properties and help in repairing skin damage.

Retinoids

Retinoids are chemical compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A. They make the skin thinner and smoother and reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles.

Retinoids are widely used in the treatment of many diseases and are effective in treating a number of skin conditions such as inflammatory disorders of the skin, cancer, skin disorders in cell renewal and aging.

Retinoids reduce wrinkles, freckles, blackheads (whiteheads and blackheads), and stains caused by sunlight.

Topical retinoids are also effective treatments for mild acne and severe.

It takes about 3 months for the skin acclimates to a retinoid.

Hyaluronic acid

Hyaluronic acid is a component of connective tissue whose function is to cushion and lubricate the skin.

It is found naturally in the skin, its function is to hold water.

Useful tips related to the use of anti-aging creams

– Apply your anti-aging cream with upward strokes from the throat to the front.
– Do not forget: you may need to use an anti-wrinkle for several weeks before you notice improvement.
– Ask for samples before buying a face cream to see if it works for you.
– Try to use a facial cleanser with glycolic acid.
– Exfoliate your skin regularly (at least twice per week) with a gentle exfoliant to remove dead skin cells and accelerate cell renewal.
– Always use a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 to protect your skin against the sun’s harmful rays that cause premature aging of the skin and causes discoloration.
– Consult a dermatologist or esthetician to give you the product that best suits you.
– It is essential to get a good amount of sleep each night.
– Try to use a wrinkle cream that contains more natural ingredients, vitamins, essential oils, aloe vera and natural emollients.
– You can put on your sunscreen cream.
– Choose makeup: foundation, concealers, lipsticks, lip glosses that offer sun protection.
– It is essential to follow a strict regimen of skin care every day to keep your skin clear and healthy.
– Always remove your makeup at night with a mild cleanser that suits your skin type.
– Use masks or face firming moisturizer twice to keep your skin radiant mature.
– Drink plenty of mineral water at least 1.5 liters a day to keep your body and skin hydrated.
– Perhaps now is the perfect time to quit smoking: Smoking seriously harms health and damages the skin by destroying collagen and elastin.
– Compare different wrinkle creams and find out what works best for you.

For more information about wrinkles and anti-aging creams visit my blog Best Cream for Wrinkles.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7259744

Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias

June 12, 2016 by · Comments Off on Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias
Filed under: General 

Australian business is starting to see the light when it comes to their hiring policies for mature aged employees, and the positive impact they can have on the workplace. A brief visit to main street shopping centre and you will begin to see a few more weathered faces at work than you would have seen a few years ago.

However, if you scratch below the surface, you begin to see this trend still has a long way to play out. A few older workers get hired into the senior ranks where experience and maturity are greatly valued, more older workers are now being hired at the lower end of the corporate scale into unskilled roles, however the numbers being hired into the mid tier ranks remains low.

This barbell approach to hiring mature workers at the top and bottom of an organisation reflects an ongoing bias that remains difficult to overcome. A company is a microcosm of society, and in a perfect world employers should (within reason) seek diversity in the workplace and value skill, experience and aptitude, regardless of age, race or gender.

Unfortunately, we live in a far from perfect world. When it comes to mature aged workers they tend to be penalised on two fronts. Often the first to be made redundant in uncertain economic times, this setback is then compounded when they are regularly overlooked for someone younger as they begin searching for a new job.

As a result of these two biases towards mature aged job seekers, once out of work, the journey back can often be long and arduous. This is reflected in RBA statistics which indicate long-term unemployment at approximately 40% for those aged 45-64, compared to about 25% for those aged between 25 and 44.

So what are the reasons employers provide for not hiring mature aged workers? Typically, reasons include being overqualified or over-experienced. Taken at face value being overqualified or experienced might not seem so bad, but when you hear the same reason trotted out time and again, it becomes less palatable.

Openly negative feedback from employers tend to include perceptions that mature aged workers are not as IT savvy, do not possess the latest skills, or are not as flexible as their younger counterparts. While these reasons may hold true in many instances, many of the older job seekers I speak to, believe these are often used as convenient excuses to exclude them.

Employer feedback that you are not likely to hear include concerns about health (and subsequent cost) or worse insecurity. There are many poor managers in the workplace that may be intimidated by the experience a mature applicant brings to the role. Rather than leveraging the knowledge and experience an older worker can bring to the workplace, the insecure hirer is concerned about the potential competition, and the presence of someone who may know more than they do.

Dealing with many of these preconceived concerns and fears remains an ongoing challenge for the mature aged job seeker. Perhaps the following facts should be mandatory reading for hiring managers. These facts debunk many of the concerns and myths that persist in the workplace relating to mature aged workers;

    • Mature aged workers can deliver cost savings to employers through increased retention rates. For example, workers over 55 are five times less likely to change jobs compared to workers aged 20-24, reducing both recruitment and training costs. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006)Labour Mobility Survey,
    • Mature workers can deliver an average net benefit of $1956 per year to their employer compared to other workers due to high retention rates, lower rates of absenteeism, decreased recruitment costs and greater return on investment.Business, Work and Ageing (2000) Profiting from Maturity: The Social and Economic Costs of Mature Age Unemployment
    • Australians are living longer and are healthier.2005 ABS survey found the proportion of Australians aged 55-64 reporting their health as ‘good’, ‘very good’ or ‘excellent’ was 75.5% – an increase of four per cent since 1995. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006) National Health Survey: Summary of Results, 2004-05
    • Mature workers were the least likely group to take days off due to their own illness or as a carer. In the two week period prior to the survey nearly half the number of mature workers had days off compared to workers aged 25-34. ibid
    • ABS data shows that Australians aged 55-64 are the fastest growing users of information technology. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2005) Year Book Australia,
  • Australian Health Management which examined the daily work habits of 4000 employees found that workers aged 55 years and over performed at their best for approximately seven hours out of an eight-hour day-an achievement that other workers in the study were unable to match. Australian Health Management (2006), Baby boomers give employers a bang for their buck

While government has been doing its part to address mature aged unemployment through initiatives like DEEWR Experience+, the introduction of the Age Discrimination Act (2004) and appointment of an Age Discrimination Commissioner, it remains imperative that older job seekers directly address some of these age bias issues themselves if they are to enhance their prospects for employment.

Following are some helpful hints that mature aged workers can utilise to make themselves more appealing to employers and thus improve their chances of a speedy return to the workforce;

Government or Community Assistance– Take advantage of government or community based initiatives and assistance. There is a considerable amount of free information and assistance available, and I would strongly recommend looking into these resources. For example, the DEEWR “Experience+” initiative provides free career planning and advice for over 45’s until June 2016, along with an Assistance Program delivering refresher and basic training in IT and social media applications.

Value Proposition– Whether writing your resume or cover letter, or sitting in an interview, ensure the focus of discussion clearly remains on the value that you can bring to an organisation. Discuss how you can help, what you have done in the past and what you can deliver going forward. Outline how your experience might bring special insights and perspectives that other candidates may not possess.

Training– Undertake relevant training or up-skilling. Keeping ‘up to date’ is critical if you expect serious consideration for any position, especially if there is a technical element. The benefit will be that an employer will see that you have not fallen behind and therefore will not require retraining, along with any associated cost.

Resume– You will need a properly structured and well written resume to be considered for most roles. Use an appropriate resume style that is tailored to your strengths, skills and experience. Also ensure primary focus of your resume is on the last 5-10 years (include older information where pertinent). Think about getting assistance from a professional resume writer, whocan add significant value if you are looking to ‘get it right the first time’.

Age Bias – To counter potential impact of age bias, you will need to carefully address the following with any potential employer;

Health– Don’t hesitate to communicate your good health and fitness to potential employers at opportune moments. Inform them if you play sport, run, walk or go to the gym regularly. This should allay any potential concerns about health.

IT Savvy –Take every opportunity to indicate your IT capability. Whether it’s your ability to use specialised systems, the MS Office suite or even your use of Facebook or Twitter, this will highlight your ability to embrace new technology.

Adaptability – Highlight your adaptability in the workplace, providing actual examples where appropriate. If you don’t know something, indicate you are keen to learn (and not that you wouldn’t know where to start). Highlighting your adaptability will help to dispel concerns of rigidness and inflexibility.

Team Player –Communicating that you work well as part of a team is critical. It shows a willingness to take direction and work for the common good, and can present you as less threatening, especially if the hirer feels concerned by a mature more experienced candidate.

Be Positive –Though you need to be fully prepared to discuss negative issues, make every attempt to keep the discussion on a positive footing. Unless specifically requested, there is no need to volunteer information of a negative nature.

While industry is beginning to see the light when it comes to acceptance of mature aged workers, the pace of change remains slow. While providence is on the right side due to the ageing Australian population and the inevitable necessity to hire older workers, the fact remains that age discrimination is still entrenched in much current thinking.

As a result, dealing with age bias will continue to be a challenge for the foreseeable future. However with the combination of positive government policy, changing attitudes and a proactive attitude to making oneself more appealing to employers (as outlined above), the situation is not without promise.

Honing your individual approach and message will take time and effort. To strike the right balance the mature job seeker will need to walk a fine line between sounding experienced, but not old, adaptable, but not inflexible and appear keen, not desperate. There is no magic formula for success except practice, perseverance and occasionally seeking help where necessary.

A.J. Bond, is the proprietor of Absolute Resume Writing Services ( http://absoluteresume.com.au ), an Australian based consultancy specializing in the provision of Resume and Cover Letter writing services.

Absolute Resume assists a broad range of job seekers to find their preferred roles, including mature aged job seekers, individuals out of work for a period of time and those made redundant.

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The Aging Process: Can It Be Reversed?

June 6, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Aging Process: Can It Be Reversed?
Filed under: General 

With regard to fitness, for many years, I have been outspoken about my support of sports and strength training as good alternatives to redundant exercises like treadmill workouts. Steve Holman, editor-in-chief of Iron Man Magazine, has taken that idea to the extreme with a new body shaping program designed to slow down and even reverse the aging process. But he’s not the only one interested in the concept of aging.

You may also be familiar with the Real Age Program, or with one of its founders, Dr. Mehmet Oz. Real Age asserts that your actual age is often not in synch with the biological condition of your body. Based on your level of conditioning and diet and other factors, your body may be aging at an accelerated rate. Real Age calculates your age based on your body’s condition and compares it your chronological age. The goal is to improve the body so its actual “real age” is at or below one’s biological age. To me, that is the basis for Holman’s approach: return the body to the youthful condition that it was in before declining fitness and other factors accelerated the aging process.

According to Steve Holman, after we reach the age of 40, our bodies start aging at a faster rate than they had to that point. Studies have shown that without the proper nutrients and exercise, our bodies are aging about 6 months extra for every year that passes! So, let’s say you’re 40. By the time you reach 50, you will look and feel 55. By the time you reach 60, you will look and feel 70 years old! I don’t know about you but that kind of aging does not appeal to me a whole lot.

Did you ever notice that the folks who stay the most physically active seem to be aging more slowly than others who don’t? In my mind, I picture a 63-year old woman gardening while her 65-year-old husband is chopping wood nearby and they both look like they’re in their 50s. Hmm… maybe that was a scene from a 1940s movie but I think it makes the point. They kept active with muscle taxing activities and no doubt felt and looked younger because of it. Steve Holman says that 90% of people over the age of 35 lose enough muscle every year to burn off an additional 4 pounds of body fat. The aging process really starts to catch up with us at that point. Muscle gives shape and strength to our bodies. As we know, when you lose muscle mass, you gain fat, even if the calories you take in stay the same. We don’t feel or look as good. Then we get depressed because we don’t feel and look as good. Then we give up on retaining our youth and it’s all downhill from there. Wow. That was depressing, huh?

Fear not! That doesn’t have to happen.

Both the folks at Real Age and Steve Holman insist that all of this accelerated aging is reversible. According to them, there are specific ways to move and eat that will slow down the rapid aging process to the point where you’re aging less than a year for every year. That means we can look younger in a few years than we do now? Now that is an aging plan we could get behind, right?

Not so fast. Are there drugs, supplements or expensive supplies to buy? No. Just food choices and targeted short-duration exercises are involved. Steve Holman says his years as a fitness magazine editor have allowed him to pick up tips, tricks and strategies from anti-aging experts over the years. And they don’t involve cycling classes or elliptical machines.

According to Steve, to get started, there are 5 rules one must absolutely follow if he or she wants to “slow the aging process, reclaim your health and achieve your ideal body”:

Forget low-fat diets. They lead to sugar addiction and we all know what that causes – fat storage!
Work out less. Resistance training done the right way burns fat and is a great cardiovascular workout, as well. Sports that tax muscles over the entire body can be effective, as well.
Drink water. Water renews your skin, helps burn fat, suppresses hunger and allows your kidneys to operate under less strain which allows your liver to burn fat like it’s supposed to.
Stop endless cardio workouts. Cardiovascular conditioning can be gained with far less time and effort. New studies are showing that long-duration exercise accelerate the aging process by increasing free radicals. These free radicals are scavengers that prey on your body’s essential nutrients and tissues.
Don’t blame your age for all your fitness issues. Studies have shown that men and women of every age, even those in their 90s, were able to gain muscle tone in just a matter of weeks of simple weight training.
Well, those are good guidelines to use to begin combating the aging process. There’s an old saying that goes something like, “I want to die as young as possible at as old an age as possible” (or something like that). I do follow the 5 steps already, though I would admit to not doing enough of #2. How about you? I have been told I look younger than I really am and that’s nice. Now if only I could reverse the aging process so I would feel younger…

Hi. This is Mike. As I mentioned, playing sports can give you a great full body workout and help reverse the aging process. If you are just getting started or getting restarted after a layoff, we can help you with information about supplies and equipment at our site: [http://www.roundballgames.com/sample-page]. Or read our blog @ [http://www.roundballgames.com]

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How Old Are You Really? Biological Age

May 29, 2016 by · Comments Off on How Old Are You Really? Biological Age
Filed under: General 

People have always been interested in being “forever young” and today’s society is no different. We want to resist the ageing process.

The speed at which we are ageing can be measured – its called biological age, or how old your body really is.

The area of study which is now called longevity, and was once called anti aging, is hugely popular in the states.

It’s something I’m very interested in, and see it as a big part of the future for myself and my clients.

Your chronological age is how old you actually are.

Biological age is the age of your body at the cellular level.

Today we will look into how you can establish, what your biological age is and how you can improve it.

There are a few longevity factors in the list which surprised me!

(Deep question alert!)

What is the purpose of life? I don’t mean any deep seated stuff, like procreation.

I just mean, what is most people’s AIM in life. What do they want to get out of their time on earth?

Firstly and most importantly, people want to be happy. Easier said than done.

Happiness is a state of mind. It’s a feeling.

Ask someone with a big goal (like building a successful business or losing more than three stone).

“What will reaching your goal do for you?”

Often they will say something like “When I get there I will feel happy”, or “satisfied with myself”, or they say “I will feel proud”.

“I will have more energy”.

“I won’t be afraid of trying new clothes on or going out with friends”.

“I don’t want to feel like a slave to food”

“I don’t want to be scared to look in the mirror or get on the scales”.

Life is all about feelings.

People spend their entire lives in search of feelings! (mostly happiness, contentment, satisfaction and love)

How people actually reach this state of “happiness” is different for us all.

Most people I know AIM for a decent job (or business) with decent money.

All with the ultimate goal of having a good retirement.

I hear people say “When I finish work, I’m going to do this or I’m going to… (insert goal)”.

The point here being, if being happy and having a nice retirement is people’s main goal in life, then keeping your body fit and healthy surely must be part of your plan.

I know of a very wealthy man who got cancer and passed away just before his retirement, I’m sure that was not part of the master plan, he had built his business up so he could sell it and have a nice retirement (as most business people do).

He didn’t make it and didn’t get to “cash out”.

Many people don’t make it to retirement because their “plan” is messed up from the start.

Without sounding depressing we only get one shot remember.

This is NOT a rehearsal.

A lot of people get to retirement age and their body is wrecked!

This stops them from being able to enjoy their time off as much. Living life with lots of restrictions. “I can’t go there because of the steep hill”, or “I can’t do that because of my back or my knees”.

After working hard for 40-50 years – to give yourself a good pension and retirement, this is the last thing that anyone wants.

Peoples bodies are like cars.

On one hand you have new cars with high mileage that are not well serviced.

On the other hand you have old cars with low mileage that have been well looked after.

I want YOU to be like a well looked after old car, with low mileage when you get to your retirement.

I know some people, that slog away and get to the age of 40, and feel and look like they’re 50 or 60!

I also know many people who hit retirement age and feel like a 40 year old, and can keep on working and exercising for another 20 years!

This is all dependent on how we live our lives, obviously there are things such as injuries, diseases and other bad things which can impact our lives negatively through no fault of our own but on the whole we are in control of our own health.

What affects our longevity?

Scientists agree that these factors all affect your longevity in some way, big or small. (this is not a definitive list)

Muscle size and strength
Level of education
How pro active you are with going to see the doctor if needed
The amount of friends you can rely on, and love in your life
Your diet
Blood pressure
Your upper body strength
If you enjoy your work or not
Weather you smoke/drink alcohol or not, and the amount
If you exercise or not

Most of us shorten our lives and ultimately kill ourselves, through our bad habits and lifestyle choices, whatever they may be.

As you would of guessed, it is possible to slow down the onset of ageing and even reverse it to some extent.

I must say, that there is nothing wrong with ageing, it is inevitable. It is something we should be proud of, a chance to show our wisdom to the younger generation.

This article is just to show you how you can SLOW the ageing process with ease and actually enjoy it.

The Ageing Process

As we get older our bodies start to slow down and stop being able to function as well, sadly there is no getting away from this.

BUT through healthy living and making the right choices day in day out we can delay our body slowing down by years!

Just think how much more you will be able to enjoy your retirement if you feel like a 40 year old? and can spend it with the people you love.

Compare this to how much you will enjoy it if you can barely walk up a flight of stairs without having tired legs and being short of breath.

Your chronological age doesn’t have to be the same, or worse, than your physiological age.

How to slow the effects of ageing

The list above obviously helps you but here are a few more ideas for you to beat the clock.

When some people think anti aging, I’m sure some of you may think of things like anti wrinkle creams and lotions, hair dying products, botox and maybe even plastic surgery.

That does kind of sum up some of the western world that these are the steps that the majority of people (plastic surgery being an extreme example) will take to make them look younger, rather than eating healthily and exercising.

Aging leads to loss of muscle mass, loss of mental function, low mobility and a lack of energy, and as you know the cosmetic type anti aging steps I mentioned won’t help any of these.

Top tips to delay ageing naturally:

Enjoy the Outdoors – Don’t spend all of your time cooped up indoors behind the computer or watching TV. There are plenty of things to do and see outside, especially on a nice day I can’t think of anything better than going for a walk with the family down the park or beach. Sunlight also is a natural source of Vitamin D.

Yoga & Meditation – I would say that this is one of the most important strategies in staying young. I started to do this myself and it honestly makes me feel great. Yoga and meditation can help you relax and lower your stress levels (linked with aging) dramatically. It can also help you to see things a lot clearer.

Yoga is also great for your flexibility, the more flexible and supple you are the less chance you have in the future of suffering falls and lack of mobility.

Socialise – Loneliness can be a real killer. Socialise as much as possible with your friends and family. Get out there and do things, go to the cinema, concerts, attend an evening class (the more mentally stimulating the better).

Stay Strong & Active – You have to keep moving or your body will come to a standstill. Taking part in regular exercise is absolutely vital. Regular strength training is extremely important.

Losing muscle mass is something you want to avoid or at least delay for as long as possible so strength training will help this as well as keeping your bones strong, this will lower your chances of osteoporosis.

Nutrition

I believe food is medicine, many of the effects you get from modern day medicine you can get from eating the right foods.

Nutrition influences biochemistry. Biochemistry influences everything at a cellular level.

If you eat well there should be no need for some medications.

If you spend your whole life eating fresh, natural whole foods and stay active then it will also show. You will most likely be lean, mobile, disease free and full of energy, a rarity these days.

You should aim to eat a diet containing lots of quality fats and protein’s (the bodies building materials) which will help you to maintain your muscle stores. Also protein boosts the production of HGH in your body, HGH (Human growth Hormone) is your body’s natural ‘fountain of youth’.

As you age the production of this hormone slows down greatly, regular strength exercise (lifting, pushing and pulling heavy stuff) and quality protein keeps the production of this hormone going!

Eat plenty of antioxidant rich foods – Antioxidants which are found in colourful fruit and vegetables help to reduce the damage caused by free radicals in your system.

Free radicals can speed up the onset of ageing; they are unstable electrons (O1 molecules)which are produced during metabolism. They damage the cell nucleus and the mitochondria.

Free radicals bounce around inside your cells like a pin ball, causing damage every time they hit something. They cause absolute havoc.

Antioxidants provide the free radical with the extra O1 molecule they need to become stable O2 molecules.

Good quality natural foods are the best way to combat these harmful free radicals. Natural organic foods are packed with antioxidants which neutralise the free radicals before they cause too much damage.

Eat Omega 3s – They fight inflammation, improve the appearance of your skin and aid brain function. Three vital things that we need as we age. So make sure you get as many omega 3s into your system as you can, the best source is fresh fish, if not a fish oil supplement will do.

Lower Sugar Intake – Aim to cut out any excess sugar that you eat, excess sugars can modify essential proteins in our body which can lead to wrinkles and energy loss.

Look after your skin through good food and lots of water – Eating foods containing vitamin A (sweet potatoes, broccoli, spinach, asparagus and carrots), Vitamin C (red peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, strawberries, oranges, kiwi and pineapple) and Vitamin E (nuts, seeds and spinach) are a great way of helping your skin look healthy.

Stop smoking and limit alcohol intake – There are few things that age you faster than smoking and drinking alcohol every day so cut out smoking and do as much as you can to drink less.

Lower Stress Levels – This is another big one, I just mentioned that there are few things that age you faster than smoking and alcohol; well I think stress is one of them.

Being constantly stressed will ruin your mood, energy levels, social interaction as well as causing so many health problems.

As I mentioned above, I have found deep breathing techniques, yoga and meditation really important and a great way of combating stress.

Let’s be realistic the big medical and health companies aren’t going to promote anti aging through the things I just said, they are going to promote it through new miracle pills, lotions and creams, there is a lot of money to be made from it so they will keep on doing it.

The people who buy these products don’t have to alter their lifestyle one little bit so it suits them which is why it is so popular.

We ultimately reap our rewards in our retirement, if you have invested some time and effort into your “health & fitness account”, you will reap the rewards.

If you haven’t then you won’t!

You can actually measure your biological age online with a biological age calculator.

If all of the things I have mentioned above didn’t require effort or commitment then everyone would be running around into their 90s and later!!

But unfortunately we don’t, we die much younger than that.

Depending on what stats you use, in 2010, UK men were reported to live on average until about 77 or 78, and women on average live until 82 or 83 years old.

Do it naturally and do it right.

Let me know your thoughts on this topic, comment below, I really want to know what you think.

Thanks for reading, take care,

Richard

If you would like to receive weekly health and fitness updates on the top news in the industry along with several free gifts then follow this link: http://richard-clarke.co.uk/

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There are also many easy to read helpful articles and information which can inspire you to reach your fitness and exercise goals FASTER!

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Take a Number: Five Ways to Look at Age

April 24, 2016 by · Comments Off on Take a Number: Five Ways to Look at Age
Filed under: General 

One for the Ages

Satchel Paige was a great baseball pitcher, one of the greatest of all time. He was an African-American and, due to the racial discrimination of the time, most of his outstanding career was not spent in the (white) major leagues. However, after the historic breakthrough by the courageous and talented Jackie Robinson (Mr. Paige’s junior by about 14 years), Satchel Paige pitched in the major leagues for a number of years. In fact, he was still able to get major league batters out at the age of 60! (Mr. Paige’s age at his retirement from baseball is not known for certain because no one, probably including Mr. Paige himself, knew his exact year of birth; some thought he was older than 60). Mr. Paige revealed a mind as sharp as the break on his curve ball when he asked this profound question for the ages:

“How old would you be if you did not know how old you are?”

These writings are dedicated to the memory of Satchel Paige and to all the so-called “over-the-hill” guys and gals in every sport and in every area of life, from Churchill and Reagan in politics to Jessica Tandy in acting and Paul McCartney in fatherhood. They and many like them in the past and present will be joined by many more in the future who are not really “over the hill” because they are too busy taking the hill.

Five Ways to Look at Age

Chronological Age

The most common way to look at age is the Chronological. This is the one that everyone is familiar with. It is simply the time that has passed since your date of birth to today. It is the one that governments and insurance companies require of you and that your Doctor knows, even if your boy friend doesn’t. It is a unidimensional measure because it considers only time. It is uniform because everybody who is 48 years, 6 months, and 3 weeks old is exactly that, chronologically. People who view age only from the chronological perspective are somewhere between dumb and dumber.

True Age

True Age is another and better way to look at your age. True age is basically what a measurement of all the biomarkers of aging would reveal about you. Here’s four points about true age. One, if a well-trained physician did NOT know how old you are but reviewed a print-out of your biomarkers, she or he could accurately estimate your true age. Two, your true age is not uniform but varies by individual: you can be younger or older than your chronological age. Three, true age is multidimensional rather than confined to time. Four, absolutely nothing can be done about chronological age because it is fixed, but a great deal can be done about true age.

Appearance Age

Appearance Age is the age you appear to be to others. It no doubt has some relationship to both chronological age and true age. Yet it is different. This is because it is heavily influenced by a number of factors outside the scope of biomarker measurement, not the least of which is attitude. We all know people that appear to be quite a bit younger or older than their chronological age. But the only scientific way to measure a person’s appearance age would be to have a representative sample of the population observe a person for at least a few minutes. A quick glance is not sufficient because appearance age includes factors such as movement of the body and alertness, not just a frozen face. Then the estimates from all members of the representative sample would be gathered, simple statistical measures applied, and Voila! You have the person’s appearance age. Of course, unless we are part of a study, none of us will ever get this scientific about it. We will just have to rely on random comments from friends, family, and nice or mean strangers to estimate our appearance age; and usually it’s a pretty good estimate.

NEAT Age

A new way to look at age, which occurred to me awhile back, is what I call one’s N.E.A.T. age. This is simply one’s time left on the planet from right Now to the time of death. This age is unknowable by readers or anyone, except those committed to imminent suicide (and these poor folks are no more likely to take the short time remaining to do age calculations than they are to be caught dead reading an article about lively longevity). The best we can do is make a calculated estimate based on what we know about the general population and factor in any pluses or minuses that apply to us individually.

The N in NEAT of course stands for Now since the calculation is from the present, today, right now. E is for Elusive because I believe moments of time are elusive. As we humans try to hold or capture a moment of time it eludes us because the next moment is here, and then the next. Time and life are a flow.

The A in NEAT is for Allotted. Everyone who has ever lived has only so much time to live. Some have short lives, some have long lives, and some have lives neither particularly long nor short. But human life is finite and almost certainly will remain finite into the distant future if not forever. We do not need to take sides in the age-old debate about whether or not our allotted time is predestined by God in order to recognize that the amount is finite.

Of course, T is for Time. Time remaining is what it is all about. As has been oft noted: a millionaire on his death bed would gladly exchange his riches for a little more time, say one more day of healthy living.

So one’s NEAT age is one’s Now Elusive Allotted Time. It is a concept that provides a different perspective on aging and on life. For example, let’s suppose there was a 30-year old person named Terry and a 60-year old person named Sydney living in the same town in 1960. Conventional wisdom and simple arithmetic agree that Sydney was twice as old as Terry at that time. Such wisdom carries the (usually) unstated assumption that Terry is about 30 years further from the grave than Sydney. Statistically, this is difficult to argue with. But statistics are oft off for an individual and sometimes by a wide margin.

Let’s suppose that Terry had a lifetime of very bad health habits and, never having had the opportunity to read my writings, continued the very bad habits. Poor Terry expired a little shy of 40. (The same fate could have befallen Terry due to a dreaded disease or tragic accident.) Sydney, on the other hand, decided at some point to lead a health-conscious life. Sydney made good choices and stuck with them. Sydney enjoyed basically good health beyond age 100 before passing on. When Sydney was 60 and Terry was 30, Sydney had a NEAT age of 40+ and Terry had a NEAT age just under 10. So way back in 1960, who was younger: the one with less than a decade of life left, or the one with more than four decades of vibrant life left? One of the neat things about the NEAT age is that the bigger this age number the better.

Ideal Age

The fifth and final way that we will look at age is one’s Ideal Age. Your ideal age is your age of choice, your preferred age. The concept of ideal age brings us back to Satchel Paige’s question:

How old would you be if you did not know how old you are?

In a sense, perhaps most of us do NOT know how old we are anyhow. Sure we know our chronological age, and some of us have a rough gauge of our appearance age. But few of us know our true age, and none of us knows our NEAT age. So it should not be so difficult to put chronological age aside for a few moments and answer Mr. Paige’s question.

Before leaping to an answer like 21, keep in my mind that successful living usually involves a combination of physical vigor, mental acuity, and wisdom. Personally, my ideal age is 37; thus even at my next birthday I will still be one year younger than all the women over 40.

What about you? What’s your number? What’s your ideal age? The way my anti-aging program works for you is that after reflection you establish your ideal age. Then we work with all the tools and techniques of the program to bring your true age into ever closer alignment with your ideal age. There is a balance to be struck. A 90-year old reader shooting for an ideal age of 19 is setting up way too much of a challenge and thus is setting up for failure. A 50-year old reader settling for an ideal age of 45 is not challenging herself or himself enough.

Take a number.

Satchel Paige was the impetus for me to write the close to this article:

When it comes to matters of age,

It is best to take a page out of Paige,

And move forward with grace,

Paying no mind to this myth of the human race.

Gary Patrick is a certified anti-aging professional (Giovane Medical Services). He is also an author, hypnotist, personal trainer, and speaker. Free stuff is available for a limited time at his web site: [http://rapidresults.biz]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Gary_Patrick/18668

The Development of Old Age and Related Issues

April 18, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Development of Old Age and Related Issues
Filed under: General 

In traditional Chinese and other Asian cultures the aged were highly respected and cared for. The Igabo tribesmen of Eastern Nigeria value dependency in their aged and involve them in care of children and the administration of tribal affairs (Shelton, A. in Kalish R. Uni Michigan 1969).

In Eskimo culture the grandmother was pushed out into the ice-flow to die as soon as she became useless.

Western societies today usually resemble to some degree the Eskimo culture, only the “ice-flows” have names such a “Sunset Vista” and the like. Younger generations no longer assign status to the aged and their abandonment is always in danger of becoming the social norm.

There has been a tendency to remove the aged from their homes and put them  in custodial care. To some degree the government provides domiciliary care services to prevent or delay this, but the motivation probably has more to do with expense than humanity.

In Canada and some parts of the USA old people are being utilised as foster-grandparents in child care agencies.

SOME BASIC DEFINITIONS

What is Aging?

Aging: Aging is a natural phenomenon that refers to changes occurring throughout the life span and result in differences in structure and function between the youthful and elder generation.

Gerontology: Gerontology is the study of aging and includes science, psychology and sociology.

Geriatrics: A relatively new field of medicine specialising in the health problems of advanced age.

Social aging: Refers to the social habits and roles of individuals with respect to their culture and society. As social aging increases individual usually experience a decrease in meaningful social interactions.

Biological aging: Refers to the physical changes in the body systems during the later decades of life. It may begin long before the individual  reaches chronological age 65.

Cognitive aging: Refers to decreasing ability to assimilate new information and learn new behaviours and skills.

GENERAL PROBLEMS OF AGING

Eric Erikson (Youth and the life cycle. Children. 7:43-49 Mch/April 1960) developed an “ages and stages” theory of human development that involved 8 stages after birth each of which involved a basic dichotomy representing best case and worst case outcomes. Below are the dichotomies and their developmental relevance:

Prenatal stage – conception to birth.

  1. Infancy. Birth to 2 years – basic trust vs. basic distrust. Hope.
  2. Early childhood, 3 to 4 years – autonomy vs. self doubt/shame. Will.
  3. Play age, 5 to 8 years – initiative vs. guilt. Purpose.
  4. School age, 9to 12 – industry vs. inferiority. Competence.
  5. Adolescence, 13 to 19 – identity vs. identity confusion. Fidelity.
  6. Young adulthood – intimacy vs. isolation. Love.
  7. Adulthood, generativity vs. self absorption. Care.
  8. Mature age- Ego Integrity vs. Despair. Wisdom.

This stage of older adulthood, i.e. stage 8, begins about the time of retirement and continues throughout one’s life. Achieving ego integrity  is a sign of maturity while failing to reach this stage is an indication of poor development in prior stages through the life course.

Ego integrity: This means coming to accept one’s whole life and reflecting on it in a positive manner. According to Erikson, achieving integrity means fully accepting one’ self and coming to terms with death. Accepting responsibility for one’s life and being able to review the past with satisfaction is essential. The inability to do this leads to despair and the individual will begin to fear death. If a favourable balance is achieved during this stage, then wisdom is developed.

Psychological and personality aspects:

Aging has psychological implications. Next to dying our recognition that we are aging may be one of the most profound shocks we ever receive. Once we pass the invisible line of 65 our years are bench marked for the remainder of the game of life. We are no longer “mature age” we are instead classified as “old”, or “senior citizens”. How we cope with the changes we face and stresses of altered status depends on our basic personality. Here are 3 basic personality types that have been identified. It may be a oversimplification but it makes the point about personality effectively:

a. The autonomous – people who seem to have the resources for self-renewal. They may be dedicated to a goal or idea and committed to continuing productivity. This appears to protect them somewhat even against physiological aging.

b.The adjusted – people who are rigid and lacking in adaptability but are supported by their power, prestige or well structured routine. But if their situation changes drastically they become psychiatric casualties.

c.The anomic. These are people who do not have clear inner values or a protective life vision. Such people have been described as prematurely resigned and they may deteriorate rapidly.

Summary of stresses of old age.

a. Retirement and reduced income. Most people rely on work for self worth, identity and social interaction. Forced retirement can be demoralising.

b. Fear of invalidism and death. The increased probability of falling prey to illness from which there is no recovery is a continual source of anxiety. When one has a heart attack or stroke the stress becomes much worse.

Some persons face death with equanimity, often psychologically supported by a religion or philosophy. Others may welcome death as an end to suffering or insoluble problems and with little concern for life or human existence. Still others face impending death with suffering of great stress against which they have no ego defenses.

c. Isolation and loneliness. Older people face inevitable loss of loved ones, friends and contemporaries. The loss of a spouse whom one has depended on for companionship and moral support is particularly distressing. Children grow up, marry and become preoccupied or move away. Failing memory, visual and aural impairment may all work to make social interaction difficult. And if this then leads to a souring of outlook and rigidity of attitude then social interaction becomes further lessened and the individual may not even utilise the avenues for social activity that are still available.

d. Reduction in sexual function and physical attractiveness. Kinsey et al, in their Sexual behaviour in the human male, (Phil., Saunders, 1948) found that there is a gradual decrease in sexual activity with advancing age and that reasonably gratifying patterns of sexual activity can continue into extreme old age. The aging person also has to adapt to loss of sexual attractiveness in a society which puts extreme emphasis on sexual attractiveness. The adjustment in self image and self concept that are required can be very hard to make.

e. Forces tending to self devaluation. Often the experience of the older generation has little perceived relevance to the problems of the young and the older person becomes deprived of participation in decision making both in occupational and family settings. Many parents are seen as unwanted burdens and their children may secretly wish they would die so they can be free of the burden and experience some financial relief or benefit. Senior citizens may be pushed into the role of being an old person with all this implies in terms of self devaluation.

4 Major Categories of Problems or Needs:

Health.

Housing.

Income maintenance.

Interpersonal relations.

BIOLOGICAL CHANGES

Physiological Changes: Catabolism (the breakdown of protoplasm) overtakes anabolism (the build-up of protoplasm). All body systems are affected and repair systems become slowed. The aging process occurs at different rates in different individuals.

Physical appearance and other changes:

Loss of subcutaneous fat and less elastic skin gives rise to wrinkled appearance, sagging and loss of smoothness of body contours. Joints stiffen and become painful and range of joint movement becomes restricted, general mobility lessened.

Respiratory changes:

Increase of fibrous tissue in chest walls and lungs leads restricts respiratory movement and less oxygen is consumed. Older people more likelyto have lower respiratory infections whereas young people have upper respiratory infections.

Nutritive changes:

Tooth decay and loss of teeth can detract from ease and enjoyment in eating. Atrophy of the taste buds means food is inclined to be tasteless and this should be taken into account by carers. Digestive changes occur from lack of exercise (stimulating intestines) and decrease in digestive juice production. Constipation and indigestion are likely to follow as a result. Financial problems can lead to the elderly eating an excess of cheap carbohydrates rather than the more expensive protein and vegetable foods and this exacerbates the problem, leading to reduced vitamin intake and such problems as anemia and increased susceptibility to infection.

Adaptation to stress:

All of us face stress at all ages. Adaptation to stress requires the consumption of energy. The 3 main phases of stress are:

1. Initial alarm reaction. 2. Resistance. 3. Exhaustion

and if stress continues tissue damage or aging occurs. Older persons have had a lifetime of dealing with stresses. Energy reserves are depleted and the older person succumbs to stress earlier than the younger person. Stress is cumulative over a lifetime. Research results, including experiments with animals suggests that each stress leaves us more vulnerable to the next and that although we might think we’ve “bounced back” 100% in fact each stress leaves it scar. Further, stress is psycho-biological meaning the kind of stress is irrelevant. A physical stress may leave one more vulnerable to psychological stress and vice versa. Rest does not completely restore one after a stressor. Care workers need to be mindful of this and cognizant of the kinds of things that can produce stress for aged persons.

COGNITIVE CHANGE Habitual Behaviour:

Sigmund Freud noted that after the age of 50, treatment of neuroses via psychoanalysis was difficult because the opinions and reactions of older people were relatively fixed and hard to shift.

Over-learned behaviour: This is behaviour that has been learned so well and repeated so often that it has become automatic, like for example typing or running down stairs. Over-learned behaviour is hard to change. If one has lived a long time one is likely to have fixed opinions and ritualised behaviour patterns or habits.

Compulsive behaviour: Habits and attitudes that have been learned in the course of finding ways to overcome frustration and difficulty are very hard to break. Tension reducing habits such as nail biting, incessant humming, smoking or drinking alcohol are especially hard to change at any age and particularly hard for persons who have been practising them over a life time.

The psychology of over-learned and compulsive behaviours has severe implications for older persons who find they have to live in what for them is a new and alien environment with new rules and power relations.

Information acquisition:

Older people have a continual background of neural noise making it more difficult for them to sort out and interpret complex sensory input. In talking to an older person one should turn off the TV, eliminate as many noises and distractions as possible, talk slowly and relate to one message or idea at a time.

Memories from the distant past are stronger than more recent memories. New memories are the first to fade and last to return.

Time patterns also can get mixed – old and new may get mixed.

Intelligence.

Intelligence reaches a peak and can stay high with little deterioration if there is no neurological damage. People who have unusually high intelligence to begin with seem to suffer the least decline. Education and stimulation also seem to play a role in maintaining intelligence.

Intellectual impairment. Two diseases of old age causing cognitive decline are Alzheimer’s syndrome and Pick’s syndrome. In Pick’s syndrome there is inability to concentrate and learn and also affective responses are impaired.

Degenerative Diseases: Slow progressive physical degeneration of cells in the nervous system. Genetics appear to be an important factor. Usually start after age 40 (but can occur as early as 20s).

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE Degeneration of all areas of cortex but particularly frontal and temporal lobes. The affected cells actually die. Early symptoms resemble neurotic disorders: Anxiety, depression, restlessness sleep difficulties.

Progressive deterioration of all intellectual faculties (memory deficiency being the most well known and obvious). Total mass of the brain decreases, ventricles become larger. No established treatment.

PICK’S DISEASE Rare degenerative disease. Similar to Alzheimer’s in terms of onset, symptomatology and possible genetic aetiology. However it affects circumscribed areas of the brain, particularly the frontal areas which leads to a loss of normal affect.

PARKINSON’S DISEASE Neuropathology: Loss of neurons in the basal ganglia.

Symptoms: Movement abnormalities: rhythmical alternating tremor of extremities, eyelids and tongue along with rigidity of the muscles and slowness of movement (akinesia).

It was once thought that Parkinson’s disease was not associated with intellectual deterioration, but it is now known that there is an association between global intellectual impairment and Parkinson’s where it occurs late in life.

The cells lost in Parkinson’s are associated with the neuro-chemical Dopamine and the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s are associated the dopamine deficiency. Treatment involves administration of dopamine precursor L-dopa which can alleviate symptoms including intellectual impairment. Research suggests it may possibly bring to the fore emotional effects in patients who have had psychiatric illness at some prior stage in their lives.

AFFECTIVE DOMAIN In old age our self concept gets its final revision. We make a final assessment of the value of our lives and our balance of success and failures.

How well a person adapts to old age may be predicated by how well the person adapted to earlier significant changes. If the person suffered an emotional crisis each time a significant change was needed then adaptation to the exigencies of old age may also be difficult. Factors such as economic security, geographic location and physical health are important to the adaptive process.

Need Fulfilment: For all of us, according to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs theory, we are not free to pursue the higher needs of self actualisation unless the basic needs are secured. When one considers that many, perhaps most, old people are living in poverty and continually concerned with basic survival needs, they are not likely to be happily satisfying needs related to prestige, achievement and beauty.

Maslow’s Hierarchy

Physiological

Safety

Belonging, love, identification

Esteem: Achievement, prestige, success, self respect

Self actualisation: Expressing one’s interests and talents to the full.

Note: Old people who have secured their basic needs may be motivated to work on tasks of the highest levels in the hierarchy – activities concerned with aesthetics, creativity and altruistic matters, as compensation for loss of sexual attractiveness and athleticism. Aged care workers fixated on getting old people to focus on social activities may only succeed in frustrating and irritating them if their basic survival concerns are not secured to their satisfaction.

DISENGAGEMENT

Social aging according to Cumming, E. and Henry, W. (Growing old: the aging process of disengagement, NY, Basic 1961) follows a well defined pattern:

  1. Change in role. Change in occupation and productivity. Possibly change in attitude to work.
  2. Loss of role, e.g. retirement or death of a husband.
  3. Reduced social interaction. With loss of role social interactions are diminished, eccentric adjustment can further reduce social interaction, damage to self concept, depression.
  4. Awareness of scarcity of remaining time. This produces further curtailment of activity in interest of saving time.

Havighurst, R. et al (in B. Neugarten (ed.) Middle age and aging, U. of Chicago, 1968) and others have suggested that disengagement is not an inevitable process. They believe the needs of the old are essentially the same as in middle age and the activities of middle age should be extended as long as possible. Havighurst points out the decrease in social interaction of the aged is often largely the result of society withdrawing from the individual as much as the reverse. To combat this he believes the individual must vigorously resist the limitations of his social world.

DEATH The fear of the dead amongst tribal societies is well established. Persons who had ministered to the dead were taboo and required observe various rituals including seclusion for varying periods of time. In some societies from South America to Australia it is taboo for certain persons to utter the name of the dead. Widows and widowers are expected to observe rituals in respect for the dead.

Widows in the Highlands of New Guinea around Goroka chop of one of their own fingers. The dead continue their existence as spirits and upsetting them can bring dire consequences.

Wahl, C in “The fear of death”, 1959 noted that the fear of death occurs as early as the 3rd year of life. When a child loses a pet or grandparent fears reside in the unspoken questions: Did I cause it? Will happen to you (parent) soon? Will this happen to me? The child in such situations needs to re-assure that the departure is not a censure, and that the parent is not likely to depart soon. Love, grief, guilt, anger are a mix of conflicting emotions that are experienced.

CONTEMPORARY ATTITUDES TO DEATH

Our culture places high value on youth, beauty, high status occupations, social class and anticipated future activities and achievement. Aging and dying are denied and avoided in this system. The death of each person reminds us of our own mortality.

The death of the elderly is less disturbing to members of Western society because the aged are not especially valued. Surveys have established that nurses for example attach more importance to saving a young life than an old life. In Western society there is a pattern of avoiding dealing with the aged and dying aged patient.

Stages of dying. Elisabeth Kubler Ross has specialised in working with dying patients and in her “On death and dying”, NY, Macmillan, 1969, summarised 5 stages in dying.

  1. Denial and isolation. “No, not me”.
  2. Anger. “I’ve lived a good life so why me?”
  3. Bargaining. Secret deals are struck with God. “If I can live until…I promise to…”
  4. Depression. (In general the greatest psychological problem of the aged is depression). Depression results from real and threatened loss.
  5. Acceptance of the inevitable.

Kubler Ross’s typology as set out above should, I believe be taken with a grain of salt and not slavishly accepted. Celebrated US Journalist David Rieff who was in June ’08 a guest of the Sydney writer’s festival in relation to his book, “Swimming in a sea of death: a son’s memoir” (Melbourne University Press) expressly denied the validity of the Kubler Ross typology in his Late Night Live interview (Australian ABC radio) with Philip Adams June 9th ’08. He said something to the effect that his mother had regarded her impending death as murder. My own experience with dying persons suggests that the human ego is extraordinarily resilient. I recall visiting a dying colleague in hospital just days before his death. He said, “I’m dying, I don’t like it but there’s nothing I can do about it”, and then went on to chortle about how senior academics at an Adelaide university had told him they were submitting his name for a the Order of Australia (the new “Knighthood” replacement in Australia). Falling in and out of lucid thought with an oxygen tube in his nostrils he was nevertheless still highly interested in the “vain glories of the world”. This observation to me seemed consistent with Rieff’s negative assessment of Kubler Ross’s theories.

THE AGED IN RELATION TO YOUNGER PEOPLE

The aged share with the young the same needs: However, the aged often have fewer or weaker resources to meet those needs. Their need for social interaction may be ignored by family and care workers.

Family should make time to visit their aged members and invite them to their homes. The aged like to visit children and relate to them through games and stories.

Meaningful relationships can be developed via foster-grandparent programs. Some aged are not aware of their income and health entitlements. Family and friends should take the time to explain these. Some aged are too proud to access their entitlements and this problem should be addressed in a kindly way where it occurs.

It is best that the aged be allowed as much choice as possible in matters related to living arrangements, social life and lifestyle.

Communities serving the aged need to provide for the aged via such things as lower curbing, and ramps.

Carers need to examine their own attitude to aging and dying. Denial in the carer is detected by the aged person and it can inhibit the aged person from expressing negative feelings – fear, anger. If the person can express these feelings to someone then that person is less likely to die with a sense of isolation and bitterness.

A METAPHYSICAL PERSPECTIVE

The following notes are my interpretation of a Dr. Depak Chopra lecture entitled, “The New Physics of Healing” which he presented to the 13th Scientific Conference of the American Holistic Medical Association. Dr. Depak Chopra is an endocrinologist and a former Chief of Staff of New England Hospital, Massachusetts. I am deliberately omitting the detail of his explanations of the more abstract, ephemeral and controversial ideas.

Original material from 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

In the lecture Dr. Chopra presents a model of the universe and of all organisms as structures of interacting centres of electromagnetic energy linked to each other in such a way that anything affecting one part of a system or structure has ramifications throughout the entire structure. This model becomes an analogue not only for what happens within the structure or organism itself, but between the organism and both its physical and social environments. In other words there is a correlation between psychological conditions, health and the aging process. Dr. Chopra in his lecture reconciles ancient Vedic (Hindu) philosophy with modern psychology and quantum physics.

Premature Precognitive Commitment: Dr. Chopra invokes experiments that have shown that flies kept for a long time in a jar do not quickly leave the jar when the top is taken off. Instead they accept the jar as the limit of their universe. He also points out that in India baby elephants are often kept tethered to a small twig or sapling. In adulthood when the elephant is capable of pulling over a medium sized tree it can still be successfully tethered to a twig! As another example he points to experiments in which fish are bred on

2 sides of a fish tank containing a divider between the 2 sides. When the divider is removed the fish are slow to learn that they can now swim throughout the whole tank but rather stay in the section that they accept as their universe. Other experiments have demonstrated that kittens brought up in an environment of vertical stripes and structures, when released in adulthood keep bumping into anything aligned horizontally as if they were unable to see anything that is horizontal. Conversely kittens brought up in an environment of horizontal stripes when released bump into vertical structures, apparently unable to see them.

The whole point of the above experiments is that they demonstrate Premature Precognitive Commitment. The lesson to be learned is that our sensory apparatus develops as a result of initial experience and how we’ve been taught to interpret it.

What is the real look of the world? It doesn’t exist. The way the world looks to us is determined by the sensory receptors we have and our interpretation of that look is determined by our premature precognitive commitments. Dr Chopra makes the point that less than a billionth of the available stimuli make it into our nervous systems. Most of it is screened, and what gets through to us is whatever we are expecting to find on the basis of our precognitive commitments.

Dr. Chopra also discusses the diseases that are actually caused by mainstream medical interventions, but this material gets too far away from my central intention. Dr. Chopra discusses in lay terms the physics of matter, energy and time by way of establishing the wider context of our existence. He makes the point that our bodies including the bodies of plants are mirrors of cosmic rhythms and exhibit changes correlating even with the tides.

Dr. Chopra cites the experiments of Dr. Herbert Spencer of the US National Institute of Health. He injected mice with Poly-IC, an immuno-stimulant while making the mice repeatedly smell camphor. After the effect of the Poly-IC had worn off he again exposed the mice to the camphor smell. The smell of camphor had the effect of causing the mice’s immune system to automatically strengthen as if they had been injected with the stimulant. He then took another batch of mice and injected them with cyclophosphamide which tends to destroy the immune system while exposing them to the smell of camphor. Later after being returned to normal just the smell of camphor was enough to cause destruction of their immune system. Dr. Chopra points out that whether or not camphor enhanced or destroyed the mice’s immune system was entirely determined by an interpretation of the meaning of the smell of camphor. The interpretation is not just in the brain but in each cell of the organism. We are bound to our imagination and our early experiences.

Chopra cites a study by the Massachusetts Dept of Health Education and Welfare into risk factors for heart disease – family history, cholesterol etc. The 2 most important risk factors were found to be psychological measures – Self  Happiness Rating and Job Satisfaction. They found most people died of heart disease on a Monday!

Chopra says that for every feeling there is a molecule. If you are experiencing tranquillity your body will be producing natural valium. Chemical changes in the brain are reflected by changes in other cells including blood cells. The brain produces neuropeptides and brain structures are chemically tuned to these neuropeptide receptors. Neuropeptides (neurotransmitters) are the chemical concommitants of thought. Chopra points out the white blood cells (a part of the immune system) have neuropeptide receptors and are “eavesdropping” on our thinking. Conversely the immune system produces its own neuropeptides which can influence the nervous system. He goes on to say that cells in all parts of the body including heart and kidneys for example also produce neuropeptides and neuropeptide sensitivity. Chopra assures us that most neurologists would agree that the nervous system and the immune system are parallel systems.

Other studies in physiology: The blood interlukin-2 levels of medical students decreased as exam time neared and their interlukin receptor capacities also lowered. Chopra says if we are having fun to the point of exhilaration our natural interlukin-2 levels become higher. Interlukin-2 is a powerful and very expensive anti-cancer drug. The body is a printout of consciousness. If we could change the way we look at our bodies at a genuine, profound level then our bodies would actually change.

On the subject of “time” Chopra cites Sir Thomas Gall and Steven Hawkins, stating that our description of the universe as having a past, present, and future are constructed entirely out of our interpretation of change. But in reality linear time doesn’t exist.

Chopra explains the work of Alexander Leaf a former Harvard Professor of Preventative Medicine who toured the world investigating societies where people  lived beyond 100 years (these included parts of Afghanistan, Soviet Georgia, Southern Andes). He looked at possible factors including climate, genetics, and diet. Leaf concluded the most important factor was the collective perception of aging in these societies.

Amongst the Tama Humara of the Southern Andes there was a collective belief that the older you got the more physically able you got. They had a tradition of running and the older one became then generally the better at running one got. The best runner was aged 60. Lung capacity and other measures actually improved with age. People were healthy until well into their 100s and died in their sleep. Chopra remarks that things have changed since the introduction of Budweiser (beer) and TV.

[DISCUSSION: How might TV be a factor in changing the former ideal state of things?]

Chopra refers to Dr. Ellen Langor a former Harvard Psychology professor’s work. Langor advertised for 100 volunteers aged over 70 years. She took them to a Monastery outside Boston to play “Let’s Pretend”. They were divided into 2 groups each of which resided in a different part of the building. One group, the control group spent several days talking about the 1950s. The other group, the experimental group had to live as if in the year 1959 and talk about it in the present tense. What appeared on their TV screens were the old newscasts and movies. They read old newspapers and magazines of the period. After 3 days everyone was photographed and the photographs judged by independent judges who knew nothing of the nature of the experiment. The experimental group seemed to have gotten younger in appearance. Langor then arranged for them to be tested for 100 physiological parameters of aging which included of course blood pressure, near point vision and DHEA levels. After 10 days of living as if in 1959 all parameters had reversed by the equivalent of at least 20 years.

Chopra concludes from Langor’s experiment: “We are the metabolic end product of our sensory experiences. How we interpret them depends on the collective mindset which influences individual biological entropy and aging.”

Can one escape the current collective mindset and reap the benefits in longevity and health? Langor says, society won’t let you escape. There are too many reminders of how most people think linear time is and how it expresses itself in entropy and aging – men are naughty at 40 and on social welfare at 55, women reach menopause at 40 etc. We get to see so many other people aging and dying that it sets the pattern that we follow.

Chopra concludes we are the metabolic product of our sensory experience and our interpretation gets structured in our biology itself. Real change comes from change in the collective consciousness – otherwise it cannot occur within the individual.

Readings

Chopra, D. The New Physics of Healing. 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

Coleman, J. C. Abnormal psychology and modern life. Scott Foresman & Co.

Lugo, J. and Hershey, L. Human development a multidisciplinary approach to the psychology of individual growth, NY, Macmillan.

Dennis. Psychology of human behaviour for nurses. Lond. W. B.Saunders.

[http://www.psychologynatural.com/DepressionBroch.html]

Dr. Victor Barnes is an Adelaide psychologist and hypnotherapist. He has also had three decades of experience in adult education including serving as Dean of a Sri Lankan college (ICBT) teaching several Australian degrees. His overseas experience includes studies and consulting experience in USA, PNG, Poland and Sri Lanka.

Unprotected Heroes Vests Save K-9s Lives as They Protect and Serve Communities

January 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

11734(Family Features) A German Shepherd named Kilo was shot multiple times during a gun battle in Florida between police and a man suspected of shooting at officers earlier in the night. Fortunately for Kilo, he was wearing a protective vest, which saved his life. Unfortunately, thousands of other K-9s officers across the country perform their duties without proper protective wear, putting them in harm’s way.

 

Bullet and stab protective vests cost around $1,000 each and many departments simply do not have the means to outfit their dogs. PetArmor®, known for its products that protect pets from fleas and ticks, is helping to ensure more K-9s are protected while in the line of duty. Through a yearlong partnership with Vested Interest in K-9s, PetArmor® is providing funding for bullet and stab protective vests for law enforcement teams throughout the United States.

 

“These dogs are out 30 feet in front of us and need these vests,” said Officer Vinnie Curcio, with the Jupiter, Fla., Police Department, which is one of the police departments benefiting from the donation. “They’re leading us into dark, wooded areas after some of the most violent people.”

 

Police forces in most major cities use police dogs to track criminals, sniff out illegal materials, search buildings, and do other jobs human police officers can’t do as well as a dog can. Additionally, their sense of smell is tens of thousands of times more sensitive than that of humans, making them ideal for their duties.

 

Beyond their sense of smell, successful police dogs have exceptional intelligence and strength. Most police dogs are male, and are frequently left unneutered so that they maintain their natural aggression. This aggression must be kept in check with thorough and rigorous training.

 

The most popular breeds used as police dogs are German Shepherds, Belgian Malinois, Dutch Shepherds, and occasionally mixes of these breeds. Other breeds used include Bloodhounds for detection and scent work, and Labrador Retrievers for narcotics and explosives detection.

 

“Police K-9 units provide an invaluable service to their community and deserve the same kind of protection as their human counterparts,” said Sandy Marcal, founder of Vested Interest in K-9s, Inc.  “Thanks to PetArmor®, many more police dogs will be protected from harm while they protect their neighborhoods and towns.”

 

For more information on PetArmor® product offerings, visit www.petarmor.com. Additional information on Vested Interest in K-9s, Inc. can be found on their website, www.vik9s.org/.

How to Talk to Aging Parents About Senior Housing

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

One in three adults ages 65 and older will fall each year. Use this podcast to learn how to talk to aging parents about senior living before an accident occurs.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in three adults ages 65 and older fall each year. Of these falls, 20–30 percent result in debilitating injuries limiting seniors’ ability to live on their own. It is more important than ever for seniors and their adult children to plan for senior living accommodations—before an accident occurs.

Of course, the conversation about senior living can be emotional and taxing for aging parents. Seniors may view the change as a loss of independence, and it can be difficult to think about leaving their home and existing lifestyle to join a new community.

In a recent podcast from MySilverAge.com, Lisa Holland—regional director of quality improvement at be.group, a nonprofit provider of California senior living communities—offers expert tips to ease these challenges and strategies to help start the conversation. Holland explains how to approach the subject respectfully and sensitively, and how to offer the right support for each parent’s unique needs.

To hear all of Holland’s tips on talking to aging parents about senior living, including whom to include in the discussion and ways to prepare for potential responses, visit: www.mysilverage.com/thetalk.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

U.S. Veterans Honored by Encore.org’s 2013 Purpose Prize

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Seven Awards for People Over Age 60 Solving the World’s Toughest Social Problems

The Purpose Prize has become a “MacArthur genius award for people who develop a second career as social service entrepreneurs.” – The New York Times.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy organizes a network of volunteers across the country to teach disabled veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan how to combat stress — through fly-fishing.

A public relations executive helps wounded warriors find and renovate foreclosed homes – and transforms lives and neighborhoods in the process.

These are two of the seven winners of the 2013 Purpose Prize, awarded by Encore.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who translate decades of skill and experience into “second acts” that contribute to society’s greater good.

Now in its eighth year, The Purpose Prize is the nation’s only large-scale investment in people over 60 who are combining their passion and experience for the social good. Created in 2005 by Encore.org, the prize is aimed at those with the passion to make change and the wisdom to know how to do it, showcasing the value of experience and disproving the notion that innovation is solely the province of the young.

Two winners will receive $100,000 each and five winners will receive $25,000 each.

This year’s winners:

* Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. ($100,000 winner of The Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra)

* Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron taps into her own experience as a cancer survivor to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. ($100,000)

* Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing emotional wounds through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. ($25,000)

* Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
Fennelly runs a unique summer camp behind bars that is transforming federal prisoners into involved parents. ($25,000)

* Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
Huttinger’s project is on a path to eradicate human schistosomiasis, a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. ($25,000)

* Reverend Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. ($25,000)

* Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
Young’s rise from immigrant nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. ($25,000)

The Purpose Prize winners will be honored on December 5, 2013, at an awards ceremony in Sausalito, Ca. NBC’s Jane Pauley will emcee the event for hundreds of Encore leaders and the Purpose Prize winners.

Twenty-one judges – leaders in business, politics, journalism and the nonprofit sector – chose the seven winners from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees. Judges include Sherry Lansing, former CEO of Paramount; David Bornstein, author and New York Times columnist; Eric Liu, writer and founder of CitizenUniversity; and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, The Purpose Prize is a program of Encore.org, which aims to engage millions of boomers in encore careers combining personal meaning, continued income and social impact in the second half of life.

This year, Symetra is sponsoring the $100,000 Purpose Prize for Future Promise, which recognizes an individual whose approach for helping society has the potential to grow steadily over the next five years. The company plans to sponsor another Purpose Prize for Future Promise in 2014.

“While Purpose Prize winners are helping to solve a wide range of pressing social problems, they have one thing in common,” said Marc Freedman, CEO and founder of Encore.org and author of The Big Shift (PublicAffairs Books). “They – and millions of others in encore careers – are turning personal passions and decades of experience into invaluable contributions across sectors, continents and generations, often through entrepreneurship.”

Short summaries for all winners follow. Photos are attached. Longer bios and higher resolution photos are available.

Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas, winner of this year’s Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra, rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. Following a 35-year-career as a fundraising and marketing dynamo, she became the director of communications at Purple Heart Homes in 2008 in an effort to provide greater services for veterans who have service-connected disabilities. In just three years, Thomas helped take the fledgling nonprofit to new heights. She has raised millions for Purple Heart Homes in financial contributions and material donations. Revenue shot up 600% in her first year with the startup. She’s developed an innovative program that matches veterans with foreclosed homes donated by banks, then raises the funds to renovate a home for the individual veteran’s needs. It’s a win-win for all generations—and communities too. It helps veterans to grow assets, towns to recoup lost taxes and neighborhoods that have struggled with foreclosures to stabilize.

Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron is an award-winning journalist with more than 42 years in television broadcasting. She tapped into her own experience as a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. To focus on the plight of low-income Latinos fighting the disease, Duron founded Latinas Contra Cancer (Latinas Against Cancer), an organization committed to educating, supporting and providing essential services to low-income Spanish speakers often overlooked by the health care system. Latinas Contra Cancer has offered a range of programs that have taught more than 3,000 men, women and teens about the disease, resulting in more than 300 preventative cancer screenings. The group has provided psychological and social support to over 100 patients per year. However, the call to action Duron answered has had an impact far beyond the Bay Area. Her passionate commitment is helping Latino communities across the U.S. gain access to cancer support, information and treatment. Her great empathy for cancer patients has made her utterly clear on her bigger purpose in the second stage of life.

Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing the emotional wounds of battle through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. A cancer survivor and war veteran himself, Nicholson was impressed by the fortitude of disabled veterans at the Walter Reed military hospital, where he was treated for prostate cancer in 2005. It spurred him to found Project Healing Waters, a program dedicated to helping disabled soldiers and veterans recover from the trying aftermath of war through the sport of fly-fishing. One-on-one connections have been key to Project Healing Waters’ approach since the beginning. Nicholson knew there were fly-fishing groups and facilities all over the country. His innovation was to convince them to start, manage and lead fly-fishing instruction and outings with veterans through military and Veterans Administration facilities. The quiet bonds forged over fishing lines began to transform lives. Again and again Nicholson heard from family members who said their loved ones had returned from war withdrawn, angry, and difficult to be around. But after fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters, they’ve become happier, more open and engaged. Project Healing Waters works closely with VA Recreational and Occupational therapies to identify those who would most benefit from the program. Many are in wheelchairs or using prosthetics. A few are blind. Participants reflect of full spectrum of disabled veterans and include all ages, genders, ethnicities and disabilities. Nicholson says the impact “goes well beyond the mechanics of fly-fishing.”

Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
A lifelong social activist who ran homeless shelters in the District of Columbia for 17 years, Carol Fennelly abandoned her plans to retire in 1998 when she learned that D.C. inmates had been transferred to Youngstown, OH. One woman made 10-hour round-trip drives twice a week to visit her son. Moved to answer a social need, Fennelly thought about opening a hospitality house in Youngstown for family members visiting inmates. She soon learned that while 93% of the federal inmate population is male, in sheer numbers there are more programs for mothers in prison than there are for fathers. She decided she had what it took to change things. “I had spent years organizing, dealing with government, making change happen, and that emboldened me to think I could go into prisons and start all these radical programs,” Fennelly says. So she launched an encore career with Hope House, an innovative organization that helps prison inmates stay in regular contact with their children. In the past 14 years, Hope House has hosted 200 video teleconferences, 18,000 personalized book readings by fathers and 31 week-long summer camps, which allow kids to spend time with their fathers free of the usual restrictions that come with visitor hours and family chaperones. California recently decided to implement the Hope House model in its 33 state prisons. Prisons in Texas, Idaho and New Hampshire may follow. In 2013 Fennelly was honored at the White House as a Champion of Change.

Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
International public health expert Elizabeth Huttinger spotted a big idea in shrimp, and launched an encore career that could eradicate a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. Huttinger’s project – founded in 2006 – is targeting human schistosomiasis, an infectious parasite carried by river snails. Understanding that the population of prawns that eat those snails had precipitously declined, Huttinger, 63, has devoted her encore career to restoring the prawn population in the SenegalRiver Basin. Projet Crevette’s mission is multifaceted: the restoration of the prawn population diminishes the spread of schisto, provides new economic opportunities to afflicted communities and heals families infected by the disease. Today, Projet Crevette is a prawn-farming microenterprise, operated by locals at public watering holes. It has brought social innovation, new microbusinesses, environmental restoration and improved health to communities. Huttinger is confident Projet Crevette will meet its bold goal to fully restore the indigenous prawn population—and improve countless lives in the process.

Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Reverend Violet Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. After 14 years as parish pastor trained in psychotherapy, Little left behind her traditional congregation to create a religious refuge for the homeless on the streets of the city, which became the “WelcomeChurch.” The church relies mostly on word of mouth, and services can pop up in a city park or on a sidewalk. No questions are asked, and everyone is welcome. The WelcomeChurch coordinates medical services through local universities, helps people get into rehab or jobs, and offers educational services to the public on the causes of homelessness. Little estimates 40 percent of her congregants have moved off the streets into permanent housing and the WelcomeChurch celebrates each and every one of them, many of whom stay connected with Little through their transition. Little’s congregation has grown to include hundreds of homeless as well as non-homeless volunteers in the EvangelicalLutheranChurch in America.

Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
An immigrant from the West Indies who built a meaningful life on meager income, Young’s gritty rise from nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. She’s encouraged thousands to stand up for their right to earn a living wage, and counsels and trains others to become leaders themselves. In 2004, Young began building a movement to legislate a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in New YorkState, which would make overtime, paid time off and rest days mandatory. In 2009, when she heard then Governor David Patterson say on the radio that he’d sign the bill if it made it to his desk, she put on a full court press, becoming the engine behind passage of the law in 2010. The law is the first of its kind in the country, but Young is committed to making sure it isn’t the last. She’s now a key player in the NDWA’s expansion from 11 to 44 affiliated organizations with 15,000 members, up from 5,000 in 2007. Young’s passion for serving her community has only just begun.

Read More About Encore’s Purpose Prize at www.encore.org/prize.

About Encore.org

Encore.org is a national nonprofit that promotes the idea that people in their second acts have the talent and experience to solve some of society’s greatest problems.

About The Atlantic Philanthropies

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. In keeping with the Giving While Living philosophy of founder Charles “Chuck” Feeney, The Atlantic Philanthropies believes in making large investments to capitalize on significant opportunities to solve urgent problems now, so they are less likely to become larger, more entrenched and more expensive challenges later. The Atlantic Philanthropies also seeks to encourage others of significant wealth to engage in major philanthropic pursuits in their lifetime.

About The John Templeton Foundation

The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, supporting research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.

About Symetra

Symetra Financial Corporation (NYSE: SYA) is a diversified financial services company based in Bellevue, Wash. In business since 1957, Symetra provides employee benefits, annuities and life insurance through a national network of benefit consultants, financial institutions, and independent agents and advisors.

 

CONTACT: Sara Ying Rounsaville, srounsaville@encore.org, 415-952-5121, or Russ Mitchell, rmitchell@encore.org, 510-969-0801

Keep it simple to move seniors successfully

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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According to experts, from 2000 until 2011, senior citizens 65 years and older grew nearly 18 percent, up to 41.4 million. Nearly 81 percent of that age group owned homes at the end of 2011.

Children and families of the Baby Boomer generation — people born between 1946 and 1960 — will soon find themselves helping elderly loved ones move.

Moving a senior family member is challenging. No one wants to upset that person, and everyone wants the move to go as smoothly as possible. This can sometimes seem like an impossible task.

The important thing to remember when moving a senior is to stay organized and calm throughout the move, say the experts at TWO MEN AND A TRUCK®. When moving a senior into a living facility, consider contacting management to find out what can be brought onto the campus, what are appropriate moving hours, and do they have any best practices for the move.

Remember:

  • Start packing several weeks in advance. Pack early to avoid being overwhelmed as moving day draws near.
  • Wrap small items in colored paper. This prevents items such as knick-knacks from becoming lost or thrown out.
  • Label boxes on top and sides. Mark the top and sides of boxes as they’re packed. Make sure to label boxes containing breakable or sentimental items with “fragile.”
  • Pack all electronic equipment in original boxes. Otherwise use low-static bubble wrap when packing these items
  • Always use packing paper. When wrapping fine china and precious items, the ink from printed newsprint may bleed onto valuables.
  • Sealing all boxes with packing tape. This makes it easier to stack and protect belongings.
  • Use boxes designed for the items you are packing. Use dish pack boxes for dishes and wardrobe boxes for clothing.

TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® is the largest franchised moving company both in the United States and internationally. Currently there are more than 240 national locations and 1,500 trucks operating in the U.S.; in total, the company operates 260 locations and 1,600 trucks. TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® has performed more than 4.5 million moves since its inception in 1985. The company has seen consistent monthly growth dating back to December 2009 and more than 20 months of double-digit growth. Each location is independently owned and operated. Visit twomenandatruck.com.

Contact: Dawn Kroeger
dawn.kroeger@twomen.com
(517) 803-2901

Animal-Senior Citizen Companionship Leads to Improved Overall Health

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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 The mental and physical benefits of animal companionship have been praised across the world, from seeing-eye dogs to therapy dogs to household pets. According to the US Pet Ownership and Demographics Sourcebook, there are approximately 70 million pet dogs and 74 million pet cats in the United States. Of this number, about 63 percent of pets are considered to be members of the family. Now, pet adoption companies are utilizing the health improvements to better the quality of life for senior citizens.

“The pairing of seniors with calm, manageable adult dogs and cats has yielded amazing vitality and unparalleled effects, the feeling of loneliness dissolves and a reason to be active arises,” affirms Will Post, CEO of Hound & Gatos Pet Food, whose mission is to provide the public with high-quality pet food options for dogs and cats. “The simple presence of animal companionship can provide amazing health benefits that truly lift a senior’s mental and physical state because they have someone to depend on and someone who depends on them.”

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention reports that pets can reduce stress, lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels, in addition to increasing social interaction and physical activity. Add unconditional love, purpose, and that special something to care for and nurture, and you have an elixir for senior citizens.

According to Pet Partners, seniors with pets experience fewer minor health issues when visiting their doctor, and overall better health and mental well-being.  Pets are also praised for reducing loneliness and depression, two major factors that can lead to an unhealthy body and mind. Since dogs live in the present, their focus on ‘today’ tends to rub off on their owners, resulting in managing anxiety levels.

“These positive results of animal companionship for seniors is one more reason to encourage the ownership and nurturing of pets for the seniors of today. We are only beginning to document these facts determining the health benefits of pet ownership for the elderly, though animal lovers have always suspected it. Their contribution to a better quality of life being recognized can only lead to happier and healthier seniors, something we can all be excited about,” says Post.  “The importance of love proves to be a major force in life no matter what age one might be.”

Research continues to show that pets help people of all ages enjoy a much fuller and rewarding life, and the mission of Hound & Gatos Pet Food Corporation is to try to create cat and dog formulas that can ultimately improve our beloved pet’s vitality and longevity. Dubbed as the original Paleolithic pet food company, their recipes are 100 percent protein and zero percent plant protein, with the number-one ingredient being meat. To learn more about Hound & Gatos, including where to buy products, visit their site at: www.houndgatos.com.

About Hound & Gatos Pet Foods Corporation

Hound & Gatos Pet Foods Corporation is based in New York. Their mission is to provide the public with high-quality pet food options for dogs and cats. Their line of pet foods focus on quality ingredients that provide maximum nutrition, and avoid all bi-products and other ingredients that would generally be unnatural to a pet’s diet. For more information on Hound & Gatos visit the site at www.houndgatos.com.

 

# # #

Source: American Veterinary Medical Assocation. US Pet Ownership & Demographics Sourcebook.https://www.avma.org/KB/Resources/Statistics/Pages/Market-research-statistics-US-Pet-Ownership-Demographics-Sourcebook.aspx

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Health Benefits of Pets.http://www.cdc.gov/healthypets/health_benefits.htm

Pet Partners. Health Benefits of Animals for Seniors. http://www.petpartners.org/page.aspx?pid=312

Study Shows that People Who Undergo Cataract Surgery to Correct Visual Impairment Live Longer

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Australian researchers find a 40 percent lower mortality risk among patients who had their vision corrected through the procedure  

SAN FRANCISCO – Sept. 4, 2013 – People with cataract-related vision loss who have had cataract surgery to improve their sight are living longer than those with visual impairment who chose not to have the procedure, according to an Australian cohort study published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. After comparing the two groups, the researchers found a 40 percent lower long-term mortality risk in those who had the surgery.

The research is drawn from data gathered in the Blue Mountains Eye Study, a population-based cohort study of vision and common eye diseases in an older Australian population. A total of 354 persons aged 49 years and older and diagnosed with cataract-related vision impairment –  some of whom had undergone surgery and others who had not – were assessed between 1992 and 2007. Adjustments were made for age and gender as well as a number of mortality risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, smoking, cardiovascular disease, body mass index and measures of frailty and comorbid disease. Follow-up visits took place after five and ten years since the baseline exam.

Previous research had indicated that older persons with visual impairment were likely to have greater mortality risk than their age peers with normal vision, and that cataract surgery might reduce this risk. These studies – unlike the Blue Mountains Eye Study – compared people who had undergone cataract surgery with those in the general population or with those who had not had cataract surgery, and did not link vision status to the surgical status.

“Our finding complements the previously documented associations between visual impairment and increased mortality among older persons,” said Jie Jin Wang, Ph.D., of the Westmead Millennium Institute and one of lead researchers of the study. “It suggests to ophthalmologists that correcting cataract patients’ visual impairment in their daily practice results in improved outcomes beyond that of the eye and vision, and has important impacts on general health.”

The association between correction of cataract-related visual impairment and reduced mortality risk is not clearly understood, but plausible factors may include improvements in physical and emotional well-being, optimism, greater confidence associated with independent living after vision improvement, as well as greater ability to comply with prescription medications.

Dr. Wang noted one limitation of the study is that participants with cataract-related visual impairment who did not have cataract surgery could have had other health problems that prevented them from undergoing surgery, and that these other health problems could partly explain the poorer survival among non-surgical participants. This issue is addressed by the researchers in a subsequent study.

Caused by the clouding of the lens, cataract is a leading cause of treatable visual impairment that will affect more than half of all Americans by the time they are 80 years old.[1]  Surgical removal of the opaque lens with an artificial lens implanted is a successful procedure of cataract treatment. If completing everyday tasks is difficult, cataract surgery should be discussed with an ophthalmologist − a medical doctor specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

Seniors who are seeking eye care but are concerned about cost may qualify for EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, which offers eye exams and care at no out-of-pocket cost to qualifying seniors age 65 and older. Learn more at www.eyecareamerica.org. For more information on cataracts and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology 
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons — Eye M.D.s — with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who has the education and training to treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trusted and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

About Ophthalmology
Ophthalmology, the official journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, publishes original, peer-reviewed, clinically applicable research. Topics include the results of clinical trials, new diagnostic and surgical techniques, treatment methods technology assessments, translational science reviews and editorials.

End Holiday Gatherings with a Slice of Decadence

October 31, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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(Family Features) Savoring a flavorful, homemade pie is the perfect way to end any gathering during the holidays. While apple, pecan and pumpkin are go-to favorites this time of year, introducing holiday-inspired flavor twists is perfect for those who crave a little variety.

 

“You’ll love the smooth layers of rich chocolate and the crunch of pecans seasoned with cinnamon and allspice in this easy-to-make pecan pie,” said Mary Beth Harrington of the McCormick Kitchens. “I like to bring this pie as a hostess gift, too – the additional ingredients give it a unique, memorable touch.”

 

Make any pie holiday-worthy by topping each piece with an extra-special homemade whipped cream flavored with Vanilla Extract. Try other festive varieties like candy cane, cocoa cinnamon and eggnog.

 

For more holiday-inspired recipes, visit www.McCormick.com, www.Facebook.com/McCormickSpice, or www.Pinterest.com/mccormickspices.

 

Decadent Chocolate Pecan Pie

Serves: 10

 

1          refrigerated pie crust, (from 14.1-ounce package)

1          cup semi-sweet chocolate chips

3          tablespoons milk

4          eggs

3          tablespoons butter, melted

2          teaspoons McCormick® Pure Vanilla Extract

1          cup dark corn syrup

1          cup sugar

1/2       teaspoon McCormick® Ground Cinnamon

1/4       teaspoon McCormick® Ground Allspice

1/4       teaspoon salt

1 1/2    cups pecan halves

1.      Preheat oven to 425°F. Line 9-inch deep dish pie plate with pie crust. Bake 7 minutes. Remove crust from oven. Reduce oven temperature to 325°F.

2.      Meanwhile, microwave chocolate chips and milk in medium microwavable bowl on HIGH 1 to 1 1/2 minutes. Stir until smooth. Pour chocolate evenly over crust.

3.      Beat eggs in large bowl. Add remaining ingredients; mix well. Slowly pour mixture over chocolate layer. Place ring of foil around edges of crust to prevent over-browning.

4.      Bake 55 to 60 minutes or until filling is puffed and center is still soft enough to move when shaken gently. Cool completely on wire rack.

Holiday-Flavored Whipped Toppings

 

For Vanilla Whipped Cream, beat 1 cup heavy cream, 1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar and 1 teaspoon McCormick® Pure Vanilla Extract in medium bowl with electric mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form.

 

For Candy Cane Whipped Cream, beat 1 cup heavy cream, 1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar, 1/2 teaspoon McCormick® Pure Vanilla Extract and 1/4 teaspoon McCormick® Pure Peppermint Extract in medium bowl with electric mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form.

 

For Cocoa Cinnamon Whipped Cream, beat 1 cup heavy cream, 2 teaspoons unsweetened cocoa powder,1/2 teaspoon McCormick® Ground Cinnamon and 1/2 teaspoon McCormick® Pure Vanilla Extract in medium bowl with electric mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form.

 

For Eggnog Whipped Cream, beat 1 cup heavy cream, 1/2 teaspoon McCormick® Pure Vanilla Extract, 1/4 teaspoon McCormick® Ground Nutmeg and 1/4 teaspoon McCormick® Imitation Rum Extract in medium bowl with electric mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form.

 

 

 

 

 

Deserving Senior Caregivers to be Rewarded through “Caring for the Caregiver” Program Sponsored by Twilight Wish Foundation and Parentgiving

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Deserving Senior Caregivers to be Rewarded through “Caring for the Caregiver” Program Sponsored by Twilight Wish Foundation and Parentgiving

Caregiver nominations taken online at www.twilightwish.org until October 15

The national nonprofit Twilight Wish Foundation and Parentgiving are pleased to announce the “Caring for the Caregiver” award. According to a recently released Bureau of Labor Statistics survey, over 39 million Americans provide hours of unpaid care to someone over the age of 65. Caregivers often struggle with their own physical, financial and mental needs. This program was created to recognize and reward these deserving senior caregivers who often put their own needs last by providing a respite from caregiving duties.

“Often, caregivers are seen as hidden patients themselves,” said Cass Forkin, founder of Twilight Wish. “Although caregiving is a labor of love to many, the stress and strain of providing around-the- clock care often takes a toll on the caregivers, both mentally and physically.”

According to David Spain, CEO of Parentgiving, many caregivers are often not able to get the break from their responsibilities that they need. “This program offers caregivers the chance to relax and rejuvenate, away from their daily duties,” said Spain. “We want them to know that their selfless contributions and dedication are appreciated.”

Twilight Wish and Parentgiving chose August 21 to launch “Caring for the Caregiver” because it’s National Senior Citizens Day, first proclaimed by President Ronald Reagan in 1988. “Older citizens are reinforcing their historical roles as leaders and as links with our patrimony and sense of purpose as individuals and as a Nation,” said the late president.

Anyone can nominate a deserving caregiver by filling out an application at www.twilightwish.org.  Caregivers can nominate themselves. Entries will be accepted through October 15, 2013. The winner will be notified in early November 2013. The “Caring for the Caregiver” award may be a two-night hotel stay, restaurant meal(s), spa treatment(s), or tickets to an event or any combination of these as chosen by the award winner. The winner will also receive free in-home caregiving services from a local senior homecare organization, ensuring a worry-free getaway.

Twilight Wish Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit charitable organization whose mission is to honor and enrich the lives of deserving seniors through wish granting celebrations that connect generations. Since its founding in 2003, Twilight Wish has granted over 1,931 individual wishes to deserving, low-income seniors, thanks to volunteers, corporate and community involvement, and donations. Recent wishes granted include a visit from a string band for a nursing home resident’s 89th birthday, transporting a nursing home resident to Christmas Eve dinner with family, and hearing aids for an Army veteran who wished to be able to hear his grandchildren’s voices. For more, visit www.twilightwish.org.

Parentgiving.com is a leading online destination for seniors and their caregivers, offering a wealth of information on eldercare, news, Q&As with experts, and healthy aging resources as well as a store with thousands of homecare products and medical supplies, delivered right to the home. Bestsellers include walkers, bed rails, bath safety bars, incontinence supplies, and daily living aids. For more, visit www.Parentgiving.com. For more about Parentgiving’s mission, contact Julie Davis at 203-984-4424.

For more about the “Caring for the Caregiver Award,” contact Mary Farrell, Twilight Wish Director of Community Relations, 215-230-8777 ext. 103

Read more news from Parentgiving

Treat them like a person, not a patient

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Treat them like a person, not a patient

New living systems developmental model of care shifts the focus of treating Alzheimer’s disease and other debilitating illnesses

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. – Donald H. Ford observed that advanced Alzheimer’s patients, like his mother-in-law, are typically bored and lonely, and often depressed, frightened or angry.  His professional knowledge convinced him it didn’t have to be that way.  When Alzheimer’s struck his wife, he created a scientifically based alternative form of Alzheimer’s care that enabled her to still have a satisfying life.
Ford shares this revolutionary plan he used with his wife, Carol in the new book Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey: Treat Them Like a Person, Not a Patient. He is an experienced psychology professional and developed a living systems developmental model for care that incorporates an individual’s humanity. It helps patients live a meaningful and pleasurable life, despite their limitations. Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey is a guide for caregivers of senior citizens with serious limitations to improve their care receivers’ quality of life.
“Traditional medical model caregiving focuses on what’s wrong with a person and tries to fix it. However, when what is wrong can’t be fixed, the caregiver can’t succeed and that’s discouraging,” Ford says. “In Our developmental model of care, the focus is on what the person can still do and on designing experiences from which they get satisfaction.”
As people continue to gain more awareness of Alzheimer’s disease and other seriously debilitating diseases, plans like the model in Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey become more relevant. Based on his professional research, Ford believes that a person always functions as an integrated unit, so a model was needed that combined the biological, psychological, behavioral, social and contextual aspects of a person’s patterns of behavior when planning for elder care. Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey asks society to adopt the view that it is not enough to focus on keeping senior citizens alive and “warehousing them” until they die.
Ford’s plan in Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey is a person-centered quality of care focus.  It replaces the traditional medical emphasis on what is wrong with the person with a positive emphasis on using their remaining capabilities to create a satisfying life, despite limitations.

 

Carol’s Alzheimer’s Journey: Treat Them Like a Person, Not a Patient
By Donald H. Ford
ISBN: 978-1-3008-0321-8 (sc); 978-1-3009-9178-6 (e)
Softcover, $26.55
Ebook, $8.99
Approximately 564 pages
Available at www.LuLu.com, www.amazon.com and www.barnesandnoble.com.

 

About the author
Donald H. Ford earned a Bachelor of Science, Master of Science and doctorate degrees in mathematics and psychology from KansasState and PennsylvaniaStateUniversities.  He spent the first 10 years of his career creating a new kind of psychological and developmental services program at PennState for students and their families.  Then PennState asked him to create a new kind of college called Health and Human Development.  It stimulated other universities to develop similar colleges.  After 10 years as Dean, he resigned and returned to his first love of teaching, scholarly and professional work.  He published seven books about psychotherapy and human development.

ALZHEIMER’S SET TO MOVE FROM THE MOST DAUNTING GLOBAL HEALTH CRISIS TO THE 21ST CENTURY’S FISCAL NIGHTMARE

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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ALZHEIMER’S SET TO MOVE FROM THE MOST DAUNTING GLOBAL HEALTH CRISIS TO THE 21ST CENTURY’S FISCAL NIGHTMARE

OECD and the Global Coalition on Aging Convene at Harris Manchester College, Oxford University to Shape New Approaches for Solutions

Oxford, UK (26 June 2013) – The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Harris Manchester College, Oxford University and Global Coalition on Aging (GCOA) concluded on Friday 21 June, an “Expert Consultation on Unlocking Global Collaboration to Accelerate Innovation for Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia.”  Aimed at providing input to the OECD action agenda for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, the Consultation brought together the highest level of global experts across health, economics, public policy, business, biotechnology and beyond.

Its timing is aligned with UK Prime Minister David Cameron’s recent recognition that dementia is fast becoming the biggest pressure on care systems around the world.  “That’s why we’re using our G8 to bring together health ministers, clinical researchers and healthcare companies,” he said.  “If the brightest minds are working together on this then we’ve got a greater chance of improving treatments and finding scientific breakthroughs.  I’ve said before that we need an all-out fight-back against dementia that cuts across society. Now we need to cut across borders and spearhead an international approach that could really make a difference.”

The objectives of the Consultation included:

  • Providing a space for country experts, policy makers, and scientific, medical and academic experts to share views on the main scientific, technological and policy challenges Alzheimer’s and dementia raise in the context of creating a pathway for aging populations to be sources of economic growth in the 21st century; and
  • Creating an opportunity for multidisciplinary exchange on a collective action plan that maps the way forward.

“The impact of Alzheimer’s and dementia on individuals, families, health systems and national economies as populations age will become truly crippling, and no one nation or research organization can solve this global epidemic alone.” said Michael Hodin, Executive Director of GCOA.  “It requires global understanding, sharing and collaboration, and this Consultation was a critical step in our ongoing fight against Alzheimer’s – a fight we must win if we are truly to unlock our aging populations as new sources of economic growth.”

Alzheimer’s afflicts one in eight over 65 and one-half of all those over 85, and the economic, social and personal costs will only increase with age-related demographic change.  In 2010, the global cost of Alzheimer’s and dementias equalled 1 percent of global gross domestic product (GDP), or $604 billion.  The prevalence and cost, combined with the stigma, which prevents recognition of symptoms and subsequent treatments, signal an urgent call to action.

“Traditional strategies around healthcare services and investments in research are not enough to address the growing worldwide onslaught of Alzheimer’s and dementias,” said Marc Wortmann, Executive Director of Alzheimer’s Disease International.

“The global scale of the pending healthcare-economic crisis mandates a bold forward looking action plan to harmonize a multi-nation attack on the problem,” noted  Zaven Khachaturian, recognized at the meeting as the ‘Chief Architect’ of Alzheimer & Brain Aging research in the United States, now the President of the Campaign to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease by 2020. He indicated the urgent need for a “multinational strategic goal for reducing the prevalence of Alzheimer’s and other chronic brain disorders by 50 percent within a decade” – thus urging the OECD to “identify the framework conditions to accelerate multi-national collaborative R & D.”

George Vradenburg, Chairman of USAgainstAlzheimer’s and convener of the Global CEO Initiative on Alzheimer’s, called for new attention, resources, commitment and collaboration to defeat Alzheimer’s disease. In his keynote speech, coined “The Oxford Accord,” he called for G8 leadership equivalent to the G8 Summit that created the HIV/AIDS Global Fund.

Consultation experts presented their views for proactive public policy and an OECD role in supporting actions to : promote broad-based partnerships; identify incentives, frameworks and infrastructures for enhanced international data sharing; leverage big data as strategies to advance our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease, improve care, promote global exchange of good practice and move toward cure and even prevention.

The Consultation was borne out of the September 2012 OECD workshop, “Anticipating the Special Needs of the 21st Century Silver Economy: From Smart Technologies to Services Innovation,” co-hosted by the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, OECD and Waseda University, with the support of the Japanese government.  The workshop concluded that innovation was needed to meet the challenges and opportunities of global demographic change and mitigate the health, social and economic impacts of aging.

The Consultation was held on 20-21 June, 2013 at The Harris Manchester College (HMC), Oxford University in collaboration with the OECD.

For more information see OECD’s website: oe.cd/innovating-against-alzheimers.

ABOUT THE GLOBAL COALITION ON AGING

The Global Coalition on Aging (GCOA) aims to reshape how global leaders approach and prepare for the 21st century’s profound shift in population aging. GCOA uniquely brings together global corporations across industry sectors with common strategic interests in aging populations, a comprehensive and systemic understanding of aging, and an optimistic view of its impact. Through research, public policy analysis, advocacy and communication, GCOA is advancing innovative solutions and working to ensure global aging is a path for fiscally sustainable economic growth, social value creation and wealth enhancement. For more information, visitwww.globalcoalitiononaging.com.

Northern Nevada Medical Center Announces New CEO, Alan Olive

Northern Nevada Medical Center Announces New CEO, Alan Olive

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(Sparks, NV) Northern Nevada Medical Center welcomes Alan Olive, MPH, MHA, as new CEO for the 108-bed hospital in Sparks, NV.

Born and raised in Reno, Olive has 19 years of healthcare leadership experience. He has served as CEO at northern Nevada hospitals including Carson Tahoe’s Sierra Surgical Hospital in Carson City and Renown South Meadows Medical Center in south Reno. He was also previously an executive with Providence Health and Services, based in Portland, Ore, and MountainView Hospital in Las Vegas, NV.

“Alan is an experienced health care professional with expertise in integrated health systems, project management, health plan partnerships, hospital operations, and physician relations,” said Karla Perez, Regional Vice President for Acute Care at Universal Health Services. “His experience and history in the Reno/Sparks area will greatly benefit Northern Nevada Medical Center and healthcare in the community.”

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Alan earned a Bachelor of Science in Sociology from Brigham Young University and a Master of Public Health – Hospital Administration and Master of Healthcare Administration from Loma Linda University.

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Northern Nevada Medical Center is a 108-bed acute care hospital located in Sparks, Nevada. NNMC’s tradition of providing quality healthcare in a comfortable, accessible environment means peace of mind for the thousands of patients served by the hospital each year.

 

NNMC is the only hospital in Nevada certified by The Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center as well as knee replacement, hip replacement and spine surgery. NNMC is also the first program in the nation certified by The Joint Commission in low back pain and is also an Accredited Chest Pain Center by the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care. Northern Nevada Medical Center is owned and operated by a subsidiary of Universal Health Services, Inc.(UHS), a King of Prussia, PA-based company, that is one of the largest healthcare management companies in the nation.

Headed to the Beach? Don’t Let Your Feet Ruin Your Vacation

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Headed to the Beach? Don’t Let Your Feet Ruin Your Vacation

CHICAGO—July 2, 2013 As millions of Americans hit the beach this summer, the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons offers these foot safety tips:

  • Wear shoes to protect your feet from puncture wounds and cuts. Sea shells, broken glass and other sharp objects when stepped on can ruin your day at the beach. Avoid the water if your skin gets cut – bacteria in oceans and lakes can cause infection. If you do suffer from a puncture wound, have it treated by a foot and ankle surgeon within 24 hours to avoid complications.
  • Feet get sunburned, too. Rare but deadly skin cancers, such as melanoma, can occur on the foot. Prevent skin cancer on your feet by lathering up with sunscreen. Don’t forget to apply to both the tops and bottoms of your feet!
  • Wear shoes to protect your soles from getting burned as you walk on blistering-hot sand, sidewalks and pavement. Take extra precaution if you have diabetes.
  • Be careful with your footing while playing beach sports such as Frisbee or volleyball – walking, jogging and playing sports on soft, uneven surfaces frequently leads to arch pain, heel pain, ankle sprains and other injuries. It’s best to wear supportive shoes while playing beach sports. If injuries occur, use rest, ice, compression and elevation to ease pain and swelling. Any injury that does not resolve within a few days should be examined by a foot and ankle surgeon.
  • Remember jellyfish stings can still occur even if it’s washed up on the beach. Remove any tentacles that may stick to the foot or ankle, and protect your hands. Vinegar, meat tenderizer or baking soda reduce pain and swelling. Most jellyfish stings heal within days, but if they don’t, see a doctor.
  • Diabetes Risks: People who have diabetes face serious foot safety risks at the beach. The disease causes poor blood circulation and numbness in the feet. A person with diabetes may not feel pain from a cut, puncture wound or burn. Any type of skin break on a diabetic foot has the potential to get infected and ulcerate if it isn’t noticed right away. People with diabetes should always wear shoes to the beach, and remove them regularly to check for foreign objects like sand and shells that can cause sores, ulcers and infections.

For more information on foot and ankle health, visit the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeon’s patient education page at FootHealthFacts.org.


About ACFAS

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of more than 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons. Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research and provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its consumer website, http://FootHealthFacts.org.

Betty White’s “Off Their Rockers” TV Show Is Demeaning to Older People, Says Octogenarian Anti-Aging Expert Barbara Morris

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Betty White’s “Off Their Rockers” TV Show Is Demeaning to Older People, Says Octogenarian Anti-Aging Expert Barbara Morris

ESCONDIDO, Calif., May 2, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — While everyone loves Betty White, not everybody loves her TV show, “Off Their Rockers” according to octogenarian anti-aging expert Barbara Morris, editor, and publisher of the online Put Old on Hold Journal and e-Magazine.

(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130502/PH05987-a )
(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130502/PH05987-b )

Morris, author of Put Old on Hold, a book acclaimed by Florence Henderson and other celebrities for its non-traditional approach to aging, says that while she admires Betty White’s energy and creative ability, the premise of “Off Their Rockers” is so distasteful that Morris doesn’t understand why Betty can’t see that she is not doing old people a favor with the show’s premise of seniors pulling pranks on unsuspecting folks. The “unsuspecting folks” are usually embarrassed young people. “The whole idea is embarrassing to a lot of us older folks, too,” says Barbara Morris.

“Why did Betty decide to do this show?” asks Ms. Morris. “Is it because she is so confident and so vibrant that she can’t understand that most of her audience doesn’t grasp that she is trying to spoof the pathetic stereotype of “old” and see it as confirming it instead? Maybe she is so focused on getting a laugh that she doesn’t see the damage she’s doing.”

“Regardless of her reason to create this misguided show and no matter how good her reason, it’s still damaging to all of us who ever get old enough to fall prey to the ‘old people eventually lose it’ stereotype,” asserts Morris. “She is undoing the very thing that we love her for–being vibrant and funny and “with it” in her 90’s.”

Morris continued, “We appreciate and applaud Betty White. But she needs to give us respect in return. Participating in a show that’s demeaning to older people is simply not the right thing to do. In so many ways Betty could use her talent, energy, and experience to choose projects that more accurately reflect the caliber, talent and continued competence of old people.” In the meantime, says Morris, “It’s time to retire “Off Their Rockers.” It never belonged on the air in the first place.”

Barbara Morris, 84, is a pharmacist, writer, and anti-aging expert who lives the productive lifestyle she advocates. In addition to her monthly Put Old on Hold Journal and e-Magazine her books include Put Old on Hold, No More Little Old Ladies, Why, Boomer Women Become Their Mothers, and I’m Not Goin’ There!  Click here for the full critique of “Off Their Rockers

Caring.com’s New Referral Program Supported by Leading Assisted Living Operators

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Caring.com’s New Referral Program Supported by Leading Assisted Living Operators

Caring.com Named Preferred Provider by Assisted Living Federation of America (ALFA)

SAN MATEO, Calif., May 6, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — A group of the nation’s largest senior living providers — including Brookdale Senior Living (NYSE: BKD), Emeritus Senior Living (NYSE: ESC), Benchmark Senior Living, and Senior Star — have chosen Caring.com as their agency of record for national buying of Internet leads for families looking for housing and care for their elderly loved ones. Separately, the Assisted Living Federation of America (ALFA) named Caring.com as its preferred partner for Internet marketing services.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20070921/AQF020LOGO)

With surging demand in the U.S. senior housing market, more Americans than ever before are turning to the Internet and online word of mouth to find and select the best senior living providers for their senior loved ones. About 30-50% of the senior living industry’s leads are coming from the Internet and that number is expected to rise, as tech adoption among baby boomers and seniors alike continues to increase. Whether seeking independent livingassisted living, or memory care, about two million consumers every month turn to Caring.com to find expert guidance about their options, research local providers, and get help in making well-informed selection decisions.

The country’s top senior living providers have chosen Caring.com to increase visibility of their senior living communities, optimize inquiry-to-visit rates, and leverage Caring.com’s resources to better nurture leads from the moment the search begins, through the research and decision-making phases, all the way to community selection and move-in.

In Q4-2012, Caring.com expanded its service offering with the launch of a new toll-free referral help line. Available seven days a week to those seeking senior housing, Caring.com’s family advisors explain different types of senior living options, help identify local senior communities matched to the prospective resident’s needs and preferences, schedule tours, share and encourage consumer reviews, and answer a range of senior living questions. With this added consumer support infrastructure, as well as other new and expanded capabilities for lead qualification and nurturing, the group of senior living community partners announced Caring.com as the agency of record for lead qualification and development, starting January 1. The help line is now referring nearly four thousand prospective residents per week.

“Caring.com has been great to work with as they’ve added the referral model to their business,” said Jayne Sallerson, executive vice president of sales and marketing at Emeritus Senior Living. “Emeritus wanted to consolidate our Internet lead buying with a company we could trust, and Caring.com has demonstrated their commitment to consumers, to us, and to the industry. Their new program is showing positive signs of increased tours and conversions.”

“Caring.com has proven themselves to be a strong partner for Brookdale,” said Jim Pusateri, senior vice president of sales at Brookdale Senior Living. “Working with fewer Internet lead sources has improved our operational efficiencies, lowered our marketing costs, and improved consumers’ experience with Brookdale Senior Living.”

Separately, ALFA, the largest national association of providers of professionally managed communities for seniors, signed Caring.com as its preferred provider for Web-based lead services as well as to power the organization’s new ALFA Senior Living Community Directory.

“Caring.com is our preferred provider of Web-based services because they are an exceptional online resource,” said Richard P. Grimes, president and CEO of ALFA, which is the largest national association exclusively dedicated to professionally managed, consumer-driven senior living communities. “Caring.com’s high-quality content, easy-to-use directory, and online reviews help prospective residents and their families find the right solutions for their needs — this is good for consumers and good for senior living.”

“From the beginning, we’ve focused on building the most comprehensive and most credible online resource to help those caring for a senior parent, spouse, or other loved one,” says Andy Cohen, co-founder and CEO of Caring.com. “Unlike some other Internet resources that will only share information about those providers who pay them, we’ve stayed true to our social mission and help connect consumers to a variety of quality resources for their needs. Working with ALFA and the leading senior living communities helps enable our ability to best serve those in need of senior care — and we continue to offer referral to free and low-cost support resources as well.”

More information for senior living providers interested in partnering with Caring.com is available here: http://providerinfo.caring.com/ProviderGetListed.html Consumers can begin their search for senior housing here: http://www.caring.com/local

About Caring.com
Caring.com is the leading website for family caregivers seeking information and support as they care for aging parents, spouses, and other loved ones. Caring.com provides helpful caregiving content,online support groups, and the most comprehensive Senior Care Directory in the United States, with 35,000 consumer ratings and reviews and a toll-free senior living referral line (1-866-824-8174). In January 2012, Caring.com launched the Caring Stars award program recognizing America’s best assisted living communities based on consumer reviews. This year, 383 communities in 40 states were named the Caring Stars of 2013. Based in San Mateo, California, Caring.com is a private company funded by DCM, Intel Capital, Shasta Ventures, and Split Rock Partners. Connect with Caring.com onFacebookTwitterGoogle+, PinterestLinkedIn and/or YouTube.

CONTACT: PR@caring.com, 650-762-8190

Top 10 steps to prepare for a remodel

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Top 10 steps to prepare for a remodel

NARI offers tips in honor of National Home Improvement Month.

  

Des Plaines, Illinois, May 8, 2013—In honor of National Home Improvement Month this May, the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) advises homeowners of the 10 most important steps to take before the remodeling project starts.

“The planning and researching phases of a project are the most critical steps in the remodeling process,” says NARI National President Art Donnelly, MCR, CKBR, Legacy Builders & Remodelers Corp., based in Mount Sinai, N.Y. “The more knowledgeable and prepared a homeowner is, the more they protect themselves.”

What can a homeowner do to prepare for a remodel? NARI provides a top 10 list of steps homeowners should take before breaking ground on their next remodel.

  1. Research your project. Taking time to research projects on the Internet and NARI.org will provide a good sense of what is involved such as price, scope of work, return on investment and new product/material options. Also, research property values in your neighborhood to make sure your project is in line with other homes in the area.
  2. Plan project around the long-term. How long do you plan to stay in your home? How might your family structure change over time? Life can change quickly—these questions should be answered early on to ensure your project will fit your lifestyle long after it’s complete.
  3. Set your budget. Deciding on a realistic budget and arranging finances to support your project are essential. This number needs to include everything—the project, products, contingencies, etc. Don’t be afraid to share this with your remodeler; professionals are respectful of a client’s budget and will create a plan around it, not over it.
  4. Use advanced search for professionals. The online world makes it easy to gather information about strangers. Ask friends, family and neighbors for referrals and then spend time researching that person online. Professional remodelers take their reputation seriously and hold credentials beyond licensing, such as certifications, memberships in trade associations and additional training. Look for examples of press coverage or involvement in industry presentations or events. Check online reviews and social media to see how they interact with past clients and peers.
  5. Ask the right questions. Time and cost are important, but getting the right information requires the right questions. Ask your professional remodeler about his educational background, training, specialties or past issues with clients. Ask about how the remodeling process will work.
  6. Verify your remodeler. Don’t take their word for it. Check the information given to you such as references, license numbers, insurance information and certifications by calling providers to verify. Request a visit to an active client’s jobsite. Make it known that you are checking on him—a true professional considers that as a positive sign to working with a homeowner.
  7. Review contracts word-by-word. A remodeling contract protects you and your remodeler. Homeowners should review this carefully. Professional remodelers have done this before, and know what should go in a contract. Homeowners are not as familiar with remodeling and should ask about terms if they don’t understand. Pay attention to details about change orders, payment, additional fees, timeline and responsibilities. If it’s not in the contract, it doesn’t exist.  
  8. Keep design in mind. Your design guides the entire project. Think about what you dislike about your current space and the intended use of the new space. Use Websites such as Pinterest.com and Houzz.com to gather design ideas. Make sure you can articulate specifically what you like about that design when talking to your designer. Professionals don’t recreate a photo—they incorporate accessibility, functionality, ease of modification, style and value into your design.
  9. Make your selections. Deciding on products and materials is a larger process than most imagine. With so many options to choose from, product selections are one of the primary reasons for project timelines to get extended. Base decisions on quality, function, price, style and availability. Include selections in the contract to lock down pricing and keep your budget intact.
  10. Create a communication plan. A common downfall in remodeling is lack of communication between homeowners and remodelers. Your remodeler should lay out a communication plan at the beginning of the project. If not, ask them to do so. This plan should clarify roles of everyone involved, communication methods, availability, and frequency of communication that is expected.

As an industry that struggles with a persistent negative perception of remodeling contractors, these tips serve both the industry and consumers in elevating real professionals from the pack.

The first step to hiring a professional is through NARI, whose members are vetted and approved by industry peers to ensure they live up to the professional standards that NARI sets. “NARI members are proud of their affiliation and commitment to professionalism, and it’s a reputation they work hard to protect,” Donnelly says.

Consumers may visit www.NARI.org to find a qualified professional who is a member of NARI or call NARI National at (847) 298-9200 and request a free copy of NARI’s brochure, “How to Select a Remodeling Professional.”

Click here to see an online version of this press release.

EDITOR’S NOTE: NARI can provide hi-res digital photos of award-winning projects to accompany your story. Contact NARI with your photo request at marketing@nari.org or ask for Morgan Zenner at (847) 298-9200.

# # #

About NARI: The National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) is the only trade association dedicated solely to the remodeling industry.  The Association, which represents member companies nationwide—comprised of 63,000 remodeling contractors— is “The Voice of the Remodeling Industry.”™ To learn more about membership, visit www.NARI.org or contact national headquarters, based in Des Plaines, Ill., at (847) 298-9200.

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

At a time when thousands of Baby Boomers are reaching the age of 65 every day, the issues of senior rights, elder laws, and anti-ageism have never been more important, more volatile, or more questioned. After all, this is the generation that was ready to take down the establishment fifty years ago, and they haven’t lost any of their desire to change the world for the better. And, they have the numbers to do it. Here are our 100 top blogs for seniors dealing with senior rights, law & policy, and anti-ageism.

Boomers Against The Law

  1. Elder Law Plus: lawyer Evan H. Farr blogs about topics concerning elder law, including probate strategies and parental care.
  2. Michigan Elder Law Blog: the attorneys at Barsch & Joswick provide seniors and their loved ones with sage advice on a variety of Elder law issues.
  3. Everything Elder Law: Evan Farr is back at it again, this time focusing on Elder Law news, concepts, and innovations from around the country.
  4. Massachusetts Estate and Elder Law Blog: lawyer and blogger Stephanie Konarski gives tips on estate planning and other elder law topics.
  5. New York Elder Law Attorney Blog: your source for elder law news and comment in New York, this blog analyzes nursing home legislation and elder care costs.
  6. Elder Law Prof. Blog: Elder Law professor Kim Dayton authors a really nice blog that covers a wide range of Elder law issues, from Supreme Court cases to seminars.
  7. The Pop Tort: can a consumer advocates blog dealing with civil justice be cute? This blog proves it can, complete with an adorable “Pop Tort” logo, even while exploring such issues as Medicare and Medicaid lawsuits, nursing home scams, and medical malpractice against the elderly, among other legal issues.
  8. Supportive Senior Solutions: this blog from a geriatric care management practice in New York covers issues related to geriatric care, caregiving, and healthcare laws for the elderly and infirm.
  9. Aging Beats the Alternative: elder care specialist Lorie Ebers uses her blog to talk about overcoming the challenges of aging, caring for aging parents, and the less talked about side of elder law: Boomer divorce.
  10. Elder Law Blog: lawyer Ronald C. Morton’s elder law blog is full of sage advice for seniors looking how to tap into Veteran’s benefits, how to plan for their golden years, and more.
  11. The Best Elder Law Blog: published by the attorneys at Lamson & Cutner, this blog discusses elder law cases, the Affordable Care Act, and same-sex marriage.
  12. Elder Law Tips and News: the lawyers at Cooper, Adel & Associates bring you posts on living trusts, aging issues, and general estate planning.
  13. The Connecticut Elder Law Blog: lawyer Michael Keenan provides his readers with estate planning tips, elder fraud, and Medicare rules.
  14. The Teddy Bear Lawyers: attorney Rick Law gives readers a great resource for Elder Law in the Chicagoland area. Find articles on protecting vulnerable seniors and financial planning.
  15. Oregon Elder Law: attorney Orrin Onken blogs on elder law, estate planning, and probate proceedings in plain, easy to understand language.
  16. Florida Elder Law and Estate Blog: this informative blog includes great articles on VA benefits, estate planning, and trusts.
  17. Golden Law Center: written by attorney Sasha Golden, the Golden Law Center blog discusses elder law, special needs planning, guardianship, wills and trusts, and estate administration.
  18. Kraft Elder Law: attorney Robert Kraft blogs about Medicaid, Medicare, wills, trusts, probate, veterans benefits, and other elder law topics.
  19. Pennsylvania Law Blog: this elder law blog by the attorneys at the law offices of Shober & Rock discusses Medicaid, taxes, Veterans, banks, and annuities.
  20. Long Beach Elder Law Blog: this blog focuses on elder abuse, estate protection, the Cal MediConnect program, and reform of health law.
  21. Houston Elder Law Blog: the folks at Wright Abshire Attorneys blog about care planning, estate planning, Medicaid Planning, Probate & Estate Administration, and and Veteran’s Benefits.
  22. Hauptman Law Blog: readers of this blog can learn more about elder, estate, and special needs law. Includes articles on the Medicare Settlement and VA Aid.
  23. Fulkerson Elder Law Blog: the function of this elder law blog is for the firm to respond to common questions clients have about elder law and review developments in the law impacting elder law and estate planning.
  24. CMLP Estate Planning and Elder Law Blog: readers can look forward to reviewing articles on simplifying their estate plan and elder law news items of note.
  25. Massachusetts Estate Planning and Probate Blog: attorney Matthew Karr keeps readers up to date on estate planning and probate news and information.
  26. Marshall Elder and Estate Planning Blog: the author of this elder law blog has over 30 years experience in estate planning, special needs planning, and estates.
  27. Hartford, CT Elder Law Blog: the attorney’s at Ruggiero Ziogas & Allaire discuss estate planning, care planning, Medicaid, Veteran’s Benefits, and Probate.
  28. El Paso Elder Law Blog: the law firm of Stephanie Townsend Allala and Associates blogs on estate planning, guardianships, Medicaid Planning, Nursing Home Abuse, and Trust & Probate.
  29. Miami Probate Law Blog: the folks at the Byrant law firm keep readers up-to-date on estate administration, probate court, estate litigation, and the nuisances of will and trust disputes.
  30. Elder Law News: attorney Brian A. Raphan is based in New York City and specializes in Wills, Estates, Trusts, and Elder Care issues. His blog is full of great resources.
  31. Aging & Law in West Virginia: this blog contains news in law and aging in West Virginia, written by the West Virginia Senior Legal Aid organization.
  32. Florida Elder Law and Estate Planning: this Florida Certified Elder Law attorney provides in depth insights and news to help Floridians protect themselves and preserve their assets.
  33. Family Law Blog Maryland: while this blog looks at all matters pertaining to Family Law, elder law sneaks in as a prevalent theme in many of the cases discussed. They look at legal matters like when divorce and retirement coincide, or when grandparents wish to take custody of their grandchildren.
  34. Phoenix AZ Family Law Blog: looking at issues older couples face in Arizona, this family law blog explores the specific challenges elders face in divorces and custody battles, complete with the latest policy changes and laws.
  35. Otherspoon: hospice volunteer and blogger Ann Neumann talks about care-giving and the realities, politics, and senior rights involved in death and dying.

Seniors Talk Policy And Politics

  1. Aging in Place: this blog is concerned with seniors who are dealing with shrinking benefits and increasing costs—seniors find answers on how to protect themselves.
  2. Estate in Denial: providing news, analysis, and commentary on abusive practices occurring in probate courts. Features original perspective and direct communication.
  3. Florida Estate Planning Lawyer Blog: this blog covers estate planning legal issues, cases of interest, and news with a focus on Florida elder law.
  4. McGuire Woods: the people at McGuire Woods author this great blog on long term care legal issues, including timely news, articles, and white papers.
  5. Illinois Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: published by the law office of Wilson & Wilson, this blog covers asset protection, banking, estate planning, and trusts.
  6. Illinois Nursing Home Abuse Blog: covers Illinois nursing home law, including Supreme Court cases and other information relating to residents and family members.
  7. Law Office of Donald D. Vanarelli Blog: provides readers in New Jersey with information on elder law, estate and special needs planning, and mediation services.
  8. Maryland Nursing Home Lawyer Blog: this blog offers insight on nursing home abuse reports, legislation, and legal opinions of elder law in Maryland.
  9. Massachusetts Estate Planning, Probate & Elder Law: elder law attorney Brian Barreira writes on legal issues involving death, taxes, special needs, and long-term elder care.
  10. New Jersey Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: blog posts explore life and death in New Jersey from a perspective of estate planning, elder law, taxation, probate, and estate administration.
  11. Medina Law Group: postings provide readers with advice on estate planning and management, estate taxes, elder law, and VA benefits.
  12. North Carolina Wills and Trusts: this blog provides readers with estate planning and elder law news with a North Carolina focus.
  13. California Nursing Home Abuse Law Blog: covers nursing home abuse, elder law abuse, and features many quality articles relating to California elder law.
  14. Nursing Home Law Blog: this well written blog discusses elder issues, legislation, legal news, protections of elder rights, and helpful health tips.
  15. PA Elder Estate and Fiduciary Law Blog: focuses on elder law, long-term care, end-of-life and health care surrogate decision-making, and estate planning.
  16. Patti’s Blog: find information about this lawyer’s practice, which concentrates on advocacy for seniors. She shares personal interests and her passions.
  17. Pennsylvania Nursing Home Abuse Lawyer Blog: this blog discusses nursing home abuse laws, cases, and news items from Pennsylvania.
  18. Barbara Cashman Blog: Barbara blogs about elder law and policy issues, and often hosts guest bloggers to share their insights on elder law and news.
  19. NJ Elder Law: lawyer Kenneth Vercammen blogs about topics related to estate planning and elder law. He was once awarded the NJ State Bar Municipal Court Practitioner of the Year.
  20. The Senior Sentinel: a blog compiling news and information for Baby Boomers, the Senior Sentinel concentrates on the intersection of ageism and public policy both nationally and world-wide.
  21. Elder Consult: this geriatric medicine blog not only covers Alzheimers, dementia, financial decision making, and medications, it also discusses related legal issues such as elder financial abuse.
  22. Grey Pride: a UK blog by the Anchor Digital Marketing team is dedicated to keeping older people at the top of the political agenda and petitioning the government to create a Minister for Older People to ensure their needs are met.
  23. Over 65 Blog: project organizers from Harvard, Yale, and The Hastings Center host this blog for “seniors seeking solutions for health care and security, mainly looking at health care system reforms, elder law policies and practices, and how seniors can achieve a stronger role in the future of health care.
  24. Reaping Hope Blog: a blog from an NGO in Nepal promoting dignified aging and elder rights, Reaping Hope explores elder abuse and elder oppression while actively helping elderly people claim their rights and challenge discrimination.

Age Against The Machine: Anti-Ageism

  1. Ageist Beauty: the musings, product reviews, and random thoughts of a woman who is fighting against her age.
  2. Everyday Ageism Project: this blog aims to capture people’s everyday experiences dealing with ageism. The author has discovered that ageism is the most commonly experienced form of prejudice.
  3. The Lonely Gerontologist: professor Kelly Yokum blogs about all things aging—including aging stereotypes and other aging topics that come to mind.
  4. My Elder Advocate: this blog provides comprehensive coverage of ageism, the dangers of nursing homes, elder abuse, and elder care.
  5. The Roaming Boomers: David and Carol are great examples of a couple who doesn’t let age get in the way of living life to the fullest.
  6. The Gypsy Nester: Veronica and David show readers how to rock the empty nest and get the most out of life as you age.
  7. Changing Aging: this multi-blog platform challenges conventional views on aging. The authors believe aging is a strength, rich in developmental potential and growth.
  8. The Elders: founded by Nelson Mandela in 2007, the Elders is a group of seniors committed to addressing global challenges, including child marriage and climate change.
  9. Beauty and Wisdom: the blog of photographer Robbie Kaye, who traveled to salons throughout the US to photograph and interview women in their 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s and discovered that beauty is ageless.
  10. Advanced Style: don’t tell these women they are too old to model hip and alluring fashions. This blog teaches women how to dress to impress and that age is only a number.
  11. RL TV: the only cable network and online destination for folks 50+, features a nice blog that provides tips on elder issues and promotes active living.
  12. The 70-Something Blog: blogger Judy informs readers how to live a full and engaging life as she chronicles her journey of aging.
  13. Retirement is Work: newly retired librarian and blogger resolves to post one good thing about retirement every day for a year, but along the way struggles with senior rights and anti-ageism.
  14. Yo Is This Ageist?: a humorous blog by Ashton Applewhite dedicated to determining whether age-related remarks are offensive, “challenging the stereotypes that segregate us by age.”
  15. This Chair Rocks: a smart and sassy blog by Ashton Applewhite that challenges the ideas of ageism with humor and snark. All stereotypes and insensitive remarks are grounds for brilliant blog posts.
  16. Senior Planet: “aging with attitude” is the tagline of this blog community of older adults using technology to connect with each other and take on the issues of ageism and senior rights.
  17. Changing Aging: a blog founded by Dr. Bill Thomas to promote “a radical reinterpretation of longevity” which focuses on anti-ageism and senior rights, as well as getting the most out of a long life.
  18. Time Goes By: Ronni Bennett takes on aging, ageism and related issues with humor, exploring the truth of “what it’s really like to get old.” She starts by rejecting the “cutesy” terms for old people – they’re called “elders” around here!
  19. The Magic of Middle-Aged Women: author Daniel Even Weiss – a man – blogs on the theme of his latest book, The Magic of Middle-Aged Women, where he challenges the prevailing ageist idea that women don’t get better as they age. They do.
  20. Advanced Style: Ari Seth Cohen, a young-ish photographer, roams the New York City streets photographing stylish and creative elders. Here, art challenges the paradigm that age and beauty can’t co-exist.
  21. The New Old Age: the New York Times blog on aging takes advantage of the newspaper’s top writers to explore the unprecedented intergenerational challenge of the Baby Boomers.
  22. The Little Old Lady Stays Put (or doesn’t): explores the “lives, lifestyles and issues of interesting older people,” touching on the issues surrounding ageism, elder rights, living with dementia, and overcoming the struggles of aging with strength and good humor.
  23. Naked at Our Age: advocate of ageless sexuality, Joan Price, talks about sex and aging, taking on Senior Rights subjects like safer sex for seniors while providing helpful tips.
  24. Aging & Work at Boston College: scholars, academics, and researchers share their findings on ageism in the workplace and the challenges aging workers face in this PhD-heavy blog by The Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College.
  25. Ethnic Elders: this newsy blog by New America Media examines the Senior Rights issues and Elder Law of minority groups such as age discrimination, lawsuits related to Social Security, and elder healthcare reform.
  26. The Everyday Ageism Project: blending blogging and research, this site’s goal is to capture the experience of age discrimination. The forum is full of people sharing their experiences in a supportive environment.
  27. Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens Blog: the Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens sub-blog offers wide ranging posts on issues including senior rights and ageism – with its signature left-wing perspective.
  28. Clinical Geriatrics: created as more of a peer-reviewed clinical journal by the American Geriatrics Society, some of the top scholars in geriatrics converge on this blog to discuss geriatric health and wellness issues, which often cross over into legal and anti-ageism issues.
  29. Age Action Alliance: this organization brings together a network of 300 organizations and individuals committed to helping older people. Its blog is dedicated to improving older people’s lives through advocating against ageism, particularly in Britain.
  30. Manitoba Senior Centres: this Canadian blog covers the rampant ageism in Canada and promotes world elder abuse awareness. It also has a list of resources for older adults.
  31. Fierce with Age: defying ageism goes mainstream at this blog, created by veteran journalist Dr. Carol Orsborn. Having written about the Boomer generation for major newspapers and blogged for the Huffington Post and NPR’s Next Avenue, Orsborn is well equipped to take on the spiritual and policy hurdles of aging.
  32. Live Better Boomer!: a Philadelphia-based blog, by social worker Tiffany Matthews, devoted to helping educate and empower Boomers advocate for their own improved healthcare.
  33. Third Age: billed as “health for Boomers and beyond,” Third Age offers relatively fluffy fare, like “Change your Mood with Color,” to the legal issues surrounding Boomer divorce and care-giving.
  34. The Old Gunhand: one facet of senior citizen rights you don’t see every day is elder gun advocates. This website not only tells you the best types of guns for elderly wielders, it also goes into gun policy and senior self-defense.
  35. Age Discrimination Info: a simple name for a one-stop source of statistics and information on age discrimination, including legislation, cases, news, publications, events and training. The perfect resource for the activist.
  36. Age UK: the largest organization in the United Kingdom for working with and for older people, this website has an entire section dedicated to age discrimination and ageism.
  37. National Youth Rights Association: not just for youngsters, the National Youth Rights Association combats ageism in all its forms. In fact, they probably wouldn’t appreciate being called “youngsters.”
  38. Disability and Representation: a blog by writer, photographer and activist Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg that discusses (and tries to change the discourse about) disability rights and ageism, along with autism.
  39. Over 50: Career coaching and workshops for the over-50 crowd, this blog doesn’t stop at finding a job. This site explores Baby Boomer activism in and out of the workplace.
  40. Activist Post: while this blog deals with many topics requiring advocacy, they often include issues that regard Senior Rights, Elder Law and anti-ageism.
  41. California Booming: an informational blog dedicated to California Baby Boomers, this blog covers everything from sex, to diet, to politics of the Boomer generation, including issues concerning senior rights and ageism in the workplace.

Respecting The Rights Of Senior Citizens – 4 Factors To Pick The Right Care Facility For The Elderly by Abhishek Agarwal

June 4, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

There is no formal ‘Senior Citizens Bill of Rights’, but as individuals, senior citizens are entitled to their rights. However, the senior citizens have little energy left in them in their old age to fight for their rights and therefore, it is the duty of the children to see that their elderly parents are getting what they are rightfully entitled to.

Every right must be claimed to be deemed as a right. There are laws in existence for the running of nursing homes for the elderly and retirement communities. Even if your elderly mom or dad is in an assisted care facility, there are certain laws that are fundamental and expected to be followed by these care facilities too. It is your duty as a caregiver to see that they are following the laws and living up to the expectations.

There are some factors that you must verify before selecting a facility for your elderly parents:

– Ensure that the facility will provide the basic cleanliness and safety. Check out the evacuation plans in place, in case of an emergency situation. Verify whether the evacuation plan is a workable one, considering the fact that the facility may be full of elderly and invalids who may be slow in moving out of the building in case of a fire. Find out if there is emergency power available to operate the automatic doors and elevators so that everyone can get out safely.

– If food is provided by the facility, ensure that meals will be provided three times a day. The meals should be healthy and the food should be delivered to the room if your parent is disabled or injured. There should be some variety in the diet and since there is a separate charge for the food, it is not wrong to expect some quality and variety in the food.

– If your parent has moved to an assisted care facility, they have every right to live as they wish in that apartment, since they have paid for it. However, they have to observe certain restrictions because they are living in a community setting. They should be able to live without any interference from the staff of the facility and have the freedom to select the décor of the apartment or have family and friends to visit.

– Another fundamental right of a senior citizen is to be treated with compassion, respect and dignity. Although this is not a tangible right, how the staff at the facility treats the elderly is an important aspect in the selection of a facility for your parents. The staff of the facility must be respectful and pleasant in their dealings with your parents. If your parent complains of any emotional or verbal abuse, you must investigate and hold the facility accountable for it.

As a primary caregiver, responsible for the well being of your elderly parents, you have the right to remind the assisted care facility of their responsibilities. Ensure that your parents are getting the service and care that they paid for and that they are comfortable in their living quarters and enjoying their stay there.

Abhishek successfully runs an Old Age Home and he has got some great Eldercare Secrets up his sleeves! Download his FREE 80 Page Ebook, “How To Take Great Care Of Elders” from his website http://www.Senior-Guides.com/560/index.htm. Only limited Free Copies available.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Abhishek_Agarwal

Senior Citizens and the Job Search by Mort Ferguson

June 4, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Although many employers are looking for new graduates or someone younger with a bit of experience, there are still plenty of jobs that you can secure as a senior citizen. Opportunities in the work force abound for older Americans. On the surface it may seem harder to find such roles; however they are available – you just need to know where and how to approach the search.

There is a great potential among older employees. They have more experience, are (generally) easier to work with, and typically more flexible than the person fresh from college who is more likely to have an implanted ideal of what their job should be like. In other countries such as the Netherlands and Australia, younger employees are losing jobs to the more experienced and mature adults; in North America, this is a growing trend as well.

It is illegal, of course, to have someone ask your age when applying for a job, but hiring personnel can tell from application and resume information whether you may have been in the work force for some time. That is why instead of talking strictly about your age, you need to highlight your experience. When putting together your resume, clearly list your accomplishments over the years and all your previous jobs. In your cover letter, focus on why you would be better suited for the job than a young applicant – even if you committed decades at home to raise children – thus helping employers understand the benefits in hiring you over a recent graduate with no real life experience.

If you have been out of work for a while or entering a field in which you have not had that much experience, consider enrolling in a class that can refresh your memory about that market or a class that can update you on new policies. Businesses are constantly changing, and part of entering the work force again means learning contemporary methods of working rather than continuing the way work was done when you were younger.

The Internet has web sites offering opportunities for senior citizens, and shows relevant vacancies in the city in which you work. There are even specific agencies that work solely with senior citizens to make sure you can find a job in which you would be welcome. Some of the fields that value the knowledge of a senior citizen include healthcare, public speakers, and writers. You simply need to determine what you may be interested in doing and then make the move to apply for jobs in your chosen field.

It is not so difficult to land a job when you are 60; you just need to become a bit savvy at learning where to look.

For practical job hunting & career [http://www.job-hunting-careers.com/medical_billing_and_coding_career.shtml] information, please visit [http://www.job-hunting-careers.com], a popular site providing great insights on your search for just the right job or career, ranging from US Post Office to a travel nurse [http://www.job-hunting-careers.com/travel_nurse_employment.shtml] position and many more!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mort_Ferguson

Why Are Reverse Mortgages Important to Senior Citizens? by Craig Castle

May 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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In Texas and many other parts of the country, senior citizens are being squeezed. They receive, on average, $965 per month in social security. And, while property taxes vary, a senior in many Texas cities with a home valued at $100,000 will pay more than $200 per month in property taxes alone. Add to that the high cost of necessities like health care, prescription medicine, utilities, and mortgage payments, and the financial picture can be very bleak. It’s no wonder that many seniors face foreclosure or tax liens on their homes.

“Reverse mortgages are important to Texas seniors because they allow them to obtain a loan against the equity in their home—often their single largest asset—without making monthly payments to repay that loan. That means that with a government-insured reverse mortgage, a senior will never lose his or her home to a bank simply because he or she could not make a payment,” said Craig Castle, a San Antonio reverse mortgage specialist for the past four years.

So why don’t more Texas seniors take advantage of this financial product?

Castle says that in his experience, seniors shy away from reverse mortgages for three reasons:
◾1. Fear
◾2. Bad advice
◾3. The availability of other, more well-advertised, loan products

“I have had many clients elect not to complete the reverse mortgage process because of fear,” Castle says. “Usually, the additional cash could have improved their lives significantly.”

Seniors’ fear is not unfounded. They are often the targets of scams and fraud. But, reverse mortgages have one important safe-guard built into them to protect even those who are uncomfortable making financial decisions. In order to obtain a government-insured reverse mortgage, a senior must have counseling by a HUD counselor with the local housing authority or the Consumer Credit Counseling Office. This unbiased person can help the senior determine whether a reverse mortgage makes sense for his or her individual situation.

And, sometimes well-meaning family and friends give bad advice.

“I have had ministers tell clients that they heard that you could lose your home with a reverse mortgage,” Castle said. “It isn’t true, but advice isn’t always based on facts.”

The availability of home equity loans also clouds the picture for many seniors. “Home equity loans can be appropriate for people who have an income, but they often spell disaster for seniors,” Castle said. “I talk to potential clients every week who tell me that they are having problems keeping up with their payments.”

“My experience has been that most home equity clients who are over 65 and have taken the maximum 80% of their home value will eventually lose their house—if they live at least 3-5 years beyond the date of loan origination,” Castle added.

With a reverse mortgage, the homeowner can access from 40-60% of the appraised value of their home, but the loan is not repaid until they die or leave the home permanently. Then the home is sold and the proceeds are used to repay the loan, with any remainder going to the owner’s estate.

To find out more about the benefits and requirements for a reverse mortgage, visit [http://www.SouthTexasReverseMortgage.com] and request the free Federal Trade Commission publication, Facts for Seniors about Reverse Mortgages. Or call Castle at 210-789-3685.

“Misinformation has prevented many seniors from getting a reverse mortgage when it would have provided them with greater financial stability—and peace of mind. That’s why I like to have the family involved and why I often spend several hours at my clients’ home explaining and re-explaining how a reverse mortgage works and how the various pay-out options can make their lives better,” Castle said.

Craig Castle is a Reverse Mortgage Specialist with Financial Freedom in San Antonio and the South Texas area. He holds a BA in Economics from the University of Missouri, is a former Licensed Stock Broker, and has worked with reverse mortgages for the past four years. He is also chairman of the Not Forgotten Coalition, a not-for-profit organization that provides services and advocacy for senior citizens in San Antonio. For more information, visit [http://www.SouthTexasReverseMortgage.com] or phone 210-789-3685.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Craig_Castle

Marketing, Selling, and Serving the Older Adult, Senior Citizens, Family Caregivers by Barbara Mascio

May 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Are your clients pleased by the fine quality service that you provide?  Validating your clients’ endorsement of you through Certification as a Senior Approved Service will increase your client base.  Senior Approved Certification leads a family towards a service like yours side stepping the possibility of connecting with a less than desirable service.

If you serve the older adult, the disabled or those with chronic illnesses you may qualify for an independent consumer-driven survey process leading to certification as a Senior Approved Service.

You will not pay for clients, leads or referrals.  You will not violate HIPAA or the Anti-kickback rulings.  You will not pay for membership or advertising space.

Certifications are offered for medical, non-medical, alternative healing practices, housing, elder-law, and financial planners – virtually any type of business that reaches this population.  “We are building the ultimate one-call solution,” states Barbara Mascio, founder.  “Seniors are need of many kinds of service, including lawn care, handyman services and so on.  We save the headache of shopping around and completely remove the guess work.”

Confident business owners recognize the benefits of being part of an exclusive network of Certified Senior Approved Services.  See [http://www.qualityeldercare.com/senior-services.html]

Jean F. Wales, President of Wales Consulting LLC and Author of “Do It Now! An Organizing Handbook for Families and Senior Citizens writes  Becoming a Senior Approved Service instantly raised the credibility of my book “Do It Now! An Organizing Handbook for Families and Senior Citizens.  [http://www.seniorsapprove.com/organizing.html]

Ester Whitney, owner of Sweet Adeline’s Home writes  I feel I have been given a great opportunity to be the first Residential Home Care Provider to be approved by Senior Approved Services in the Dallas Area … everyone has been impressed …  [http://www.sweetadelineshomes.com/]

Tony Latina and Peggy Schmidt, co-owners of Advanced Laser Solutions writes  We have had nothing but positive feedback from the referrals from Senior Approved Services. They have been excellent to work with and we strongly recommend them.   [http://www.seniorsapprove.com/stop_smoking.html]

Paul Stone, owner of Occasional Help for Seniors a general cleaning and handyman service writes  We are so proud to be Certified as a Senior Approved Service. Putting this on our brochures, business cards and other advertisement pieces has clearly, without a doubt, increased our client base. Barbara is right; seniors need services but are afraid or confused about which one to call. [http://www.seniorsapprove.com/occasional-help.html]

See [http://www.qualityeldercare.com/providers] for details.  Mention Savings Code 0630 when you apply for certification.

Barbara Mascio, Founder of Senior Approved Services – a National Network of Products, Resources and Services Endorsed by Seniors

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Barbara_Mascio

The Amazon Kindle Fire Tablet Is Perfect for Senior Citizens on the Go by Amy B Sycamore

May 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Whether seniors are enjoying time on the golf course, a cruise to the Bahamas, or just visiting the grandkids there are a lot of great new technologies on the market to make their lives easier. The new Amazon tablet known as the Kindle Fire can be ordered right now for $199.00, and ships to consumers November 15, 2011. Users will be able to watch movies, play games, listen to music using a vibrant color touch screen with an extra wide viewing angle. The 199.00 Kindle Fire can be used for web browsing, checking email, and reading books and magazines.

Just think of having all of that computing power in your pocket for only 199.00? Senior citizens can carry only one thin tablet around instead of stacks of heavy books. No more need for a bulky laptop on all of those trips, saving seniors from experiencing shoulder pain. With the easy to use interface seniors only need to touch the screen to surf the web, finally a tablet computer that is easy for the whole family to enjoy. The Amazon tablet weighs in at 14.6 ounces and has a super durable display screen that won’t scratch or break.

Just think of having every Agatha Christie book on one device! The Amazon Kindle Fire has an 8GB internal memory. That is enough for 80 apps, plus 10 movies or 800 songs or 6,000 books. You could have every Humphrey Bogart movie right there to watch on the plane. Many senior citizens are moving onto the Internet as a way to connect and share information with their kids, grandkids, and friends. With the baby boomers retiring soon, there is going to be a huge wave of seniors who have tech skills and the desire to own and operate the latest in technology whether it is a laptop, touch pad, smart phone, or camera. Seniors are moving onto Facebook, using Google, uploading pictures to Picasa and chatting with their friends on Skype or using Google chat. Now, for these seniors who are on the move, they can take all of their entertainment with them, on one small Kindle Fire!

Here are some tips to know if a tablet computer is right for you:

1) If you aren’t using your computer for word processing. Touch screens are not comfortable for typing unless you get an external plug in keyboard.

2) If portability is more important to you than functionality.

3) If you are a new computer user and want something that is easy to use instead of extremely powerful.

If you are interested in buying a new computer and want something cheap but powerful and extremely easy to use, think about the Amazon Kindle Fire. For more information on how to buy a Kindle Fire or for technical help, check your local seniors focused tech help company.

Amy B. Sycamore is a technology specialist who focuses on senior citizens. She works as a computer tech in Naples, Florida helping seniors get on the web.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Amy_B_Sycamore

Planning Fun Activities for Senior Citizens by Matthew G Young

May 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many senior citizens do not want to or cannot leave the house. There are many reasons for this, some are physically impaired and have trouble getting around, and others simply don’t leave because they believe that they have nothing to do. Either way, getting out of the house is important sometimes, if only for the sake of the joys that social gatherings bring. Maintaining existing friendships and creating new ones can mean a lot to elderly folks, especially if they have not left the house for a while.

There are many senior citizen friendly activities out there, the trick is to match an activity with an interest that they hold, and therefore will be more accepting of going out of the comfort zone that is their home. Many people enjoy playing cards or board games. This is a much better solution than something like going to a movie will create; when playing games, it is hard not to be social. Movies are not the best choice because, although fun, there is little opportunity for social exchange. Games foster relationships, especially games like canasta or trivial pursuit where you can play on teams.

Another great activity for senior citizens is craft making. A group of people being instructed in how to put together a scrap book or design simple jewelry for the first time promises to be very fruitful. Not only will they learn a fun new skill, but they will inevitably interact with others at nearby at their table.

Going to a zoo or to a museum is another great choice. If there are any disabilities or hindrances to mobility, this can be a frustrating thing, but most public gatherings and places now allow people to rent wheelchairs. This will make getting around a much easier task, even if the people you are with have difficulty walking. Electric wheelchairs are perhaps the best choice since these require minimal effort in using.

Finally, you can always just go to a coffee shop. Social gatherings don’t need to be big group affair; sometimes people feel more comfortable in an intimate setting. Taking a friend out for coffee is a great way to interact on a one on one basis. It’s hard not to have a good time when you are with a close friend or relative. Coffee shops are great public places to go to with a couple friends because of this.

The most important thing about choosing an activity is to make sure that the person you are with has fun. If the senior citizen you are caring for does not have fun, they will not be likely to give social outings a second chance. As a caretaker, it’s your job to care for them physically as well as emotionally. Making activities fun isn’t hard, but you do need to choose the right activity that will match their desires and wishes.

Matthew G. Young is a freelance writer who specializes in financial, sports, and health-related topics. To learn more about in home health care visit Paradise In Home Care

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Matthew_G_Young

Multivitamins For Senior Citizens – Why Some Types Are Better Than Others by Michael Walters

May 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

The effectiveness of multivitamins is due in large part to the fact that they  are targeted towards specific demographics. There are multivitamins just for the  elderly, for women and even specifically for men. The ones targeted towards  senior citizens in particularly raise questions.

It’s fairly simple – people think about multivitamins targeted at senior  citizens because those things seem like they’re inherently stronger. This is  because senior citizens require just a little more than everyone else.

There are other alternatives that have as much of a health kick as senior  multivitamins. Premium class supplements are just as strong, if not stronger  than senior multivitamins, so it’s an option.

Seniors, naturally, find themselves lacking in nutrition more than the young.  It’s important to keep yourself healthy during the golden years. Your comfort  could be drastically improved if you make sure that you enter those years as  healthily as you can manage.

Don’t get fooled by the name – there’s more to multivitamins than you’d  think. There are special ingredients that include resveratol as well as herbal  extracts that are unique to specific multivitamins that you should consider when  picking your multivitamin.

It can get confusing, but luckily the internet is here to help you out. I’ve  researched these things myself for the better part of the decade and believe me,  there’s enough information out there to help you become educated just like  me.

Your health is reliant on what things you give your body. Give it the  nutrition it deserves and it will treat you right. Scientists and doctors can’t  be wrong about it.

So many lives are lost because people don’t take care of themselves. Make  sure to buy the best multivitamins that you can find to make sure that you don’t  become just another statistic. Be a survivor and take the vitamins that you  need.

Read more of this author’s work on electronic topics like cheap computer speakers and computer speaker cable.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Michael_Walters

Final Expense Life Insurance: Life Insurance Agent Lures Senior Citizen Inside A Decaying Casket by Donald Yerke

May 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

The sale of final expense life insurance opens up dormant prospects. Final expense life insurance representatives employ intense selling techniques  with a senior.

Looking confident but insecure, the sales agents feature dollar symbol  tattoos etched upon their chests. Typically enlarged eyes like low-cost red neon  glare as their looks show signs of being famished. In spite of this, these  indicated company agents resemble an assassin centering in on the newly  generated money target… a senior citizen.

Just about any older senior citizen has gained ample deep-rooted ability by  encounters with nonstop sellers. Stricken by a sales figure quota, the sales  agent keeps trying to hack continuously for sales closings. Stabilizing in for  improved position gets him shifting backward, bordering on dropping back just  like a gunshot hare.

The sales agent gives his best presentation. All the same, in all certainty  this is absolutely not a quick game, yet this still is an important matter of  life and death..By this time many newer career agents get raindrops of anxiety  arising swifter than the countless stars in the sky.

The retired weakened senior catches his breath and then takes an object out  of his new sweater zippered pocket. Out from an undersized vial of  prescriptions, he removes a singular one, more shrunken than an upsetting bug.  Without water to drink, the speck of the potent nitrate is centered then below  his tongue.

Wonder overwhelms the representative, now aware that this is absolutely  without doubt no chunk of sweet stuff. Making a response, the senior citizen  starts commenting in a gentle scratchy vocal tone. He replies it was a nitrate  pill as previously he had sustained a congestive heart stoppage. Flowing words & phrases bring figures of a full-length account of health circumstances.  Then a smile glows, as a gesture to the agent to dismiss the final expense life  insurance.

No doubt he had completely been outdone. How could this retiree still be  persuaded even if he rips the paperwork form from the agent’s possession?   His  plans of a high demanding canned sales recital turns to a grinding halt. The  newer agent is mum. And then finally he knows that letting a client feel being  in a burial place is absolutely cold.

On this occasion with the mild light wind, the conversation adjusts to one of  interactive mutual interest. The topic is fishing.. This improved topic  activates passion, even if at points the vastness of trophy fish landed most  certainly appeared to be expanded.

This newer agent notices how swiftly the chitchat among the two flows back & forth. Maybe securing the respect of the potential purchaser to approve of  you is much more gainful than fighting disputes? Perhaps confidence evolves into  being as potent as facts and results?

Closely after comes a move surprising the agent, similar to a creepy  cockroach unveiled to a spotlight. The older senior citizen pulls from inside  his wallet a picture of his individual grandchild. Next gently nudging the sales  agent he asks, “Will you tell me of the final expense life  insurance?”

The company agent holds to  his very greedy wants only,. Not at any time does  he inform the senior that the final expense life insurance coverage will  absolutely be turned down. Still, much like a crafty rat in an infested attic,  he scurries finding the insurance application. The good man even asks for being  insured for the greatest amount. Not even finishing the all-important paperwork  form, the trustworthy big-bellied new buyer goes into a far end passageway.  Reappearing, his fist is skintight encircling a roll of cash.

Close to drooling, the agent needs this newest purchaser to merely sign the  policy application. Arriving at the office later, the agent knows the final  expense life insurance application is not truly guaranteed issue. Quickly he  makes an unusual decision. The sales agent, very low on funds, decides to  swindle the $700.00 and destroy the application form.

Two years later to the day, the senior has his bright light turn to final  darkness. After the burial and coupled with grief, the grandchild finds he does  not receive one dime.

Case shut… but not completely. That precise identical time, a young chronic  drunk rams through the metal barrier aside a hill. Someone with identity  comparable to the former agent’s likeness is at once being engulfed in glowing  flames. After his instant cremation, no life insurance coverage is ever  located.

Final Expense Life Insurance was written by professional insurance business  writer, Donald Yerke. His writings will likely be launched right here, and  published in many locations. Find important material at Agents Insurance  Marketing, [http://www.agentsinsurancemarketing.com] right now. During the time  there steal your complimentary personal copy of “The Science of Getting Rich,”  as long as supplies last.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Donald_Yerke

Computing For Senior Citizens by Mike Stancik

May 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

For many people, computing is a tool that allows folks to have a hobby either  directly, for example, by getting information from the internet or indirectly,  i.e. a person likes to cook and therefore visits the Food Channel on line for  recipes. What about computing for seniors? What can a senior do with a computer  and the internet?

First of all, who are senior citizens? Many people are confused by the term  “senior”. Very often we see advertisements saying, for example, “Over 55 senior  discount available”. Others may think of “seniors” as folks at retirement age  which technically would be 62 to 65 years old and some think of seniors as  living in retirement homes. For the sake of this article I’m going to consider  “seniors” as being age 50 and older (in part because one can join American  Association of Retired People at age 50).

For some at any age, using a computer is a frightening undertaking,  unfortunately. It is, therefore, not unreasonable to think that seniors would  have an even more difficult time understanding computers and computing. For  myself (I am 60) I have been involved with computers since the days of the  Commodore 64 (around 1980) and even owned a TRS 80 Color computer from Radio  Shack (with an amazing 16K of memory)! For me using a computer is not so  daunting – not the same for many others however.

The difference between today and years gone by is that modern computers have  so many more applications available than ever. During the 80’s the computer  allowed us to do simple word processing and fool around with spread sheet  calculations as well as game playing. The 90’s gave us the internet and that  changed the way we thought about the usefulness of computers forever. Today we  have cell phones with operating systems that give us the world in a package we  can hold in one hand. Computers are also somewhat easier to use today (not  always!) since many applications are graphically driven and operated with mouse  click

How does this apply to seniors and how can seniors take advantage of the  computer world today? Let’s look at what seniors have available to them through  computing.

Social Networking: Facebook, MySpace or just simple emailing  is out there. They cost nothing, can be fun and informative and can keep seniors  connected with people going back to their high school years.

Blogging: A great way for seniors to express their interests  and spread the word. A blog does not have to be public and can be a great way to  share information with family and friends.

Article Publishing: Article publishing for seniors? (Wait a  minute – didn’t I tell you that I was a senior?!?). Why not is my answer.  Seniors have a life full of knowledge and experience that can be shared over  cyber space.

These are just a few examples why seniors should be involved in computing and  why they should own a computer. I’m sure that there are more reasons than those  mentioned, but, for the sake of space of this article I’ll leave you with  those.

What kind of system would be good for a senior to own? For a suggestion  please visit my website at wesavemoney4u.com/buyers-guide/seniors/

The author, Mike Stancik, has been computing for over 25 years. He also has a  degree in Digital Electronics and has designed and built his website  [http://wesavemoney4u.com]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mike_Stancik

Senior Citizen Assisted Living Facilities by David Crumrine

May 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Assisted living is an alternative living arrangement for senior citizens requiring moderate elder care, including help with activities like eating, getting dressed, bathing, and using the bathroom as opposed to the more intensive care provided in nursing homes. This type of care serves as an intermediate between in home care for the elderly and the elder care provided by a nursing home. Facilities for this type of living may be in connection with retirement communities, nursing homes, home health care agencies, or complexes for senior citizens, or they may be separate facilities. This type of elder care is known by many names, such as residential care, board and care, congregate care, and personal care.

Assisted Living Facilities

When looking for an assisted living facility, you can usually expect to have your own room or apartment, provided meals, a staff of caregivers for support, and some or all of the following services:

  • housekeeping and laundry
  • security
  • recreational activities and exercise
  • transportation
  • guidance and monitoring of health care
  • reminders about or help taking medication
  • support with dressing, bathing, and eating

Choosing the Right Assisted Living Community

 

With these ideas in mind, it is important to choose the right facility for you. Each facility may have different ideologies of caring for the elderly, so not every facility may be a match for the kind of care and services you are looking for. When searching for elder care in an assisted living facility, there are a number of ways to determine whether a certain place will provide you with the comfort, security, and level of care you need:

  • Think about your future needs and determine whether the facility can provide the right kind of care for those needs.
  • Figure out whether the facility is near family, friends, and shopping centers or other businesses you’d like to walk to.
  • Are there admission and retention policies that do not allow people with severe cognitive impairments or physical disabilities to live there?
  • Is there a written statement of the philosophy of elder care of the facility, and do you agree with it?
  • Make more than one trip to each facility you are considering, sometimes unannounced.
  • Try to make some of those trips during mealtimes to check out the quality of food and service to the residents.
  • Take note of interactions between residents and those providing the elder care.
  • Ask whether each facility offers social, recreational, and spiritual activities based on your interests.
  • Talk to residents.
  • Find out what kind of training caregivers receive and how often they are trained.
  • Review state licensing reports.

Researching Assisted Living Centers

 

If you have concerns after performing some of the preceding suggestions-or if you would simply like to be thorough in your search-you may also wish to consider the following:

  • Call your state’s long-term care ombudsman as well as the local Better Business Bureau to ask about recently issued complaints against the facilities you are considering.
  • If a facility is connected to a nursing home or home health care agency, you may want to find out more its counterpart. You can find information about nursing homes on the Medicare website (www.medicare.gov/nhcompare/home.asp).

Assisted Living Financial Considerations for Seniors

 

Another aspect of assisted living facilities to consider is cost. Assisted living is generally less expensive than nursing home care, but more expensive the in home care for the elderly. The usual range is anywhere from $10,000 per year to over $50,000 per year, so it is important to know what you can afford and how much each facility costs. Another thing to know is that there may be fees not included in the basic rate. It will be helpful to figure out how much extra you will have to pay to live in a certain home.

Insurance may help cover some of these costs, but usually charges are covered primarily by the senior citizens who decide to live in these residences or family members responsible for their elder care. Some facilities also offer financial assistance programs, which you may want to inquire about.

Medicare does not cover the costs of these residences or the elder care provided there. Medicaid-the joint federal and state program that helps senior citizens and people with disabilities pay for health care when they are unable to afford it-may cover the service component of assisted living in certain states.

It is important to consider the different options in elder care. If cost is a concern, it may be helpful to consider in home care for senior citizens. This type of elder care may provide sufficient care for your needs in the comfort of your own home. If the degree of elder care provided by in home care or an assisted living facility does not meet your needs, consider a nursing home.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

Incremental Retirement – Sensible Advice For Senior Citizens by Jerry Elrod

May 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many senior citizens just won’t retire. They are ambitiously alive. They stay  busy. They love what they do. They are not putting off retirement because of  economic issues. They either own their business or are in a situation in which  their business gives them so much permission that the business can do quite well  without them. That is, of course, a fortunate place to be. They are in  incremental retirement. They are doing it in stages. For the most part, they  don’t keep rigid or strict hours. They are fully aware of what’s going on in  their business or their lives, but they don’t obsess over it. An acquaintance  is, at 70, building a new office and expanding his business. It is not to “make  more money” for himself. He gives it all away to his family and causes he  believes in.

Another person travels a great deal, sometime in a humongous motor home. He  is quite well off, but he chases around Texas doing what he does for his  business.

Still another is a retired judge, but still a practicing lawyer. He and his  spouse spend enormous time enjoying themselves with frequent travel forays and  maintain an elegant antebellum home in East Texas. When home, he still keeps a  busy roster of clients.

Incremental Retirement, whether continuing to pursue business or professional  interests, is a healthy way to retire. It doesn’t have to happen all at once.  One need not surrender the things of ones previous life all at once. Keeping up  with events and excitement in ones “career” world is a healthy way to stimulate  body, mind and soul.

Incremental Retirement means you may do it on your own terms. You can plan to  have a three-month hiatus, while the wheels keep turning. You can generate new  excitement and energy for living. You can even expand your career interests in  ways that will provide further for family, charity, a foundation, and a life of  absolute satisfaction.

So, look at Incremental Retirement, if you are fortunate like many senior  citizens, which may round out your life in enormously gratifying ways.

Article provided by Dr. Jerry D. Elrod. Dr Elrod, and his wife, Dr Sharon  Shaw Elrod, manage Senior Citizen Journal online. For information on retirement,  Baby Boomers and everything related to Seniors, please visit my blog at http://www.seniorcitizenjournal.com/. Links to  other Senior Citizen Journal pages can be found on the blog.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jerry_Elrod

 

Caring For Elderly Parents? Jitterbug Cell Phones & Medical Alert Devices For Senior Citizens Help! by Kaye Swain

May 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Are you one of the many members of the never-aging Baby Boomers Generation  caring for elderly parents who don’t live nearby? Or perhaps they are close, but  work keeps you too busy to get over to check on them daily? Would you like  something made just for them to help them in the event of a fall or sudden  illness?

My senior parents and their friends have wrestled over this situation  themselves and we’ve come up with a couple of good resources. One dear senior  prefers a personal emergency response system using an emergency pendant around  her neck. Relatively inexpensive and very easy to use, these necklaces as well  as the wristwatches they also offer, are usually monitored 24/7 by the alarm  company.

If your senior parent falls or feels suddenly ill and can’t get to the  telephone, they just push the button on their medical alert device and an  operator should answer right away. If they push the button but are unable to  speak, the operator should then call 911 for them automatically. Our friend has  used hers 2-3 times over the last few years and been so grateful she had it.

Of course, you’ll want to use a reputable company. I always like to check for  a good recommendation such as the Better Business Bureau or Good  Housekeeping.

Another option that my senior mom and I prefer is a cell phone specifically  made for senior citizens. We personally think that Jitterbug makes the best cell  phone for seniors, as she has been using one for the past two years and loves  it! It’s a flip-phone style of cell phone which means she can’t accidentally  call someone from her purse or pocket. (My old “candy bar” style phones used to  do that all the time! It drove me crazy and it would totally confuse our sweet  elderly relatives.)

It has large numbers which are easy to read – always a great thing for cell  phones for senior citizens! It is geared to work easily with hearing aids.  Seniors have the option to dial their own phone numbers, use the menu to select  the person they are calling, or just dial 0, like they once did when they were  much younger. Just like then, an operator will come on the phone to help them in  any way they need, including placing the call for them.

The reason we prefer the Jitterbug cell phone for our elderly parents is  because they can keep it with them in their pocket. If they go for a walk and  have a problem, they’ll have it right there with them. Unlike the medical alert  device, it will work anywhere, not just at their home. And I love it for  shopping! When we go to a big store, my senior mom can enjoy shopping at her own  pace, while I grab my items or sit and write. When one of us is ready to meet  up, we’re each just a simple phone call away. You will love the peace of mind it  will give you!

The Jitterbug large and simple cell phones for seniors are a  wonderful gift for our senior parents AND for our own peace of  mind. To find out more about how these great senior cell phones can help you and your beloved elderly  relatives, just pop over to SandwichINK – http://www.SandwichINK.com. There you will find plenty  of resources to help you, as you are busy caring for your elderly  parents.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kaye_Swain

Viewing Our Senior Citizens As Part of History by John Harmer

May 2, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

When we consider the activities and contributions by the senior members of  our society, we only look at them now. Yet they have been around for over 60  years. In that time they had seen, been part of, and shaped much of the world we  live in.

Many who were born before World War II. They have seen and taken part in many  of the world’s conflicts. The Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Balkan conflicts,  the events of September 11, the Gulf War, the Falklands conflict, to name only a  few.

Their contributions to medicine and the health of our community includes our  ability to harvest body organs to make use of them to keep yet another person or  persons alive. Add to that the huge strides that have been made in the  health-care and community care, policing, and defence.

In business today’s retirees can show that they have contributed to the  growth and stability of the world’s industry and commerce. Motor cars,  airplanes, ships and shipping have all benefited from the experience and  knowledge of those who are now counted amongst our old folks.

In education what we know now is so far advanced from where it was 60 years  and more ago that it is barely recognizable. All of this progress in the  attributed directly to the work, talents, and experience of today’s seniors.

In the world of art,music,and theater, many of our greatest triumphs were  created designed and engineered by those who are now enjoying a well-earned  retirement. We often see today that the music art and theater that was made  years ago being taken out of mothballs and re-presented And why is this? Because  it was brilliantly done in the first place and imitation is sincere  flattery.

When today’s retirees were but children themselves, they never expected to  see a man walk on the moon. Or a spacecraft lands on Mars. Yet we have seen men  fly high in the heavens and plumb to the depths of the sea. All made possible by  the endeavors of people now aged over 60.

In sporting events we have seen people run faster, jump higher,swim even  faster, lift huger weights. None even thought that such was possible in past  years. All initiated by the then activities of now older people. Who wanted to  see how much we, as a human race, could improve.

Yes we have better foods in some respects, better food preparation, often  better housing and schooling. But not always. In many parts of our world older  people are struggling along with their younger counterparts. Many countries  unfortunately are in poverty, lacking in basic food water and medical supplies.  So our senior citizens have also been forced to look upon some spectacular  failures.

Development in some countries is lagging behind perhaps in what might be seen  to be the basic essentials and human rights. Clearly something that needs to be  addressed and rectified.

We are using up many things that previously existed in plenty. Raw materials,  water, vegetation, are diminishing all too quickly. Our native animals are  becoming extinct because we have not cared for them. Our grandchildren will not  enjoy the pleasure of seeing the animals, flowers, and trees we accept as part  of our lives.

One could go on forever trying to recall even some of the things that today’s  senior citizens have included in their activities and actions. That this is  impossible for us to so many things have happened in the last 60 years. The next  60 years will bring its own changes. We can only look forward.

John Harmer is an online researcher who is himself a senior citizen. He  admires the contributions made by his peers. He is constructing a website that  will provide information about, and advice for, our senior citizens.

You can visit the website by clicking on the following link  [http://www.lotson4seniors.com]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=John_Harmer

 

Know More About Short Term Health Insurance Plans For Senior Citizens by John D. Edwards

May 2, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Short term insurance has become very popular over the recent years as it is a  cheaper and affordable insurance option for many people. When it comes to  insurance polices there are many to choose from. There are companies that  provide a host of insurance policies and at times it is difficult to choose the  ideal one for you. For people over 65 years of age it becomes even more  difficult because they are not aware of the right plans for themselves and they  fear the amount of premium that they need to pay as the amount for insurance  policy increases with age. If you are over 65 years this may sound depressing  for you however the good news is that there are many short term health insurance  plans that are offered by insurance companies for their benefit and welfare.

The above insurance companies offer the best policies that are less expensive  for them. These companies have two sets of health insurance policies that are  available for people under 65 and the next set for people over 65. The insurance  policies that have been framed for senior citizens by Medicare are short term  insurance policies that have been targeted for the welfare of these citizens.  There are certain cholesterol levels, blood pressure, family history, height,  weight and other considerations that are taken into account for these citizens.  In fact, the above policy considerations are more liberal than the ones that are  made for younger adults. These citizens can reap the benefits of short term  health insurance polices that have been made keeping their needs in mind.

The term insurance policy intended for senior citizens offer the best rates  and helps them save significant money. The short term insurance is also called a  temporary insurance that provides health insurance for a limited period only.  The time period can be as short as a month and can also go up to 6 to 12 months  as well. The term health insurance works in the same way as the long term health  insurance. The coverage between the two is different and in the case of the  former the person gets a health card that will possess limits and the  deductibles on the services of the policy. Such a short term insurance policy  provides you with the advantages of an insurance against accidents and illnesses  only for a limited period.

The short term health insurance plan for senior citizens do not contain  pre-existing conditions and preventive care. The pre-existing condition is a  medical problem that a person suffers from before he or she goes into insurance.  These short term health insurance plans are specially designed to provide  protection against major health problems that a senior citizen faces.

Thus, from the above it is evident that the above short term health insurance  have been specially designed for the purpose of senior citizens and they can  avail all the benefits and the advantages of the polices that have been offered  to them with ease.

Are you looking for low cost short term health insurance? Visit http://www.short-termhealthinsurance.com today  for more information!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=John_D._Edwards

 

Should Mobile Car Washes And On-Site Auto Detailing Companies Give Senior Citizen Discounts? by Lance Winslow

May 1, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

The other day, I was talking to a mobile detailing entrepreneur in the state  of Florida. He been doing business an awful long time, but he also noted that  unemployment in the state just hit 8.8%. It wasn’t like this in the past where  he could go to any office building, and all the workers were flush with cash and  paid him for an executive $20 wash, and a $125.00 detail every other month.  Today, he is busy trying to find any customer he can, and he asked me a very  interesting question.

He told me that many of the customers in the retirement resort gated  communities were asking him for a senior citizen discount. I told him that would  be rather tough because almost everyone in those facilities, living between the  fairways and the golf courses was a senior citizen. You might as well just lower  the price and give it to everyone, or raise the price and let everyone get the  discount, either way the concept of a senior citizen discount in Florida is  rather silly.

Further, retired folks like to talk a lot, and they have nothing better to do  but sit there and watch you detail the car, this could actually slow you down,  and then they want to tell you all about their grandchildren, like you have  time, you need to get to the next car to make some more money so you can afford  to put gas in your mobile detailing rig because even that is up to four dollars  a gallon now. Of course, the seniors do like to get a discount or least feel  they are getting a discount, so maybe it is time that you rearranged the prices  on your menu flyer, perhaps raising them 10 or 15%, and then giving the senior  citizens a 20% discount.

Another issue that you may not have considered is that the baby boomers are  retiring in record numbers, and they’re all hitting age 55 or 60. It might even  be possible now to tell people that if they are only 65; “hell you are still  young, you could probably wash and detail your own car, so I can’t give you the  discount, I only give the senior citizen discounts to people 90 years old or  older.” They might get a laugh about that, but maybe you can set your senior  discount age at 70 or 75. If you are in the state of Florida like my  acquaintance, you’ll still have plenty of customers take you up on the  offer.

Well that’s all for now, if you have other questions or concerns you may  shoot an e-mail. Until then I hope you will please consider all this and think  on it.

Lance Winslow has launched a new series of eBooks on the Mobile Detailing Business. Lance Winslow is a retired Founder  of a The Detail Guys, a Nationwide Franchise Chain, and now runs the Online  Think Tank; http://www.worldthinktank.net

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lance_Winslow

 

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!