Warning: trim() expects parameter 1 to be string, array given in /home/nvsenior/public_html/wp-content/plugins/custom-post-order-category/wp-customcategorypostorder.php on line 492
risk | Nevada Senior Guide

Life Extension: The Modern Anti-Aging Movement – Are We Standing at the Threshold of Immortality?

July 17, 2016 by · Comments Off on Life Extension: The Modern Anti-Aging Movement – Are We Standing at the Threshold of Immortality?
Filed under: General 

Why is skincare the focus of longevity research? I guess a cell is a cell, and if you can crack the code for one human cell, it is only a matter of time to solving the puzzle with different types of cell – and skin is without doubt the most visible cells each of us have. And it’s our faces in particular we often judge ourselves and others by, and we are in turn quickly scrutinized, and often opinions reached in a fraction of a second. Our faces often show the most visible signs of aging, and for many in modern society age is by nature “bad” and young or looking young is the ideal. That is why billions and billions of dollars each year are poured by consumers into all sorts of treatments to minimize wrinkles, to push back the effects of gravity, and to turn back the hands of time. And with that much money to be spent by consumers, there are many manufacturers eager to find the next step in arresting Father Time – and at least detaining him until the next stagecoach arrives, where hopefully he can be encouraged to move on before too much damage can be done.

The Entire Issue Explained – In A Pair of Shoelaces

Some time ago a friend gave me a simple analogy that puts this entire issue in perspective. The science may not win a Nobel Prize, but it gave me the necessary ah-ha moment.

The double helix of the DNA strand – our most basic foundation for life – is held together at each end by things that act in the same way as the hard plastic bits on the end of shoelaces do – preventing the DNA from unraveling, and the individual chromosomes scattering across the floor like dropping a string of pearls down a marble staircase. These things are called telomeres.

Somewhere programmed into these tiny telomeres is the entire basis to how long the DNA stays intact – and by inference these are the keys to the length of life of the organism. Somewhere written into the telomere is a great musical score but like all musical scores it has a double bar somewhere to signify the end; but is it to be a minuet or a Wagnerian epic? But sure enough, when the time comes, and the telomeres blow the full time whistle, the DNA strand will unravel and die – and the circle of life begins again. Telomeres govern how often our skin cells are replaced; why a puppy and a child born on the same date may age exactly the same chronologically, but the puppy has become a geriatric before the child reaches puberty.

Telomeres, my friend explained, occasionally go on the fritz (that must have a very specific scientific meaning). One of the ways this occurs is they may forget their programming to release and unravel, and they just hang on, allowing the cells thus affected to multiply again and again without dying. In fact, when this occurs often they become very difficult to kill and to all intents and purposes once the telomeres act in this way, the cell – and those it propagates – are effectively immortal.

This condition has a name which we all know. Cancer.

But, what if we were able in some way to persuade the telomeres within a cancer to behave normally – would that not be the “magic bullet” cure for cancer? And the other side to that equation – if the telomeres in healthy cells could be persuaded to act as they do in a cancer – then is this the recipe for a healthy cell that does not die? Does the cure for cancer and immortality hang on just this one thread?

Whatever your views may be, the reality is that some of the world’s finest research scientists are working on that exact question and some would say it is only a matter of a decade or two before this is neither conjecture nor science fiction, but a reality to face up to. The changes that would take place in society even if life expectancy were to take a leap forward by say 10 or 20 years are enormous, but we should all be thinking that this is a distinct possibility.

From the dab of lanoline a generation ago to what I know hold in my hand as an anti aging skincare treatment is more than just a revolution – and I have no doubt in a few years I will be saying this cream will not just slow the aging process and reduce the visible signs of aging, making your face appear younger – but it will actually be younger.

But before that, let’s look back at how this whole engagement with life extension and anti-aging started. Mankind has always striven for longevity and mused about immortality – but the past 50 years has seen some dramatic steps in reality toward this goal.

Genesis

The thought of extending life has been on the mind of mankind for millennia. References to the search for ways to prolong life can be found as far back as the Epic of Gilgamesh.

Gilgamesh was reputedly the fifth king of the kingdom of Uruk, the modern-day Iraq, around 2500 BC. According to the Sumerian list of kings, he reigned for 126 years. The Torah or Old Testament records Methuselah as living over 900 years, with life spans measured in centuries apparently commonplace before the time of Noah.

Throughout the development of scientific thought from the Reformation onwards, scholars have applied themselves to solving this riddle and these endeavors continue today at the very leading edge of scientific progress.

Unraveling Secrets

As the secrets of our existence are unraveled in ever more minute detail, we are beginning to understand what it is that makes us grow from tiny babies into adults. We now know, for example, that cell functions slow down as the body ages and that production of certain substances required by the body to regenerate decrease or cease completely.

Skin, for instance, needs two substances to retain strength and firmness.
The production of these substances namely collagen (strength, tightness) and elastin (flexibility) decreases with age. The decreases in production together with other factors that include the threat of free radicals make the skin age and become wrinkly. Free radicals are essentially incomplete oxygen molecules causing destructive chain reactions within cells.

The same kind of thing happens in every cell, every tissue and organ around the human body. For example, people develop frown lines, crow’s feet and wrinkles. Nutrients are no longer absorbed easily and vital cell functions, hormones and other substances are produced at decreased rates resulting in the body aging.

A Brief History of the Life Extension Movement

Science has been looking for ways to slow down this process for centuries. The forming of life extension movements, however, did not really begin until around 1970.

➢ In this year, Denham Harman, the originator of the so-called ‘free radical theory of aging’, decided that an organization dedicated to the research and information sharing between scientists working in biogerontology (the field of science concerned with the biological aspects involved in the aging process) was needed. As a result, the American Aging Association was formed.

➢ In 1976, two futurists, Philip Gordon and Joel Kurtzman wrote a book on the research into extending the human lifespan. This popular volume was titled ‘No More Dying. The Conquest Of Aging And The Extension Of Human Life’.

➢ Kurtzman was then invited to speak at Florida’s House Select Committee (HSC) of Aging, which was chaired by Claude Pepper, an American politician and spokesman for the elderly. The aim of this talk was to discuss the impact on Social Security by life extension.

➢ In 1980, Saul Kent, a prominent activist in the field of life extension, published the book ‘The Life Extension Revolution’ and founded the nutraceutical (from ‘nutrition’ and ‘pharmaceutical’, in other words, a nutrition supplement) firm known as ‘The Life Extension Foundation’.

This foundation is a non-profit making organization promoting dietary supplements and publishing the periodical ‘Life Extension Magazine’. Kent was later involved in work relating to cryogenics. He was jailed in the course of this work over a dispute at one point, although charges were dropped at a later stage.

➢ In 1982, American health writer and life extension advocate Sandy Shaw and her co-writer, Durk Pearson, popularized the term ‘life extension’ even further with the bestseller ‘Life Extension: A Practical Scientific Approach’.

➢ Roy Walford, a gerontologist and life-extensionist, published ‘Maximum Lifespan’, another popular book on the subject. He and Richard Weindruch, his student, followed this up in 1988 with their summary on the research they had conducted into the ability to prolong the life of rodents through calorie restriction. The title of this book is ‘The Retardation of Aging and Disease by Dietary Restriction’.

Although this ability to extend life with calorie restriction had been known since the 1930’s, when gerontologist, biochemist and nutritionist Clive McCay did some research into the subject, it was the work of Walford and Weinbruch that gave solid scientific grounding to the McCay’s findings.

Walford’s scientific work was driven by a personal interest in life extension. He practiced calorie restriction as part of his own life and eventually died at the age of 80. The cause of his death was amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a progressive motor neuron disease.

➢ A4M, the ‘American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine’ was founded in 1992 to create a medical specialty for anti aging that was distinctly separate from geriatrics. This allowed scientists and physicians interested in this particular field of science to hold conferences and discuss the latest developments.

➢ The sci.life-extension, a Usenet group, was created by California-born author, philosopher and translator Brian M. Delaney. This represented an important development within the movement of life extension. It made it possible, for example, for the CR (Calorie Restriction) Society to be created.

➢ A more recent development is the proposal of Dr A. de Grey, a biogerontologist at Cambridge University. This proposal suggested that damage to cells, macromolecules, organs and tissues can be repaired with the help of advanced biotechnology. This is evident in hair restoration products, for instance.

More than Books

Although it would appear that most of the work revolving around life extension has been done solely by writing books or founding societies or organizations of some kind or another, the reality is that these books were written in response to or based on very specific, detailed scientific research that have yielded positive results.

They are no longer the works of hopeful minds, but the works of dedicated scientists who have spent their lives working on discovering facts about aging and trying to find ways to slow down, or even reverse the process.

Many breakthroughs have been made, and in many ways, we are already able to extend lives to a certain extent. The average lifespan of a human being is already far greater than it used to be as a result of medical, pharmaceutical and nutritional advances brought about by research and development.

The work continues, and scientists around the world are continually conducting research, comparing results, discussing options and making advances on our behalf.

Driving Forces behind the Development of the Life Extension Movement

What factors are driving this movement into ever greater efforts to find solutions to the extension of Life? The answer to this question actually includes a whole range of factors.

Expectations Have Risen

As the ‘baby boomer’ generation (born between 1946-1964) enters retirement age, expectations of this group are dramatically different from those of the preceding generations. They have greater expectations and desires to enjoy their life as pensioners to the fullest and for as long as is possible. This expectation covers not only length of life, but quality of life as well and this is not a passive request but an active and strident demand in many cases.

Pharmacology

Progress in pharmacology has led to a wide selection of drugs that allow people to live longer and fuller lives being developed over the last two decades or so. The work is still very much in progress and many more drugs are being developed daily.

One of the classic examples of a drug raising the quality of life for older individuals are erectile dysfunction treatments – notably Viagra, Cialis and Levitra. These drugs have dramatically reduced the number of fatalities or serious injury resulting from elderly men rolling out of bed, as well as a number of more qualitative benefits.

Advances in Genetics

Some of the latest scientific research and subsequent advances made in biotechnology and genetics are providing some hope that it may be possible to hold back some of the fundamental causes of aging.

As we outlined previously, chromosomes containing DNA strings are essentially capped with a binding substance known as telomeres. In effect, the telomeres are consumed during cell division and over time, they become shorter and shorter.

This was first observed by a scientist called Leonard Hayflick, and the process of limited cell division was subsequently named the Hayflick Limit. Advocates of life extension work on the thought that lengthening the telomeres through drugs or gene therapy may ultimately extend the Hayflick Limit and thereby fool the cells, and as such the body, into ‘thinking’ it is younger than it actually is.

Developments in Precision Manufacture

Advances made in the fields of nanotechnology, miniaturization, computer chips and robotics also provide hope for potentially life extending solutions.

In the 1970’s, a popular TV series starred Lee Majors as the ‘Six Million Dollar Man’? Science fiction then. Today, it is science fact. Millions of people now walk through life with artificial ankle, knee and hip joints and healthy feet. A generation ago, mass production of this kind of technology was a distant dream.

The same applies to many individuals with artificial limbs. Artificial legs used to be crude wooden contraptions that were just able to keep a person balanced. Today’s artificial limbs are almost fully functional.

The Blessings of Medical Progress

Who would have thought even 50 years ago that it would become possible to bypass a coronary artery, or even replace a heart completely? Yet there are hundreds of thousands, if not millions of individuals enjoying their lives after having this kind of surgery – few of whom would be alive just half a century ago.

Millions of people no longer have to wear glasses, because of the availability of laser surgery. This, too, was science fiction just a few years ago. Today, it is advertised next to shampoo in magazines and on TV.

In other words, science is moving rapidly towards not only extending life, but making the quality of these extra years better as well.

Is it Science, Science Fiction or Lunacy?

What should the average person believe? This question is almost as difficult to answer as finding solutions to extended life. Even among scientists, opinions are divided. Some do believe that extending the quality of life is as possible as extending life in general.

Others brush off the thought as un-scientific nonsense. This is often simply based on the fear of anything ‘new’ disturbing the status quo of established limits. Fortunately, real scientists do keep on looking, because if every single scientist had decided that some of the advancements already in medical, pharmaceutical and technological fields could not be possible, we would all still be dying at 30.

So where does that leave us?

There is no doubt what-so-ever that there are many charlatans out there trying to make a quick buck out of people’s desire to retain their youth. Even today, many products being sold in their millions are essentially non-effective – often given fantastic names and have the most bewildering ingredients to make them look scientific to consumers and justify their cost.

But the facts are while many advancements are being made and research points to the possibility of eventually finding the key to maintaining youth for longer, the scientific community is still warning the public that many of the products being sold today are unreliable to say the least.

➢ Although food supplements may assist in keeping a body healthier – something that can often be achieved by simply adopting a healthier life style and diet – there is as yet no categorical and undeniable proof that they slow down aging as such.

➢ The same goes for many hormone treatments. Although they may have a short term effect of some kind, it is not yet scientifically proven that they will actually work in the long run. The fear that it may not work is based on the fact that taking hormones, a good example is the hormonal acne treatment, will ultimately actually slow down the body’s own production of these hormones.

In addition, many treatments may have potential (and yet unknown) side effects in the long run that could be harmful to the user’s health. This includes the fears that such hormone treatments could increase the risk of cancer, diabetes and other major illnesses.

➢ Other ideas, like the calorie restriction method, are working for rodents. In fact, studies conducted with rats on 30 to 50 per cent restricted diets have shown to almost double the life span of rats.

Similar studies conducted on primates have also shown tendency to extend life to a certain extent and prevent a list of age related illnesses. There are as yet no studies on humans, although some are actually living on calorie restricted diets. Whether this will prolong their lives, however, is a question of having to wait and see.

The theory is that by reducing calorie intake, the metabolism of the body is slowed down, thereby slowing the aging process as well. Nutritionists say there is a certain amount of calories a body of a certain size and weight needs to have to maintain health. Reducing this amount by up to 50 per cent is hardly a good idea in the long term.

Time will tell, as they say, but how will anyone be able to tell the difference? If a person lives to the age of 80, is this because they are on this diet or would they have lived to this age anyway?

Where Will This Lead?

Many believe there is realistic hope and expectation of making significant strides in the area of longevity within the next two decades. This group typically believes the answer will ultimately lie within genetics and biotechnology. It is too early to make definite predictions, but the research so far shows promise and, as mentioned earlier, some of the results of this research are already being used in certain treatments to improve patients’ lives.

At present, overall aging is difficult to slow down, to say the least. Some products indicate they will assist in maintaining overall health/longevity, but the area we are seeing the first commercial products being developed is in the area of skin care and given the size of this market, it is likely that this will continue to be the weather-vane of longevity treatments.

Science or Snake Oil?

It will be difficult to tell these two apart for many years. Charlatans are likely to about, because it is difficult to disprove many theories easily. Equally difficult will be positive proof from those with an ethical perspective on the trail of a real breakthrough, as products based on valid research and using technology or ingredients that will actually have an effect rarely promise overnight results. This is something that anyone looking to find improved youthful looks, etc, will have to bear in mind. None of these products can perform miracles. Even the best of them will take time and regular use in order to achieve the desired effect.

The bottom line is that where we stand now, we can be sure there are some things which are ineffective or even harmful; there are some that show some promise and there are some that are starting to cross the line of being able to demonstrate results – albeit modestly at this point.

In the meantime, it is wise to research products very carefully and to refuse to be baffled by weird and wonderful sounding ingredients or fantastic sounding promises of instant youth. Regeneration will take time – let’s face it, it has taken a lifetime to get to this point, turning back the clock can never be possible over night.

Skin Care and the Life Extension Movement

One may well ask just what all this, and in particular the life extension movement as such, could possibly have to do with skin care, health and beauty products. The fact is, much of the research into life extension is resulting in new approaches to skin care as a kind of by-product.

A greater understanding of how genetics and cellular processes affect the aging and condition of skin allows these research and development teams to investigate different compounds, their compatibility with human cells and genetic make up.

Many compounds found in nature are not just compatible to human skin but in fact the skin cells actually have natural receptors for these compounds. Because life extension research has discovered these receptors, skin care developers can now use this knowledge and create the formulae for their products to provide maximum effect.

Another skin care ‘by-product’ of life extension research is the use of nanotechnology. The use of nanotechnology, or, to be more precise, nanoparticles, has had a huge impact on the way nutrients and other components of skin care products are being delivered to the skin cells. In some ways, nanotechnology has already revolutionized skin care. It is now possible to use active ingredients previously difficult to effectively deliver to the skin, as well as making old, proven ingredients even more effective. Some ingredients used in cosmetics for hundreds, if not thousands of years by certain cultures can now be even more effectively used to improve skin condition and maintain a healthy, youthful look.

Even the moisturizing effect of skin care products can be improved with nantechnology. For this effect, so-called nanosomes are used. Nanosomes are small, pocket-like particles that melt or disintegrate on skin contact. By doing this, the moisturising effect is accelerated, assisting the skin faster and more efficiently.

Nanotechnology plays a key part not only in slowing the aging of skin, but is believed to actively assist in repairing and healing skin cells and tissue.

Another breakthrough in life extension research that is beginning to make itself felt in skin care products is the research into stem cells. Stem cells are elements of all life, plant, animal and human. Stem cells have two properties other cells do not have. These properties are the ability to develop into any kind of cell type and the ability to divide almost indefinitely. The use of plant stem cell extracts in skin care is likely to become one of the next ‘big things’ in the industry. And prepare for the debate when human stem cells are proposed as part of an anti-aging skincare regime, as will inevitably occur!

One thing we can be certain of, is that science will continue to search for answers to the question of life extension, and business will drive the commercialization of discoveries. But whether these lead us to a utopian future or potentially a minefield of strife as we debate who will use and who will benefit from these new godlike powers. In the meantime, at a practical level in the skincare, health and beauty industry we remain hopeful and expectant we will see the emergence of products that not only promise results, but produce them.

David Christensen is a veteran of Asia Pacific business, currently residing in Bangkok, Thailand and heading up the business he was a co-founder of, Royal Siam Natural Health & Beauty – who can be located at [http://www.royalsiam.asia], and the information supporting site at [http://www.royalsiam.info]. Royal Siam was established after careful planning in early 2011, spending 2011 concentrating on building the necessary business infrastructure and concentrating on the domestic Thai market. Early in 2012 Royal Siam launched its international website and online store, and in April 2012 publicly declared the ambition to be among the world’s top 20 premium health and beauty brands by the year 2020. Royal Siam is a unique business, operating in the premium skincare, anti aging, and related fields. At its core, one mission is to commercialize and bring to a global market the immense wealth of knowledge about the healing and beneficial properties of Thai and South East Asian plants – a knowledge base carefully built up over the last thousand years. At the same time, the mission is to bring to market the very latest in scientific advances in the area of anti aging… resulting in the unique position of having a Thai heritage and offering the best of nature, tradition, and science.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/David_D_Christensen/1317312

Aging And Anti-Aging Products

May 16, 2016 by · Comments Off on Aging And Anti-Aging Products
Filed under: General 

As you age, different processes in your skin change its appearance, activity and structure. The aging skin has reduced cellular activity, less collagen production, lowered epidermal turn over and damage accumulation as a result of free radicals from UV exposure. All these changes contribute to the aging process and leave you with apparent signs of aging such as wrinkles, fine lines and dark spots. They come about because the skin loses moisture and elasticity from all the aging changes. Using anti-aging cream can help fight the signs because a good cream reduces the wrinkles by improving skin elasticity and also offers deep skin renewal and cellular rejuvenation by enhancing collagen production.

Causes of premature skin aging

What most people don’t know is that the aging process can actually be slowed by living healthy lifestyles. This way, you won’t have to start using anti-aging products until much later in life. When you take good care of the skin, you will prevent premature aging, which results from things such as;

· Psychological stress

· Unhealthy diets

· Nicotine

· Excessive alcohol consumption

· UV radiation

All these factors put you at risk of free radical formation leading to premature skin aging. A few lifestyle changes might be all you need to maintain a youthful look before it is time to use a wrinkle cream. To block out sun damage, you can use a day cream and sunscreen.

Using Anti-Aging Creams

Skin aging processes can start at different times for different individuals depending on the factors. Skin professionals advise that you start giving the skin some protection from aging between the age of 25 and 30. Anti-aging creams with hyaluronic acid and creatine are some of the best in protecting the skin from harmful UV rays. Today, it is easy to choose the best anti-aging creams since you can choose for your specific skin type or your age. You will find anything from anti-aging 20s cream to anti-aging cream 50+ products. The categorization is important because skin at different ages require different treatments for the best results to be enjoyed.

As for eye creams, you can start using them as soon as you see signs of aging around this thin skin. Even younger people have issues of dark circles as well as puffiness and wrinkles around the delicate skin eye. It can be beneficial to use eye creams before turning thirty.

When using ant-aging creams, most people expect instantaneous results. However, it is important to remember that your results will depend on your type of skin and the condition of the skin when you start using the products. Regularly using your products will of course hasten the process but it is also important to adhere to the given directions of use for best results. When using quality anti-aging creams, you will feel a change in your skin texture after a few days and you should see improvements as with the appearance of the wrinkles and fine lines as you continue using them. Choose quality products and be consistent with your use.

Anti-aging cream 25 year old [http://www.amazing-anti-aging-cream.com/] beginnings can help a lot in maintaining a youthful beautiful skin. Choosing quality products is however also paramount in pushing you closer to the expected results.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9067111

The Development of Old Age and Related Issues

April 18, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Development of Old Age and Related Issues
Filed under: General 

In traditional Chinese and other Asian cultures the aged were highly respected and cared for. The Igabo tribesmen of Eastern Nigeria value dependency in their aged and involve them in care of children and the administration of tribal affairs (Shelton, A. in Kalish R. Uni Michigan 1969).

In Eskimo culture the grandmother was pushed out into the ice-flow to die as soon as she became useless.

Western societies today usually resemble to some degree the Eskimo culture, only the “ice-flows” have names such a “Sunset Vista” and the like. Younger generations no longer assign status to the aged and their abandonment is always in danger of becoming the social norm.

There has been a tendency to remove the aged from their homes and put them  in custodial care. To some degree the government provides domiciliary care services to prevent or delay this, but the motivation probably has more to do with expense than humanity.

In Canada and some parts of the USA old people are being utilised as foster-grandparents in child care agencies.

SOME BASIC DEFINITIONS

What is Aging?

Aging: Aging is a natural phenomenon that refers to changes occurring throughout the life span and result in differences in structure and function between the youthful and elder generation.

Gerontology: Gerontology is the study of aging and includes science, psychology and sociology.

Geriatrics: A relatively new field of medicine specialising in the health problems of advanced age.

Social aging: Refers to the social habits and roles of individuals with respect to their culture and society. As social aging increases individual usually experience a decrease in meaningful social interactions.

Biological aging: Refers to the physical changes in the body systems during the later decades of life. It may begin long before the individual  reaches chronological age 65.

Cognitive aging: Refers to decreasing ability to assimilate new information and learn new behaviours and skills.

GENERAL PROBLEMS OF AGING

Eric Erikson (Youth and the life cycle. Children. 7:43-49 Mch/April 1960) developed an “ages and stages” theory of human development that involved 8 stages after birth each of which involved a basic dichotomy representing best case and worst case outcomes. Below are the dichotomies and their developmental relevance:

Prenatal stage – conception to birth.

  1. Infancy. Birth to 2 years – basic trust vs. basic distrust. Hope.
  2. Early childhood, 3 to 4 years – autonomy vs. self doubt/shame. Will.
  3. Play age, 5 to 8 years – initiative vs. guilt. Purpose.
  4. School age, 9to 12 – industry vs. inferiority. Competence.
  5. Adolescence, 13 to 19 – identity vs. identity confusion. Fidelity.
  6. Young adulthood – intimacy vs. isolation. Love.
  7. Adulthood, generativity vs. self absorption. Care.
  8. Mature age- Ego Integrity vs. Despair. Wisdom.

This stage of older adulthood, i.e. stage 8, begins about the time of retirement and continues throughout one’s life. Achieving ego integrity  is a sign of maturity while failing to reach this stage is an indication of poor development in prior stages through the life course.

Ego integrity: This means coming to accept one’s whole life and reflecting on it in a positive manner. According to Erikson, achieving integrity means fully accepting one’ self and coming to terms with death. Accepting responsibility for one’s life and being able to review the past with satisfaction is essential. The inability to do this leads to despair and the individual will begin to fear death. If a favourable balance is achieved during this stage, then wisdom is developed.

Psychological and personality aspects:

Aging has psychological implications. Next to dying our recognition that we are aging may be one of the most profound shocks we ever receive. Once we pass the invisible line of 65 our years are bench marked for the remainder of the game of life. We are no longer “mature age” we are instead classified as “old”, or “senior citizens”. How we cope with the changes we face and stresses of altered status depends on our basic personality. Here are 3 basic personality types that have been identified. It may be a oversimplification but it makes the point about personality effectively:

a. The autonomous – people who seem to have the resources for self-renewal. They may be dedicated to a goal or idea and committed to continuing productivity. This appears to protect them somewhat even against physiological aging.

b.The adjusted – people who are rigid and lacking in adaptability but are supported by their power, prestige or well structured routine. But if their situation changes drastically they become psychiatric casualties.

c.The anomic. These are people who do not have clear inner values or a protective life vision. Such people have been described as prematurely resigned and they may deteriorate rapidly.

Summary of stresses of old age.

a. Retirement and reduced income. Most people rely on work for self worth, identity and social interaction. Forced retirement can be demoralising.

b. Fear of invalidism and death. The increased probability of falling prey to illness from which there is no recovery is a continual source of anxiety. When one has a heart attack or stroke the stress becomes much worse.

Some persons face death with equanimity, often psychologically supported by a religion or philosophy. Others may welcome death as an end to suffering or insoluble problems and with little concern for life or human existence. Still others face impending death with suffering of great stress against which they have no ego defenses.

c. Isolation and loneliness. Older people face inevitable loss of loved ones, friends and contemporaries. The loss of a spouse whom one has depended on for companionship and moral support is particularly distressing. Children grow up, marry and become preoccupied or move away. Failing memory, visual and aural impairment may all work to make social interaction difficult. And if this then leads to a souring of outlook and rigidity of attitude then social interaction becomes further lessened and the individual may not even utilise the avenues for social activity that are still available.

d. Reduction in sexual function and physical attractiveness. Kinsey et al, in their Sexual behaviour in the human male, (Phil., Saunders, 1948) found that there is a gradual decrease in sexual activity with advancing age and that reasonably gratifying patterns of sexual activity can continue into extreme old age. The aging person also has to adapt to loss of sexual attractiveness in a society which puts extreme emphasis on sexual attractiveness. The adjustment in self image and self concept that are required can be very hard to make.

e. Forces tending to self devaluation. Often the experience of the older generation has little perceived relevance to the problems of the young and the older person becomes deprived of participation in decision making both in occupational and family settings. Many parents are seen as unwanted burdens and their children may secretly wish they would die so they can be free of the burden and experience some financial relief or benefit. Senior citizens may be pushed into the role of being an old person with all this implies in terms of self devaluation.

4 Major Categories of Problems or Needs:

Health.

Housing.

Income maintenance.

Interpersonal relations.

BIOLOGICAL CHANGES

Physiological Changes: Catabolism (the breakdown of protoplasm) overtakes anabolism (the build-up of protoplasm). All body systems are affected and repair systems become slowed. The aging process occurs at different rates in different individuals.

Physical appearance and other changes:

Loss of subcutaneous fat and less elastic skin gives rise to wrinkled appearance, sagging and loss of smoothness of body contours. Joints stiffen and become painful and range of joint movement becomes restricted, general mobility lessened.

Respiratory changes:

Increase of fibrous tissue in chest walls and lungs leads restricts respiratory movement and less oxygen is consumed. Older people more likelyto have lower respiratory infections whereas young people have upper respiratory infections.

Nutritive changes:

Tooth decay and loss of teeth can detract from ease and enjoyment in eating. Atrophy of the taste buds means food is inclined to be tasteless and this should be taken into account by carers. Digestive changes occur from lack of exercise (stimulating intestines) and decrease in digestive juice production. Constipation and indigestion are likely to follow as a result. Financial problems can lead to the elderly eating an excess of cheap carbohydrates rather than the more expensive protein and vegetable foods and this exacerbates the problem, leading to reduced vitamin intake and such problems as anemia and increased susceptibility to infection.

Adaptation to stress:

All of us face stress at all ages. Adaptation to stress requires the consumption of energy. The 3 main phases of stress are:

1. Initial alarm reaction. 2. Resistance. 3. Exhaustion

and if stress continues tissue damage or aging occurs. Older persons have had a lifetime of dealing with stresses. Energy reserves are depleted and the older person succumbs to stress earlier than the younger person. Stress is cumulative over a lifetime. Research results, including experiments with animals suggests that each stress leaves us more vulnerable to the next and that although we might think we’ve “bounced back” 100% in fact each stress leaves it scar. Further, stress is psycho-biological meaning the kind of stress is irrelevant. A physical stress may leave one more vulnerable to psychological stress and vice versa. Rest does not completely restore one after a stressor. Care workers need to be mindful of this and cognizant of the kinds of things that can produce stress for aged persons.

COGNITIVE CHANGE Habitual Behaviour:

Sigmund Freud noted that after the age of 50, treatment of neuroses via psychoanalysis was difficult because the opinions and reactions of older people were relatively fixed and hard to shift.

Over-learned behaviour: This is behaviour that has been learned so well and repeated so often that it has become automatic, like for example typing or running down stairs. Over-learned behaviour is hard to change. If one has lived a long time one is likely to have fixed opinions and ritualised behaviour patterns or habits.

Compulsive behaviour: Habits and attitudes that have been learned in the course of finding ways to overcome frustration and difficulty are very hard to break. Tension reducing habits such as nail biting, incessant humming, smoking or drinking alcohol are especially hard to change at any age and particularly hard for persons who have been practising them over a life time.

The psychology of over-learned and compulsive behaviours has severe implications for older persons who find they have to live in what for them is a new and alien environment with new rules and power relations.

Information acquisition:

Older people have a continual background of neural noise making it more difficult for them to sort out and interpret complex sensory input. In talking to an older person one should turn off the TV, eliminate as many noises and distractions as possible, talk slowly and relate to one message or idea at a time.

Memories from the distant past are stronger than more recent memories. New memories are the first to fade and last to return.

Time patterns also can get mixed – old and new may get mixed.

Intelligence.

Intelligence reaches a peak and can stay high with little deterioration if there is no neurological damage. People who have unusually high intelligence to begin with seem to suffer the least decline. Education and stimulation also seem to play a role in maintaining intelligence.

Intellectual impairment. Two diseases of old age causing cognitive decline are Alzheimer’s syndrome and Pick’s syndrome. In Pick’s syndrome there is inability to concentrate and learn and also affective responses are impaired.

Degenerative Diseases: Slow progressive physical degeneration of cells in the nervous system. Genetics appear to be an important factor. Usually start after age 40 (but can occur as early as 20s).

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE Degeneration of all areas of cortex but particularly frontal and temporal lobes. The affected cells actually die. Early symptoms resemble neurotic disorders: Anxiety, depression, restlessness sleep difficulties.

Progressive deterioration of all intellectual faculties (memory deficiency being the most well known and obvious). Total mass of the brain decreases, ventricles become larger. No established treatment.

PICK’S DISEASE Rare degenerative disease. Similar to Alzheimer’s in terms of onset, symptomatology and possible genetic aetiology. However it affects circumscribed areas of the brain, particularly the frontal areas which leads to a loss of normal affect.

PARKINSON’S DISEASE Neuropathology: Loss of neurons in the basal ganglia.

Symptoms: Movement abnormalities: rhythmical alternating tremor of extremities, eyelids and tongue along with rigidity of the muscles and slowness of movement (akinesia).

It was once thought that Parkinson’s disease was not associated with intellectual deterioration, but it is now known that there is an association between global intellectual impairment and Parkinson’s where it occurs late in life.

The cells lost in Parkinson’s are associated with the neuro-chemical Dopamine and the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s are associated the dopamine deficiency. Treatment involves administration of dopamine precursor L-dopa which can alleviate symptoms including intellectual impairment. Research suggests it may possibly bring to the fore emotional effects in patients who have had psychiatric illness at some prior stage in their lives.

AFFECTIVE DOMAIN In old age our self concept gets its final revision. We make a final assessment of the value of our lives and our balance of success and failures.

How well a person adapts to old age may be predicated by how well the person adapted to earlier significant changes. If the person suffered an emotional crisis each time a significant change was needed then adaptation to the exigencies of old age may also be difficult. Factors such as economic security, geographic location and physical health are important to the adaptive process.

Need Fulfilment: For all of us, according to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs theory, we are not free to pursue the higher needs of self actualisation unless the basic needs are secured. When one considers that many, perhaps most, old people are living in poverty and continually concerned with basic survival needs, they are not likely to be happily satisfying needs related to prestige, achievement and beauty.

Maslow’s Hierarchy

Physiological

Safety

Belonging, love, identification

Esteem: Achievement, prestige, success, self respect

Self actualisation: Expressing one’s interests and talents to the full.

Note: Old people who have secured their basic needs may be motivated to work on tasks of the highest levels in the hierarchy – activities concerned with aesthetics, creativity and altruistic matters, as compensation for loss of sexual attractiveness and athleticism. Aged care workers fixated on getting old people to focus on social activities may only succeed in frustrating and irritating them if their basic survival concerns are not secured to their satisfaction.

DISENGAGEMENT

Social aging according to Cumming, E. and Henry, W. (Growing old: the aging process of disengagement, NY, Basic 1961) follows a well defined pattern:

  1. Change in role. Change in occupation and productivity. Possibly change in attitude to work.
  2. Loss of role, e.g. retirement or death of a husband.
  3. Reduced social interaction. With loss of role social interactions are diminished, eccentric adjustment can further reduce social interaction, damage to self concept, depression.
  4. Awareness of scarcity of remaining time. This produces further curtailment of activity in interest of saving time.

Havighurst, R. et al (in B. Neugarten (ed.) Middle age and aging, U. of Chicago, 1968) and others have suggested that disengagement is not an inevitable process. They believe the needs of the old are essentially the same as in middle age and the activities of middle age should be extended as long as possible. Havighurst points out the decrease in social interaction of the aged is often largely the result of society withdrawing from the individual as much as the reverse. To combat this he believes the individual must vigorously resist the limitations of his social world.

DEATH The fear of the dead amongst tribal societies is well established. Persons who had ministered to the dead were taboo and required observe various rituals including seclusion for varying periods of time. In some societies from South America to Australia it is taboo for certain persons to utter the name of the dead. Widows and widowers are expected to observe rituals in respect for the dead.

Widows in the Highlands of New Guinea around Goroka chop of one of their own fingers. The dead continue their existence as spirits and upsetting them can bring dire consequences.

Wahl, C in “The fear of death”, 1959 noted that the fear of death occurs as early as the 3rd year of life. When a child loses a pet or grandparent fears reside in the unspoken questions: Did I cause it? Will happen to you (parent) soon? Will this happen to me? The child in such situations needs to re-assure that the departure is not a censure, and that the parent is not likely to depart soon. Love, grief, guilt, anger are a mix of conflicting emotions that are experienced.

CONTEMPORARY ATTITUDES TO DEATH

Our culture places high value on youth, beauty, high status occupations, social class and anticipated future activities and achievement. Aging and dying are denied and avoided in this system. The death of each person reminds us of our own mortality.

The death of the elderly is less disturbing to members of Western society because the aged are not especially valued. Surveys have established that nurses for example attach more importance to saving a young life than an old life. In Western society there is a pattern of avoiding dealing with the aged and dying aged patient.

Stages of dying. Elisabeth Kubler Ross has specialised in working with dying patients and in her “On death and dying”, NY, Macmillan, 1969, summarised 5 stages in dying.

  1. Denial and isolation. “No, not me”.
  2. Anger. “I’ve lived a good life so why me?”
  3. Bargaining. Secret deals are struck with God. “If I can live until…I promise to…”
  4. Depression. (In general the greatest psychological problem of the aged is depression). Depression results from real and threatened loss.
  5. Acceptance of the inevitable.

Kubler Ross’s typology as set out above should, I believe be taken with a grain of salt and not slavishly accepted. Celebrated US Journalist David Rieff who was in June ’08 a guest of the Sydney writer’s festival in relation to his book, “Swimming in a sea of death: a son’s memoir” (Melbourne University Press) expressly denied the validity of the Kubler Ross typology in his Late Night Live interview (Australian ABC radio) with Philip Adams June 9th ’08. He said something to the effect that his mother had regarded her impending death as murder. My own experience with dying persons suggests that the human ego is extraordinarily resilient. I recall visiting a dying colleague in hospital just days before his death. He said, “I’m dying, I don’t like it but there’s nothing I can do about it”, and then went on to chortle about how senior academics at an Adelaide university had told him they were submitting his name for a the Order of Australia (the new “Knighthood” replacement in Australia). Falling in and out of lucid thought with an oxygen tube in his nostrils he was nevertheless still highly interested in the “vain glories of the world”. This observation to me seemed consistent with Rieff’s negative assessment of Kubler Ross’s theories.

THE AGED IN RELATION TO YOUNGER PEOPLE

The aged share with the young the same needs: However, the aged often have fewer or weaker resources to meet those needs. Their need for social interaction may be ignored by family and care workers.

Family should make time to visit their aged members and invite them to their homes. The aged like to visit children and relate to them through games and stories.

Meaningful relationships can be developed via foster-grandparent programs. Some aged are not aware of their income and health entitlements. Family and friends should take the time to explain these. Some aged are too proud to access their entitlements and this problem should be addressed in a kindly way where it occurs.

It is best that the aged be allowed as much choice as possible in matters related to living arrangements, social life and lifestyle.

Communities serving the aged need to provide for the aged via such things as lower curbing, and ramps.

Carers need to examine their own attitude to aging and dying. Denial in the carer is detected by the aged person and it can inhibit the aged person from expressing negative feelings – fear, anger. If the person can express these feelings to someone then that person is less likely to die with a sense of isolation and bitterness.

A METAPHYSICAL PERSPECTIVE

The following notes are my interpretation of a Dr. Depak Chopra lecture entitled, “The New Physics of Healing” which he presented to the 13th Scientific Conference of the American Holistic Medical Association. Dr. Depak Chopra is an endocrinologist and a former Chief of Staff of New England Hospital, Massachusetts. I am deliberately omitting the detail of his explanations of the more abstract, ephemeral and controversial ideas.

Original material from 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

In the lecture Dr. Chopra presents a model of the universe and of all organisms as structures of interacting centres of electromagnetic energy linked to each other in such a way that anything affecting one part of a system or structure has ramifications throughout the entire structure. This model becomes an analogue not only for what happens within the structure or organism itself, but between the organism and both its physical and social environments. In other words there is a correlation between psychological conditions, health and the aging process. Dr. Chopra in his lecture reconciles ancient Vedic (Hindu) philosophy with modern psychology and quantum physics.

Premature Precognitive Commitment: Dr. Chopra invokes experiments that have shown that flies kept for a long time in a jar do not quickly leave the jar when the top is taken off. Instead they accept the jar as the limit of their universe. He also points out that in India baby elephants are often kept tethered to a small twig or sapling. In adulthood when the elephant is capable of pulling over a medium sized tree it can still be successfully tethered to a twig! As another example he points to experiments in which fish are bred on

2 sides of a fish tank containing a divider between the 2 sides. When the divider is removed the fish are slow to learn that they can now swim throughout the whole tank but rather stay in the section that they accept as their universe. Other experiments have demonstrated that kittens brought up in an environment of vertical stripes and structures, when released in adulthood keep bumping into anything aligned horizontally as if they were unable to see anything that is horizontal. Conversely kittens brought up in an environment of horizontal stripes when released bump into vertical structures, apparently unable to see them.

The whole point of the above experiments is that they demonstrate Premature Precognitive Commitment. The lesson to be learned is that our sensory apparatus develops as a result of initial experience and how we’ve been taught to interpret it.

What is the real look of the world? It doesn’t exist. The way the world looks to us is determined by the sensory receptors we have and our interpretation of that look is determined by our premature precognitive commitments. Dr Chopra makes the point that less than a billionth of the available stimuli make it into our nervous systems. Most of it is screened, and what gets through to us is whatever we are expecting to find on the basis of our precognitive commitments.

Dr. Chopra also discusses the diseases that are actually caused by mainstream medical interventions, but this material gets too far away from my central intention. Dr. Chopra discusses in lay terms the physics of matter, energy and time by way of establishing the wider context of our existence. He makes the point that our bodies including the bodies of plants are mirrors of cosmic rhythms and exhibit changes correlating even with the tides.

Dr. Chopra cites the experiments of Dr. Herbert Spencer of the US National Institute of Health. He injected mice with Poly-IC, an immuno-stimulant while making the mice repeatedly smell camphor. After the effect of the Poly-IC had worn off he again exposed the mice to the camphor smell. The smell of camphor had the effect of causing the mice’s immune system to automatically strengthen as if they had been injected with the stimulant. He then took another batch of mice and injected them with cyclophosphamide which tends to destroy the immune system while exposing them to the smell of camphor. Later after being returned to normal just the smell of camphor was enough to cause destruction of their immune system. Dr. Chopra points out that whether or not camphor enhanced or destroyed the mice’s immune system was entirely determined by an interpretation of the meaning of the smell of camphor. The interpretation is not just in the brain but in each cell of the organism. We are bound to our imagination and our early experiences.

Chopra cites a study by the Massachusetts Dept of Health Education and Welfare into risk factors for heart disease – family history, cholesterol etc. The 2 most important risk factors were found to be psychological measures – Self  Happiness Rating and Job Satisfaction. They found most people died of heart disease on a Monday!

Chopra says that for every feeling there is a molecule. If you are experiencing tranquillity your body will be producing natural valium. Chemical changes in the brain are reflected by changes in other cells including blood cells. The brain produces neuropeptides and brain structures are chemically tuned to these neuropeptide receptors. Neuropeptides (neurotransmitters) are the chemical concommitants of thought. Chopra points out the white blood cells (a part of the immune system) have neuropeptide receptors and are “eavesdropping” on our thinking. Conversely the immune system produces its own neuropeptides which can influence the nervous system. He goes on to say that cells in all parts of the body including heart and kidneys for example also produce neuropeptides and neuropeptide sensitivity. Chopra assures us that most neurologists would agree that the nervous system and the immune system are parallel systems.

Other studies in physiology: The blood interlukin-2 levels of medical students decreased as exam time neared and their interlukin receptor capacities also lowered. Chopra says if we are having fun to the point of exhilaration our natural interlukin-2 levels become higher. Interlukin-2 is a powerful and very expensive anti-cancer drug. The body is a printout of consciousness. If we could change the way we look at our bodies at a genuine, profound level then our bodies would actually change.

On the subject of “time” Chopra cites Sir Thomas Gall and Steven Hawkins, stating that our description of the universe as having a past, present, and future are constructed entirely out of our interpretation of change. But in reality linear time doesn’t exist.

Chopra explains the work of Alexander Leaf a former Harvard Professor of Preventative Medicine who toured the world investigating societies where people  lived beyond 100 years (these included parts of Afghanistan, Soviet Georgia, Southern Andes). He looked at possible factors including climate, genetics, and diet. Leaf concluded the most important factor was the collective perception of aging in these societies.

Amongst the Tama Humara of the Southern Andes there was a collective belief that the older you got the more physically able you got. They had a tradition of running and the older one became then generally the better at running one got. The best runner was aged 60. Lung capacity and other measures actually improved with age. People were healthy until well into their 100s and died in their sleep. Chopra remarks that things have changed since the introduction of Budweiser (beer) and TV.

[DISCUSSION: How might TV be a factor in changing the former ideal state of things?]

Chopra refers to Dr. Ellen Langor a former Harvard Psychology professor’s work. Langor advertised for 100 volunteers aged over 70 years. She took them to a Monastery outside Boston to play “Let’s Pretend”. They were divided into 2 groups each of which resided in a different part of the building. One group, the control group spent several days talking about the 1950s. The other group, the experimental group had to live as if in the year 1959 and talk about it in the present tense. What appeared on their TV screens were the old newscasts and movies. They read old newspapers and magazines of the period. After 3 days everyone was photographed and the photographs judged by independent judges who knew nothing of the nature of the experiment. The experimental group seemed to have gotten younger in appearance. Langor then arranged for them to be tested for 100 physiological parameters of aging which included of course blood pressure, near point vision and DHEA levels. After 10 days of living as if in 1959 all parameters had reversed by the equivalent of at least 20 years.

Chopra concludes from Langor’s experiment: “We are the metabolic end product of our sensory experiences. How we interpret them depends on the collective mindset which influences individual biological entropy and aging.”

Can one escape the current collective mindset and reap the benefits in longevity and health? Langor says, society won’t let you escape. There are too many reminders of how most people think linear time is and how it expresses itself in entropy and aging – men are naughty at 40 and on social welfare at 55, women reach menopause at 40 etc. We get to see so many other people aging and dying that it sets the pattern that we follow.

Chopra concludes we are the metabolic product of our sensory experience and our interpretation gets structured in our biology itself. Real change comes from change in the collective consciousness – otherwise it cannot occur within the individual.

Readings

Chopra, D. The New Physics of Healing. 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

Coleman, J. C. Abnormal psychology and modern life. Scott Foresman & Co.

Lugo, J. and Hershey, L. Human development a multidisciplinary approach to the psychology of individual growth, NY, Macmillan.

Dennis. Psychology of human behaviour for nurses. Lond. W. B.Saunders.

[http://www.psychologynatural.com/DepressionBroch.html]

Dr. Victor Barnes is an Adelaide psychologist and hypnotherapist. He has also had three decades of experience in adult education including serving as Dean of a Sri Lankan college (ICBT) teaching several Australian degrees. His overseas experience includes studies and consulting experience in USA, PNG, Poland and Sri Lanka.

Immunize Nevada – Nevada Senior Guide

November 4, 2014 by · Comments Off on Immunize Nevada – Nevada Senior Guide
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Reno 

www.immunizenevada.org

NSG_NovDecJan_2015-16_Web-38

 

Immunize Nevada Reminds Nevadans: It’s Time to Get your Flu Vaccine

 

Reno, Nev. (October 15, 2015) – October 4 was significant for an inauspicious reason, according to the Centers for Disease Control – it marked the date the CDC officially began tracking cases of the flu.

 

“Seasonal flu vaccines are your best protection against getting flu,” said Heidi Parker, executive director of Immunize Nevada. “Everyone 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine every year. The flu vaccine can literally save your life or the life of someone you love. Getting vaccinated not only protects you, but also those in our community who are vulnerable — like children and seniors.”

 

Nevadans are increasingly seeing flu vaccine reminders at local pharmacies, and family doctors/pediatricians are now reminding patients to get themselves and their children vaccinated.

 

These are valid reminders. Because while some think flu is akin to a “bad cold,” it’s something altogether different — and far more serious.

 

CDC Chief Thomas Frieden spoke during a National Foundation for Infectious Diseases press conference Sept. 17, noting that the 2014-2015 season had the highest hospitalization rate among seniors ever documented.

 

And so far this year, the new vaccine formulation appears to be a good match for the infection.

 

“The [strains] that are causing very early disease are exactly as predicted, and it looks to me like the vaccine is going to be well protective,” Dr. William Schaffner, infectious disease specialist at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and the past president of the NFID, said at the press conference.

 

To emphasize the gravity of flu, the CDC and flu.gov ask people to keep a few facts and figures in:

 

  • More than 200,000 Americans are hospitalized and thousands die every year from the influenza virus.
  • During the 2014-2015 flu season, 146 pediatric deaths were reported from 40 states; that number is typically closer to 100.
  • Eight pediatric deaths occurred in Nevada during the 2014-2015 flu season.
  • Flu causes 38 million lost school days and 111 million lost workdays a year, resulting in more than $7 billion in lost wages.
  • About 20,000 children under 5 are hospitalized each year from the flu.
  • The median age of children who died from the flu virus from January 2014-June 2015 was 5.9 years old.

 

“This is not just a bad cold or headache,” Parker said. “Flu can — and does — kill.”

 

Flu vaccination, either by shot or nasal spray, is your best chance at not getting the flu, and Parker adds that Nevada has many options for no-cost flu vaccinations. Additionally, Immunize Nevada has a convenient interactive widget on its website, www.influencenevada.org; the “Flu Vaccine Finder” allows you to input your zip code, generating a list of locations nearby offering flu vaccine.

 

And according to the CDC, people should be vaccinated against flu as soon as possibly after vaccine becomes available — ideally by October.

 

“It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body and provide protection against the flu,” notes the CDC’s website.

 

But what if you do contract flu?

 

Flu symptoms include:

 

  • A fever of 100 degrees or higher
  • A cough and/or sore throat
  • A runny or stuffy nose
  • Headaches and/or body aches
  • Chills
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea, vomiting and/or diarrhea

 

CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or other necessities.

Prevention Is Our Mission: We are a diverse partnership of individuals, businesses and organizations committed to improving and protecting the health of children, teens, adults & seniors in Nevada. Our mission is to promote health & prevent the incidence of vaccine preventable diseases in Nevada through community partnerships & education.

Immunize Nevada is a statewide network of individuals, businesses, public health entities and organizations committed to improving and protecting the health of children, teens, adults and seniors in Nevada.

Established in 1995 as a small group of citizens concerned about Nevada’s immunization rate being the lowest in the country, Immunize Nevada now consists of more than 100 members working together to help improve the health of Nevadans through vaccination awareness, outreach and education.

We help keep Nevadans healthy and educated about immunizations. Some of our responsibilities include:

  • Supporting healthcare professionals by providing education opportunities, conferences, office tools and incentives.
  • Collaborating with regional, state and national partners to develop immunization projects and programs.
  • Serving as an expert resource to community members.
  • Providing outreach and education about the benefits of immunizing and the risks of not doing so.
  • Advocating for pro-immunization policies.

Learn more about Immunize Nevada’s evolution from a small grassroots organization, to an award winning, statewide immunization coalition.

Task Force evidence reviews suggests that one-time screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms could benefit older men

January 28, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

A one-time screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in men 65 years or older is associated with decreased AAA rupture and AAA-related mortality rates, according to a new review being published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

AAA is a weakening in the wall of the infrarenal aorta resulting in localized dilation, or ballooning, of the abdominal aorta. A large proportion of AAAs are asymptomatic until a rupture develops, which is generally acute and often fatal (up to 83 percent of patients die before hospitalization). Risk factors for AAA include advanced age, male sex, smoking, and a family history, with smoking being the most important modifiable risk factor.

The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) reviewed published evidence to update its previous recommendation on screening for AAA. The reviewers found convincing evidence that screening men aged 65 and older decreased AAA-related mortality rates by approximately 50 percent over 13 to 15 years. Determining the most effective and efficient approaches to population-based AAA screening was an important goal of the review.

Continue reading here:  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/271716.php

Living with diabetes? Watch your mouth!

January 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

11723Living with diabetes? Watch your mouth!

 

(Family Features)  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people with diabetes are two times more likely to develop gum disease. In fact, about one-third of people with diabetes have severe gum disease.

 

Why are those with diabetes more vulnerable to gum disease? High blood glucose levels impair the body’s ability to heal from oral infections and uncontrolled diabetes can make treating gum disease more difficult, according to the American Diabetes Association. The Association is joining with Colgate to launch a new “Watch Your Mouth!” campaign to help raise awareness surrounding the often over-looked link between oral health and diabetes. Here are some tips to help you live well with diabetes:

 

  • Watch your mouth! Begin to develop healthy oral care habits, like brushing, flossing and visiting the dentist regularly. Research shows that brushing twice a day with Colgate Total toothpaste can help improve gum health in as little as four weeks.*
  • Don’t miss out on your favorite foods. Just eat healthier versions that everyone in your family can enjoy. Making simple substitutions to most dishes can help increase nutritional value, while not sacrificing on taste.
  • Use the right tools. Stay organized with a journal large enough to keep your diet, exercise, goals and health information together. Keep a week’s worth of prescriptions in one place with a handy pill case.
  • Know your risks. The American Diabetes Association lists the common risk factors for diabetes as being 45 or older, being overweight, not exercising regularly, having high blood pressure and being a part of certain racial and ethnic groups.
  • Visit your dentist. While your doctor and certified diabetes educator play an important role in helping with your diabetes, so does your dentist. If you don’t see a private-practice dentist, you can visit dental schools that provide services at a fraction of the cost to help you keep your mouth healthy.

 

For more expert tips and information, visit www.OralHealthAndDiabetes.com.

 

*Results improve with continued twice daily use, as shown in 6 month clinical studies of the general population.

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

American Red Cross Advancing Health Options in Southern Nevada

January 22, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

dr-john-lunettaDr. John Lunetta, D.O. arrived in Las Vegas more than a year ago to help with the American Red Cross Blood Services regional expansion. For decades, the Red Cross blood supply in Southern Nevada came from other areas of the country, mostly from Idaho, Montana and Utah. But over the course of the last year and a half, the team has grown the program of blood collection to that of supplying nine of the area’s 14 hospitals.

 

But Dr. Lunetta’s presence here makes this program so much more than a simple blood collection service. Licensed to practice in seven western states, and eight of our local hospitals, Dr. Lunetta assists local doctors when they have questions about using Red Cross blood products. Transfusion recommendations to find the most compatible blood or questions about reactions to transfusions are all topics on which Dr. Lunetta can speak.

 

Dr. Lunetta also brings with him the latest in patient blood management education. His contemporary approach allows local doctors to, when appropriate; use less product resulting in less risk to patients.

 

But there are additional American Red Cross Blood Services here in Las Vegas not available in some other regions known as clinical services. With the medical equipment and the skilled nurses that work with Dr. Lunetta, Clinical Services can offer one-on-one patient contact delivering care through an apheresis machine, which uses centrifugal force to separate blood into its constituent components. This is a method used in the treatment of leukemia patients, sickle cell patients, and a large number of neurologic and oncology patients. Dr. Lunetta also oversees treatments involving some new technology using extracorporeal photopheresis, or ECP. In layman’s terms, it’s like a tanning bed for your blood.  Due to Dr. Lunetta’s expertise, some area patients will soon be able to receive treatment here that they could only get in California previously.  It’s used to treat patients who suffer from Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma in which the skin is attacked by the patient’s own T-cells. The treatment calms those cells down and the skin begins to heal. An average patient needs to receive 150 – 300 procedures once every two weeks.  Another more common use of this treatment is for patients who have graft vs. host disease; usually as a result of a bone marrow transplant, or other organ transplant such as lung or heart.

 

Many more procedures and innovations are in the pipeline that Dr. Lunetta and his staff may be able to offer in the future and the Red Cross is pushing the development of new ways in which Blood Services can help in our community. From his involvement with donors at blood drives to his work with patients who get the blood transfused, Dr. Lunetta is involved every step of the way.

 

Dr. Lunetta is available for interviews for print, online, radio and television. Well-spoken and with a talent to break complex medical ideas down into language that we can all understand, Dr. Lunetta is a delightful guest and talented subject matter expert.

 

To book Dr. Lunetta, or to interview him on his range of expertise, please contact the office of Lloyd Ziel at the contact below.

 

Lloyd Ziel

Public Information Officer | Communications and Public Affairs

 

American Red Cross

Southern Nevada Chapter

1771 E. Flamingo Rd. Suite 206-B

Las Vegas, NV 89119

702-232-6604 cl

702-369-3351 of

702-791-3372 fx

Lloyd.Ziel@redcross.org

www.redcross.org/southernnevada

Staying Safe on the Road: Senior Driving Guide

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Learn the challenges that may keep older adults off the road and find tips for staying safe behind the wheel

According to a recent study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, drivers in their mid- to late-80s have lower overall crash rates than drivers in their early 20s and roughly half as many crashes as teenagers—making them among the safest drivers on the road.

However, fatal crash rates skyrocket for drivers ages 85 and older. In “The Guide to Driving Safety for Older Drivers” from MySilverAge.com, Jake Nelson, AAA director of traffic safety advocacy and research in Washington, D.C., says it’s important to understand what health factors can compromise safe driving. If senior drivers have ongoing limitations that could put them or their passengers at risk, they may want to reconsider their capacity to continue driving.

Older drivers should evaluate how the following factors affect their driving ability:

  • Vision. How well a driver can see accounts for about 90 percent of his or her ability to drive safely. Weak visual aptitude can be measured by an inability to read signs, street markings, or to see other cars and pedestrians in low-light conditions.
  • Mobility. Loss of strength, coordination and flexibility can make it challenging to control a vehicle. Mobility difficulties may also be signaled by pain and discomfort performing daily activities as well as arthritis in the neck and shoulders.
  • Behavior. Trouble remembering familiar routes, anxiety or confusion while driving, or problems distinguishing the gas from the brake pedal are causes for immediate concern.

For a complete list of driving safety tips, including information on driver improvement courses, new driving technologies and alternate modes of transportation, download the driving guide for seniors.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

Study Shows that People Who Undergo Cataract Surgery to Correct Visual Impairment Live Longer

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Australian researchers find a 40 percent lower mortality risk among patients who had their vision corrected through the procedure  

SAN FRANCISCO – Sept. 4, 2013 – People with cataract-related vision loss who have had cataract surgery to improve their sight are living longer than those with visual impairment who chose not to have the procedure, according to an Australian cohort study published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. After comparing the two groups, the researchers found a 40 percent lower long-term mortality risk in those who had the surgery.

The research is drawn from data gathered in the Blue Mountains Eye Study, a population-based cohort study of vision and common eye diseases in an older Australian population. A total of 354 persons aged 49 years and older and diagnosed with cataract-related vision impairment –  some of whom had undergone surgery and others who had not – were assessed between 1992 and 2007. Adjustments were made for age and gender as well as a number of mortality risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, smoking, cardiovascular disease, body mass index and measures of frailty and comorbid disease. Follow-up visits took place after five and ten years since the baseline exam.

Previous research had indicated that older persons with visual impairment were likely to have greater mortality risk than their age peers with normal vision, and that cataract surgery might reduce this risk. These studies – unlike the Blue Mountains Eye Study – compared people who had undergone cataract surgery with those in the general population or with those who had not had cataract surgery, and did not link vision status to the surgical status.

“Our finding complements the previously documented associations between visual impairment and increased mortality among older persons,” said Jie Jin Wang, Ph.D., of the Westmead Millennium Institute and one of lead researchers of the study. “It suggests to ophthalmologists that correcting cataract patients’ visual impairment in their daily practice results in improved outcomes beyond that of the eye and vision, and has important impacts on general health.”

The association between correction of cataract-related visual impairment and reduced mortality risk is not clearly understood, but plausible factors may include improvements in physical and emotional well-being, optimism, greater confidence associated with independent living after vision improvement, as well as greater ability to comply with prescription medications.

Dr. Wang noted one limitation of the study is that participants with cataract-related visual impairment who did not have cataract surgery could have had other health problems that prevented them from undergoing surgery, and that these other health problems could partly explain the poorer survival among non-surgical participants. This issue is addressed by the researchers in a subsequent study.

Caused by the clouding of the lens, cataract is a leading cause of treatable visual impairment that will affect more than half of all Americans by the time they are 80 years old.[1]  Surgical removal of the opaque lens with an artificial lens implanted is a successful procedure of cataract treatment. If completing everyday tasks is difficult, cataract surgery should be discussed with an ophthalmologist − a medical doctor specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

Seniors who are seeking eye care but are concerned about cost may qualify for EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, which offers eye exams and care at no out-of-pocket cost to qualifying seniors age 65 and older. Learn more at www.eyecareamerica.org. For more information on cataracts and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology 
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons — Eye M.D.s — with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who has the education and training to treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trusted and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

About Ophthalmology
Ophthalmology, the official journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, publishes original, peer-reviewed, clinically applicable research. Topics include the results of clinical trials, new diagnostic and surgical techniques, treatment methods technology assessments, translational science reviews and editorials.

AARP Report Highlights Need for Innovative Long-Term Care for the Aging Baby Boomer Population; Japan’s Technological Secrets May Hold the Answers

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

A newly published AARP report illustrates a profound demographic shift that will have consequences for decades to come, particularly in the senior living and long-term care industry. Baby boomers are entering their retirement years, while the ratio of potential family caregivers to those who require long-term services and support is beginning to drop. Fewer available caregivers will mean the senior living industry must rapidly adapt to a surging market. The AARP’s full report is available here: http://bit.ly/156phYi

Family caregiving is a low-cost but often burdensome approach to elder care. Becoming a primary caregiver often involves leaving behind a career, among other sacrifices. Plus, these well-intentioned caregivers may not have the expertise necessary to provide the level of care needed by an aged parent. Adults in these roles often feel enormous pressure and stress, sometimes even resentment. At any rate, the nation’s changing demographics will make today’s family caregiving situation far different in the near future.

Between 1990 and 2010, there were about 7 potential caregivers for every one person aged 80-plus. That ratio is at the start of a freefall that will force society to change the way it cares for its elderly members. By 2030, the ratio of caregivers to elderly will be 4 to 1. All remaining baby boomers will have reached their years of highest risk (80+) by 2050, when the caregiver ratio will have plummeted still further to 3 to 1.

Kevin Williams, president of SeniorMarketing.com, suggests innovative thinking will be required to bridge this care gap: “Naturally, with fewer family caregivers available, the responsibility will largely shift to senior living communities, care agencies and already overextended government programs. But it will take more than simply building more communities or training more staff—assuming an adequate number of candidates are even available. Technological innovation may be the silver bullet to raise the standard of living for aging boomers, improve efficiency, and reduce costs.”

The nation of Japan, which has the greatest life expectancy and one of the oldest average populations in the world, has recently experienced a demographic transition of its own. Recently, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare put out a call for 2 million new professional caregivers, but only received 1.3 million eligible candidates. With low birth rates being the norm, that shortfall will only increase. A tech-savvy society to begin with, the Japanese have embraced robotics and automation as a solution to the elder care issue. Motorized, assistive devices can help older individuals perform tasks themselves, while automated pill dispensers can prevent dangerous medication mistakes. A recent blog post on The Economist explained Japan’s inventive approach to the elder care dilemma: http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2013/05/automation-elderly

Williams concluded: “This demographic shift is a great challenge but also a great opportunity. Forward-thinking, entrepreneurs will be leading the way in this new environment. Technology to assist with daily tasks, provide medical care, monitor, and connect seniors to loved ones is advancing at a faster pace every year. It’s not unreasonable to predict that the future will witness even better care for our future seniors.”

About SeniorMarketing.com

Baltimore-based SeniorMarketing.com was created with twin goals in mind. First, the company helps connect caregivers and seniors with local, affordable care options. Second, the company increases income for senior living communities and health care agencies.

Contact:

Kevin M. Williams, President
SeniorMarketing.com
5024 Campbell Blvd., Suite D-3
Baltimore, MD 21236
Phone: 1-888-523-3311

Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Actor Lee Majors Joins Flu + You Campaign to Raise Awareness of Risks of Flu for People 65 and Older

National Council on Aging Launches Second Year of Education Program for Older Adults and Those Who Care for Them Aimed at Helping to Protect More Older Adults from the Flu

Actor Lee Majors, best known for his iconic roles on The Big Valley, The Fall Guy, and The Six Million Dollar Man, is joining the National Council on Aging (NCOA) Flu + You program to help protect older adults from influenza (commonly known as “the flu”). Flu + You aims to inform adults 65 and older, their caregivers, and those who care about them, about the dangers of the flu, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options.

As a part of his involvement in the Flu + You campaign, Majors will appear in a public service announcement (PSA) that follows him as he embarks on an important and action-packed mission: learning about his vaccine options and getting vaccinated against the flu. The PSA will educate the public about the increased risk of flu in adults 65 years of age and older and the importance of knowing your vaccine options and getting a flu vaccine, even for tough guys like Majors.

Every year in the United States, roughly nine out of 10 flu-related deaths and more than six out of 10 flu-related hospitalizations occur in people 65 and older. Older adults are at a greater risk for flu due, in part, to the weakening of the immune system that typically occurs with age. This means that no matter how healthy or youthful we feel, as we age we become more vulnerable to the flu and its related complications.

“The CDC recommends an annual flu vaccine as the single best way to protect yourself from the flu, yet a third of people 65 and older still don’t get vaccinated,” said Richard Birkel, PhD, MPA, NCOA Senior Vice President for Healthy Aging and Director of NCOA’s Self-Management Alliance. “As NCOA continues to educate older adults about the flu and the potential severity of the illness, we hope to encourage more people to protect themselves and their loved ones by getting an annual flu shot.”

The flu vaccine offers the best defense to protect against the flu, and adults 65 years of age and older have several vaccine options. In addition to the traditional flu vaccine (which helps protect against three strains of the flu virus), there is also a quadrivalent vaccine (which helps protect against four strains), and a higher dose vaccine that was designed specifically for adults 65 and older. By improving the production of antibodies in older patients, the higher dose vaccine can provide a stronger immune response to the flu than traditional vaccines. All flu vaccines are covered as a Medicare Part B benefit, which means there is no copay for Medicare beneficiaries 65 years of age and older.

“I get the flu shot every year and encourage my peers to do the same – it’s a simple step you can take to protect yourself from the flu,” says actor Lee Majors.  “I urge everyone 65 years of age and older to talk to their health care provider about their vaccine options this flu season.”

The flu can make existing health conditions worse, and it is especially dangerous for people with lung disease, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer—conditions that commonly affect older adults. Nationwide, 86 percent of adults 65 years of age and older have at least one chronic health condition and approximately 66 percent of Medicare beneficiaries have two or more chronic conditions, putting them at increased risk of the flu and flu-related complications, which can be severe and include hospitalization and even death.

For more facts about flu, and to order free educational materials, including a brochure and fact sheet, visit www.ncoa.org/Flu.

About Flu + You
Flu + You is a national public education initiative, from the National Council on Aging with support from Sanofi Pasteur, to educate adults 65 years and older about the dangers of the influenza virus, the importance of annual vaccination, and available vaccine options. Older adults and their caregivers can learn more on the Flu + You website, www.ncoa.org/Flu, which features a public service announcement with Lee Majors and facts about the flu. Also available on the website is a calendar of Flu + You events that will be held in 12 cities throughout the United States in September and October. At the events, older adults will have the opportunity to learn more about their risks for flu and available vaccine options, as well as talk to a health care provider and receive a flu vaccination.

About NCOA
The National Council on Aging is a nonprofit service and advocacy organization headquartered in Washington, DC. NCOA is a national voice for millions of older adults—especially those who are vulnerable and disadvantaged—and the community organizations that serve them. It brings together nonprofit organizations, businesses, and government to develop creative solutions that improve the lives of all older adults. NCOA works with thousands of organizations across the country to help seniors find jobs and benefits, improve their health, live independently, and remain active in their communities. For more information, please visit:

www.NCOA.org | www.facebook.com/NCOAging | www.twitter.com/NCOAging

 

CONTACT: Dana Kinker, (212) 301-7181, dkinker@wcgworld.com

Protect your Winter Landscape from Hungry Wildlife

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Protect your Winter Landscape from Hungry Wildlife
by gardening expert Melinda Myers

There’s no doubt that managing critters in the landscape can be a challenge especially as food supplies start to dwindle. If you are battling with rabbits, deer, groundhogs or other wildlife, don’t let down your guard as the growing season begins to wind down.

Be proactive. Start before they get into the habit of dining on your landscape. It is easier to keep them away than break the dining habit.

Fence them out. Fencing is the best defense against most wildlife.  A four feet tall fence around a small garden will keep out rabbits.  Secure the bottom tight to the ground or bury it several inches to prevent rabbits and voles from crawling underneath.  Or fold the bottom of the fence outward, making sure it’s tight to the ground. Animals tend not to crawl under when the bottom skirt faces away from the garden.

Go deeper, at least 12 to 18 inches, if you are trying to discourage woodchucks. And make sure the gate is secure. Many hungry animals have found their way into the garden through openings around and under the gate.

A five foot fence around small garden areas can help safeguard your plantings against hungry deer. Some gardeners report success surrounding their garden with fishing line mounted on posts at one and three foot heights.

Break out the repellents. Homemade and commercial repellents can be used.  Apply before the animals start feeding and reapply as directed. Consider using a natural product like Messina’s Animal Stopper (www.Messinas.com). It is made of herbs, safe to use and smells good.

Scare ‘em away. Blow up owls, clanging pans, rubber snakes, slivers of deodorant soap, handfuls of human hair and noise makers are scare tactics that have been used by gardeners for years. Consider your environment when selecting a tactic. Urban animals are used to the sound and smell of people.  Alternate scare tactics for more effective control.  The animals won’t be afraid of a snake that hasn’t moved in weeks.

Combine tactics. Use a mix of fencing, scare tactics and repellents.  Keep monitoring for damage. If there are enough animals and they are hungry, they will eat just about anything.

Don’t forget about nature.  Welcome hawks and fox into your landscape. Using less pesticides and tolerating some critters, their food source, will encourage them to visit your yard. These natural pest controllers help keep the garden-munching critters under control.

And most importantly, don’t give up.  A bit of persistence, variety and adaptability is the key to success.  Investing some time now will not only deter existing critters from dining in your landscape, but will also reduce the risk of animals moving in next season.
Gardening expert, TV/radio host, author & columnist Melinda Myers has more than 30 years of horticulture experience and has written over 20 gardening books, including Can’t Miss Small Space Gardening. She hosts The Great Courses “How to Grow Anything” DVD series and the nationally syndicated Melinda’s Garden Moment segments. Myers is also a columnist and contributing editor for Birds & Blooms magazine. Myers’ web site, www.melindamyers.com, offers gardening videos, podcasts, and garden tips. 

Fraudbuster Reports from Fraud Protection Network Can Protect Senior Citizens from Financial Losses

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Fraudbuster Reports from Fraud Protection Network Can Protect Senior Citizens from Financial Losses

New services are designed to offer added protections for the vulnerable senior citizen market and will provide guidance and help for these at-risk individuals.

The launch of Fraudbuster Reports by leading consumer and investor protection services firm Fraud Protection Network (FPN) is designed to help senior citizens avoid falling prey to common scams and fraudulent schemes in the consumer marketplace. Due to the prevalence of these types of crimes, the National Council on Aging has called scams that target seniors “the crime of the 21st Century.” FPN’s full line of services can provide guidance and support for older individuals and couples in avoiding fraudulent transactions and protecting themselves against financial scammers.

 

Each year, older Americans lose billions of dollars to sham investments, dishonest commercial transactions and outright scams.

  • Major insurer MetLife estimates that individuals over 60 years of age experienced losses of nearly $3 billion due to scams, frauds and sham investments in 2010. This represents a 10 percent increase over similar loses in 2009.
  • According to research performed by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, the average amount lost by senior citizens to these fraudulent transactions is $141,000.
  • Figures released by the Federal Trade Commission indicate that older Americans lose an estimated $35 million each year trying to claim fake lottery and sweepstakes prizes.

Senior citizens may be especially vulnerable to certain types of fraud that include the following tactics:

  • Healthcare scams that bill insurers for services not rendered or not needed
  • Counterfeit prescription medications that can actually harm patients when used as directed
  • Fake lottery and sweepstakes prizes that solicit a small advance cash payment to claim a much larger sum
  • Reverse mortgages from disreputable or unknown companies

These fraudulent schemes are among the most common scams that target senior citizens in the U.S. The Fraudbuster Reports service can be used to check out any company that offers services or provides investment opportunities for senior citizens. Fraudbuster Reports from FPN can be used to obtain a wide range of data on potential investments and retirement plans:

Protections for Consumers:

  • Comprehensive identity and background checks on businesses that target the senior citizen market, especially medical insurance plans, reverse mortgage offers and online prescription medication companies
  • Assessment and evaluation of online complaints to verify their credibility
  • Licensing checks to ensure proper federal and state credentials and business licenses
  • Contact with listed corporate references to ensure the authenticity of companies that offer services to older individuals

Senior citizens also receive personalized services from their own personal account executive to streamline the investigative process and ensure a comfortable working relationship.

Protections for Investors:

  • Due diligence investigations that identify primary stockholders and officers for companies and that disclose liens, judgments, pending charges and bankruptcies
  • In-depth evaluation of all information provided to senior citizens regarding the investment opportunities
  • Previous and current employment histories for company officers and board members
  • License checks for brokers to ensure appropriate state and federal licensing and to identify any areas of concern in the brokerage history
  • Reference checks and financial data for brokers and investment advisors
  • Investor protections also include all features available in the consumer protection tier

FPN does not evaluate the likely profitability of investments. However, the services rendered by FPN can help senior citizens avoid fraudulent investment schemes that offer no chance of financial gain.

To promote these new services and the launch of Fraudbuster Reports, FPN has begun a major media push that includes advertising spots on major networks that include CNBC, Fox News, Fox Business, MSNBC, CNN and CNN Headline News and Bloomberg TV. The commercial can also be viewed online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ocieWK1hDq8.

About Fraud Protection Network:
Since its founding in 2012, FPN has provided advanced investigative services to help clients avoid being taken in by scammers and fraudulent companies. Because senior citizens are especially vulnerable to these dishonest schemes, FPN provides an exceptional range of services that are specifically designed to prevent scammers from preying on older Americans. The newly released Fraudbuster Reports products will offer even more protection for these at-risk individuals and can ensure a brighter financial future for senior citizens.

Contact:
Fraud Protection Network
Raul Martinez, COO
raulm@fraudprotectionnetworkinc.com
855-203-0683
www.fraudprotectionnetworkinc.com

Video with caption: “Fraud Protection Network TV Ads.” Video available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ocieWK1hDq8

Columbus Travel Insurance For Senior Citizens by Lee Jacksonlee

September 4, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

perfect-travel-insurance-product

Majority of the senior citizens nowadays opt for insurance whenever they plan for any trips, especially when traveling abroad. It does not matter whether they are experienced travelers or have been waiting for the journey of a lifetime, they would still want to have a safe and enjoyable trip. Moreover, senior citizens and the rest of the people would like to travel with a peaceful mind, knowing that any misfortunes along the way would be well taken care of with minimum distractions.

As a matter of fact, most senior citizens are covered with health insurance at home. So it makes it even more sensible to be safely protected with travel insurance while they are away from home. Where health is concerned, irregardless of how fit and healthy you are, you cannot afford to take the risk of not being insured. The reason being, in the event of any sicknesses or accidents, the medical expenses incurred will be very costly, especially if require hospitalization.

Depending on your destination, less developed countries with unfamiliar and perhaps unhygienic food may be hazardous to health, what more with poor quality drinking water…! The climate may also be another factor contributing to health problems, especially when there is a drastic change in temperature. Besides the issue of health, there are other types of mishaps too, such as flight cancellation, lost luggage or personal belongings, delayed flights, thefts and even accidents.

There are many insurance agencies available online with competitive prices. Some rates provided are more lucrative and affordable than the others so it is wise to scout around for better deals. In fact, there is a variety of comprehensive coverage specially catered to meet the requirements and demands of consumers, namely backpacker and adventure travel insurance, pre-existing medical insurance, business insurance, single and group insurance.

Generally, a customer oriented company will pride themselves on providing quick, efficient and hassle-free service. So go ahead and enjoy your golden years by seeing the world. Travel extensively but do it only under the protection of insurance. Ensure to obtain an adequate coverage to give you and your loved ones peace of mind. Then you can “stop worrying about the potholes in the road and celebrate the journey”… as quoted by Fitzhugh Mullan.

So if your parents want enjoy their vocation with good memories, seek travel insurance from Columbus travel insurance. By doing so, you are not just securing your trip from any unforeseen events but also for a surely wonderful vacation with affordable best travel insurance

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lee_Jacksonlee

Healthy Eating – 5 Dietary Requirements For Senior Citizens by Christine Abbate

August 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Healthy eating, whether as a child or senior citizen is a vital part of a healthy and active lifestyle. Your nutritional needs are pretty much the same at 40, 50, 60 and beyond as they were when you were younger–with some minor variations. As we grow older, our bodies becomes less forgiving, and we will have to make more of an effort to eat well and stay fit.

Here are 5 Dietary Requirements for Senior Citizens:

1. Exercise:
Studies of the elderly indicate that current weight, rather than age, determined energy intake in men and women. The study suggests that changes in lifestyle, not age, resulted in the dietary changes seen in the healthy elderly survey. As you mature, your body will loose muscle mass, decreasing your metabolic rate, which in turn burns fewer calories at a slower rate. A great way to maintain control of your maturing body is to exercise regularly and eat healthy meals in moderation.

2. Eat More Fiber:
Maintaining a regular cycle of all systems in our bodies is very important. Fiber helps maintain regularity to prevent constipation and gastrointestinal diseases like divertculosis (pouches that cause spasm or cramping in the large intestines). You may also want to be extremely selective in your diet and not include gaseous foods.

3. Eat More Calcium:
Around 40 years old, our bones start to lose more minerals quicker than it can replace them. For women, menopause causes a drop in estrogen levels, estrogen helps bones maintain calcium. Menopause is responsible for a greater loss of calcium than in men. You should discuss with your physician a dietary supplement to ensure you are properly maintaining your body.

4. Water:
Water is essential from birth throughout life. It is critical to health-and is chronically overlooked. Second only to air in its steady and relentless necessity, H2O carries nutrients to cells; aids digestion by contributing to stomach secretions; flushes bodily wastes and reduces risk of kidney stones by diluting salts in the urine; ensures healthy function of moisture-rich organs (skin, eyes, mouth, nose); lubricates and cushions joints; regulates body temperature; and protects against heat exhaustion through perspiration. And the list goes on and on. Everybody should consume the minimum eight glasses of water daily to maintain our youthful vigor and pep.

5. Avoid Foods With Too Much Sugar:
Too much sugar causes a number of problems- it suppresses the immune system, weakens eyesight, contributes to obesity and diabetes, causes constipation, leads to all different types of cancers, and the list goes on and on about the effects of sugar intake. Young and old should never binge on sugar.

Eating well can make us feel a lot better. It gives us more energy – and it can actually help slow down the aging process!

Assisted Living New York

http://LakeShoreLI.com/

The Lake Shore Assisted Living Facility, located on beautiful Lake Ronkonkoma in Long Island, New York has been providing seniors with assisted living care, delicious dining, friendly services and award-winning recreational programs for many years.

Submitted by Christine at NewSunSEO Inc.
http://NewSunSEO.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Christine_Abbate

Fullfilling Your Dreams, As a Senior Citizen by Eva Fry

August 12, 2013 by · Comments Off on Fullfilling Your Dreams, As a Senior Citizen by Eva Fry
Filed under: Articles 

Senior-Citizen-Health-Care

Today there are 30 million seniors. In 2030 there will be 70 million. The senior years can be an opportunity to fulfill dreams. Think of how happy those 70 million seniors will be if they believe they still have time to live their dreams. Think of how much happier and better our world will be when it is filled with people who are productive, doing good and living fulfilled lives, in their latter-years.

When we were young, we each had dreams of what we wanted to do with our life. Unfortunately many of us have never realized those dreams.

Why? We may have had parents who didn’t provide the opportunities we needed, when we were young. We may have married young, had children and the responsibilities of life took over. Before we knew, it we were seniors and believed we were too old to live our dreams.

I’m happy to report I am not one of those who live with regret or wish they had done more with their lives. Today, I am 67 years old and I am living my dreams.

I had three dreams when I was a young girl. My first, to be married, have children, and be a good mother with a happy family. My second, to be an entertainer and my third dream was to be a missionary.

Thankfully I have accomplished all three of my dreams and I’m starting on new ones.

My husband and I have been married for 48 years. We have three wonderful grown children and nine grandchildren. Why was this dream so important to me? My father was alcoholic and my mother emotionally ill. My childhood was sad and troubled. I desperately wanted a happy family like some of my friends. I was blessed to have that dream come true because I worked hard to make it come true.

Through the years, I never forgot my dreams to become an entertainer and a missionary. I just put them on hold. These dreams took a long time coming, but today my dreams have come true.

How have I accomplished my long-awaited dreams, in my senior years?

Change is the answer! Life doesn’t always stay the same. One door to our life may close but a new door always opens and we must be ready for it. When my children grew up and started their own lives, it left me in an empty nest. I was smart enough to use it as a launching pad to direct me toward my life-long dreams. I now had time to pursue them.

It began with me going back to college and taking a speech class. I took it to overcome my shyness and to learn to be more outgoing to I would have a chance at being an entertainer. You must know that I had no musical training and could not play an instrument so I had big dreams.

The class was a big step toward my dreams. I discovered I was a pretty good speaker and was asked to be on the college speech team. I traveled all over the USA competing with my speeches with intelligent teenagers. It was so much fun and I won a national speaking award. I joined Toastmasters and became president of my club. I took a stand-up comedy class. For many years I spoke for Mother’s Against Drunk Driving, because I had been a victim of a drunk driver when I was a teenager. These all helped me gain confidence in myself and encouraged me to see what I could do as an entertainer.

I began to learn words to old songs and entered a talent contest for the city of San Diego and won another award. For several years now, I have been the master of ceremonies for the same talent show and for their variety show at the San Diego Fair.

At the age of 60 I began entertaining at senior residences and to learn to play the piano and guitar. I began to write my own music. I have produced 60 songs and had my music played on 150 radio stations. For several years now I have entertained with my own show using my own music at many functions.

I feel I have actually accomplished my second dream to become an entertainer. I wrote a book to encourage others to do the same called “You Must Have a Dream.”

Accomplishing my third dream, to become a missionary, has been a wonderful blessing to me. Because I spoke for MADD, I was asked to speak at Juvenile Hall in San Diego. Because of my involvement with incarcerated kids, I began my own program called “Be a Winner in Life.’ which I presented for ten years to over 10,000 young people. From this I wrote two books to help the kids “Be a Winner in Life” and “Letters From Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids.”
This work has helped me be a missionary to these children teaching them true values and principals of life. My books help me share the message of The Gospel of Jesus Christ and the joy that it brings.

I am a senior citizen now and very thankful to God that I was able to fulfill the dreams of my heart.

We can all live to be 100 years old. How will your life turn out? I hope that when your life is over you will have no regrets and you will never have to say “I wish”, “if only”, but rather you will say, ” I fully lived my life and I have no regrets. I loved my life because I lived my dreams! This is how I feel about my life. I am so thankful. The Lord has truly blessed me. I pray He will bless you too.

My books can be purchased at http://www.evafry.com . I hope they will encourage you to live your dreams.

Eva Fry’s mission is to help others become better and happier. She is an inspirational author, singer/songwriter/ motivational speaker and seminar leader. Eva has published three books – “YOU MUST HAVE A DREAM” -for seniors, “BE A WINNER IN LIFE”-for good kids, troubled kids and their parents. “LETTERS FROM JUVENILE HALL, KIDS HELPING KIDS” (Actual letters from kids at Juvenile Hall, intended to save other kids from destroying their lives) She invites you to use the FREE ARTICLES she has written for: at- risk kids Also FREE ARTICLES of inspiration to help meet life’s challenges. http://www.evafry.com She has produced 7 Music CD’s

“Remember” (new music for seniors), “Oh What Joy Christmas” “The Little Things” (inspirational country), “I Love Living The Teachings of The Lord” (Gospel/Christian) “Savior of Mine” – (Christian) “God Gave You Intelligence” (for children)

“Classical Style” (instrumental)

Her music and books can be purchased at http://www.evafry.com Her books can also be ordered at any bookstore. Her articles have been published, all over the world.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eva_Fry

Ophthalmologists Warn that Fireworks-Related Injuries Can Cause Permanent Vision Loss

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Ophthalmologists Warn that Fireworks-Related Injuries Can Cause Permanent Vision Loss
American Academy of Ophthalmology and Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology urge parents to closely supervise children when around fireworks

LAS VEGAS – June 26, 2013 – As the Fourth of July holiday approaches and Americans make plans to celebrate the stars and stripes with a little red glare from celebratory rockets, the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology urge the public to take important steps to prevent fireworks-related eye injuries. The academies ask parents and other adults to be especially cautious when children are in the presence of fireworks.

Of the more than 9,000 fireworks injuries that occur in the United States each year, [I]approximately 45 percent are sustained by children age 15 and under.[II] Eyes are among the most injured body parts,[III] and one in six fireworks-related eye injuries results in permanent vision loss or blindness.[IV]

All fireworks are dangerous if not properly handled; however, sparklers cause the most injury and are particularly dangerous since many children handle them on their own. Sparklers typically burn at 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit. That temperature is nearly 1,000 degrees hotter than the boiling point of water, double the heat required to burn wood, hot enough to melt glass and cause third-degree burns to the skin.[V] Out-of-control bottle rockets also cause some of the most serious eye injuries, including corneal abrasions, traumatic cataract, retinal detachment, optic nerve damage and rupture of the eyeball – all of which can lead to potential blindness.

Both Academies advise the public that the best way to avoid potentially blinding injuries is to attend a professional public fireworks display instead of using consumer fireworks. For those who still decide to use legal consumer fireworks, the Academy recommends they follow these safety tips to prevent eye injuries:

  • Never handle fireworks without protective eyewear and ensure that all bystanders are also wearing eye protection.
  • Never let young children play with fireworks of any type. If older children are permitted to handle fireworks, ensure they are closely supervised by an adult and wear protective eyewear.
  • Clear the area of flammable materials and view fireworks from at least 500 feet away.
  • Leave the lighting of professional-grade fireworks to trained pyrotechnicians.

For those who attend professional fireworks displays and/or live in communities surrounding the shows:

  • Respect safety barriers at fireworks shows.
  • Do not touch unexploded display (show) fireworks; instead, immediately contact local fire or police departments to help.

“It’s vital that the public take seriously the dangers of using consumer fireworks. If mishandled, devastating injuries can occur – particularly to the eyes,” said Adam J. Rovit, M.D., president of the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology. “We urge parents and adults to be on high alert about these risks, especially if children are in the presence of fireworks, and take these safety measures to reduce the risk of eye injury.”

The Academy and the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology believe these tips can help to ensure safe Independence Day observances for everyone. If, however, a fireworks-related eye injury occurs, call 911 and seek medical help immediately. These injuries typically need advanced care by an ophthalmologist, a medical doctor who specializes in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

For more fireworks safety tips and additional information on how to maintain healthy vision, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology
The mission of the Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology is to promote and advance the science and art of medical eye care. The Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology’s members are dedicated to treating and preventing eye diseases for all patients.  Learn more at Nevada Academy of Ophthalmology.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide.  Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org.

About EyeSmart
The American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.orgto learn more.

###


[I] Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2011 Fireworks Annual Report, accessed at http://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/113888/2011fwreport.pdf

[II] Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Fireworks-Related Injuries to Children, accessed at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/108/1/190.full

Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2011 Fireworks Annual Report, accessed at http://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/113888/2011fwreport.pdf

[IV]  British Journal of Ophthalmology, Ocular firework trauma: a systematic review on incidence, severity, outcome and prevention, accessed athttp://bjo.bmj.com.proxy1.library.jhu.edu/content/94/12/1586.full#ref-11

[V] National Fireworks Protection Agency fireworks tips, accessed at http://www.nfpa.org/assets/files/pdf/public%20education/fireworkssafetytips.pdf

Headed to the Beach? Don’t Let Your Feet Ruin Your Vacation

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Headed to the Beach? Don’t Let Your Feet Ruin Your Vacation

CHICAGO—July 2, 2013 As millions of Americans hit the beach this summer, the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons offers these foot safety tips:

  • Wear shoes to protect your feet from puncture wounds and cuts. Sea shells, broken glass and other sharp objects when stepped on can ruin your day at the beach. Avoid the water if your skin gets cut – bacteria in oceans and lakes can cause infection. If you do suffer from a puncture wound, have it treated by a foot and ankle surgeon within 24 hours to avoid complications.
  • Feet get sunburned, too. Rare but deadly skin cancers, such as melanoma, can occur on the foot. Prevent skin cancer on your feet by lathering up with sunscreen. Don’t forget to apply to both the tops and bottoms of your feet!
  • Wear shoes to protect your soles from getting burned as you walk on blistering-hot sand, sidewalks and pavement. Take extra precaution if you have diabetes.
  • Be careful with your footing while playing beach sports such as Frisbee or volleyball – walking, jogging and playing sports on soft, uneven surfaces frequently leads to arch pain, heel pain, ankle sprains and other injuries. It’s best to wear supportive shoes while playing beach sports. If injuries occur, use rest, ice, compression and elevation to ease pain and swelling. Any injury that does not resolve within a few days should be examined by a foot and ankle surgeon.
  • Remember jellyfish stings can still occur even if it’s washed up on the beach. Remove any tentacles that may stick to the foot or ankle, and protect your hands. Vinegar, meat tenderizer or baking soda reduce pain and swelling. Most jellyfish stings heal within days, but if they don’t, see a doctor.
  • Diabetes Risks: People who have diabetes face serious foot safety risks at the beach. The disease causes poor blood circulation and numbness in the feet. A person with diabetes may not feel pain from a cut, puncture wound or burn. Any type of skin break on a diabetic foot has the potential to get infected and ulcerate if it isn’t noticed right away. People with diabetes should always wear shoes to the beach, and remove them regularly to check for foreign objects like sand and shells that can cause sores, ulcers and infections.

For more information on foot and ankle health, visit the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeon’s patient education page at FootHealthFacts.org.


About ACFAS

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of more than 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons. Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research and provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its consumer website, http://FootHealthFacts.org.

EarlySense System Implementation Shown to Reduce Falls, Decrease Transfers to Hospitals and Increase the Quality of Care for Elderly in Multi-Center Nursing Home Study

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

clip_image002

  EarlySense System Implementation Shown to Reduce Falls, Decrease Transfers to Hospitals and Increase the Quality of Care for Elderly in Multi-Center Nursing Home Study

Clinical data presented at the 2013 Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Geriatrics Society

 

Waltham, MA, May 3, 2013 —- EarlySense, the market leader in Proactive Patient Care Solutions™, announced today the results of a multi-center clinical study demonstrating that the EarlySense system helps medical teams at rehabilitation centers to reduce patient falls as well as the number of patients transferred back to the hospital.  The clinical data was collected from The Hebrew Home at Riverdale, NY and Dorot Medical Center in Israel.  The data was presented today at the 2013 Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) by Hebrew Home medical director and study principal investigator Dr. Zachary J. Palace in a poster titled The Effect of a Continuous Patient Monitoring System on Reducing Hospitalization and Falls in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

 

Dr. Palace said, “The implementation of EarlySense on the post-acute care units has demonstrated a significant decrease in the total number of falls and a trend towards reduction in the readmission rate back to hospitals, thus improving the overall quality of care for the elderly. The system also alerted regarding early warning signs of patient deterioration which enabled our medical team to proactively respond and literally save four lives. As clinicians we are always on the lookout for better ways to provide safer, more effective care for our patients.”

 

Dr. Palace continued, “Patient falls and subsequent hospital transfers are an ongoing challenge for most rehabilitation centers. The EarlySense system is the first technology to help us more effectively and proactively respond to early warning signs of deterioration and potential falls to secure better patient outcomes. We’ve experienced success and look forward to continuing this trend.”

 

Dorot Medical Center principal investigator Dr. Gad Mendelson said, “As the population ages, we are seeing a growing need to provide safer, smarter care without increasing our staffing level.  In this clinical trial, we saw that the continuous monitoring nature of the EarlySense system and its low level of false alarms allowed our team to reach deteriorating patients earlier without creating alarm fatigue.”

 

Eight-hundred and thirty-three (833) patient records at The Dorot Geriatric Center, a 374-bed facility in Netanya, Israel and seven-hundred and seventy-three (773) records at the Hebrew Home at Riverdale, an 870-bed skilled nursing facility in Riverdale, N.Y. were collected and reviewed over a six month period.  The transfer rate to the hospital decreased by 21% (p=0.12) at Dorot, and the falls rate decreased by 38.5% (p<0.05) at the Hebrew Home.

 

Mr. David Weinstein, Executive Vice President & Chief Operating Officer of the Hebrew Home at Riverdale said, “The Hebrew Home at Riverdale has always been at the forefront of care and technology.  Early Sense compliments our unique platform by offering our residents innovative advancements that are safe and effective.”

 

EarlySense Vice President of Clinical and Regulatory Affairs Dalia Argaman said, “We are fortunate to be able to work with two outstanding and highly skilled nursing facilities like the Hebrew Home and Dorot.  We look forward to continuing what has been a very productive cooperation at both of these fine locations with the vision that the EarlySense system will continue to benefit medical teams, patients and their families within the entire healthcare spectrum, in the various markets across the world where we are actively promoting the EarlySense Solutions.”

 

About EarlySense

EarlySense has brought to market an innovative technology designed to advance proactive patient care and enable clinicians to achieve better patient outcomes, by assisting in preventing adverse events from occurring through the early identification of potential adverse events, in the form of falls, pressure ulcers and/or patient deterioration.  The company’s flagship product, the EarlySense System, is a continuous, contact-free, patient safety monitoring solution that monitors and documents a patient’s vital signs and movement using a sensor that is placed underneath a bed mattress. There are no leads or cuffs to connect to the patient who has complete freedom of movement and is not burdened by any cumbersome attachments.  The system was initially designed to monitor non-ICU ‘lower risk’ patients on medical surgical floors who are usually monitored by nursing staff approximately once every four hours. The system is currently installed at hospitals and rehabilitation centers in the USA and Europe.  It is also commercially available in Canada. Hospital administrators report that patients, their families and staff feel more comfortable knowing the system is in place.  EarlySense Inc. is headquartered in Waltham, MA.  Investors include: JK&B, Pitango Venture Capital, Etgar Challenge Fund, ProSeed VC Fund (TASE: PRSD), Docor International Management, Noaber, and Bridge Investment Fund, and Peter Soderberg, managing partner of Worthy Ventures Resources, LLC and former president and CEO of Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: HRC).  For additional information, please visit www.earlysense.com.

 

Follow us on Twitter.

Like us on Facebook.

See short overview video.

Health Insurance – Boon For Senior Citizens by Mike James Soni

May 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Water, Water everywhere but not a drop to drink! That was how Senior Citizens  felt some years ago when the Health Insurance companies were selective to cater  to them. With better medical conditions, people are able to live longer and  healthier. However, age does bring some health related issues that needs to be  taken care of.

There was a time when people after 50 years of age were generally not  considered Insurable or were considered high risk. So, if anyone wanted to get  health Insurance, the policy was either denied or was issued with various  exclusions on Pre-existing diseases.

With the emergence of various Insurance companies, the Insurance segment for  Senior citizens has also opened up. It is a boon for them to be able to plan and  take their health in their own hands. The Insurance companies have started  considering senior citizens as a potential market and address their need for a  Health Insurance product. Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority (IRDA)  has also taken various steps to boost the inclusion of senior citizens in the  health insurance sector.

There are some health insurers which cover the senior citizens with no cap on  the entry age, though IRDA’s directive is to keep at least 65 years as the  maximum entry age.

The Health Insurance segment is at nascent stage and hence arbitrary at  present/dichotomous in nature. Every individual has to undergo medical tests so  as to be considered for health insurance. The reimbursement for the medical  tests varies from insurer to insurer. Now, all insurers would reimburse 50% of  the cost of the tests if they issue a health policy to the customer. However,  there still are some companies in the market that cover a senior citizen without  medical tests up to a certain age and covers pre-existing ailments from first  year itself.

The Insurance companies would have to include all these clauses in the offer  document and explain to the customer what it means to them. With IRDA bringing  more transparency, consistency and accountability in the sector, the customers  would have more options to choose from and a better product to meet their  needs.

To know more about Health, Healthy living, Insurance, Health Insurance  products of Max Bupa “Heartbeat” please click the link below.

http://www.maxbupa.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mike_James_Soni

 

Marketing to Senior Citizens – Assume Nothing! by Marte Cliff

May 3, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Once upon a time, senior citizens were old people. They were assumed to be  suffering from ill health and in need of care. They sold their homes so they  could move in with children or move to a care facility. Not any more.

Now senior citizens exhibit the same variety of health and fitness as  people much younger. In fact, those who have actively taken care of  themselves are probably more fit than those in their teens and 20’s who shun  exercise and live on junk food.

So, assume nothing, because senior citizens come in many varieties,  with many different goals.

Many choose to remain in their homes, while others want a change of scenery.  But even those want to sell have different reasons.

Some want to get away from excessive maintenance chores. They’ll  choose a smaller home with a smaller yard – or perhaps a condo. They may be in  failing health, but don’t assume so. They may just want to pursue hobbies or  take up volunteer work or be free to travel. Many have something they want to do  that they couldn’t do before, and they don’t want to be tied down by a high  maintenance home.

Others want to find a new home with a large yard, or even acreage, so  they can take up gardening or buy a horse or raise dogs.

Some just want to get away! They’ll sell the old homestead and move  into a motor home so they can see the places they’ve been dreaming about for all  those years when they were tied to work.

Some want to move to a more temperate climate – they’re tired of the  cold and snow and want to get outdoors and play all year. Some have always  dreamed of living on a lake or in the mountains or on the desert. Some wanted to  get away to a small town with a slower pace – or to move to a city with opera  houses and art galleries and the theater. But until now, they were stuck because  they were afraid to move away from their work. Now they can go where they  want.

Of course, there still are those seniors who are selling because they do need  to move in with the kids or to an assisted living facility.

Your job as an agent is to not assume anything. If you want  to sort your lists, set up a capture on your website with information about  downsizing to a smaller home, and a separate capture with information about  transitioning to assisted living. You could even have different pages on your  site – just like you might have different pages and different information for  first time buyers and move-up buyers.

When you get a call to list a home for a senior citizen, go with no pre-set  ideas. Wait and talk to the homeowner before you try to anticipate just what  kind of assistance they need. Otherwise, you’ll risk alienating a new client  before you get a chance to show your stuff!

Marte Cliff is a Freelance Copywriter who specializes in writing for real  estate and related industries.

She’ll help you with one letter, or an entire marketing plan. For Real Estate  agents and brokers who are ready to get full value from their websites, she’ll  be happy to put together an entire package – from the web copy to the lead  generation packages that make an agent’s phone ring.

For busy agents on a budget, Marte offers pre-written letter sets for use in  postal mail or in e-mail continuity campaigns. The current selection includes  letters for FSBO’s, Expired Listings, Short Sale sellers, First Time Buyers, and  a set for new agents to send to buyers. Read what’s included in these sets by  visiting http://www.copybymarte.com/pro/prospecting.html

Marte’s weekly ezine for real estate professionals offers tips and hints for  building a successful business. To subscribe, and to see other resources  available for real estate sales professionals, visit her at http://www.copybymarte.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Marte_Cliff

 

Senior Citizen Abuse by Jessie Penn

May 2, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

News headlines report of senior citizen abuse, most everyday. Long gone are  the values and moralities of our grandparent’s generation. Time was when a  handshake, or your word was all that was necessary to honor commitments. Gone  are the days on an unlocked house, open windows, or sitting out back alone.

The elderly in today’s society can, unfortunately, encounter many traumatic  events for no cause of their own. Predators watch and learn learn an old  person’s schedule, like, when they leave their homes and when they are likely to  return, what times they get up or go to bed, and if they are handicapped or ill  by the comings and goings of a visiting nurse.

Many in the society of today appear to have lost all respect for other  people’s property. It seems these people are without limits, with nothing more  important than self-serving tactics. Who cares if an old person is lonely, in  pain, or needs assistance?

Many times, the media tells us about a kid that brutally beat elderly  parents, grandparents, or elderly strangers. Without any motivation, other than  pursuing what they want, senior citizens can become their prey. And, if they  want something you have in your home, you could be their next victim.

But, not all attackers are strangers, and the elderly person might not be  beaten, robbed, or brutally murdered by the hands of an unknown person.  Sometimes, the attacker is a family member, relative, or friend.

When elderly people are attacked or threatened, how are they to protect  themselves? Many don’t possess the strength or agility to fight back or run.  They can fall down stairs, against door jams, or be trapped in a wheelchair.  Many times they do not understand what or why this is happening to them, because  the person doing them harm is someone they trusted.

Perhaps a friend or relative lives in the senior citizen’s home to provide  assistance and/or companionship. This person might get angry because they don’t  want the responsibility of caring for an older person. Perhaps they feel as if  their freedom has been taken from them. If the elderly person has adequate  finances, the one that is supposed to be looking out for the well-being of the  senior begins to feel that they should be compensated or rewarded  excessively.

An elderly person who refuses to give money or sign over their property,  risks being violently attacked by a family member or friend. It could be an  adult son or daughter, grandson or granddaughter, or a friend. Most elderly  people hesitate to report abuse from a relative or friend. Many are in failing  health, and don’t know who to turn to for help. Or, perhaps, they fear the  attacker will retaliate and things will get much worse, if they report the  abuse.

Aging can be a lonely and painful experience. Some senior citizens were  attacked and left alone to endure the pain and shame. Many could not get to  their phone to call for help. But, if they would have had an emergency alarm,  the help they needed could have been summoned.

A small device, disguised as a pendant or wristwatch can save lives,  literally. There is no need to get to a phone. Help and assistance is no further  away than the end of the finger. As easy as pushing a button on the device calls  an emergency operator, and help can be on the way.

Many times, long-term injuries or death can be the result of not being able  to get the care when it is needed. A personal security device can provide peace  of mind, and is a true friend in need. Senior citizens can live independently  knowing they have the ability to get help whenever they need.

Get free information to protect your loved ones when a medical emergency or  security treat happens. Go to http://personalsecuritydevices.walkinsarewelcome.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jessie_Penn

 

Healthy Eating For Senior Citizens by Ian Pennington

May 2, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

All too often we resort to medication to help with our medical problems when  a change in our diet could be all that was needed. As we grow older our diet  becomes more and more important and healthy eating for senior citizens can  improve their quality of life considerably.

In an ideal world, we would be following a healthy diet throughout our lives  and our medical problems later in life would be negligible. This, however, is  unlikely to be the case and there will not doubt be a range of conditions  appearing as we get older. One of these is likely to be osteoporosis. This is a  condition which will weaken the bones and can lead to an increased risk of  fractures. A plan for healthy eating for senior citizens who have, or are at  risk of getting osteoporosis would include a possible reduction in protein. We  are not saying that you should discard it from your diet, just do not eat too  much. Your body uses acid in the digestion of protein and if there is too much  you may need to counterbalance this by taking calcium from your bones.

Other conditions that the elderly are prone to include rheumatoid arthritis.  There are many debates regarding the affect of certain foods on rheumatoid  arthritis and healthy eating for senior citizens who suffer with the condition.  Some claims have been subject to research and others are still just a case of  hearsay. It is very difficult to say if there is any link between diet and the  condition and many studies are underway.

The best advice that can be given regarding healthy eating for senior  citizens is to eat a good, balanced diet with plenty of fresh foods. Do not eat  too much protein and try and reduce red meats a little. Calcium is great for the  strengthening of bones but do consider the fact that this is protein and bear in  mind what we said earlier.

Often, as you get older, you find that your appetite is not as great as it  was when you were younger. You may find it easier to digest more, smaller meals  rather than one or two larger ones. Sometimes you may feel lethargic about  preparing a meal. If this is the case try to eat something which does not  require much time and effort. This does not mean that it has to be lacking in  nutritional value. Even a bowl of cereals can be very healthy and satisfying and  will make you feel better in the short term. In the long term, however, you  would be wise to make the effort to produce a good hot, nutritious meal for  yourself and your family. Healthy eating for senior citizens is by far the best  way to ensure you keep your energy levels high. This way you will be able to  enjoy your leisure time and fight infections and ill health.

Ian Pennington is an accomplished niche website developer and author.

To learn more about healthy eating  [http://www.seniorhealthtoday.info/healthy-eating-for-senior-citizens], please  visit Senior Health Today [http://www.seniorhealthtoday.info] for current  articles and discussions.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ian_Pennington

 

The Best Self Defense Measure For Senior Citizens Is A Personal Alarm by Carl Vouer

April 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Being in the business of non-lethal self-defense I have made it my mission in  life to protect as many innocent people as I possibly can through the education  and implementation of non-lethal self-defense items such as stun devices,  defensive sprays, personal alarms and the like. I firmly believe that every law  abiding adult should have the right, if not the responsibility to themselves and  their family, to carry some form of non-lethal self defense at all times.  Oftentimes you will see devices like pepper spray, stun guns and personal alarms  geared toward women and seniors and for good reason. The idea is that  individuals who may be at a physical disadvantage in the event of an attack  should be armed with a device that can help them walk away from such an attack  unscathed. Anyone male or female of just about any age could benefit from such  devices but I personally focus most of my efforts on educating senior citizens  in regards to non-lethal self-defense. Again, anyone could potentially benefit  from carrying some form of self-defense but I think senior citizens more than  anyone can see this benefit as they are often targeted by scumbag criminals that  assume seniors will be an easier target and less capable of physically defending  themselves.

There are a multitude of devices that senior citizens can use to help protect  themselves in the unfortunate event of an attack but none are safer and easier  to use than personal alarms. That is not to say that I don’t think stun devices  and/or defensive sprays would not be suitable for many seniors it is just that  with stun devices and defensive sprays one runs the risk of potentially injuring  themselves in the process of trying to defend themselves. Also stun devices and  defensive sprays could potentially be wrestled from a senior and used against  them by the attacker, especially if the attacker is considerably stronger and  faster than the senior in question.

Personal alarms are wonderful because not only are they absolutely and  completely safe but can also be extremely effective, just as effective as a stun  device or defensive spray in many cases. Personal alarms work by emitting an  extremely loud distress signal and when I use the words ‘extremely loud’ I am  talking about 130 decibels or roughly the volume equivalent of standing in the  10th row of the average rock show here. That is more than enough volume to scare  the holy heck out of any attacker and send him running in the opposite direction  for fear of being seen and apprehended. So if you are a senior citizen, or  anyone for that matter, who would enjoy the extra security that carrying a  personal alarm can bring, please consider carrying one yourself.

Stay Safe, Carl Vouer

To see more items of self defense for senior citizens or to buy personal alarms yourself please visit us online.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Carl_Vouer

 

Tips for Staying Safe As a Senior Citizen by Mark Mahaffey

April 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

When it comes to staying safe, senior citizens have special  concerns.

Although research has shown that the risk of being a victim of a physical  assault crime decreases as you age, the risk of other kinds of crime continues  and even intensifies.

Senior citizens are just as likely as the rest of the population to have  their homes broken into, but they are at higher risk for financial crimes. To  criminals, they appear more vulnerable and defenseless. And since the elderly  are often well-off financially, they are a target for crimes involving money  scams.

Further, the elderly grew up during decades when it was proper to be polite  and trusting. This makes them less likely to be rude during a phone conversation  or face-to-face meeting with a con artist. The con artist will keep pushing, and  the elderly victim may just ‘give in.’

Financial crimes are devastating for anyone, but especially so for senior  citizens. They not only feel afraid, but may begin to question their own ability  to handle their own affairs. For an aging person already trying to hold on to  independence as long as possible, this can be emotionally terrifying.

If you are a senior citizen, or have a loved one who is elderly, there are  some steps you can take to keep yourself or your loved one protected. You don’t  have to wait for crime to happen to you: be proactive and make sure you stay  safe.

Secure your home.

A home alarm system is a great deterrent to would-be burglars. Motion  detectors, automatic lights, and a security system with 24-hour monitoring will  significantly decrease the likelihood of a home invasion.

For even more peace of mind, your monitoring service can respond to medical  emergencies as well. And you may even qualify for a senior citizen discount.

Here is a check list of home safety tips for senior citizens:

• Check the locks on all doors and windows to make sure they are secure.

• Trim tall bushes that are up close to the house to eliminate hiding  places.

• Be sure your house number is painted brightly so emergency help can find  you quickly, should you need them.

• Don’t hide keys under mats or pots. Instead, ask a trusted neighbor to keep  your extra key.

• Don’t keep extra cash in your house. It is better to keep it in the bank or  in a safe deposit box.

• Post security signs around your house to let the burglars know you are  protected.

Be smart about financial scams

Senior citizens are susceptible to con artists at the door or over the phone.  These con artists know that the elderly are interested in products promising  anti-cancer benefits or improved memory. Older adults are also less likely to  report fraud, because they don’t know who to call to report.

Here are some tips to stay safe:

• Never allow any unexpected visitor into your home.

• Install peepholes in your doors.

• Do not give out identifying information over the phone such as social  security numbers and account numbers.

• Do not do business with door-to-door salespeople of any kind.

• Know who your neighbors are and try to join a neighborhood watch for added  security.

• Never click on a link to a financial institution in an email. Instead,  manually type the URL into the address bar.

Stay safe away from home

To reduce the risk of being robbed while away from home, follow these safety  precautions:

• Never carry more cash than you need.

• Don’t carry all your credit cards with you.

• Keep your bag close to your body.

• Avoid walking in deserted or dark areas.

• Lock your car doors while traveling in areas where you will be stopping  frequently.

• Also lock your car doors while you are away from your car.

• Consider installing an alarm system in your car. This may qualify you for a  discount on your auto insurance.

You don’t have to wait for crime to come to you. By being pro-active and  educating yourself, you can outsmart the criminals and keep yourself and those  you love safe.

http://www.bestsecurityproducts.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mark_Mahaffey

 

The Senior in Senior Citizens Doesn’t Automatically Mean Senile by Jeanne Gibson

April 27, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

I am well aware that teenagers often think that people over thirty don’t know  anything. They are partially right—many of us don’t know much about  things that interest teenagers, and don’t really want to. But that’s not what I  meant by the title of this article.

When a group is formed at church or in some other organization, a Senior  Citizen is seldom asked to lead it. It is just assumed that they aren’t capable  of thinking clearly enough for such an important job.

If a senior citizen applies for a regular 9-5 job, he or she is not likely to  get it if there are other equally qualified applicants, or often some not as  qualified applicants.

Should a Senior Citizen choose to run for President, a major talking point  against him is his age. He is referred to as dottering, senile, not all there,  and/or suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. (Although, I don’t see how they could  prove that last point since even doctors admit that they have to examine a brain  after the patient has died to be sure of that diagnosis.)

Today, I was called “Hon,” at least 3 times by a clerk that waited on me in a  local store. Do you think she would have called a woman in her 30’s or 40’s  “Hon?” I don’t think so. Do we older people look like little children or  something?

Sometimes, when a older person loses a spouse or someone close to them, they  experience a temporary period of time during which they may appear to be  withdrawn and confused, but this is not limited to seniors. It is often used,  however, to take advantage of seniors.

Recently, an elderly relative of mine lost her husband, who left a legally  witnessed will, leaving everything to her, but, within a few weeks relatives  began to descend on her, claiming that “Dad,” or “Uncle,” or “Grandpa,” had  promised him or her a particular item.

His wife, still grieving, and a bit bewildered by it all, rather than risk  dishonoring a promise her husband may have made, handed over the items without  question. It was months later that she realized she had been the victim of  greed.

Even senior citizens are sometimes guilty of assuming another person is  senile just because of their age.

I overheard two older single men in a group I belonged to discussing a  lovely, but very quiet widow lady in our group. One suggested that the other  invite the lady in question to a movie, but the reply was, “No way. I think  she’s senile because she doesn’t say much. Besides, she’s too old for my taste.”  Neither man was under 70 and both were overweight and almost bald. They assumed  that this woman was senile without even knowing her. The truth is that she was  younger than either of them and her shyness kept her from talking much until she  got to know a person well.

Senior citizens are not all senile, as some people seem to think. True, many  are not quite as strong in body as they were a few years ago, but most still  have as much if not more wisdom than many younger people today. If you are  guilty of leaping to conclusions due to a person’s age, take another look. You  may be missing out on one of the very best relationships of your life.

Jeanne Gibson writes from her home in Springfield, Oregon on a variety of  subjects such as marriage, divorce, kids, cats, electric bikes, working from  home and senior citizen issues. To learn more about keeping your brain alert,  check out her blogpost at: http://sowingseedsthatmatter.blogspot.com/2010/07/perk-up-old-brain-cells.html

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jeanne_Gibson

 

Senior Citizen Health Insurance – How to Make it Affordable? by Reina Raine

April 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Senior citizen health insurance becomes a necessity as Medicare alone might  be insufficient unless you have a good savings plan or 401K during working  years. Retirement is a time when you get away from the daily grind and do things  that you love to do. However, when you consider the cost of a senior citizen  health insurance plan and added medications versus the fixed income of the  retirees, the picture looks quite bleak. Why is senior citizen health insurance  so expensive to secure? Is there anything that can be done to help the situation?

Getting an insurance policy is paying against a calculated risk. People get  hurt or sick, and the insurance company takes this risk into consideration when  calculating the premium. The greater the risks, the higher the premium.

With increasing age, people are more susceptible to illness and injury.  Illnesses such as hypertension and diabetes require long term care and  medication, hence increasing the overall cost. Age is seen as a high risk factor  to the profitability of the insurance company. This results in the premiums for  senior citizen health insurance being higher.

However, there are some ways to help you prepare for this. When setting up  your 401K savings plan, make sure that you take into consideration both the cost  of living after retirement and the cost of health care. Include the projected  costs for the premium payments for the senior citizen health insurance.

Sign up for the plan prior to retirement as the plan will be less expensive  if you are younger at the beginning of the policy. Check the details to verify  that the plan covers everything that you want and is compatible with Medicare.  Your chosen plan should be supplemental to government provisions and is not  intended to replace them. Always read the policy carefully before signing the  acceptance of the policy.

While this may seem like an extreme expense, the additional coverage provided  by these policies is worth paying for considering the kind of expenses that  might be incurred.

When purchasing the senior citizen health insurance cover, shop around to get  the best possible rates and coverage for your needs.

To learn much more on other aspects of health insurance  [http://healthinsuranceconsiderations.com/] visit  healthinsuranceconsiderations.com where you will find information on how to find  affordable health insurance [http://healthinsuranceconsiderations.com/] and how  to ensure you get best value for your money.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Reina_Raine

 

A Brain Fitness Program to Determine If Senior Citizens Are Safe Drivers by Diane Carbo

April 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Are senior citizens safe drivers? A brain fitness program that is being  tested may determine just that. A brain exercise program has just been  determined to possibly be the next big breakthrough in automotive safety.

Research studies have shown that a brain fitness program may decrease risky  driving habits and improves the response time for braking and stopping the  vehicle. As the population ages, there will be more and more senior citizens  driving than ever before.

It is presently known that as driver’s age, especially as they move into  their 70s and beyond, a number of problems with response time, planning and  concentration can get in the way of safe driving. It is the goal of a brain  fitness program to determine, “Are senior citizens safe drivers?”

The goal of the brain exercise program is to see if there is an increase in  response time, better planning executed and more concentration by the senior  drivers.

More on a brain fitness program that may determine “Are senior citizens safe  drivers?”

Medications that aging individuals are prescribed are a major problem that  affect their thinking (cognitive) abilities. As we age, we are more likely to  take multiple medications. These multiple medications can lead to impaired  driving ability in the senior citizen driver.

How does a brain fitness program improve a senior citizen driver to make them  safe? Brain fitness exercises can help senior drivers avoid or delay cognitive  decline and assist those aging drivers to maintain an independent life style as  long as possible.

A brain fitness program that encouraged an increase response time, visual  attention, memory, the ability to measure the processing of speed and the  ability to react to unexpected situations was studied. Past brain fitness  program research shows that not only do brain fitness exercises improve all of  the above, but the studies have shown that the brain training has sustained  those improved results beyond a 5 year period.

Start a brain exercise program today. There is increasing amounts of evidence  that specific thinking skills that are used for driving can be trained. The  results are better driving skills. It is never too late to start a brain fitness  program.The benefits may have lasting results that will assure a better quality  of life.

Diane Carbo Registered Nurse has more than thirty five years in the nursing  field. Her experience as a geriatric care manager, makes her uniquely qualified  to help those who want to live out their lives in their own homes. That decision  may be made when you are 20, 30, 40 or in fact at any age, with sooner rather  than later being ideal. Diane has developed a web site to make people aware of  issues and options. You will find a mountain of helpful information that will be  continually updated. Please visit http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com/brain-fitness-program.html to learn more about brain fitness. Sign up for “The Caring Advocate” her free  newsletter and receive a complimentary copy of the Home Health Care Planning  Guide.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

 

Injury-Free Physical Fitness For Senior Citizens Made Easy by Jeremy Reeves

April 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Physical fitness for senior citizens is more important than ever in today’s  society. Decades ago, everything was done manually.

Although technology has brought us many incredible things, it has also made  us a much more lazy society. No longer do we have to use our bodies to do yard  work, clean around the house, or even work on our own car.

There are now gadgets for virtually everything that lets us do it while using  minimal body strength.

But negative consequences come with the luxury we’ve been given. When manual  labor is no longer needed and our muscles aren’t getting used on a daily basis –  they start to weaken. Combine that with the fact that as every year goes by your  muscles get weaker and you’ll understand why physical fitness for senior  citizens is so important.

By strength training you will dramatically reduce your risk of osteoporosis,  sore joints and broken bones. Many doctors and health companies try to make you  buy Vitamin C and “drink a lot of milk” to overcome these problems, but in  reality they simply don’t work. Supplements can help in a small way, but  strength training has been proven time and time again to have a much more  positive effect with muscle, bone and joint problems that most senior citizens  face – even arthritis!

Isn’t It Dangerous To Exercise As I Get Older?

Unfortunately, many senior citizens are afraid to exercise due to fears of  injuring themselves. However, there are a few simple precautions you can take  such as:

  • Perform low-impact exercises such as pushups, bodyweight squats and other  bodyweight exercises.
  • If lifting weights, do it for 10 or more reps and keep it at a manageable  weight.
  • Don’t over-exert yourself. Stop or briefly rest if you get uncomfortably  tired.

 

Be smart and think about the injury-potential of each exercise before you  perform it.

For example, instead of jogging, consider using stationary exercise bikes.  Pro form exercise bikes are a great piece of equipment to try out. The Schwinn  231 recumbent exercise bike is also a great choice to have if you want to keep  one in your own home.

Besides the simple precautions you should take, there are a few other things  to consider. Physical fitness for senior citizens is a much more delicate  situation than physical fitness for younger individuals.

  • Take Things Slowly At First – Because of the weakening of bones,  joints and muscles you need to take things slowly at first. Don’t simply start a  program and push yourself to exhaustion. It’s also important to go to a doctor  who knows your medical history beforehand. They may even be able to help you  decide what type of exercise you should be doing.
  • Exercise Slowly – You should also perform the actual exercises  slowly. Don’t make jerky or bouncing movements or you’ll risk injuring yourself.  The slower you perform the exercise, the less risk you have of getting  hurt.
  • Warm Up Properly – Warming up is very important to anybody,  especially senior citizens. Lack of blood flow as well as tight joints and  muscles performing less efficiently are all factors contributing to injuries. By  properly warming up before your actual workout, you significantly reduce your  risk of getting injured.

 

Although physical fitness for senior citizens is a bit more complicated due  to more things that can possibly go wrong, it’s also just as or more important  than exercising at a young age. By taking the right precautions and making sure  you’re exercising correctly, you can enjoy injury-free and pain-relieving  exercise for a long time to come.

Jeremy Reeves is a certified personal trainer devoted to helping you get in  the best shape of your life. His website –  [http://www.fitness-product-reviews.com] – reviews the 4 most effective weight  loss products on the market today.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jeremy_Reeves

 

Investing for Senior Citizen Retirement by JD Stratis

April 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Senior citizen retirement could be an extended way off for you or it may  represent something in the near future. Regardless of that amount of time, you  without a doubt, need to begin saving up for it at once. Even so, preserving  cash for retirement Is not what it used to be with the cost of living and the  un-stableness of government social security.

Lets begin by having a look at the senior citizen retirement plan provided  from your company. At one time, these programs were very well-grounded.  Nonetheless, after scandals such as Enron and all that came after, folks aren’t  as protected in their corporate retirement plans any longer. Whenever you decide  not to commit in the company’s senior citizen retirement plan, you do possess  other alternatives.

Initially, you could put money in stock markets, bond markets, mutual fund  markets, CDs, or money market accounts for your retirement. You don’t need to  express to anyone that your payoffs on these investment funds will be utilised  for senior citizen retirement. Simply allow the money to mature over time, and  once reliable investments achieve their maturity, reinvest them and proceed to  allow the revenue to grow.

You may also begin an Individual Retirement Account (IRA). IRAs are very  fashionable since the revenue isn’t assessed until you take out your cash. You  might as well be capable of deducting your IRA contributions from your taxations  that you owe. An individual senior citizen retirement account can be started at  most financial institutions.

A different common type of senior citizen retirement vehicle is the 401-k  plan. 401(ks) are commonly provided via employers, though you might be able to  begin a 401-k plan) on your own. You had better talk with a retirement planner  or accountant to assist you with this.

Whatever retirement investment you decide on, just be sure you decide on one!  Once more, don’t rely on social security, corporate senior citizen retirement  plans, or even an inheritance that might or might not materialize! Attend to  your financial future from investments done today.

JD Stratis is a contributor to Equity  Cash  North Americas premiere program for protecting your hard-earned equity  and creating Cash Flow with ZERO risk to your equity!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=JD_Stratis

 

The Critical Importance of Recreation For Senior Citizens by Robert McCluskey

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As our population ages, there is increasing emphasis on teaching and learning  lifelong recreational skills. Research has shown that recreation is an important  part of an individual’s social behavior. Recreation plays a critical role in the  lives of older adults by contributing to an improved quality of life. People who  participate in recreational activities as senior citizens report significantly  more life satisfaction than those who do not.

Physical recreation is especially important. Engaging in physical activity  reduces almost every risk of disease, including heart disease, high blood  pressure, colon cancer and diabetes. Participation in recreational activities  improves mental health, as well. Again, research shows that older individuals  who participate in recreational activities have better coping behaviors in  response to stressful life events and daily frustrations. They learn that social  support is important, and available, through these activities.

Unfortunately, we have come to view our older years as a time of diminishing  activity and social interaction. As a result of these expectations, aging folks  often assume they are incapable of recreational activity or that it will not be  available to them. They often cite scarce financial resources, lack of  transportation or declining health as reasons for avoiding these important  activities. Although there is some validity to these concerns, we often overlook  the increasing resources that are being dedicated to wellness among senior  citizens. Some of these resources are:

  • Travel programs. Fees are usually required, but deep discounts for seniors  are often available.
  • Volunteering. Seniors bring valuable experience, wisdom and compassion to  others
  • Elderhostel. A world-wide travel program bringing affordable adventure and  learning to seniors
  • Theme parks. Senior days! Special entry fees!
  • Entertainment and arts. Museum and theatre tours often provide discounts and  transportation to seniors
  • Local parks and recreation programs. Great outdoor activities
  • Community Gardening. Check with your local parks and recreation office
  • Senior citizen centers. Free or reduced price meals and more!
  • Book clubs. Reading and socialization are a potent therapeutic combination  for the brain

 

It is important for senior citizens and those who care for them to seek out  recreational activities even at this time when they may be reluctant to do so.  Research indicates that seniors who participate in these kinds of activities  tend to remain active once they begin.

Western cultures sometimes view their aging populations as economic and  social liabilities. In fact, when they are nurtured, they become assets.  Recreational activities can provide help and motivation that seniors require to  enable them to contribute their valuable time and wisdom in return for that  nurturance.

Robert A. McCluskey Bob McCluskey is a semi retired teacher and school  administrator. He has recently been teaching college-level psychology classes  and has developed a course in the psychology of aging. Bob teaches courses  specifically designed for senior citizens and is especially interested in the  mental health of aging, With an emphasis on the preservation and enhancement of  memory.

If you would like to learn more about this topic visit our web site: Senior Technology News! Going Strong Seniors is your premier source for Internet  resources!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Robert_McCluskey

 

Spring Cooking Workshops by the Springs Cafe Presented by the Culinary Academy of Las Vegas

April 22, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Las Vegas 

Spring Cooking Workshops by the Springs Cafe

Presented by the Culinary Academy of Las Vegas

Las Vegas- April 19, 2013 – The Culinary Academy of Las Vegas announces the spring set of Springs Cafe Cooking Workshops. Learn how to grill, cook vegetables found at the local farmers market to perfection, and the slow and low art of smoked meats from the knowledgeable chefs of the Springs Cafe. Cooking demonstrations include plenty of scrumptious samples, recipes, and discussion with questions from attendees encouraged.

All classes are located at Springs Preserve, 333 S. Valley View Blvd. at US 95. Reservations are required. Space is very limited. For more information and to register please call (702) 822-7700.

WHEN: Every third Saturday of the month, 10 a.m.-Noon
COST: $30 members, $40 non-members per workshop

Member bonus: $75 all 3 three workshops purchased together

CLASS SCHEDULE

April 20: Grilling Favorites

Chefs show how to safely use a gas grill to skillfully prepare the grilling staples of beef, chicken and shrimp. Learn how to perfect steak, marinate and grill chicken satays, and season and grill shrimp like a pro.

May 18: Vegetables Under Fire

Grilling isn’t just for meat! You will learn how to properly grill vegetables and make a picture-perfect grilled vegetable salad, as well as, what seasonings work best for grilled vegetables and how to pickle veggies that are in season.

 

June 15: The Art of Smoked Food: Slow and Low Cookery

Smoked foods are in a flavor league of their own. Learn the method of cooking “low and slow” from the chefs of the Springs Cafe and how to create smoked salmon and beef brisket, as well as a Memphis-style BBQ sauce, in addition to cold smoking vs. hot smoking techniques.

About Culinary Academy of Las Vegas

Founded in 1993, Culinary Academy of Las Vegas (formerly the Culinary Training Academy), the country’s leading nonprofit culinary and hospitality training institute, was developed through a joint labor-management trust representing private sector employers, the Culinary Union Local 226 and the Bartenders Union Local 165. The Academy is licensed by the Nevada Commission on Post-Secondary Education and trains several thousand students per year for participating employers in the hospitality industry. Offerings include a 50-seat bistro-style restaurant, Westside Bistro, and a 400-seat banquet and events center located at the 710 West Lake Mead Blvd. campus. The Academy is the caterer of record for The Smith Center for the Performing Arts and operator of the cafe and catering services at the Springs Preserve. Culinary Academy of Las Vegas is an equal opportunity employer/program. For more information, call 702.924.2100 or visit www.theculinaryacademy.org. Stay up to date on happenings on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterestand YouTube.

Self Defense For Senior Citizens Is As Easy As Locating Stun Guns Dealers Online by Carl Vouer

April 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Self-defense for senior citizens is something I take very seriously as my  mother, who lives alone, is now a senior citizen and I am always worried about  her safety. She lives in an upper-middle class neighborhood and has never been  the victim of a violent crime. And to my knowledge no houses on or around her  block have been the victim of a break in in recent history but just the same it  makes no sense for her not to be prepared. Not being prepared because you live  in a good ‘neighborhood’ is much like driving around without a seatbelt because  you’re a safe driver and have never been in an accident. Bad things happen and  they can happen anywhere at any time to anyone. It is foolish to assume that you  or anyone else is immune from becoming the victim of an assault, especially  senior citizens.

The simple fact of the matter is that senior citizens cannot as easily defend  themselves as they might have been able to in their younger days. So why would a  senior (or anyone for that matter) not take a very simple and affordable step  toward ensuring their own safety and the safety of their loved ones by acquiring  a small, easily-carried stun device?

Stun guns are a non-lethal means of self-defense that are legal in all but 8  backwards-thinking states. They work by emitting a high-voltage, low-amp current  of electricity to the attacker and disrupting the attacker’s natural  neuromuscular functions. In short they make the attacker cease and desist all  attacking as they will have no control over their own body. Shocking someone  until the lose control over their own motor functions may sound inhumane but let  us remember two things, A. We are talking about an individual who has taken it  upon himself to attack a seemingly defenseless senior citizen and B. In almost  all cases the recipient of a shock from a stun gun is left with no permanent  damage whatsoever. To me that sounds about as humane as a weapon of self-defense  can be. In very rare cases a stun device has proven fatal but any device that is  going to be effective in stopping a violent crime is going to come with an  inherent risk of danger for the person cowardly and stupid enough to attack an  innocent senior citizen.

So if you are concerned about a loved one’s safety or a senior citizen  yourself (especially those living alone) please consider contacting a stun gun  dealer online about protecting yourself with a stun device.

Stay Safe,

Puzek Security Systems

If you would like to see more items of self defense for seniors or would like to contact a stun gun dealer please visit us online at Puzek Security  Systems

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Carl_Vouer

Senior Citizens Health Conditions by Ian Pennington

April 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As we reach our later years we are at risk of a great many health concerns.  The list of senior citizens health conditions is a long and complex one. It  includes both mental and physical issues and some people will be plagued with both.

It can only be expected that, as time takes it toll on our bodies, we will  experience some deterioration in our physical and mental wellbeing. That is not  to say that once we have retired we are on the scrap heap and just waiting until  our lives are over. Far from it. There has been a huge amount of medical  research taking place over the last century, and indeed much longer, and this  has paved the way for a greater understanding of the aging process. We are now  much more educated regarding nutrition and health matters and are able to  control and sometimes eliminate many of the senior citizens health  conditions.

One of the main fears that the elderly face is that of dementia of one form  or another. The most commonly known is Alzheimer’s Disease but there are others.  This affects the patients mind and can be the cause of heartache for a caring  partner who will feel unable to help. They will find that they spend much of  their time caring for the patient whilst at the same time having to accept the  fact that they are becoming more distant as the disease progresses. This can be  aggravated if the carer is also suffering from any one of the other senior  citizens health conditions, either physically or mentally.

Other serious conditions can often include strokes. Post stroke problems can  vary hugely depending on the severity of the attack and the level of recovery of  the patient. Sometimes a stroke can result in partial paralysis. This obviously  has a far reaching affect on the elderly and may jeopardise their ability to get  out and visit family and friends. Even the most simple tasks, which were taken  for granted previously, may now cause a problem; shopping, housework etc.  Strokes are high on the list of senior citizens health conditions, but, they are  also the subject of a lot of research and our understanding of the subject is  increasing all the time. Post stroke care has improved a great deal and in some  cases patients now recover fully.

Heart disease has been an increasing problem in all age groups, but continues  to be a main factor in contributing to senior citizens health conditions. Once  again, however, research is good on the subject and our knowledge increasing all  the time. Surgical options are becoming more common and our expertise in the  field has contributed to many lives being extended.

There are a number of senior citizens health conditions which can be helped  by a careful diet being followed during our earlier years. Osteoporosis,  rheumatism and arthritis have all been the subject of studies and tests. Some  foods have been found to be a great help in reducing the chances of becoming a  sufferer.

Don’t wait until it is too late. There has been so much research undertaken  on the subject of senior citizens health conditions that you would be wise to  take action early and follow the advice that is available so that you can  increase your chances of enjoying your later years in the best possible  health.

Ian Pennington is an accomplished niche website developer and author.

To learn more about senior health  [http://seniorhealthblog.info/senior-citizens-health-conditions], please visit  Senior Health Blog [http://seniorhealthblog.info] for current articles and  discussions.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ian_Pennington

 

Exercise for Senior Citizens At 50 And Beyond by Renie M Rutten

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Even a small amount of increased physical activity can benefit your  functional health. This means getting in and out of your home to attend church,  going for a walk, and getting your own mail without the assistance of someone  else.

Benefits Of Regular Exercise For Senior Citizens

—–Improved Overall Health

—–Smaller Waistline

—–Lowered Risk of Bone Fracture Including Hips

—–Lower Risk of Lung, Breast and Color Cancers

—–Stabilized Blood Sugar Reducing Type II Diabetes

—–Better Balance and Bone Strength

Levels of Senior Citizen Exercise Workouts

There are three basic levels of activity to discuss when thinking about  exercise for Senior Citizens, the first is sedentary. This is where many  senior citizens fall unfortunately. This means you are getting little or no  regular physical exercise. Sedentary individuals take less the 10,000 steps a  day and their risk of falls, illness and disease are much greater than seniors  in the next group.

The second group of seniors we want to discuss are those who get  moderate physical activity each day. Moderate activity should be the goal  of most seniors to keep them healthy and independent. Brisk walking, dancing,  bicycling, swimming, dance and exercise DVD’s are excellent examples of exercise  that will raise the heart rate, but allow you to breath and talk normally.

The final level of activity for the more active seniors is vigorous  activity. This level means you heart rate has increased to the level that  you are not able to talk and exercise at the same time. Some examples might  include running, tennis, Zumba dance or other high intensity exercise.

Senior Exercise the Answer to Anti Aging

Aging and lack of physical activity are often associated with health issues  like: loss of balance causing falls, forms of arthritis causing stiffness and  pain, breathing problems and sleep apnea, stroke, heart disease and even some  cancers. These conditions are attributed to the limited activity and excess  weight from a decrease in your muscle tone and RMR from not getting enough  movement as we age.

How To Increase Your Physical Activity Level

Increasing your activity especially if you fall into the sedentary level of  seniors may seem like a daunting task. The good news is that is not necessarily  true. Starting an exercise program can be fun and easier to start than you might  think.

The most important issue is to find some activity you enjoy. Remember you  don’t need to spend a fortune on a home gym to reach your peak fitness level.  Some ideas that cost little or nothing are walking, dancing or water aerobics.  Start slowly and increase your time and intensity each week or so. As always  it’s a good idea to visit with your doctor, especially if you have health issues  already.

Incorporate friends and make it fun. You can help others reach their peak  fitness and improve their health as well.

Learn more about exercise for senior citizens and how it can improve your  health and save your life. More fitness information is available on my website  at http://www.yourweightlossanswers.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Renie_M_Rutten

 

Riding to Death: How Healthy Eating Can Improve the Health of Senior Citizens by Stan Onodu

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Are you a senior citizen? Medical science told us that there are ailments  associated with age. You’ll agree with me that it is virtually unheard of for  youngsters to complain of illnesses like osteoporosis, high blood pressure,  diabetes, heart disease, arthritis and certain cancers. But these are mostly the  health challenges of older adults. As a senior citizen, you need to know that  you can effectively manage these diseases through healthy eating. Let me show  you how.

Fluids. Naturally, you’ll observe, in most cases, that the skin and the  entire body frame of older adults shrink as they get older and older. This is as  a result of the fact that they tend to dehydrate so easily, which may not be  unconnected with their inability to feel thirsty most of the time. As a senior  citizen therefore, you should form the habit of constantly ingesting water and  fruit juices into your system.

Proteins. Proteins are body-building foods. They are also in the business of  repair and or replenishment of worn-out body cells and tissues. The healthy  proteins for senior citizens include eggs, lean meats, turkey or poultry and  fish. From these, minerals such as calcium, zinc and iron, greatly needed by the  elderly can be sourced.

Carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are energy-giving foods. It is a known secret  that senior citizens need a lot of energy derivable from this kind of foods in  order to sustain their ability to perform basic daily activities like dressing,  bathing, etc. Whole grains, cereals and their derivatives form excellent diets  for them. And more so, with some fibre content in the foods, these older folks  will be less exposed to constipation.

Fats. Only unsaturated fat foods, as in lean meats, fish, low-fat diary  products, avocados, nuts and seeds, should be taken by senior citizens. The  reason being that other fats contain HDL kind of cholesterol that can aggravate  blood pressures, thereby putting their heart conditions at very high risk.

Moderate Exercise. Man shall not leave by bread alone. Our senior citizens  need some bit of exercises – taking a walk, light gardening, riding bicycles,  etc – which can help them burn off calories thereby reducing weight; improving  heart and lung functions, and ultimately engender overall feeling of well-being.  It is important to note, however, that before they embark on any form of  exercises, their doctors must be aware.

If our senior citizens can strive to adopt the above healthy lifestyles or  habits, I guarantee their good health even though, for sure, their health cannot  be as it used to be when they were younger. Healthy eating is a gateway to a  healthy, long life and the case of our senior citizens cannot be  different.

What is that health condition that constitutes a burden in your life? Do you  know that through healthy eating you can overcome it? You can learn a lot more  here: http://www.healthyeatingpalace.blogspot.com/.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Stan_Onodu

 

Reasons for Hospitalizations of Senior Citizens by Warren Comer

April 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Experts are saying that senior citizens of today are a lot healthier than the  elderly a few decades ago. Not only are they getting sick less, but they are  also more active. They are living fuller lives, something that the old folks in  the past couldn’t have done.

What the Numbers Say

Statistics show than one third of all seniors need medical attention in a  hospital annually. The reasons for hospitalization are very varied, but most of  it is caused by the declining condition of their bodies. The fact remains  however, that life expectancy is on the rise.

What Increased Life Expectancy Means

The increase in life expectancy means that people people would need care for  a longer period. Though they are living longer years, it does not mean that they  are immune from the more common ailments. Even if they don’t get sick, their  body conditions really aren’t at their top forms anymore.

Common Reasons for Hospitalization

When a person becomes a senior citizen, the chances of being hospitalized are  increased. There are two major reasons why a person can be hospitalized, these  are due to injuries and heart problems.

Common Senior Citizen Injuries

Falls are the most common causes of injuries for the elderly. As people grow  older, the chances of falling are greatly increased. Half of all those who are  over 80 are likely to experience falling at some point.

The most common type of injury for seniors who have fallen is a hip injury.  It accounts for more than 40% of all the injuries that seniors suffer because of  falls

We all know that as people start to age, their bones become a lot weaker.  This would account for the brittleness of the bones. When a person who doesn’t  have a strong structure falls, the bones could easily break.

Other Types of Injuries

There are other types of injuries that seniors are prone to getting. These  include injuries from motor vehicle accidents, poisoning from medications and  fires. Their frail physical conditions can make them suffer more from these  injuries. It is important that they be given immediate medical attention should  they suffer from any of them.

Illness among Senior Citizens

When it comes to illnesses, heart problems are the most common reasons why  seniors get hospitalized. These problems include heart attacks and strokes. When  seniors exhibit signs and symptoms of any heart ailment, they should be brought  to the hospital right away so they can be treated.

Something as simple as flu can cause the hospitalization of a senior. In  their stage in life, a simple flu can cause a great deal of problems already. It  should be treated right away so that it won’t get any worse or cause other  conditions.

These are the most common reasons why seniors get taken to a hospital. If you  are living with a member of your family who is a senior citizen, then you should  know about these things so you can take better care of them. You can also share  what you’ve learned to make them aware of the health risks.

Family First  HomeCare is the perfect solution for seniors and others in need in New  Jersey who are not ready to leave their home for an institutional setting, but  because of illness or chronic conditions need support to remain at home. We  improve your life by providing compassionate, one-on-one care in the comfort of  your own home. Find out more about senior care services in New Jersey.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Warren_Comer

 

Do Senior Citizens Need to Exercise? by Judy Conway

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many people ask the question, “Do senior citizens need to exercise?” One of  the greatest causes of atrophy to the muscles of seniors is insufficient  activity needed to stimulate adequate blood flow to vital organs.

Reasons for an Exercise Program:

Left to the reticence of a senior lifestyle can result in disease, lack of  muscle tone, and promote a depressing, non productive lifestyle. I speak from  experience as I watched my mother refuse to do her required exercises after her  knee replacement surgery. She chose instead to sit in her chair and watch TV the  greater part of the day and evening. Because of her inactivity I watched as she  became a prisoner in her own body. This had a great effect on not only her  physical activity but also her mental condition.

Recommendations:

A sensible, regular exercise program that is planned around a person’s  capacity and needs will help them feel better, live longer and gain  independence.

A senior is not someone who is going to engage in a marathon. In planning a  healthy, stimulating program start by planning a routine that will provide  enough exercise that will generate adequate blood flow to all of the vital  organs. You will want to maintain the hard-earned muscles employing  cardiovascular exercises, weight training and stretching routines. Consider  using resistance bands.

The primary goal is to reach a balance of activity providing just enough  exercise to accomplish the goals of maintaining muscle mass, adequate blood flow  and a feeling of well-being. If the regimen is extremely strenuous it can cause  an adverse effect to the overall condition of a senior. It is imperative that  you check a senior’s physical and verbal response. Pay special close attention  for adverse signs such as excessive sweating, difficulty in breathing,  imbalance, droopy eyelids and evidence of mild to severe pain. It these elements  occur the activity should be stopped immediately.

A senior citizen’s exercise program should be based on their individual  needs. If a group regime is put into action there could be the risk of over  training. In addition it will be easier to follow the progress of a person if  they are following a specific set of exercises that have been developed with  only their needs in mind. One person may be able to do more repetitions and a  more vigorous exercise than another person. For this reason a program that has  been commenced with a senior citizen should be fully documented and a log book  maintained noting the details of every workout.

As a senior develops more strength and flexibility their exercise program can  be changed. The program should be flexible, keeping in mind that the routines  and movements can be increased or decreased on a weekly basis depending on the  physical condition of the person.

Execution Procedures:

If you are a family member, or friend caring for the senior citizen, it is  recommended that you seek the opinion of a professional to help you develop the  exercise plan. They will be able to assist you in selecting a program with the  proper intensity and type of exercises that will be beneficial to the patient.  In addition to an exercise plan, it is also suggested you engage the services of  a dietitians, physical therapist, and a nutritionist. These trained  professionals will be able to monitor whether the program is too strenuous or  acceptable.

When you commence a program it is suggested that you ask a professional to be  present and assist in demonstrating the various moves. An exercise that is  executed improperly can cause severe injury to a patient. To achieve the  required results you want to be certain that exercises are performed properly.  Professionals should also be scheduled to check in various times during the  program to evaluate the senior’s response to the treatment.

Research Recommendations:

It is important for the person who is going to be initiating the exercise  program do their due diligence and research what is available to help them make  the right decisions in achieving the goals for physical help to the senior  citizen. Below are a few suggestions for developing the best program  possible:

· Check on the availability of exercise DVD’s that cater specifically to  senior citizens · Watch exercise videos online · Check forums online for  the expertise of others regarding this subject · Visit a senior citizen  center to view their typical routine · Be open to listen to and learn from  instructors and experts

In Conclusion:

As you and the patient continue in the exercise program you will develop the  ability to understand what exercises and amount of intensity works best to  achieve the desired results. It is also important to remember that in addition  to the proper exercise regimen, your senior needs the right amount of rest and  diet program to create a total healthy lifestyle.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Judy_Conway

Health Insurance For Senior Citizens by Ram Mohan Susarla

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

If you are a senior citizen and do not have health insurance, the thought of  having to go to an emergency room in case of illness may be troubling you. You  should have planned for your retirement but if you did not include the details  of having Health Insurance after you retire, you are at the mercy of the ER and  without coverage you may even have to forego treatment. For many people in the  US, health care costs often result in bankruptcy even when they have insurance  because not all illnesses are covered by the policy. When it can happen to the  people who have insurance, it can be a nightmare for those who do not have  it.

In recent months, the issue of health insurance for senior citizens has  received extraordinary coverage and attention in the US because of President  Obama’s plan to have universal health care available to all citizens. This  measure from the Obama administration has drawn critics and supporters alike and  the battle lines are drawn in an increasingly bitter battle. The issue at stake  is whether there should be a public option that would enable the senior citizens  access to health care provided for by the government. The public option does not  guarantee free coverage but includes an option for the employers and the  government to provide for an eventuality.

Senior citizens need healthcare and they need it more than the other age  groups as they need access to quality medical assistance because of their  advancing age that makes them vulnerable to disease and disability. It is for  this reason that medical care in many countries is free for senior citizens and  they have access to the best medical facilities. Likewise, the US should also  have a health care system that provides for its senior citizens and ensures that  they get proper treatment for their various ailments.

In the context of the baby boomers retiring in large numbers and without the  proper tools for some of them to plan adequately for their retirement and health  care, there should be a comprehensive plan for access to medical coverage by the  insurance companies as well as the government. There are several insurance  companies that have special plans for senior citizens as they allow for the  coverage with all facilities provided for them. However, there are other  companies that do not encourage coverage for senior citizens on the grounds that  they are a high risk category and hence the premiums do not justify coverage.  There are some commentators who call for an old age premium to be placed on the  coverage plan so that senior citizens can get coverage at the rates provided by  the insurers, albeit with a premium.

The point that is being made here is that senior citizens better plan for  their retirement when they are in their forties and fifties so that they do not  become a burden on their children and that they retain coverage beyond  retirement and after they are well into their sixties.

Freelance Writer with over two years of experience in content development,  academic writing and business writing. Specialist in Custom Writing and SEO  development with emphasis on plagiarism free and unique content.

I am an Engineer by training and was a Project Manager before switching to  Freelancing. I can take up assignments in the areas of Project Management, IT,  Economics, Management and Book reviews. I am well versed with academic  formatting styles like APA, MLA, and Harvard etc.

I am a deadline conscious writer who provides plagiarism free and quality  content. I believe in Customer delight and go the extra bit to fulfill the order  specifications. I maintain constant contact with the customer and notify  requests for deadline extensions in advance. I avoid plagiarism by citing  sources and offering original ideas and check my output with Copyscape and other  tools. I have access to online libraries like Questia in addition to a wide  collection of books and journals relevant to the fields in which I  work.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ram_Mohan_Susarla

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4335649

Senior Citizens Can See The World With Travel Insurance By W Scott

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Retirement age can be the golden age of your life! Your children have grown  up and are independent. You do not have a full-time job. There is nothing  holding you back. This is the time of your life to fulfill all your dreams of  traveling the world! There is virtually nothing holding you back!

Know The Ins And Outs Of Travel Insurance

Senior citizen travel insurance is vitally important when planning any trip.  A travel insurance policy helps to protect you against unforeseen circumstances,  such as trip cancellations. There are numerous travel insurance firms that offer  great packages for senior citizens who are 65 and older. There are even policies  these days that provide for those who are 50 and above.

Senior citizen travel insurance is provided in two formats; annual travel or  single trip coverage. Annual travel is ideal for individuals who take a variety  of vacations over the course of the year. Single trip coverage is, as the name  implies, for a single travel event. Coverage details vary from company to  company. Receive quotes from several different travel insurance companies.  Compare each policy in detail to find the one that suits individual needs at an  affordable price.

Choose An All Inclusive Travel Insurance Package

Senior citizen travel insurance packages provide overall coverage for low  risk individuals. A good senior citizen travel insurance package will include  coverage for luggage theft or loss. Some packages also provide cover for medical  costs, including medical assistance or emergency services, which may be incurred  while on holiday.

Be sure to review your travel insurance policy in full. Ensure that you  understand every aspect of your travel plan. It must provide full financial  protection for any mishap that occurs while on holiday.

Look Before You Leap!

It is always wise to carefully review each portion of a senior citizen travel  insurance policy. Do not feel rushed. Do not feel intimidated or overwhelmed.  This is an entitled right when reviewing any insurance policy. A travel  insurance policy is no different. Ensure each portion of the policy pertains to  individual travel coverage needs. In the event that it does not, move on to  another insurance policy or insurance agency.

An often unmentioned fact about insurance policies is that the document is  considered a legal agreement. This means that in a court of law the terms and  conditions presented in the policy are legally binding. Obtain clarification of  anything that is not easily understood up front. Ask as many questions as  necessary until all aspects of the travel insurance policy are clear. Anything  not understood should be clarified by an insurance agent. If an agent is not  willing to do so, simply find one who will.

Senior citizen travel insurance is not intended to restrict travel  intentions. Rather, it is a sound financial decision providing protection and  peace of mind for senior citizens. With policy in hand, a senior citizen is  ready to explore the four corners of the world.

William Scott has authored a number of articles on holiday insurance. His site http://HolidayInsuranceTips.com, offers further  information on selecting the right senior citizen travel insurance  [http://www.holidayinsurancetips.com/category/senior-citizen-travel-insurance]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=W_Scott

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/1136039

Senior Citizens Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, and Arthritis – Causes and Treatments By David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

“Arthritis” does not mean only that someone has stiff, aching joints. Many types of arthritis exist, each with its own symptoms and treatments. Most types are chronic, meaning that they can be a source of discomfort for an extended period of time. Arthritis can afflict joints almost anywhere in the body and may cause changes you can see and feel, including swelling, warmth, and redness in the joints. It can last for a short time but be very painful or continue for a long time with less pronounced results while still damaging the joints.

Arthritis is extremely common in the United States, especially among senior citizens. Still, there are many steps they and those providing care for the elderly can take to relieve the different types of arthritis. The most common types in this population are osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and gout.

Osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis in senior citizens and begins when cartilage, the type of tissue that pads joints, begins to wear away. This can eventually cause all the cartilage between bones to wear away, forming painful rubbing of bones against each other. This type of arthritis is most common in the hands, neck, lower back, knees, and hips.

Symptoms of OA can range from stiffness and mild pain that accompanies exercise or bending to severe pain in the joints even in times of physical rest. OA can also cause stiffness during times in which you haven’t used specific joints in a while, like when you’re on a long car ride, but this stiffness usually goes away when you move your joints again. OA can eventually lead to problems moving joints and sometimes to developing a disability if the areas affected are the back, knees, or hips.

Aging is often the greatest risk factor for developing OA. Other factors depend on the area of the body afflicted-for instance, OA in the hands or hips may be caused by genetic factors; OA in the knees may be caused by being overweight; and injuries or overuse of joints in the knees, hips, and hands may lead to OA.

Rheumatoid arthritis.

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) differs from OA in that it’s an autoimmune disease, meaning that your immune system attacks and damages the lining of a joint as if it were an injury or disease. RA leads to inflammation of the joints, which causes pain, stiffness and swelling, sometimes in multiple joints at once. It may be severe enough to prevent you from moving a certain joint. Senior citizens with RA may often experience fatigue or fever. You can develop RA at any age, and it’s more common in women.

RA can afflict almost any joint in the body and is often symmetrical, meaning that if you have RA in a specific joint on one side of your body, you probably experience RA in the same joint on the other side of your body. RA can damage not only joints, but also the heart, muscles, blood vessels, nervous system, and eyes.

Gout.

Senior citizens with gout experience the most severe pain relative to many other arthritis patients. An attack begins when uric acid crystals form in the connective tissue or joint spaces, leading to swelling, stiffness, redness, heat, and pain in the joint. Attacks often follow eating foods like shellfish, liver, dried beans, peas, anchovies, or gravy. Drinking alcohol, being overweight, and taking certain medications may worsen the symptoms. In senior citizens, using certain medications to lower blood pressure may also be a risk factor for a gout attack.

Gout is most common in the big toe, but it can occur in other joints such as the ankle, elbow, knee, wrist, hand, or other toes. Swelling may cause discoloration and tenderness due to skin stretching tightly around the joint. If you see a doctor during an attack, he or she may take a sample of fluid from the affected joint.

Other forms of arthritis.

Other forms include psoriatic arthritis  in patients who have psoriasis; ankylosing spondylitis, which mainly affects the spine; reactive arthritis, which occurs as a reaction to another illness in the body; and arthritis in the temporomandibular joint, the point at which the jaw attaches to the skull.

Arthritis Symptoms and Warning Signs.

Senior citizens and those providing their elder care should look out for the following symptoms as they may be indications of arthritis:

  • lasting joint pain
  • swelling in a joint
  • stiffness in a joint
  • tenderness or pain when touching a joint
  • difficulty in using or moving a joint normally
  • warmth and redness in a joint

 

Any of these symptoms lasting longer than two weeks should be addressed by a physician. If you experience a fever, feel physically ill, have a suddenly swollen joint, or have problems using a joint, a doctor should be contacted sooner. You will have to answer questions and go through a physical exam. Before suggesting treatment options, your doctor may want to run lab tests and take X-rays.

Arthritis Treatment.

Some common treatment options exist even though each type of arthritis is treatedsomewhat differently. Rest, exercise, eating a healthy diet, and becoming educated about the right way to use and protect the joints are key to minimizing the effects of arthritis. Proper shoes and a cane can minimize pain the feet, knees, and hips while walking, and some technology exists for helping open jars or bottles, turn doorknobs more easily, and otherwise improve quality of life in senior citizens with arthritis.

Additionally, some medications can lower the pain and swelling. Acetaminophen (in Tylenol) and some NSAIDs are sold over-the-counter and can ease pain. Other NSAIDs must be prescribed. It is important for senior citizens and those providing their in home care to pay attention to the warnings on both prescribed and over-the-counter drugs and to ask a doctor about how to properly and best use over-the-counter medicine to treat arthritis. The FDA also has information about many medications.

Some treatment options are specialized for individual types of arthritis.

Osteoarthritis Treatment.

There are medicines to help senior citizens with pain associated with OA, and rest and exercise may ease movement in the joints. Managing weight is also important. If one experiences OA in the knees, a doctor can provide shots in the knee joint, which can help to move it without as much pain. Surgery may also be an option to repair or replace damaged joints in senior citizens.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatments.

Treatment can diminish the pain and swelling associated with RA and cause joint damage to slow down or stop. One will feel better overall, and it will be easier to move around. On top of pain and anti-inflammatory medications, a doctor might prescribe DMARDs, which are anti-rheumatic drugs that can slow damage from RA. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, can minimize swelling while waiting for DMARDs to kick in. Additionally, biogenic response modifiers block the damage inflicted by the immune system and help people with mild to moderate RA when other treatments have failed to work properly.

Gout Treatment.

If you’ve gone through a gout attack, talk to a doctor to discuss possible causes and future prevention of attacks. Work together with your doctor and other elder care providers to plan and execute a plan for prevention. Commonly, NSAIDs or corticosteroids are recommended for an acute attack. This treatment diminishes swelling, allowing you to feel better fairly shortly after treatment. Usually, the attack fully stops within a few days. If one has experienced multiple attacks, a doctor may be able to prescribe medication to prevent further attacks.

Exercise can help Arthritis.

In addition to taking the proper medication and allowing your joints to rest, exercise can help senior citizens to stay in shape, maintain strong muscles, and control symptoms of arthritis. Daily exercise like walking or swimming keeps joints moving while lessening pain and strengthening the muscles around joints. Before starting any new exercise program, it is important to discuss options with your physician.

Three types of exercise are the best for senior citizens with arthritis:

  • Range-of-motion exercises reduce stiffness, improve flexibility, and keep joints moving. Activities like dancing fit into this category.
  • Strengthening exercises strengthen muscles, which improves support and protection to your joints. Weight training fits into this category.
  • Aerobic or endurance exercises improve health in the heart and arteries, prevent weight gain, improve how your body works overall, and may decrease swelling in some joints. Riding a bike fits into this category.

Other things to do to manage Arthritis.

 

On top of exercise and weight control, a number of other methods may help senior citizens ease the pain around joints. Applying heat or cold to joints, soaking in a warm tub, or swimming in a heated pool may help you feel better and move your joints more easily.

Surgery may be an option when damage has become disabling or when other treatment options have not adequately diminished pain. With surgery, joints can be repaired or replaced with artificial ones. Commonly, arthritic knees and hips are replaced.

Unproven remedies.

Many senior citizens with arthritis try treatments that have not been tested or proven to help. Some are harmful, like snake venom, while others are harmless yet unhelpful, like copper bracelets.

Here are a few ways to determine whether a treatment is unproven:

  • The remedy is said to work for all types of arthritis and other diseases
  • Scientific support is from only one research study
  • The label doesn’t include directions or warnings of use

Areas for further research.

 

Studies suggest that acupuncture could ease OA pain in some senior citizens. Dietary supplements such as glucosamine and chondroitin are also under investigation and may reduce OA pain. More research is needed to determine whether these types of treatments actually work to reduce symptoms and damage to joints.

Talk to your doctor and others involved in your elder care.

Try not to make light of your symptoms by telling yourself that joint pain or stiffness is simply caused by aging normally. Your doctor and other elder care providers can discuss possible treatment options with you to safely minimize your pain and stiffness and prevent more serious joint damage.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

Healthy Eating, Exercise and Lifestyle Guide For Senior Citizens By David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

 

Healthy Eating and Lifestyle

While it is important for people of all ages to stay healthy, it is especially important for senior citizens to maintain healthy eating habits as well as to stay active which is important in the prevention of chronic illnesses like diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. By practicing healthier living practices, senior citizens can maintain a healthy weight, avoid depression, and stay mentally sharp. Those participating in caring for the elderly should be aware of these healthy living practices and work to both encourage and facilitate them.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a healthy diet includes many different types of food that are rich in nutrients. They have outlined specifically what this eating plan entails at the website.. Because this eating plan is designed specifically for senior citizens, it focuses on the types of foods that are important for preventing common ailments of older Americans like obesity and serious chronic illnesses.

Healthy Eating 101:

By following some of the tips listed, senior citizens can start a healthier lifestyle today:

  • Don’t skip meals. It is important to eat regularly in order to maintain normal metabolism and not become tempted to eat higher fat foods when food is consumed.
  • Eat a diet that is high in fiber. By eating foods like whole-grain breads, beans, vegetables, and fruits, you can lower your susceptibility to diabetes and heart disease.
  • Senior citizens especially should begin to adjust their diet to one that includes less calories and fat because the body will need less as it ages.
  • Calcium and Vitamin D are very important for nutrition and keeping bones strong. You can get this by either getting in at least three servings of dairy every day, or substituting these with soy-based beverages and proteins.
  • Senior citizens will have a harder time absorbing adequate amounts of the B12 vitamin. For this reason, it is important to eat cereals fortified with this nutrient or taking vitamin B12 supplements with meals.
  • Snack the smart way. Senior citizens will want to limit the amount of unhealthy snacking they do which involves foods high in calories and sugars. Instead, keep small portions of dried fruit, peanut butter, or crackers at hand to keep the appetite under control while remaining healthy.
  • Drink plenty of water. Although senior citizens often feel less thirsty then they used to, it is important to stay hydrated by either drinking water or water-based beverages like tea, coffee, soup, and skim milk.

Planning and Preparing Meals

 

Sometimes people find it hard to eat healthily because eating is often a social event which involves many people with different eating preferences and goals. While it is important to be able to enjoy a meal with family and friends, it is also important to maintain your own eating integrity by making sure everyone is on board with your personal healthy eating goals. Friends and family, as well as those providing elder care should facilitate healthy eating, not detour from it. The following tips address ways that senior citizens can maintain the healthy eating habits without sacrificing the social aspect of sharing a meal with others or learning to adjust to a lifestyle that involves eating with less people on a day-to-day basis.

  • Grocery shopping with others. This can be a fun and smart way to control the cost and quantity of food that you consume. If you don’t live with many people, this is a good way to split large-quantity items like potatoes and eggs which you may not be ableto use before expiration.
  • A time saving a smart way to eat healthy is cooking large quantities of food ahead of time and portioning for heating on later dates.
  • A quick way to prepare meals for yourself or for guests involves keeping frozen or canned fruits and vegetables on hand. Draining and/or rinsing canned foods is a good way to lower sodium or calories in foods that are kept in high sugar or high salt fluids.
  • Eating or preparing a meal shouldn’t always be a chore. Trying new recipes or eating outside can be a fun new twist on a meal with someone special.
  • Try to eat with people you enjoy to be around.
  • Some senior citizens have difficulty preparing meals, which is why it is important to become informed about home health care agencies or eldercare facilities that can aid in providing meals. The Eldercare Locator number is 1-800-677-1116.

Loss of Appetite or Desire to Eat

 

There are various reasons for why some senior citizens may not eat as well as they should or lose the desire to eat completely.

If you find that it is difficult to eat well, then it is best to speak with a healthcare provider or someone involved in your elder care about what can be done to help you eat better.

Some senior citizens are unable to eat well due to issues involving the condition of their teeth or issues with dentures. Checking with a dentist about physical pain that occurs when eating or other issues can help with these issues that lead to poorer eating habits.

When senior citizens lose family and friends or become depressed about events in their life, they may lose the desire to eat. In these instances, it is of the utmost importance that these individuals seek help from people they trust like their family, friends, church community, or those assisting with their elder care that will happily help them in finding ways to continue a healthy lifestyle and eating plan.

Some senior citizens complain that the flavor of foods change when they begin to take certain medications. While it is best to consult with a physician about issues surrounding medication, people can also take vitamin supplements with food that will help them stay healthy.

If you have someone who assists with your in home care, ask them to be vigilant about helping you eat healthy. Have them remind you to eat, and ask them to lend you a hand in preparing meals that are good for you.

Healthy Weight

Maintaining a healthy weight is important for being able to function in day-to-day life as well as stay mentally sharp. Senior citizens often lose or gain weigh as they age. If you are unsure about what weight you should maintain, consult your physician.

Health Risks Associated with Being Underweight

  • poor memory
  • compromised immunity
  • osteoporosis (weak bones)
  • decreases strength
  • hypothermia (lowered body temperature)
  • constipation

Health Risks Associated with Being Overweight

  • type 2 diabetes
  • high blood pressure
  • high cholesterol
  • heart disease
  • stroke (lack of oxygen transported to the brain)
  • some cancers
  • gallbladder disease

 

Because healthy weights will differ for everyone, it is important to verify with a physician whether it is healthy for you personally to lose or gain weight.

Staying Active

Participating in regular healthy amounts of physical activity can not only make you feel better, but it can make you less prone to diabetes, heart disease, and colon cancer. Staying active can be difficult for senior citizens, still it is an important part of a healthy lifestyle.

The following are some tips for maintaining a lifestyle that incorporates physical activity:

  • Know what amount of physical activity is appropriate for you. Everyone has different levels of activity that is safe for them, and while remaining active is important, always consult a health care provider about what is right for your lifestyle.
  • Take time to warm up, cool down, or take breaks when participating in a session of increased physical activity.
  • Take it slow. Always start slowly and build up to more intense levels of physical activities.
  • If you experience any pain, dizziness, or shortness of breath during exercise, stop the activity immediately.
  • Drink water.
  • Dress appropriately if you decide to exercise outdoors. Wear warmer clothes during the winter and wear lighter clothes during the summer while applying sunscreen or wearing sunglasses.
  • Wear the correct shoes for the activities that you participate in.

Types of Activity

 

Aerobic activities include activities that increase the heart rate and work the larger muscle groups. You may be able to speak a few words, but would not be able to carry on an entire conversation due to breathing patterns. Some examples of aerobics include:

  • brisk walking
  • water aerobics
  • tennis
  • house work
  • active play with children or pets
  • dancing

 

Begin incorporating small periods of this activity into your schedule during the week while slowly increasing the duration and frequency as time progresses. It is also important to incorporate different types of exercise that focus on balance and flexibility. Becoming used to a lifestyle with regular patterns of aerobic activity can reduce the effects of aging, control weight, lower risk of heart disease, improve flexibility, increase mood and energy, and expand social networks by meeting new people while doing various activities.

Strengthening activities involve the use of muscle groups against resistant forces like when lifting weights or doing yard work that involves lifting, digging, or pushing a lawn mower. This type of activity can keep muscles strong, reduce the need for a cane, reduce risk of bone injury, and help maintain a healthy weight.

Balance activities focus on muscles in specific areas of the body that encourage control as you move through space, reducing the likelihood of falls. This kind of activity could include walking heel to toe, standing on one foot, getting out of a sitting position without the use of the hands, and standing on the tip of your toes. Balance activities can help you stay steady on your feet and reduce the risk of fall and subsequent injury.

Flexibility activities increase the length of the muscles and can include stretching, yoga, and popular exercise programs like pilates. These activities can maintain the felxibility of joints, prevent stiffness, prevent injuries, and lower stress levels in general.

Weight-bearing activities require the muscles to work against gravity where the arms or legs bear the weight of the body. Activities like walking, tennis, and climbing stairs can build and maintain bone mass or reduce the risk of bone fractures.

Some activities incorporate multiple types of strengthening addressed above. What is important is that senior citizens find an enjoyable and do-able activity that will help them incorporate as many benefits as possible which will have far-reaching benefits to their health.

It’s Easy to Stay Healthy

A common misconception is that it takes an excessive amount of time and extra energy to maintain a healthy lifestyle. However, by just taking short walks for ten minutes a time or cleaning the house regularly can be practical ways to incorporate different physical activities into your daily schedule. And remember, staying healthy as a senior citizen will have increasing benefits as you continue to age.

Staying Motivated to Take Care of Yourself

Just because we age doesn’t mean that we are any less stressed by occurrences in life that may make us feel bad about ourselves or decrease our motivation to be good to ourselves. If anything, many of the challenges senior citizens face add stress.  Losing loved ones and friends or having trouble being independent with the added stressed of disease and functioning due to aging can cause depression or lifestyle changes that contribute to bad health. Here are some important tips for being good to yourself when you may not feel motivated due to circumstances out of your control:

  • Get plenty of sleep
  • Stay connected with family and friends
  • Join clubs or other social groups that you enjoy
  • Spend time with people that you enjoy
  • Volunteer at organizations in your community
  • Work a part-time job that isn’t too stressful or demanding
  • Watch a funny movie or find a way to laugh
  • Take up a hobby that you enjoy

 

Most importantly, senior citizens should remember that it is relatively easy and worth-while to maintain a healthy lifestyle as they age. Be sure to keep family, friends, and those involved in your elder care informed of your goals as they can help assist you. And remembering to eat healthy meals regularly, getting in physical activity, getting enough sleep, and being good to yourself are critical for maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

Sierra Club Responds to NV Energy Proposal for Retiring Coal Plants

April 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Carson City, Press-Media Releases 

Sierra Club Responds to NV Energy Proposal for Retiring Coal Plants

Coal retirements promising but questions remain on mix of renewables, energy efficiency, and gas

Carson City – A proposal being rolled out by NV Energy today in the state legislature would set new retirement dates for Nevada’s coal plants, including speeding up retirement of the controversial Reid Gardner plant. The legislation also increases new renewable energy and allows NV Energy to build several new gas plants.

In response, the Sierra Club Energy Task Force issued the following statement:

The Sierra Club welcomed news of NV Energy’s intention to retire the Reid Gardner coal plant by 2017 and to end its contract with Navajo Generating Station’s coal-fired power by 2019. The Club also expressed support for adding new renewable energy projects to replace some of the coal power.

“With this legislation, NV Energy unequivocally acknowledges that Nevada wants and needs to leave coal behind. Closing the Reid Gardner coal plant would clean up Nevada’s air pollution and reduce health risks for thousands of Nevadans,” said Jane Feldman, Sierra Club state Energy Task Force chair. “We strongly support closing that plant and fully cleaning up the site, including the polluted lands, air and water near the Moapa Band of Paiutes’ Moapa River Reservation.”

“Replacing that coal power with renewable energy will create jobs for Nevadans and a better future for our children. We are pleased to see additional renewable energy called for in this bill,” said Feldman.

However, Sierra Club said that concerns remain over NV Energy’s proposals to build new natural gas plants and suggested that more emphasis on energy efficiency and renewable energy is needed. “Energy efficiency can put money right back into the pockets of consumers every month,” said Feldman. “And if we build more renewable energy, costs remain stable for decades because the fuel costs for solar, wind and geothermal are free,” she continued.

Sierra Club is continuing to study the bill and will provide detailed input to the legislature as these proposals move forward.

Landscape Seniority: Safe & Efficient Tools for Senior Gardening and Lawn Care

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

One is never too old to enjoy the great outdoors by tending to the garden or mowing the lawn. Your golden years aren’t the time to delegate tasks to others or relinquish landscaping. Plenty of tools exist to make gardening and landscaping a breeze. With the appropriate ergonomic tools and judicious decision-making, you can safely continue your outdoor housekeeping for years to come.

Lawn Care

It may be tempting to give the kid next door a few bucks to mow your lawn, but why not do it yourself? You’ll continue to gain strength and endurance as well as a sense of satisfaction after a freshly mowed lawn. Seniors should consider a mower that’s easy to operate and one that poses little risk. For example, seniors can comfortably sit down on zero-turn mowers and cut the lawn at a swift pace. They can turn on a dime by rotating 180 degrees around its own axis and are adept at swerving around lawn obstacles. Another shrewd choice is the push reel mower, powered by nothing but your own body. These are the simplest mowers one can buy. Speaking of buying, they’re also the least expensive. It’s true that they may take the most effort, but reel mowers require the least maintenance, and they’re the safest by far.

Low-Maintenance Grass

Your lawn needn’t be full of attention-starved grass that requires consistent and frequent work. TreeHugger.com suggests a number of grass types that need little maintenance and water. Zoysia grass, Bermuda grass, St. Augustine grass, buffalo grass and fescue are convenient choices that will grow on despite neglect.

Ergonomic Gardening

Ergonomics is the science of maximizing the efficiency of equipment by reducing discomfort and fatigue for the user. When it comes to seniors and gardening, ergonomic tools are a godsend.

Self-Watering Container – The EarthBox, or a similar self-made self-watering container, provides an incredibly simple solution to growing plants. As its name suggests, this container waters automatically by way of a water reservoir. The EarthBox’s fertilizer strips gives plants the exact nutrients they need without any work on your part.

Radius Shovel – TreeHugger.com suggests the Radius shovel for gardening use. This ergonomic shovel is built with a lightweight fiberglass handle suitable for arthritic gardeners. A sharp and heavy blade easily cuts into the most compacted of soil.

Landscaper’s Wagon – Wheels make everything easier. Plop your heavy pots, plants and gardening materials in the wagon to easily cart off to your garden. Its pneumatic tires traverse the harshest terrain. Plus, the wagon’s sides fold down and form a flatbed.

Garden Kneeler – The garden kneeler cushions your knees during your gardening. The two side handles enable you to raise and lower yourself without back strain. When flipping the eight pound garden kneeler over, it takes on a second function as a comfortable bench.

The Vision Council Launches Online Resource for Low Vision and Saving Sight

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

The Vision Council is pleased to announce the launch of www.whatislowvision.org — a new web site created to educate the public on low vision, its symptoms, and the resources available to help.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130228/PH61076LOGO-a )
(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130228/PH61076LOGO-b )

As America’s baby boomers enter their senior years, they may notice a gradual loss in some areas of sight. Loss of peripheral or central vision could indicate low vision, a visual impairment that cannot be corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses, pharmaceuticals or surgery. More than 2.9M people in the U.S. suffer from low vision and it is most common in people age 60+.

What is low vision?
“More likely than not, everyone knows someone with low vision — maybe a mother, sister, neighbor, or co-worker,” said Dr. Paul Michelson, Chair of The Vision Council’s medical arm — known as the Better Vision Institute — and  a low vision consultant.  “Recognizing the symptoms of low vision early and taking the proper actions may help preserve sight and in some cases, lessen the advance of low vision.”

Low vision can impair the ability to complete activities of daily living or follow routines and enjoy pastimes — such as reading — that people take for granted.

Symptoms
At first, people might notice a bit of distortion in their vision.  An object that is straight in reality — a telephone pole, for example — may appear curved or wavy to a person with low vision.  A low vision diagnosis is often the result of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, or another aging eye disease.

Low vision differs from presbyopia, which is when the ability to focus on near objects diminishes. Presbyopia, which can be corrected with reading glasses or other optical solutions, typically emerges between ages 40 and 45.  Signs of low vision are broader than presbyopia and include:

  • Areas of blurred or distorted vision or spots and blotches in your vision
  • Shadowed or darkened field of view or noticeable loss of peripheral vision
  • A gradual loss of central vision
  • Cloudy and blurred vision or exaggerated “halos” around bright lights
  • Blind spots in your field of view

Preventive Measures and Resources
Seeing an eye doctor at the first sign of any visual changes can help to detect the diseases that result in low vision.  In general, seeing an eye doctor is an important step in maintaining eye health.  The onset of low vision is a slow progression of symptoms and the ultimate goal is to maintain remaining sight and prevent further deterioration in vision.

Sometimes, a pharmaceutical or surgical solution may stop further development of one of the diseases associated with low vision, but there are also eye care providers who specialize in low vision.  These specialists can introduce patients to low vision devices such as stand magnifiers, closed-circuit TVs, and telescopic lenses that help people affected by low vision maintain independence and improve their ability to perform daily tasks.

Dr. Michelson continued, “We urge people to check on family, friends, and neighbors who might be experiencing some of the signs of low vision. Vision training, vision rehabilitation, and low vision devices can help people maintain and optimize visual function, and preserve as much sight as is possible.”

At the onset of any symptoms of low vision, The Vision Council reminds people to:

  • Seek an accurate diagnosis and develop a good relationship with an eye care provider
  • Know the risk factors of not maintaining sight and the overall prognosis

To learn more about low vision and find resources, visit www.whatislowvision.org.

”The information and resources on this new website can teach people more about the changes they are experiencing and help them make the most of their remaining vision — which can lead to increased independence and quality of life,” said Dr. Michelson.

About The Vision Council
The Vision Council is the global voice for vision care products, practices, and services.  We represent eyewear manufacturers and suppliers in the optical industry by providing education, consumer outreach and advocacy.  The Vision Council also serves as a resource to the public who want to learn more about options in glasses and sunglasses, eyewear trends, and advances in technology.  Learn more at www.thevisioncouncil.org or find us on Facebook.

 

CONTACT: Erin Hildreth, The Vision Council, +1-703-548-5089; or Susan Caldwell, Access Public Relations, +1-540-204-4033

Top Five Tips To Save Your Vision: EyeCare America Encourages Prevention and Early Detection

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Many people take their vision for granted, but what if you lost your peripheral vision, developed a black spot in the center of your visual field, or even went blind altogether?  For more than 4.2 million Americans living with serious vision loss or blindness,  these and other vision challenges can make it difficult to enjoy life’s simple pleasures such as reading, playing cards, or watching grandchildren grow. Vision loss can also make it difficult to live independently, work, or drive. That’s why it is so important to prevent eye disease and vision loss whenever possible.

Often, preventive care and lifestyle choices can help keep your vision healthy. Ophthalmologists – eye physicians and surgeons – encourage seniors to follow these top five tips to safeguard vision:

  1. Get an eye exam. To protect healthy vision, seniors age 65 and older should have a dilated eye exam every 1-2 years, or as recommended by their ophthalmologist. Visit www.eyecareamerica.org to find out if you or a loved one qualifies for an eye exam at no out-of-pocket cost with one of EyeCare America’s volunteer ophthalmologists.
  2. Know your family history. Eye diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma can run in families, so it’s important to know your family’s history of eye disease and talk to your ophthalmologist about any possible genetic risk factors.
  3. Don’t smoke. Tobacco smoking is directly linked to many adverse health effects, including cataracts and AMD. Studies show that current smokers and ex-smokers are more likely to develop AMD than people who have never smoked.
  4. Eat right. A variety of vegetables, especially leafy green ones, are an important part of an eye-healthy diet. Researchers have found people on diets with higher levels of vitamins C and E, zinc, lutein, zeaxanthin, omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA are less likely to develop early and advanced AMD. For delicious recipes that incorporate these essential nutrients, EyeCare America offers a free, downloadable cookbook, called Feast Your Eyes on This.
  5. Protect your eyes from injuries. An estimated 2.5 million eye injuries occur in the U.S. each year, so it is critical to wear proper eye protection to prevent eye injuries, especially during home projects like gardening and cleaning. Eye injuries can also be prevented by securing loose rugs, railings, or other hazards that could cause falls or slips.

Seniors age 65 and older are at the greatest risk for eye disease and vision loss, and because diseases like AMD and glaucoma often have no early symptoms, comprehensive eye exams are especially important. EyeCare America provides care at no out-of-pocket cost to seniors age 65 and older through its corps of volunteer ophthalmologists across the U.S. and Puerto Rico.

EyeCare America is designed for people who:

  • Are U.S. citizens or legal residents;
  • Are age 65 and older;
  • Have not seen an ophthalmologist in three or more years; and,
  • Do not receive eye care through an HMO or the VA.

To see if you or a loved one age 65 or older is eligible, visit www.eyecareamerica.org. EyeCare America is co-sponsored by the Knights Templar Eye Foundation, Inc., with additional support provided by Alcon. The program is endorsed by state and subspecialty ophthalmological societies.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. Since its inception, EyeCare America has helped more than 1.7 million people.  More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

Ophthalmologists Consider Five Tests and Treatments that Would Benefit from Doctor-Patient Conversations

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

American Academy of Ophthalmology Joins Choosing Wisely® Campaign to Advance Quality Eye Care and Promote Health Care Savings

The American Academy of Ophthalmology today announced it is participating in the Choosing Wisely® campaign, a national initiative of the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation to encourage conversations between patients and their doctors about treatment options and efficient use of health care dollars. The Academy is one of 17 organizations joining Choosing Wisely today – representing more than 350,000 physicians, nurses, pathologists, radiologists and other health care professionals – to release lists of commonly performed tests, procedures and treatments that patients and physicians should discuss.

The United States spends more on health care than many other industrialized nations, yet often does not achieve better health outcomes. This may be explained in part by an overuse of unnecessary and duplicative medical tests. Choosing Wisely, which promotes best practices and better management of health care resources, complements physicians’ efforts to use evidence-based medicine to meet patients’ needs.

To ensure that the best care options are considered for ophthalmic patients, the Academy has identified five common tests and treatments that ophthalmologists and patients should discuss:

  1. Preoperative Medical Tests: Don’t perform preoperative medical tests – such as an electrocardiogram or blood glucose test – prior to eye surgery unless there are specific signs indicating a need for them.
  2. Imaging Tests: Don’t routinely order imaging tests when there are no symptoms or signs of significant eye disease.
  3. Antibiotics for Pink Eye: Don’t prescribe antibiotics for pink eye that is caused by an adenovirus.
  4. Antibiotics for Eye Injections: Don’t routinely provide antibiotics before or after injections into the vitreous cavity of the eye.
  5. Punctal Plugs for Dry Eye: Don’t treat dry eye by inserting punctual plugs before attempting other options, such as medical treatments with artificial tears, lubricants and compresses.

“Some experts estimate that up to 30 percent of health care delivered in the U.S. may be unnecessary or duplicative,” said David W. Parke II, M.D., CEO of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. “Not only does this represent significant waste, but it also underscores patients’ unnecessary exposure to risks associated with any test or procedure. The American Academy of Ophthalmology is participating in Choosing Wisely as a way to support evidence-based medicine and promote greater patient involvement in their eye care. By increasing conversations between ophthalmologists and those they treat, we can better guarantee that patients receive the right eye care at the right time.”

The Academy’s health policy committee led the development of the list of five tests and treatments with input from members and ophthalmic subspecialty societies. Numerous recommendations and supporting evidence were researched and reviewed under the leadership of William L. Rich III, M.D., the Academy’s medical director of health policy.

“In medicine, more isn’t necessarily better,” said Dr. Rich. “Conversations around the five tests and treatments identified by the American Academy of Ophthalmology can reduce the potential for over-treating our patients. We will continue our work to identify treatments that could benefit from better conversations between ophthalmologists and their patients.”

To date, twenty-five specialty societies have released lists through Choosing Wisely. The lists released today will be promoted nationwide through the Choosing Wisely campaign’s consumer partners, including Consumer Reports, AARP, Wikipedia and the National Business Coalition on Health.

The Academy’s participation in the Choosing Wisely campaign is one component of its ongoing efforts to promote responsible use of health care resources, without sacrificing quality of care. The Academy also provides a wide variety of educational programs, products and services to ophthalmologists — medical doctors specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye disease and conditions — and the patients they serve in order to improve patient care. The organization’s EyeSmart® program features the most trustworthy and medically accurate consumer information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries.

To learn more about Choosing Wisely and to view the complete lists and details about the recommendations, visit www.ChoosingWisely.org. To learn how patients can start conversations about the five ophthalmic tests and treatments above, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons — Eye M.D.s— with nearly 32,000 members worldwide.  Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org  The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trusted and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org  to learn more.

About the ABIM Foundation
The mission of the ABIM Foundation is to advance medical professionalism to improve the health care system. We achieve this by collaborating with physicians and physician leaders, medical trainees, health care delivery systems, payers, policy makers, consumer organizations and patients to foster a shared understanding of professionalism and how they can adopt the tenets of professionalism in practice. To learn more about the ABIM Foundation, visit www.abimfoundation.org, read our blog blog.abimfoundation.org, connect with us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.

About Choosing Wisely
First announced in December 2011, Choosing Wisely is part of a multi-year effort led by the ABIM Foundation to support and engage physicians in being better stewards of finite health care resources. Participating specialty societies are working with the ABIM Foundation and Consumer Reports to share the lists widely with their members and convene discussions about the physician’s role in helping patients make wise choices. Learn more at www.ChoosingWisely.org.

Pediatric Flatfoot – Cause for Alarm?

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Untreated Flat Feet in Children Can Result in Chronic Pain, Reduced Mobility

and an Increased Risk for Obesity

 

Parents keep a close eye on their growing children, watching for proper development and alert for any sign of a problem because small problems can have big implications. Surgeons at the Annual Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) this week are conferring with one another on Pediatric Flatfoot, a childhood condition that, if left untreated, can result in permanent deformity in adulthood. Flatfoot deformity makes mobility and exercise painful, increasing the risk of reduced cardiovascular health and obesity.

“Parents never want their child to undergo a surgical procedure,” says Mary Crawford, DPM, FACFAS, an Everett, Washington foot and ankle surgeon and conference presenter. “But uncorrected symptomatic flatfoot can lead to chronic pain and instability as the child ages into adulthood. Children will be on their feet for a long time to come. It’s vital to keep those feet healthy. A foot and ankle surgeon can help parents understand the options – surgical and non-surgical – for treating pediatric flatfoot.”

 

Not all children have symptoms, but others will complain of pain, tenderness or cramping in the foot, leg, and knee. Parents may notice an outward tilting of the heel, awkwardness or clumsiness in walking and difficulty with shoes. Pediatric flatfoot makes participating in activities more difficult, so parents should take note if their child is unable to keep up with playmates, tires easily or voluntarily withdraws from physical activities.

 

To diagnose a pediatric flatfoot, a foot and ankle surgeon examines the child’s foot in weight bearing and non-weight bearing positions, both in and out of shoes. The physician also notes how the child walks and evaluates the foot’s range of motion. In some cases, flat feet are associated with issues of the hip and knee, so the physician may examine those as well.

 

For further detailed analysis, the physician may order imaging tests such as x-ray, a CT scan, MRI or bone scan. Family history will be evaluated as well, since the presence of flatfoot disorder in the family increases the possibility of flatfoot in the child.

 

“There are different types of flatfoot deformities,” notes Crawford. “Thorough testing helps us pinpoint the causes of the flatfoot disorder and develop an appropriate treatment plan.”

 

Pediatric flatfoot can be divided into two categories, flexible and rigid. Flexible flatfoot is characterized by a normal arch when non-weight bearing, or sitting, and disappearance of the arch when standing.  There may or may not be symptoms. In the case of rigid flatfoot, however, the arch is stiff and flat when both sitting and standing. In most cases, children with rigid flatfoot display symptoms associated with the condition. In either case, flexible or rigid flatfoot, there are a variety of underlying reasons, requiring different treatments.

 

Babies often appear to have flat feet due to cramped positioning inside the womb, and the symptoms will abate with time. In other cases, the surgeon recommends stretching exercises or a soft brace for a short period. Children who do not exhibit symptoms typically do not require treatment, but will be monitored and reevaluated periodically by the foot and ankle surgeon.

 

For children who do exhibit symptoms, the physician may recommend physical therapy, shoe modifications, anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen to reduce pain and inflammation, or an orthotic device. This device fits inside the shoe and supports the structure of the foot. In some cases, surgery is the best alternative.

 

For more information on pediatric foot and ankle conditions or injuries, visit the ACFAS patient health education website, FootHealthFacts.org.

###

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of over 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons.  Founded in 1942, the College’s mission is to promote research and provide continuing education for the foot and ankle surgical specialty, and to educate the general public on foot health and conditions of the foot and ankle through its consumer website, FootHealthFacts.org.

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts March 2013 Calendar Of Events

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts March 2013 Calendar Of Events

495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101
Contact: Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993 Feb. 11, 2013
Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org
City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Spring Class Registration at Charleston Heights Arts Center (ages 2-adult)
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
March 1-April 3 registration for 7- to 8-week session of classes April 3-May 24.
Offered courses include ballet, jazz, hip hop, ballroom dancing, visual arts and private lessons in music and dance by appointment. For more information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org. Register for classes at www.artslasvegas.org/classes/register.htm beginning March 1.

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Spring Drama Class Registration (ages 4-17)
Registration Opens March 1 for 7-week class sessions that begin the week of April 3.
Cost: Fees range from $49 to $70.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
To register or for more information, call (702) 229-6553 or 229-6383, or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m.
Admission: $4 dollars per person per week at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of fun learning international dance styles, including Arabic, Armenian, Bulgarian, Chinese, Greek, Israeli, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian and Turkish folk dances. No need to bring a partner. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Contra Dances (ages 8+)
Saturdays, March 2 and 23. Group lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7 to 10 p.m.
Admission: $10 adults; $5 members, students & military; $3 children under 16 & non-dancers; pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance to a live acoustic band playing joyful fiddle tunes, driving reels and a waltz or two. All dances are taught and called; newcomers and families welcome. No need to bring a partner. Wear comfortable flat-soled shoes and casual clothing. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.
Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Auditions for “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale”
Saturday, March 2, 2013, 1 p.m.
No fee to audition.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Auditions for the Rainbow Company musical production of “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale” will start promptly at 1 p.m. Roles are available for ages 12 through adult. Comfortable clothes that allow for movement should be worn and a prepared song is strongly recommended. The show will be performed April 26-May 5. For more information, call 229-6553.

“The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle” presented by Target and ArtsPower (all ages)
Saturday, March 9, 10:30 a.m.
Cost: $3 general admission.
Historic Fifth Street School Auditorium, 401 S. 4th Street, 229-3515.
ArtsPower’s “The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle” tells the uplifting story of an ordinary train that performs an extraordinary feat of strength and courage. The story follows the adventures of The Little Blue Engine, who dreams of someday pulling the Piney Vale Ex¬press just like her best friend Rusty. For tickets and information, call 229-3515 or 229-6469 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, March 9, 7 to 11 p.m. Dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Admission: $5 members, military and students ages 13-25; $10 for non-members. Pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St. (702) 229-6383.
Presented by USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. For more information, call (702) 813-6694 or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org.

Downtown Cultural Series – Bill & Kate Isles Concert (all ages)
Friday, March 15, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
Bring your lunch to enjoy a concert by Bill and Kate Isles, an acoustic singer/songwriter duo based in Duluth, Minn. They tour nationally, entertaining audiences with a wide variety of musical styles, catchy melodies and memorable songs. For more information, visit www.billandkateisles.com or www.artslasvegas.org, or call (702) 229-3515.

Poets’ Corner
Friday, March 15, 7 p.m.
Admission is free.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Hosted by Keith Brantley, this monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants features the best local poetry talent.

St. Patrick’s Day Dance (adults)
Saturday, March 16, 7 p.m.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Admission: $10 in advance; $15 event day.
It’s easy to be green! Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day early by dancing to songs from the 1940s- 70s, from swing and foxtrots to Latin and jazz, performed by the Carl Grove Combo.
For tickets or information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.
Women and Young Women’s Conference 2013 (ages 14+)
“The Spirit Of A Woman…Body & Soul”
Saturday, March 23, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Admission is free, but advance registration is required. Call (702) 229-4800 to register.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
This dynamic event will promote personal empowerment and mentorship, with a focus on sisterhood. The purpose of the event is to strengthen communication between women and young women, creating and enhancing opportunities for understanding. A series of specialized workshops will be offered throughout the day to benefit and assist women as they share, teach, and learn from each other. Participants are asked to wear comfortable active wear for the workshops. Each adult participant is encouraged to bring a young lady or mentee of high school age, friend, mom, sister, or aunt to the event. The event is cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District.

Spring II Class Registration at the West Las Vegas Arts Center (all ages)
March 23-April 6 registration for 6-week session of classes April 10-May 18.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Cultural arts classes include African Drum; African Dance for Children and African Dance for Teens/Adults; Keep it Moving…Ballet & Tap; Ballet–Beginner/Intermediate; Modern Dance; Hip Hop; Zumba; Tae Kwon Do; Video & Documentary Creation; Music Production; Arts & Crafts – Kids Create and Craft It Up; and Private Piano/Voice lessons. To register, or for more information, call (702) 229-4800 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Folk Celebration and Stage Performance (all ages)
Saturday, March 23, 12:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Admission: $10.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Admission includes a 2 p.m. theatre concert performance in the Jeanne Roberts Theatre, featuring international dance artist “Zarnia,” who specializes in Middle Eastern dances with elaborate costuming, musician RJ Fox playing Flamenco-style guitar accompanied by flamenco dancers, and talented Las Vegas Kaminari Taiko Drummers, a performance group affiliated with the Japanese American Citizens League. View demonstrations and information 12:30-1:45 p.m., take dance lessons 3:30-6:30 p.m. A concert ticket stub will provide half off admission to the Contra Dance at 6:30 p.m. A food vendor will be on site from 12:30 to 6 p.m. This event coincides with the 2013 National Folk Organization’s Las Vegas conference. For tickets or information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Rainbow Company Spring Break Drama Workshop (grades 2-6)
Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Cost: $135. Advance registration is required.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Students will enjoy five full days of drama, with a performance on the main stage Saturday, March 30. For information and registration, call 229-6553 or 229-6383 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Spring Break Dance Camp (ages 12-18)
Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 3:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Cost: $75. Advance registration is required. Registration opened Feb. 1.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dedicated young dancers will flourish within this weeklong intensive and disciplined atmosphere available to intermediate- and advanced-level students (or students with a minimum of one year of dance instruction). Instruction led by Jackie Koenig and Jennifer Kidder. Dance attire required; please bring snacks. A student demonstration for family and friends at 6:30 p.m. Friday will conclude the camp. To register or more information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.
Spring Break Arts Workshop (ages 10-18)
Wednesday-Friday, March 27-29, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Admission is free, but advanced registration is required.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
This will be a heritage development workshop, exploring traditions and discovering individualities. Call (702) 229-4800 for information and registration.

Life Skills & Job Readiness Workshop (ages 14-19)
Saturday, March 30, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Admission is free, but registration is required.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Life Skills Training is a dynamic, skills-based program that promotes health and personal development. It is designed for those facing the new roles and responsibilities of becoming young adults transitioning into the workplace. The workshop focuses on goal setting, communication, decision making, risk, and maintaining relationships. The program is cosponsored by Nevada Partners. For more information and registration, call (702) 924-2134.
Exhibitions

“Narratives of Progress”
Artist Armin Mühsam
Through March 16, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
About his work, Mühsam says, “My work focuses on the relationship between the natural and the human-built. I imagine the land after technology has rendered it nearly uninhabitable, despite its promises to create a better world. I paint the absence of humans but not of humanity — man-made, sterile landscapes after the disappearance of the natural.” For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

“African-American Heritage”
Artist Lolita Develay
Through April 18, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
Lolita Develay is a 2014 Master of Fine Arts candidate at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She lived in Hollywood, Calif., prior to moving to Las Vegas in 2008. Her works are well painted surfaces which reflect her interest in traditions of realism, often focusing on the intrigue of light acting on an object. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

“Sculptures in Glass”
Artists Larry Domsky and Barbara Domsky
Feb. 26-May 30, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Grand Gallery, 495 S. Main St., First floor, (702) 229-1012.
Glassworks designed and created by this husband-and-wife team will be displayed. The work will include newer pieces that fit the format and space of City Hall as well as pieces from their collection of glassworks. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.
Nevada Watercolor Society’s 2013 Signature Members’ Exhibit
Feb. 28-March 23, during the reception and by appointment.
Artists’ reception Feb. 28, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information about the city gallery programs, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org. More information about the Nevada Watercolor Society can be found at www.nvws.org/.

“Spirit Journeys”
Artist Rainer Bertrams
March 21-May 4, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Artist’s reception March 21, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The images will focus on meditative subjects and themes that explore human kind’s existential struggles for a universal understanding of human nature. For questions about this exhibit or the gallery program, call 229-1012 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

“Equinox”
March 28-June 8, during reception and by appointment only.
Artists’ reception March 28, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Tips to increase safety and lower the risk of hearing loss when listening to music while exercising

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Listening to loud music through headphones can make a walk, run or bike ride more enjoyable, but it can distract from potential hazards. There are two serious issues: compromised safety and the risk of increased hearing loss. Serious accidents involving pedestrians wearing headphones with electronic devices such as iPods and MP3 Players have more than tripled since 2004. The risk of danger increases significantly with hearing loss.

Research in the January 2012 Injury Prevention Journal reports that 70% of collisions end in fatalities. Two out of three victims were male, under the age of 30. It was reported that nearly a third of the vehicles sounded some type of warning signal prior to the crash. Pedestrians wearing headphones are less likely to hear the warning signals around them, increasing their risk of injury. Many times the listener turns the volume of the music high to overcome the surrounding noise, but the loud music can mask the sound of a car horn, siren, or even a train whistle.

Researchers also advise against wearing Noise Cancelling Headphones when exercising outdoors.

In addition to safety issues, prolonged exposure to loud music can put a person at an increased risk of permanent hearing loss. Hearing loss is on the rise and occurring at a younger age. It affects one in five Americans over the age of 12. Untreated hearing loss can contribute to depression, withdrawal from social situations, relationship challenges, lower earnings, and increased risk for personal safety.

Below are tips to increase safety and lower the risk of hearing loss when listening to music while exercising:

1. Turn the volume on the electronic device down. Good rule of thumb: “60/60”. Listen at 60% volume for no more than 60 minutes at a time.
2. Listen through only 1 ear bud when exercising outdoors.

Reference: Lichenstein et al, Headphone use and pedestrian injury and death in the United States: 2004–2011, Injury Prevention Journal, January 2012.
To schedule a hearing test contact hi HealthInnovations at 1855-523-9355.

 

Nine simple ways you can improve your heart health

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Ten minutes a day is all you need to be heart healthy. Walking the dog, knowing your numbers, eating your greens – those are a few heart-healthy things that only Take 10.

Since 1963, to urge Americans to join the battle against heart and vascular diseases, Congress has advised the president to proclaim February “American Heart Month.” To celebrate American Heart Month this year, Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health is offering a variety of educational and screening events and opportunities for disease prevention and to support the fight against heart disease and stroke.

1. Beginning Feb. 1 though Feb. 28, Renown is helping people commit to improve their heart health in just 10 minutes a day. Every day in February, visit the Take 10 tab on the Renown Health Facebook page. From heart-savvy information and healthy recipes to useful apps, Renown will reveal a simple health tip that takes 10 minutes or less. Also enter to win an Ultimate Health Screening Package ($219 value).

2. Friday, Feb. 1, people are encouraged to promote awareness of heart disease by dressing in red on National Wear Red Day.

3. Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 5 and 6, Renown South Meadows Medical Center will host the life-saving services of Life Line Screening, the nation’s largest provider of preventive screenings. The screening event is designed to help local residents identify their risk of stroke, vascular disease and osteoporosis before the life-changing effects of these conditions can occur. The event is from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Northview Conference Room. Call 1-800-690-0295 to schedule an appointment.

4. Throughout February: Low-cost health screenings. These events include a variety of health screenings for cholesterol, diabetes, arthritis, heart disease and more. No appointment required. The schedule includes:

Feb 6, 8 – 10 a.m.: Renown Medical Group, 202 Los Altos Parkway.
Feb 13, 8 – 10 a.m.: 850 Mill St.
Feb 20, 8 – 10 a.m.: Renown Medical Group, 1343 W. Newlands Drive, Fernley
Feb 27, 8 – 10 a.m.: Renown South Meadows Medical Center, Northview Conference Room

5. Saturday, Feb. 9, Renown will participate in the Save a Heart – Simple 7 Health Expo featuring the American Heart Association’s Simple 7, steps to heart healthy living: Get Active, Control Cholesterol, Eat Better, Manage Blood Pressure, Lose Weight, Reduce Blood Sugar and Stop Smoking. The expo takes place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Scheels, Legends at Sparks Marina. The event is open to the public. No RSVP needed.

6. Friday, Feb. 15, at 12 noon, Renown will host a free Online Health Series webinar on the link between gout and heart disease. Renown Health Rheumatologist Malin Prupas, MD, FACP, will be the featured presenter. Register for this webinar at renown.org/onlinehealthseries.

7. Wednesday, Feb. 27, at 12 noon, Renown will host a free Online Health Series webinar on the early warning signs of heart attacks. Karen Meskimen, DNP, RN, will be the featured presenter. Register for this webinar at renown.org/onlinehealthseries.

8. Thursday, Feb. 28, Renown will host its annual Save Your Heart Luncheon featuring Letitia Anderson, MD, FACC. The educational luncheon will be from 12 noon to 1 p.m. at the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa, Paradise Ballrooms D & E. Doors open at 11:30 a.m. Cost is $10 and includes lunch. To RSVP, call 775-982-6483.

9. Friday, March 1, the American Heart Association will host its annual Go Red For Women Luncheon from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa:

Local Leader Larry W. Ruvo to receive national honor and one NV senior to receive $20,000 Horatio Alger scholarships

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

The Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans, Inc., is pleased to announce that Larry W. Ruvo is one of 11 individuals selected to receive the Horatio Alger Award in 2013.

The Horatio Alger Award is presented each year to individuals who have overcome obstacles to become successful entrepreneurs or community leaders. Based in Nevada, Larry W. Ruvo is the Senior Managing Director of Southern Wine & Spirits of Nevada. Recipients of this award become lifelong members of the Horatio Alger Association, and they serve as role models for its young scholarship recipients.

The Horatio Alger Association is pleased to announce that 106 students, who hail from every state in the nation, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, have been selected to receive National Scholarships. This is the Association’s top college scholarship, valued at $20,000, to be used toward a bachelor’s degree. It is accompanied by an all-expense-paid trip to Washington, D.C., to attend the annual Horatio Alger award ceremonies. These exceptional students were selected to receive National Scholarships because of the courage they demonstrated in overcoming personal challenges to attain academic success.

The 2013 Horatio Alger National Scholarship recipient from Nevada is:
• Jesus O. Dominguez-Becerra, North Valleys High School, Reno.

Both the Horatio Alger Award recipients and the National Scholarship recipients will be honored in Washington, D.C., during the 66th Annual Horatio Alger Awards Induction Ceremonies on April 4-6, 2013.

“The Association is proud to salute men and women of exceptional achievement with the Horatio Alger Award, and we are grateful to them for joining in our efforts to enable more and more young people to achieve their own versions of the American Dream through higher education,” said Tony Novelly, President and CEO of the Horatio Alger Association.
As a role model, the association will share Larry W. Ruvo’s life experiences with its scholars and the American public. Larry Ruvo began his career at the Sahara and Caesar’s Palace hotels in Las Vegas then went on to be the youngest manager at the Frontier Hotel. He established a liquor distribution company with famed Las Vegas entrepreneur Steve Wynn. He then created Southern Wine and Spirits and currently serves as the company’s managing director. The company is Nevada’s largest wholesale liquor, wine and beer importer and distributor. He is a longtime supporter of numerous charitable organizations. Dissatisfied with the pace of advances made in treating Alzheimer’s, Mr. Ruvo started a charitable organization called Keep Memory Alive, and he was instrumental in building the preeminent Cleveland Clinic LouRuvo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas. With the leadership of Mr. Ruvo, Keep Memory Alive increases awareness and raises funds for the research, management, and treatment of brain disorders at the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health. He has been listed as one of the Most Influential Businessmen of Southern Nevada and received the Governor’s Philanthropist of the Year Award.
The Association is also proud to announce that Joseph Neubauer, Chairman of the Board of ARAMARK Corporation based in Philadelphia, PA, has been selected to receive the 2013 Norman Vincent Peale Award. This award is annually conferred on an association member who has made exceptional humanitarian contributions to society, who has been an active participant in the association, and who continues to exhibit courage, tenacity and integrity. The award is named for Dr. Norman Vincent Peale who provided valuable leadership for the Horatio Alger Association for more than 40 years.

For a complete listing of all the 2013 Horatio Alger Award honorees, please visit http://www.horatioalger.org

The Horatio Alger Association
Founded in 1947, the Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans celebrates those individuals in our society whose determination and hard work have enabled them to overcome life’s obstacles to achieve success. As a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit, the Association provides college scholarships and mentorship to at-risk students who demonstrate courage in the face of adversity and dedication to pursuing higher education. The Horatio Alger Association has awarded almost $100 million to nearly 20,000 Scholars since the inception of its scholarship programs in 1984.

National Surgical Association Comes to Las Vegas

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) is hosting its 71st Annual Scientific Conference in Las Vegas on February 11-14, 2013 at Mandalay Bay Resort & Conference Center. ACFAS is a professional society of more than 6,800 foot and ankle surgeons dedicated to promoting the art and science of foot, ankle, and related lower extremity surgery; addressing the concerns of foot and ankle surgeons; and advancing and improving standards of education and surgical skill.

This year’s conference will bring about 1,500 surgeons and 150 exhibiting companies to the city of Las Vegas and we are looking forward to the Las Vegas experience! During the conference our surgeons will discuss the latest trends and procedures in foot and ankle surgery to help improve the health and quality of life for patients. Three of those topics have been turned into consumer-aimed press releases for distribution during the conference. The three press releases, which are embargoed until the conference, include:
Smoking and Bone Healing – A Risky Combination: Smokers take nearly 50 percent longer to heal after surgery than non-smokers. For every non-smoking patient whose bones heal normally, four smokers will experience non-union, or failure of the bone to mend. Surgeons discuss ways to treat this challenging patient population.
Lisfranc Injury – Easy to Miss, Hard to Get Over: Left untreated, this little-known and often overlooked foot injury can lead to serious long-term problems like osteoarthritis, chronic pain and even foot deformities. Surgeons assess the best treatment options for this complex injury that seems to be afflicting more and more professional athletes.

Pediatric Flatfoot Deformity – A Cause for Alarm? Left untreated, pediatric flatfoot poses a serious developmental threat to children. Foot and ankle surgeons re-examine the best course of treatment for optimal long-term health.
Please contact Tracy Hulett or Melissa Matusek if you are interested in receiving advance copies of these embargoed releases, or if you are interested in setting up interviews/photo opportunities with the College’s physician media spokespeople. You can reach us by e-mail at the below addresses or by phone at 773-693-9300. You can also visit FootHealthFacts.org, the College’s patient education website for more valuable foot and ankle health information.
Thank you and we hope to see you in Vegas!
Tracy Hulett
Manager, Public Relations and Communications
tracy.hulett@acfas.org
Melissa Matusek
Director of Marketing and Public Relations
melissa.matusek@acfas.org

Financial Solution for Baby Boomers is to Start Their Own Businesses, Says Founder of Bizstarters

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Jeff Williams proclaims the benefits of starting a business at the age of 50 or older 

CHICAGO, Jan. 9, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Americans over age 50 face a profound dilemma today – the vast majority want to keep working well into their sixties but fewer and fewer of them are welcome in the corporate world, often because of their age. But, according to Chicago-based business start-up expert Jeff Williams, running a business today is a relatively low risk, high reward alternative to a corporate job for these individuals.
Jeff Williams is the CEO and Chief Coach for Bizstarters.com, a nationally known coaching company helping individuals age 50 and over start their own businesses.
Over the past seven years Williams has seen a boom in business startups by people over 50, but he says: “Many, many more older boomers need to seriously look at starting a business if they want to continue to work. And, many will if they understand the new lower cost, higher profit version of small business that’s possible today.”
Williams suggests seven reasons why starting a business is “THE way to work today” for 50+ boomers:
• Your age doesn’t matter when you run your own business. Your customers don’t care how old you are. They only care that you deliver what you promised when you promised it.
• Technology lets you look big when you’re small. Thanks to technology, more and more business owners are working from home, earning $100,000 or more per year.
• New businesses last longer than new jobs. More than 50% of new hires today only last 18 months in the job. More than 55% of new businesses last at least two years, with many running five years or longer.
• You have a lot of people near your age to sell. You have 78 million boomer peers to sell to – they see you as a “sister or brother.” You have 42 million people over age 70 to sell to – they see you as a “son or daughter.”
• It’s never been cheaper to run a business. Many highly profitable businesses today cost less than $500 per month to run.
• You determine your financial progress. You set financial goals as you wish and create plans to achieve them. You are the “boss.”
• You can continue to run your own business for as long as you wish. In fact the IRS gives you a number of ways to legally put away up to 40% of your salary in deferred retirement accounts.
Jeff Williams is widely quoted in articles on boomer entrepreneurs and spoke on the topic at the recent AARP convention held in New Orleans. He offers tips for starting a successful business in his new free digital e-book: “10 Keys to Starting a Profitable Business After 50” available at www.bizstarters.com.
Contact: Jeff Williams, 847-305-4626, cell – 224-300-1820, jeff@bizstarters.com, www.bizstarters.com.

Hometown Health Announces Region’s First Electronic Member ID Card

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Hometown Health Announces Region’s First Electronic Member ID Card

RENO, Nev. (Oct. 22, 2012) – For all those who dig through wallets, purses or pockets to locate their insurance ID cards, Hometown Health now offers an alternative – the Hometown Health eCard. With the region’s first Electronic Member ID Card, Hometown Health members can access their secure eCard from their smartphones and view, fax or email a copy of the card directly to a healthcare provider’s office.

“Hometown Health members now have on-the-go access to their insurance information, such as co-pay amounts,” said Ty Windfeldt, vice president of Hometown Health. “This leading-edge technology provides our members with added convenience not currently available by others in our market.”

The Hometown Health eCard is available to commercial, fully-insured and self-funded members and members of Senior Care Plus, a Medicare Advantage Plan offered by Hometown Health.

Members can download this free app for iPhones, iPads and Android smartphones by visiting their mobile phones’ app store and searching for ”Hometown Health eCard.” For additional information, visit hometownhealth.com/ecard.

About Hometown Health
Established in 1988, Hometown Health is the insurance division of Renown Health. Hometown Health is northern Nevada’s largest and most experienced health-insurance company. Providing wide-ranging medical coverage and great service to members, Hometown Health represents a philosophy of healthcare that emphasizes active partnerships between members and physicians. Hometown Health values prevention as a key component of comprehensive care – reducing the risks of illness and helping to treat small problems before they can become more severe. Hometown Health offers a number of insurance products including HMO, PPO, HSA, Dental, Vision and Senior Care Plus, northern Nevada’s first Medicare Advantage Plan. For more information, call 775-982-3000 or visit hometownhealth.com.

Two Health Screening Events Offered Through Renown

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Two Health Screening Events Offered Through Renown

RENO, Nev. (Oct. 23, 2012) – Renown Health Institute for Heart & Vascular Health is pleased to host the life-saving services of Life Line Screening, the nation’s largest provider of preventive screenings, to help local residents identify their risk of stroke, vascular disease and osteoporosis before the life-changing effects of these conditions can occur.

The event is open to local residents and will be held Thursday, Nov. 8, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., at Renown Regional Medical Center, 1155 Mill Street., in the Mack Auditorium, and Friday, Nov. 9, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at South Meadows Medical Center, 10101 Double R Blvd., in the Capri Conference Room. To pre-register for a screening contact Life Line Screening at www.lifelinescreening.com, or call 1-800-690-0295 to make an appointment. For directions, please dial 775-982-4100.

Offering these preventive services can help save lives and are painless and affordable. Symptoms are rarely present, and if they are, they are generally subtle, almost unnoticeable. In fact, half of all stroke victims don’t have any symptoms prior to their stroke. A simple screening may save you or your loved one’s life.

Screenings provided will include:
• Carotid Artery Screening – painless, non-invasive Doppler ultrasound used to visualize the carotid arteries, the arteries that bring blood to the brain. The majority of strokes are caused by plaque build up in these arteries.

• Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening – Ultrasound is used to visualize the abdominal aorta, the largest artery in the body, to measure the diameter of the aorta. This measurement can indicate if there is a weakening in the aortic wall which can cause a ballooning effect known as an aneurysm. Abdominal aortic aneurysms can burst. When they do, it is usually fatal.

• Peripheral Arterial Disease Screening – PAD is also known as “hardening of the arteries.” Individuals with PAD have a 4 to 6 fold increased risk of heart disease. Risk is evaluated through a measurement called the “Ankle-Brachial Index,” which is obtained by reading the systolic pressure in the ankle and arm.

• Osteoporosis Screening – Ultrasound is used to estimate the bone density of the heel. This can indicate if there is a reduction in bone density, which may indicate the presence of osteoporosis. The heel is used because it is similar in composition to the hip, where disabling fractures often occur.

• Atrial Fibrillation is an abnormal heart beat (arrhythmia) that affects the atria – the upper chambers of the heart – and is the most common form of sustained arrhythmia. 2.5 million Americans have been diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, and for those over age 40, there is a one in four chance of developing the condition.

Global Vitamin D Interactive Map Illustrates Vitamin D Insufficiency Among U.S. Population and Worldwide

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Worldwide: Rates of vitamin D insufficiency are higher among women than men with older women being at most risk for developing osteoporosis.

The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) has launched an interactive global map of vitamin D status, which presents a snapshot of vitamin D levels worldwide. The map and accompanying publication1 confirm that vitamin D insufficiency is a major public health issue in both the developing and industrialized world, with more than one third of all the populations studied, showing insufficient levels of vitamin D2.

Osteoporosis is a serious chronic disease which affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Vitamin D improves bone mineral density, which lowers risk of fracture, while also improving muscle strength, balance, and leg function which decreases the risk of falling and sustaining a fracture in the first place. As a consequence, vitamin D insufficiency has been linked to a higher risk of osteoporotic fractures. Studies show that adequate vitamin D intake can reduce the risk of falls and fractures by around 30 percent3.

Additional key findings include:
„h Older people are especially at risk for vitamin D insufficiency, including older women who are a risk group for osteoporosis, and those living indoors in institutionalized care;
„h Overall, insufficient vitamin D levels were detected in more than one third of the study population4;
„h Vitamin D insufficiency affects both the developing world and industrialized world;
„h The main source of vitamin D is sunlight, but even in sunny countries, vitamin D levels are generally low and below recommended levels (taking India as example: a sunny country; yet, with low vitamin D status);
„h It is estimated that 50-70 percent of the European adult population have insufficient levels of vitamin D.
1 A Global Representation of Vitamin D status in healthy populations, Wahl et al. Archives of Osteoporosis, August 2012
2 Understood as mean 25 (OH)D values below 50 nmol/l
3 A pooled analysis of vitamin D dose requirements for fracture prevention. Bischoff-Ferrari HA et al New England Journal of Medicine. 2012.
4 Blood levels below 50 nmol/l considered as insufficient

In the U.S., approximately 30 percent of the study population had sub-optimal vitamin D levels, rising to around 70 percent among participants with darker skin color, highlighting skin color as a risk factor for vitamin D insufficiency. Overall the U.S. vitamin D status was significantly higher compared to other regions, which may in part, be attributable to the routine fortification of foods with vitamin D (such as milk, juice and cereals).

The map has also created a very clear picture as to where the vitamin D insufficiency knowledge gaps exist and where further research is required. Dr. Eggersdorfer added, ¡§There is far too little data available, for example, in relation to adolescents and young people, and across the developing world in general. These maps are an important starting point, but it is essential that research continues to better understand the scale of vitamin D insufficiency.¡¨

DSM joins IOF in calling on healthcare policymakers to raise awareness of vitamin D insufficiency and to take action to ensure intake of recommended vitamin D levels, including through safe and effective measures such as food fortification, access to proper supplements and better consumer education.

Additional country findings include:
„h In Germany 57 percent of men and 58 percent of women had vitamin D status below recommended levels, rising to 75 percent among 65-79 year olds
„h U.K. studies focused on older people reveal that nearly two thirds of women (57 percent), and half of men (49 percent) are not getting enough vitamin D
„h In the Netherlands, around half of all study participants had sub-optimal vitamin D levels
„h The Middle East revealed lower vitamin D status compared to Europe which could result from cultural factors such as clothing and lifestyle
„h Asia showed a widespread insufficient vitamin D status across different countries, with a few exceptions (vitamin D status was ranked desirable in Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam)
„h Most regions offer some data, however no information was available for Central America, South America (except Brazil) and much of Africa
„h The most striking data gaps were found in children and adolescents
DSM ¡V Bright Science. Brighter Living..

Royal DSM is a global science-based company active in health, nutrition and materials. By connecting its unique competences in Life Sciences and Materials Sciences DSM is driving economic prosperity, environmental progress and social advances to create sustainable value for all stakeholders. DSM delivers innovative solutions that nourish, protect and improve performance in global markets such as food and dietary supplements, personal care, feed, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, automotive, paints, electrical and electronics, life protection, alternative energy and bio-based materials. DSM¡¦s

More information can be found at www.dsm.com

Ophthalmologists Offer Sight-Saving Eye Care to Prevent Blindness

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

EyeCare America promotes vision loss prevention in U.S. through no out of pocket-cost eye exams and care

According to the World Health Organization, nearly 180 million people suffer from blindness or visual impairment globally, yet 75 percent of blindness could be prevented or treated with sight-saving eye care. In observance of World Blindness Awareness Month, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, urges the public to make eye exams and care a top priority to maintain their healthy vision.

A variety of problems are responsible for blindness around the world, and the leading causes of blindness and vision loss in the United States are age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataracts, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. More than two-thirds of visually impaired adults in the U.S. are age 65 or older. The number of Americans with age-related eye disease is expected to double within the next three decades unless something is done to reverse the trend.

To better prevent blindness in the U.S., EyeCare America encourages seniors to visit www.eyecareamerica.org to find out if they qualify for an eye exam and up to one year of care at no out-of-pocket cost. EyeCare America matches eligible patients age 65 and older with an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor – who will provide a comprehensive medical eye examination.

“Regular eye exams are imperative to detect and treat eye diseases and prevent serious vision loss,” said Richard P. Mills, M.D., chairman of EyeCare America. “This is especially true for people age 65 and older who are at increased risk for eye diseases. That’s why EyeCare America is so focused on providing access to eye care, and we hope that fewer people will suffer from preventable causes of blindness as a result.”

EyeCare America is made possible through the generous support of the Knights Templar Foundation, Genentech and Alcon. To see if you or a loved one is eligible, visit the online referral center at www.eyecareamerica.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

Hometown Health Offers Drive-Thru Flu Shots at Renown South Meadows

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases, Reno 

Hometown Health and Senior Care Plus will provide northern Nevada residents with the convenience of drive-thru seasonal flu shots, Saturday, Oct. 6 from 8 a.m. to noon, at Renown South Meadows Medical Center, 10101 Double R Blvd. This event is one of more than 45 scheduled Renown Health flu and pneumonia shot offerings around the Truckee Meadows community this season.

“The drive-thru flu shot event is one of our most popular events because of the ease and convenience it offers,” said Ty Windfeldt, vice president of Hometown Health. “Depending on wait times, the entire process can take as little as 10 minutes. It’s great for people who know they should get the shot or want the shot but have trouble finding the time to fit in a visit to their doctor’s office.”

Flu shots are offered at no cost to Medicare beneficiaries (Part B), members of Senior Care Plus or Hometown Health fully insured HMO and PPO plans and Renown Health employee plan members. All other individuals can receive the seasonal flu shots for $28. Pneumonia shots will be offered for those people whose medical conditions could be helped by one (individuals must meet CDC requirements). There are no out-of-pocket costs for Medicare (Part B), Senior Care Plus members or Hometown Health fully insured HMO and PPO plan members. For all others, the pneumonia shot is $70.

“The Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommends a flu vaccine as the first and most important thing people can do to protect against the flu,” said Lori Mitchell, health management services manager at Renown Health. “Additional preventive actions like washing your hands regularly and covering your cough will help stop the spread of germs.”

If unable to attend this flu shot event, people are encouraged to visit renown.org/flu for a complete flu and pneumonia shot schedule and locations. Pediatric flu shots are available by appointment only for children ages six months to eight years old. Call 775-982-5433 to schedule. Flu shots are available to children ages nine to 17 with a parent present.

About Hometown Health
Established in 1988, Hometown Health is the insurance division of Renown Health. Hometown Health is northern Nevada’s largest and most experienced health-insurance company. Providing wide-ranging medical coverage and great service to members, Hometown Health represents a philosophy of healthcare that emphasizes active partnerships between members and physicians. Hometown Health values prevention as a key component of comprehensive care – reducing the risks of illness and helping to treat small problems before they can become more severe. Hometown Health offers a number of insurance products including HMO, PPO, HAS, Dental, Vision and Senior Care Plus, northern Nevada’s first Medicare Advantage Plan. For more information, call 775-982-3000 or visit hometownhealth.com

Helping Seniors to Vote

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General, Press-Media Releases 

With a pivotal, bitterly contested election less than two months away, the ACLU has launched a campaign to get accurate and accessible information on voting and registration into the hands of seniors.

The “Let Me Vote” initiative will help voters find out how to register, what identification they may need to vote and how to take advantage of early voting in states where that’s offered.

In a time when dozens of states have attempted or enacted measures to suppress voter turnout, we need to ensure that people—especially students, the elderly and persons of color—know their rights.

Among the resources we’ve deployed is an interactive map that lets users click to see the voting rules for each state. For example, someone who goes to the information for Kansas would find that the state now requires photo ID for all voters, while Florida provides information on voting early and eligibility to vote if a person was convicted of a crime.

Many ACLU affiliates also launched their own “Let Me Vote” campaigns to get information to at-risk voters in their states. Affiliates in Florida, Michigan, Ohio and Pennsylvania are also partnering with grassroots organizations to make sure their constituencies get the information they need.

Voting is our must fundamental right. As the nation’s best-known guardian of the Constitution, the ACLU wants the voices of all eligible voters to be heard. The “Let Me Vote” campaign will go a long way toward making that happen.

I invite you to take a look at our resources, including a just-released video that exhorts people to “make their voice heard,” at www.aclu.org/letmevote.

Please don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions or would like to arrange for an interview with one of our experts. Thanks!

Blindness and Vision Loss Spike by 23 Percent in the U.S.

September 24, 2012 by · Comments Off on Blindness and Vision Loss Spike by 23 Percent in the U.S.
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

American Academy of Ophthalmology Urges Seniors to Save their Sight through Prevention and Early Detection

Blindness and vision impairment are on the rise in the United States. A recent report by Prevent Blindness America indicates that, since the year 2000, incidence of blindness and vision impairment has increased by 23 percent among Americans age 40 and older.[i] However, most blindness in this country is preventable with proper eye care. The American Academy of Ophthalmology and EyeCare America urge Americans to get regular eye exams to better prevent and detect sight-stealing eye diseases.

Rising rates of age-related eye diseases and conditions are largely to blame for the increase in vision loss. Four of the most common causes of vision loss are diabetic retinopathy, where blood vessels in the retina swell or become blocked due to diabetes; age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a breakdown of the eye’s macula; glaucoma, an eye disease that damages the optic nerve; and cataracts, in which the eye’s lens becomes clouded. These conditions have shown a marked increase over the past 12 years:
• The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy increased by 89 percent.
• The frequency of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) increased by 25 percent.
• The incidence of glaucoma increased by 22 percent.
• The number of people affected by cataracts increased by 19 percent.[ii]
As baby-boomers continue to age, the incidence of age-related eye disease is also expected to continue to increase. Currently, people age 80 and older constitute only 8 percent of the population, but account for 69 percent of all cases of blindness.[iii] Early detection and treatment by an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor – may help prevent and in some cases, such as cataracts, even reverse vision loss.

Many seniors age 65 and older may qualify for an eye exam and up to 1 year of care at no out-of-pocket-cost through EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. EyeCare America matches qualifying patients age 65 and older with an ophthalmologist who provides a comprehensive medical eye examination. EyeCare America is co-sponsored by the Knights Templar Eye Foundation, Inc, with additional support from Alcon. To see if you or a loved one is eligible, visit the online referral center at www.eyecareamerica.org.

“Regular eye exams are imperative to detect and treat eye diseases and prevent serious vision loss,” said Richard P. Mills, M.D., chairman of EyeCare America. “This is especially true for people age 65 and older who are at increased risk for eye diseases. That’s why EyeCare America is so focused on providing access to eye care, and we hope that fewer people will suffer from preventable causes of blindness as a result.”

To learn more about EyeCare America or to find out if you or a loved one qualifies for the program, visit www.eyecareamerica.org. Learn more about eye diseases and conditions, and keeping your eyes healthy at www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® public education program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision, by providing the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. Visit www.geteyesmart.org to learn more.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. Since its inception, EyeCare America has helped more than 1.7 million people. More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

Fall Prevention Week!

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Fall Prevention Week Is Rapidly Approaching! “Don’t Fall Down! Fall Prevention 101 for Older Adults” Now Available as E-Book

The third week in September has been nationally recognized as “Fall Prevention Week” and we need your help to increase awareness of the growing public health concern of falls among our aging population!

Falls are the leading cause of accidental death and non-fatal injury for people over the age of 65. The greying of America is causing major concern among government agencies due to the financial and emotional costs to individuals, their families and society. In 2000, the average cost of a fall was over $28,000 (CDC, 2006). The good news is that up to 50% of falls can be prevented through increased awareness and behavior change.

“Don’t Fall Down! Fall Prevention 101 for Older Adults” explains situations that increase the risk of a fall and how a person can reduce that risk. Some factors can be changed and others must be accepted. The first step a person can do to prevent falls is become aware of things that contribute to instability and then make the necessary change when possible.

Balance is a complicated messenger system and this 70-page book offers scientifically-researched concepts in an easy to understand manner. The reader will gain a better understanding of what may be causing loss of balance, how to reduce the risk of a fall and where to go for help.

The index includes a “Help, I’ve Fallen and I CAN Get Up” demonstration, Fall Risk Medications List, Home Safety Checklist and a Senior Resource Directory.
Written in large print, this is a must read for older adults, loved ones, family members, caregivers, staff members, program planners, activity directors, nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, and doctors.

Knowledge is empowering. This easy to read book encourages a person to take responsibility his/her well-being in order to remain independent.

To request a review copy of this e-book, or to arrange an interview with the author, please contact:

Name: Kelly Ward, aka, “The Fall Prevention Lady”
E-mail: wardkelly@mac.com
Website: http://www.thefallpreventionlady.com
Tel: 916-821-5715

Renown Health Notices

Renown Health is committed to providing media with the latest news and events, national health trends and observances. Subject matter experts are available to discuss the following topics. Please contact Dan Davis at 775-982-6370 or ddavis2@renown.org to schedule an interview. Photos and video can also be made available.

INSIDE RENOWN HEALTH
• Hand Foot and Mouth Disease – During August, Washoe County School District and the Washoe County Health District issued warnings to parents of school children about hand, foot and mouth disease. A Renown Health pediatrician is available to answer questions about the disease and to suggest ways to prevent its spread.
• FastTrack ERs – The Emergency Rooms (ERs) at Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center now have the region’s first and only FastTrack ERs. Open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, the system is designed to treat patients who need immediate attention for small emergencies including minor cuts and burns, allergic reactions and other minor injuries. A Renown Health representative is available to discuss how FastTrack ER will help improve a patient’s ER experience.
• Pathway to Excellence® – Both Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center have been recognized as the first two Pathway to Excellence® hospitals in Nevada by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. This award honors a work environment designed to improve overall nursing satisfaction and retention of quality nursing staff. A Renown Health representative is available to discuss what this honor means for patient care.

NATIONAL TRENDS LOCALIZED
• Digital Accountability to Get Healthy – Getting exercise, eating right and losing weight always seems to be a challenge. Already connected to the digital world, people have turned to using social media tools and platforms to achieve their health goals. Renown Health has Healthy Tracks, an online program, to encourage employees to get screenings, exercise and eat nutritiously. A representative can speak on the benefits of digital accountability and how community members can become part of the Healthy Tracks challenge.
• Swallowing foreign objects – Each year, more than 100,000 cases of kids swallowing foreign objects are reported in the United States. Sometimes, the swallowed object may not harm a child at all. Other times, a doctor’s visit may be necessary. A Renown Health representative is available to talk about what to do if your child swallows something he or she should not.
• Dense breasts causing mammogram concerns – More women are learning from their physicians that they may have breasts too dense for mammograms to give a good picture. Women whose breast tissue is very dense have a greater risk of developing breast cancer than women whose breasts contain more fatty tissue. In addition, dense breast tissue makes spotting possible tumors on a mammogram more difficult. A Renown Health specialist can discuss other preventative measures and screenings women should take.

IMPORTANT HEALTH DATES/OBSERVANCES
• National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month – More than 23 million children and teenagers in the United States ages 2 to 19 are obese or overweight. Nearly one third of America’s children are at early risk for Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and even stroke. A pediatrician from Renown Health can discuss ways to prevent childhood obesity and keep children healthy.
• Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month – More than 20,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year, and approximately 15,000 women die annually from the disease. Ovarian Cancer is referred to as the silent killer because it usually is not discovered until its advanced stages. A gynecologist is available to talk about ways women can discover and effectively treat ovarian cancer early.
• Prostate Cancer Awareness Month – Prostate Cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in America affecting 1 in 6 men. Renown Institute for Cancer offers patients PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) screenings, da Vinci Robotic Surgery and leading radiation treatment options including TomoTherapy. Low-cost health screenings are offered every Wednesday. A local doctor is available to speak about this screening and cancer treatment options.

Free Screenings During Senior Fest

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General, Health and Home Care 

Hundreds of seniors will take advantage of free health screenings offered at Senior Fest 2012, Tuesday, Sept. 4 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Reno Town Mall. Last year, seniors lined up at the large tented area to participate in this once a year community outreach for tests offered by the health care team of professionals at Renown Health and Senior Care Plus.

Attendees, age 50 and older, can receive screenings regardless of their health insurance carrier. They include a Basic Metabolic Panel and Lipid Profile, Glycohemoglobin (Hemoglobin A1C) for known diabetics, blood pressure check and body mass index calculation. A pharmacist will also be available to review medications. Lab screenings will be offered from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

In addition to screenings, flu and pneumonia shots will be available at a low cost to general attendees. Medicare beneficiaries (Part B) and members of Senior Care Plus will receive the shots with no out-of-pocket cost.

Renown Health representatives will also be present to share important health information about specialized senior services, knee and hip joint replacement, cancer, heart services, Medical Group and Urgent Care and Cosmetic Laser & Skin Care.

For more information about the health screenings, contact Renown Wellness Resources at 775-982-5433.

About Hometown Health
Established in 1988, Hometown Health is the insurance division of Renown Health. Hometown Health is northern Nevada’s largest and most experienced health-insurance companies. Providing wide-ranging medical coverage and great service to members, Hometown Health represents a philosophy of health care that emphasizes active partnerships between members and physicians. Hometown Health values prevention as a key component of comprehensive care – reducing the risks of illness and helping to treat small problems before they can become more severe. Hometown Health offers a number of insurance products including HMO, PPO, HSA, Dental, Vision, and Senior Care Plus, northern Nevada’s first Medicare Advantage Plan. For more information, call 775-982-3000 or visit hometownhealth.com.

About Senior Fest
The 17th annual Senior Fest is the largest senior citizen outreach in northern Nevada. It offers informational booths featuring businesses and organizations that provide senior services in the Truckee Meadows community. Senior Fest is held at Reno Town Mall on the corner of Peckham Lane and South Virginia, across from the Reno Sparks Convention and Visitors Authority. Parking is free at both the mall and the Atlantis Casino parking lot. For more information, call 775-348-0717.

Free Senior Help Fair

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

Free Senior Help Fair Provides Vital Information & Services

The Senior Help Fair is a collaborative event hosted by community-based organizations comprised of health care, senior service providers and government. The HELP Fair attendees will be treated to a variety of vendors, offering health and wellness screenings, health-related tips and information about local services from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thursday Sept. 6, 2012, on the campus of Christ Lutheran Church, located at 111 N. Torrey Pines Drive.

The Senior Help Fair is a one-stop destination for information about local services and organizations and is open to all ages. More than 50 agencies and companies will be on hand to provide information on community services for seniors. Community agencies will be on hand to help seniors connect with resources. Assistance programs that will be available include nutrition support, energy assistance, medication costs, affordable housing, legal services and transportation including the TAP taxicab assistance program. There will also be free health screenings for blood pressure, diabetes risk, vision, falls risk and dementia.

“This fair will help all seniors and those who care for them navigate the programs and services available to help people and to give voice to their concerns regarding services and resources,” said Senior Help Fair Organizing Committee Chair Jeff Klein. Individuals, who are 65 or over, should bring their identification and Medicare cards.
Along with the more than 50 agencies and companies offering information and services, free lunch will be served to the first 200 attendees, local singer Mark Miller will be providing entertainment and many door prizes will be offered on the hour.
The best time to think about aging is before the need arises. If an emergency happens, family members have to scramble to seek out options for care within a short time period, often not being able to take the time to make the best decision. “There are still a large number of people in the state who do not know what senior services are offered, or that these services even exist, so we will continue outreach efforts to the community,” said Commission on Aging member Lucy Peres “The goal is to raise awareness of health and safety related services in the state.”

The fair will also provide an opportunity for seniors to speak with their legislators and voice their opinions and concerns on issues that affect their daily lives.

When: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Thursday Sept. 6, 2012
Where: Campus of Christ Lutheran Church 111 N. Torrey Pines Drive
Information: Call Nevada Senior Services (702) 648-3425 www.nevadaseniorservices.org

Senior Care Plus Offers Free Screenings During Senior Fest

Senior Care Plus, a Medicare Advantage Plan from Hometown Health, will offer free lab screenings during Senior Fest. Senior Fest is Tuesday, Sept. 4 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Reno Town Mall.

Lab screenings will be offered from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Attendees, age 50 and older, can receive screenings regardless of their health insurance carrier. They include a Basic Metabolic Panel and Lipid Profile, Glycohemoglobin (Hemoglobin A1C) for known diabetics, blood pressure check and body mass index calculation. A pharmacist will also be available to review medications.

Senior Care Plus members can receive a free FIT (fecal immunochemical test) at-home cancer screening and a heel bone scan (100 screenings will be offered for women only).

In addition to screenings, flu and pneumonia shots will be available at a low cost to general attendees. Medicare beneficiaries (Part B) and members of Senior Care Plus will receive the shots with no out-of-pocket cost.

Renown Health representatives will also be present to share important health information about specialized senior services, knee and hip joint replacement, cancer, heart services, Medical Group and Urgent Care and Cosmetic Laser & Skin Care.

For more information about the health screenings, contact Renown Wellness Resources at 775-982-5433.

About Hometown Health
Established in 1988, Hometown Health is the insurance division of Renown Health. Hometown Health is northern Nevada’s largest and most experienced health-insurance companies. Providing wide-ranging medical coverage and great service to members, Hometown Health represents a philosophy of health care that emphasizes active partnerships between members and physicians. Hometown Health values prevention as a key component of comprehensive care – reducing the risks of illness and helping to treat small problems before they can become more severe. Hometown Health offers a number of insurance products including HMO, PPO, HSA, Dental, Vision, and Senior Care Plus, northern Nevada’s first Medicare Advantage Plan. For more information, call 775-982-3000 or visit hometownhealth.com.

About Senior Fest
The 16th annual Senior Fest is the largest senior citizen outreach in northern Nevada. It offers informational booths featuring businesses and organizations that provide senior services in the Truckee Meadows community. Senior Fest is held at Reno Town Mall on the corner of Peckham Lane and South Virginia, across from the Reno Sparks Convention and Visitors Authority. Parking is free at both the mall and the Atlantis Casino parking lot. For more information, call 775-348-0717.

Cataract Rates are on the Rise in Americans Age 40 and Older

August 21, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Cataract Rates are on the Rise in Americans Age 40 and Older

American Academy of Ophthalmology Offers Tips for Cataract Detection and Treatment

SAN FRANCISCO – August 16, 2012 – The incidence of cataracts in the U.S. has risen 19 percent since 2000, impacting nearly 25 million Americans age 40 and older.[i] In fact, more than half of all Americans will develop cataracts by age 80, according to Prevent Blindness America’s Vision Problems in the U.S. report. In response, the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart program is educating the public about cataract risk factors, detection and treatment options during Cataract Awareness Month.

Cataract is a clouding of the eye’s lens, which can make it more difficult to focus light onto the eye’s retina – the light-sensitive tissue that sends images to the brain. Cataracts, a natural part of aging, are the most common cause of vision loss in the U.S. They typically develop slowly, so symptoms may not be immediately apparent. Over time, cataracts can cause vision to become blurry, cloudy, dull, or dim, and can interfere with daily activities.

The good news is that cataracts are almost always treatable with cataract surgery. During cataract surgery, an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor with the training and certification to provide the full range of eye care and surgery – removes the eye’s cloudy natural lens and replaces it with a clear artificial lens implant called an intraocular lens (IOL). Cataract surgery is often performed as an outpatient procedure and does not require an overnight hospital stay. Cataract surgery is one of the safest types of surgery, and 90 percent of patients who have cataract surgery enjoy better vision afterward.[ii]

“If you notice vision changes, cataracts could be to blame and you might need more than a new pair of glasses,” said David F. Chang, M.D., a clinical correspondent for the American Academy of Ophthalmology and a clinical professor at the University of California, San Francisco. “If you do have a cataract, you should be reassured that it is a normal aging change and not an eye disease. Cataract surgery usually carries an excellent prognosis, and you should talk to your ophthalmologist about whether surgery should be done to restore your eyesight.”

As the aging population grows, it is increasingly important for seniors and their caregivers to understand cataract risks, symptoms, prevention, and treatment options. The American Academy of ophthalmology recommends the following tips to maintain healthy vision:
• Get a baseline exam by age 40. All adults should get a baseline eye exam by age 40 when early signs of eye disease and vision changes may start to occur. During this visit, your ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.) will advise you on how often to have follow-up exams.
• After age 65, schedule regular eye exams. Anyone age 65 and older should visit an ophthalmologist regularly to detect eye diseases and conditions like cataract early, and to monitor any vision loss. Seniors age 65 and older may qualify for an eye exam and up to 1 year of care at no out of pocket cost through EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of American Academy of Ophthalmology. See if you qualify at www.eyecareamerica.org.
• Know your risk factors for cataract. Diabetes, smoking, extensive UV exposure, serious eye injuries, steroid use, and a family history of cataract can increase your risk for developing a cataract.
• Reduce your risks to prevent or delay the onset of cataracts. Use sunglasses and hats to protect your eyes from UV damage. Don’t smoke. If you have diabetes, control your blood sugar carefully through diet, exercise and medications if needed.
• Talk to your ophthalmologist about your treatment options. Vision loss from cataracts can interfere with daily activities. Talk to your ophthalmologist about whether cataract surgery is right for you. When preparing for surgery, give your doctor your complete medical and eye health history, including a list of medications that you have taken. Some medications can cause the iris to move out of its normal position and may require your ophthalmologist to adjust his or her surgical technique.

For more information on cataract symptoms, risk factors, surgery, and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org.

About EyeSmart
The American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

Focus on Your Vision During Cataract Awareness Month

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Focus on Your Vision During Cataract Awareness Month

Over half of all Americans will develop cataracts by the age of 70 – but poor vision doesn’t have to be an inevitable fact of aging. During Cataract Awareness Month in August, YourSightMatters.com wants to help seniors understand the simple outpatient procedures available to restore their vision and get them back to driving, reading and seeing clearly.

“Recent technological advances means cataract surgery can do more than remove cloudy lenses. It can improve vision for those who are near or farsighted,” said James W Klein, M.D. of Lakeshore Eye Surgery Center in St. Clair Shores, Michigan. “In addition, a recent study showed that cataract surgery can also reduce a patient’s risk of breaking a hip in a fall.”
Cataract surgery is one of the most common operations performed in the United States, and yet many affected individuals avoid treatment. To help put patients at ease, YourSightMatters.com provides a helpful list of questions for patients to ask their surgeon. In fact, cataract surgery is usually performed in an ambulatory surgery center, takes less than fifteen minutes and patients can resume most normal activities the next day.
Since cataracts develop over years, gradual changes in vision can become the “new normal” and therefore ignored longer than necessary. Some people even describe cataracts as looking through a “dirty windshield.”

Visit YourSightMatters.com to find a local surgeon who specializes in cataract surgery, if you are experiencing any of the following symptoms:
• Blurred, cloudy vision
• Difficulty seeing at night or while driving
• Sensitivity to light
• Seeing a “halo” around bright lights
• Colors appear faded or yellowed

A comprehensive eye exam will determine whether cataracts are present and whether you are a candidate for surgery. Cataract surgery is covered by Medicare, and most private insurance plans.

For real stories from real people who have experienced cataract surgery, please visit www.YourSightMatters.com.

About YourSightMatters.com YourSightMatters.com is powered by eye care professionals who are committed to preserving and restoring vision. This coalition represents 300 ophthalmologists and optometrists across the United States. Your Sight Matters is supported by AmSurg, a leader in eye surgery for over 20 years.

Media Contact: Jill Meyer, 615-780-3397

Early Lung Cancer Detection component of the Worker Health Protection Program (WHPP) for former Nevada Test Site workers

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

Announcing the introduction of the Early Lung Cancer Detection component of the Worker Health Protection Program (WHPP), a medical screening program for former Nevada Test Site workers. The new component of the program will introduce low-dose CT scans to at-risk former NTS workers with the primary goal of detecting lung cancer early, when treatment is more likely to be effective.

The official opening ceremony was on Wednesday, August 8th at 11:00 a.m. at the Atomic Testing Museum, 755 East Flamingo Road, Las Vegas, NV. The ceremony featured brief remarks by key program stakeholders, including government, union, medical and former worker representatives.

The Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized that workers in DOE facilities were exposed to lung carcinogens such as radiation, silica, asbestos and beryllium. In 2011, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) published a study confirming a reduction in mortality in high-risk individuals who were screened for lung cancer with a low-dose CT scan as compared to those screened with chest X-rays. This landmark study has increased DOE support and has allowed us to implement the use of low-dose CT scan program for at-risk former NTS workers. The medical screening program is operated by Queens College of the City University of New York, with funds provided by the DOE.

Also, please find a link to the NCI study below:
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1102873

If you have any questions at all, need more information or would like an interview with our program director, Dr. Lew Pepper, please be in touch to my contact information below.

Regards,

Jonathan Corbin, MPH
Outreach Coordinator
Worker Health Protection Program
CBNS, Queens College
718-670-4228 (Phone)
718-670-4167 (Fax)
www.worker-health.org

 

Seniors Citizens are a high priority in Washoe County

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Seniors Citizens are a high priority in Washoe County

Washoe County is experiencing a rapid demographic shift because of the aging of the “baby boom” generation. Like every community in America, we are evaluating how to provide services to the most vulnerable seniors.
 After an April 2, 2012 presentation by Washoe County Senior Services WCSS), the Joint Meeting of the Board of County Commissioners, Reno City Council, Sparks City Council and Washoe County School District Board of Trustees requested that the Department prepare a report on the cost and benefit of increased funding.
 The Department offers both a $1.2 million and $2.4 million option.
 Please ask your elected officials, in-person, by letter or e-mail, and in testimony at public hearings to support the proposal. The following is a summary:

Washoe County, like all of the United States, is seeing the “Baby Boomers” turn 60 in unprecedented numbers. This demographic shift is having a dramatic impact on seniors, families and our community.
 The senior population is growing faster than any other segment of the Washoe County community; 25% are now over 55, with the age group 55-64 years absorbing 27.3% of all County population growth over the last decade.
Washoe County Senior Services (WCSS) is not able to meet the needs of the rapidly growing number of vulnerable seniors.
 Today, Washoe County Senior Services assists only 8% of the more than 71,000 County residents over the age of 60. We are forecast to have as many as 93,000 over 60 by 2016.
 The Washoe County Senior Center, 9th and Sutro, is 34 years old, and over half of its Meals on Wheels delivery vehicles are over 10 years old.
 In 1985, when voters approved the $.01 Senior Citizens ad valorem Fund in perpetuity, it was believed to be adequate for all future facility, program and service needs. Because of increasing costs, the addition of essential programs and above all, population growth, this is no longer true.
 Almost all Washoe County Senior Services programs have a waiting list.
Washoe County Senior Services helps “Bend the Curve” of health and long term care costs by keeping seniors active, involved and independent.
 Planning to prepare the community for an aging society; leverage new resources.
 Senior Centers operated in partnership with cities and GID that provide classes, activities and events; volunteer opportunities.
 Congregate Meals at 8 locations in senior centers and public housing.
 Outreach and early intervention programs to connect seniors to services as early as possible.
 “Help Line” – Aging and Disability Resource Center – provides information, advice and counseling about health and long term care.
 Social Services, including case management, nursing, Home Delivered Meals and in-home care for the most vulnerable.
 Senior Law for legal matters including advance directives, public benefits appeals, elder law, and housing counseling.
 DayBreak Adult Day is an alternate to nursing home care.
Seniors and their families need help managing the maze of services and choices; many seniors are not able to pay for the services they need
 Almost every Washoe County family will be faced with providing care for aging parents and relatives. Most are not prepared.
 In a 2006 Washoe County needs assessment, only 34% of all seniors said that they could afford to pay for their own care.
WCSS low cost supportive services reduce public expenses by keeping people healthier, longer, supporting independent living in their homes and by delaying or preventing institutionalization. The additional funding would provide services and reduce other costs:
 Congregate Meal sites and Senior Centers
• 20% of the 2,100 seniors report that it is their only meal of the day.
• Site managers, which were eliminated in previous budget cuts, would be restored for all meal sites.
• Provide clerical and social work support for senior centers.
 WCSS “Help Line” provides counseling on long term care and health care options, empowering seniors to make an informed choice on decisions that affect their entire family.
• Expert information, advice and counseling would be available to an additional 5,500 seniors and family members per year.
 Case management and visiting nurse
• An additional 350 seniors would receive medication management, help with medical professionals and an in-home nursing assessment.
• An additional 600 seniors would be assisted by a case manager to coordinate care and arrange for services.
• An additional 400 low-income seniors would get in-home services, such as home care, personal care and escorted transportation that are not available elsewhere.
 Home Delivered Meals provides 1/3 of the USDA Recommended Daily Allowance to homebound seniors, who cannot prepare their own meals.
• Today, 175 (37%) of WCSS current HDM case load need assistance in 2 or more Activities of Daily Living (ADLs – bathing, dressing, eating, toileting, etc.) and receive additional case management, nursing and in-home care. They have received services for at least one year.
• New funding would serve an additional 300 homebound seniors per year; provide an additional 70,000 meals per year, for a total of 180,000.
• Additional funding would help an additional 400 high risk clients
 Senior Law: Provide legal services to an additional 400 people.
 DayBreak Adult Day Health: An additional 10 low-income seniors will get services.
• The annual cost for a DayBreak client is $11,000. Nevada Medicaid Nursing Home cost for the same senior is about $59,000 per year; an annual savings of $48,000 per year, and total potential annual savings of $3.48 million.

Special Considerations And Tips For Senior Citizens Travel

July 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Travel Tips for Senior Citizens

Cellular and extracellular changes of old age cause a change in physical appearance and a decline in function. Measurable changes in shape and body makeup occur.

The body’s ability to maintain homeostasis becomes increasingly diminished with cellular aging, and organ systems cannot function at full efficiency because of cellular and tissue deficits.

The well-being of an aged person depends on physical, mental, social, and environmental factors. A total assessment includes an evaluation of all major body systems, social and mental status, and the ability of the person to function independently despite a chronic illness.

Psychological Aspects of Aging

Successful psychological aging is reflected in the senior citizen’s ability to adapt to physical, social, and emotional losses and to achieve contentment, serenity, and life satisfactions.

Because changes in life patterns are inevitable over a lifetime, the older person needs resiliency and coping skills when confronting stresses and change.

For this reason, experts recommend travels and other recreational activities for the seniors to promote psychological, social, physical, and emotional aspect of the elderly.

Ideally, senior citizens do best in their own, familiar environment. But adjustments to the environment may be required to allow the older adult to travel to places they have not yet enjoyed in their entire life. This is to promote life satisfaction in normal aging.

Hence, it is recommended that senior citizens maintain the active lifestyle by engaging in activities that will help them promote their total well-being, such as senior citizens travel.

However, since seniors travel will mainly compose of older people, it is important for them to know the necessary precautionary measures in order to avoid health risks as well as social dilemma.

To guide the senior citizens on their travel, here is a list of some senior citizens travel tips:

1. Airline travel tips

Most seniors travel by air. Hence, it is important to know the privileges especially designed for senior citizens traveling through airplanes.

Senior citizens should know that before making any reservations, they should try to learn more about the privileges for senior citizens made available by a certain airline company.

Special discounts and privileges are provided by the government and should be imposed by all airline companies. If the seniors knows his right, he will never miss these great opportunities. He will also be able to save more on discounts and freebies.

2. Have a nose for news

Senior citizens who travel a lot should have a nose for news. If they will be traveling, they should stay glued on their televisions, newspapers, and radios for any cancellations on flight schedules.

Seniors might experience difficulty when stranded on an airport just because of delayed or cancelled flight.

Hence, knowing the problem before hand will enable the senior citizens to act appropriately and prepare solutions for the problem.

3. Money matters

When traveling, seniors should remember not to bring too many cash with them. They should only bring the necessary things with them, such as credit cards (this should be limited, at least 1 or 2 cards will do) and important identification cards.

It is best not to bring any unnecessary items such as extra cash, additional credit cards, or any cards that will reveal their Social Security number or any personal information such as address or home telephone number.

Statistical reports show that nearly 40% of identity theft cases and other crimes involve senior citizens. This is because most seniors fall easy prey to unscrupulous people. So to avoid such problems, senior citizens should be more wary on their money matters when traveling.

4. Open communication

To ensure security at all times, communication should always be open between senior citizens and their immediate families. One good way to maintain an open communication is to bring mobile phones on senior citizens travels.

If this is not possible, it is best that the concerned seniors leave the necessary information to their families to ensure immediate contact in case something came up.

There are community support services that are available to help senior citizens outside their home. Hence, it is best to know these things so that they will know what to do whenever they need help while on travel.

Keep in mind that the frail senior citizens can experience multiple problems at any given point in time. Therefore, it is important that they know what to do first when certain problems occur especially during their travel.
Source: Free Articles

About the Author

Lee Dobbins writes for http://seniors.subjectwise.com where you can learn more about areas of concern for senior citizens.

Incontinence and Senior Falls (Nevada Senior Guide)

September 27, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Seniors who have urinary incontinence have been shown to have 3 times the risk of falls as compared to seniors without urinary incontinence. The connection between urinary incontinence and falls is surprising but studies do show that when you are able to care for your bladder issues you will have a less likely chance of dealing with falls. Falls in the elderly can lead to severe problems like hip fractures and in many cases hip surgery may be too hard to recover from and can lead to death.

There are close to 1.9 million emergency room visits each year due to senior falls. If managing your urinary incontinence problems will prevent or decrease your risk of senior falls, it is important to figure out how you can start taking control of these urinary issues. So why are senior falls and urinary incontinence linked in some way? Most of the studies indicate that there is an issue with falls when a senior is rushing to get to the bathroom. They may trip over furniture and even over their own feet in their rush to relieve their bladder before it starts to dribble. Not only are the bladder muscles to blame for incontinence they are also to blame for senior falls. Weak bladder muscles actually aid in controlling our balance and when they are not strong, they will lead to serious issues.

What can you do in order to prevent falls in the home? It helps to make the home into a safer environment by installing safety devices like railings and using a walker to help you get around. It is also important to keep the home clean and organized in order to prevent piles from getting in the way when you are walking around. Grab bars in the bathtub and next to the toilet will also be able to help prevent falls from occurring when you are rushing to get to the restroom.

Strengthening the pelvic core muscles will also aid in managing urinary incontinence along with helping to prevent falls from occurring. Studies done on women dealing with urinary incontinence and balance problems find that when a woman is able to strengthen her pelvic core muscles she will have a lower change of dealing with dribble throughout the day and her body will respond quickly if she does slip or trips over something.

Muscles do get weak but they can be strengthened and retrained at any age, allowing you to fix bladder control problems even if you have dealt with them in the past. Some seniors find relief when they start to exercise but they do notice they still have dribble when they laugh or get excited. This is completely normal and it helps to have some urinary incontinence products that can make living with urinary incontinence easier.

Some of the best exercises you can do in order to improve the pelvic core muscles include Kegel exercises. These exercises are commonly used during pregnancy to help prepare a woman’s body to give birth by making her lower region stronger. What you will focus on doing is squeezing the muscles that are used to stop the flow or urine. They are great for building muscle tone around your urethra and will aid in controlling the flow or urine when the bladder tries to release it.

Another exercise to do is to lie on your back with your knees at a 90 degree angle (feet flat on the floor) and to lift up your entire lower region and hold it tight for 10 seconds and release it back to the floor. Do this exercise daily to help strengthen your lower region as it will aid in providing you with stronger pelvic core muscles and preventing falls and problems with senior falls.

About the Author:
Incontinence products
Dianna Malkowski is a Board Certified Physician Assistant and Mayo Clinic trained nutritionist specializing in diabetes, cancer, wound healing, therapeutic diets and nutrition support.
Visit the Care Giver Partnership for more info on Incontinence supplies

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Dianna_Malkowski

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6560115

Senior Living Properties – 20 Point Checklist (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

A move to senior living properties, retirement communities or estates is often complicated by perceptions and emotion. Make the decision as rationally and objectively as possible. A mistake will likely result in considerable stress and wasted money.

The questions, and their significance will depend on your personal circumstances and on how the estate is set up. I suggest that you go through each issue with a fine tooth comb.

Questions to be answered by the estate management.

1. With residents are there restrictions with for example: having someone to live with you, visitors, car parking, pets or anything else?

2. Are there any specific medical requirements to qualify to live independently?

3. Is it required to give details of any medical conditions or treatments? If so, who can see them and are they kept confidential?

4. Is there convenient estate or public transport available?

5. If the units are incomplete, can a resident change the design or finishes?

6. Are there any circumstances under which the deed of sale be cancelled?

7. Can a resident move, or be moved, from one type of accommodation to another. If so, how would the decision be made?

8. Are residents actively involved in the running of the village and in setting any fees and changing estate rules?

9. Are any resident rights at risk if the village is sold?

10. What exceptional charges will have to be paid by residents?

11. Are there any limitations when selling units? Could there be a disagreement over the selling price or improvements made?

12. Have all the estate management proven experience in this type of development?

Personal Check List – some points to ask yourself.

13. Does my my family, advisor and friends agree with my decision to move?

14. Am I considering the move because of all the daily hassles of running a home?

15. Have I considered all the information about the estate I have chosen? Has my legal representative explained all the relevant conditions in the deed of sale to me?

16. Do I think that this is the best choice for me? Does the this estate living suit the things that I believe are important? Have I spoken to any residents in the estate?

17. What choice is there if I become too ill to live alone? Will the estate and my unit suit me if I ever need a wheelchair or walking aid?

18. Are there services especially intended for the elderly like nursing care and an emergency call system? Will it meet my current and expected future needs?

19. Have I made a comparison of the facilities and the alternative financial arrangements of other developments?

20. Can I comfortably afford the estate I have chosen and what will it cost me if I decide to leave?

Working through these issues it is very apparent that this is an important choice in anyone’s life. The decision to consider senior living properties is often taken at a time of emotional distress so it is critical that it’s made in as objective and rational way as possible.

Patrick Millerd is a baby boomer “nevertiree” and aspiring digital nomad. He’ll help you discover how retirement planning can put you on the path to a create the retirement lifestyle you desire at www.Successful-Retirement.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Patrick_Millerd

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5932583

Nevada-Senior-Guide Senior Centers Directory – Northern Nevada Rural

Austin Senior Center

151 Main Street, Austin, NV 89310

(775) 964-2338 Lander County, 8am-3pm

Provides congregate meals (served at the

center Mon. – Fri. from 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.)

Battle Mountain Senior Center

365 E. 4th St., Battle Mountain NV 89820

(775) 635-5311 Lander County

Congregate and homebound meals

(Meals on Wheels), transportation locally,  Blood pressure screening once a month,  Social activities, Meals M-F at Noon

 

Carlin Open Door Senior Center

320 Chestnut St., P.O. Box 1234

Carlin, NV 89822

(775) 754-6465 Elko County

Nutrition, Transportation, Socializations

 

Carson City Colony Center

401 Washoe St., Carson City, NV 89703

(775) 883-4888

Recreational Activities, Nutritional Congregate                               Meals On Site 12-1pm, Meals on Wheels

 

Churchhill County Senior Center

310 E. Court Street, Fallon, NV 89406

(775) 423-7096, www.gofallon.com

11:30am – Provides congregate meals,

homemaking and advocacy, social activities,                           Meals on Wheels, Lifeline, Energy Assistance,             Referrals, Aging and disability resource center

 

Comstock Senior Nutrition Prgm-Storey County

Mill & E Street, Virginia City, NV 89440

(775) 847-0957

Call for branch info. Exercises & art programs,                                legal services, HAWK services, Floral program,         SHIP Help, Access to health network

Dayton Senior Center

320 Old Dayton Valley Rd.

Dayton, NV 89403

(775) 246-6210

Lunch Mon- Thurs 11:30am – 12:30pm,

Breakfast Friday 9am-10am, Home meal

delivery, transportation, activities.

Opens 8am – 4:30pm

 

Douglas County Senior Services

2300 Meadow Lane, Gardnerville, NV 89410

(775) 783-6455 Douglas, Open M-F, 8am-5pm

Dial a Ride, Meals on Wheels, Homemaker                              Program, Lunch M – F at noon, Trips and                     Activities

 

Eureka Senior Center

20 West Gold Street, Eureka, NV 89316

(775) 237-5597 Elko County

www.co.eureka.nv.us/county/senior.htm

Nutrition program which provides congregate                    meals at Noon, Meals-on-Wheels for

homebound and at-risk seniors,

transportation, Medicare Counseling,

Social Services

 

Fannie Komp Senior Center

728 7th Street, Crescent Valley, NV 89821

(775) 468-0466 Eureka County

www.co.eureka.nv.us/crescent/senior01.htm

A trip is taken once a month (weather

permitting) to Elko for shopping and doctors                      appointments. Social activities, Provides        transportation to and from the meal site daily.                   Clinic M-W

 

Fernley Senior Center

1170 W. Newlands Drive, Fernley, NV 89408

(775) 575-3370

Mondays – Friday Lunch 11:30am-12:30pm,
home delivered meals, social activities,

transportation, monthly newsletter, grief &                       alzheimers support groups monthly –

3rd Wed. at 1pm, Disabled and aging

resource center

 

Gerlach Senior Center

385 E. Sunset, Gerlach, NV 89412

(775) 557-2206 Washoe County

Provides recreational and social activities

(once a month weather permitting),

congregate meals (M-F at Noon),

Meals-On-Wheels for homebound seniors,                             transportation to appointments every

other Tuesday

 

Lincoln Senior Center/Panaca Senior Center

10 Atchison St., Lincoln, NV 89042

775-728-4477. Congregate meals, Recreation,

Transportation to Medical Appointments

and Errands, Homemaker Program (call for                         additional info)

 

Mineral County Care and Share Senior Ctr.

975 K Street, Hawthorne, NV 89415

(775) 945-5519 Mineral County

e-mail: careandshare@sbcglobal.net

Computer training, internet access, exercising

and wellness activities, Socialization,

Advocacy Representative, Health Nurse (call                     first) Monthly, Lunch Daily – Noon, Home                  Bound Delivery, Out of town trips. Senior                             services specialist. Public guardian

Shoshone Welcome Center – Elko Band

Council Senior Center

1530 Silver Eagle Dr., Elko NV 89801

(775) 738-0425 Elko County – Call for Hours

Serves hot meals to elders and handicapped,                        noon. Meals on Wheels, transportation,
nutritional information and monthly health                         presentations for elders, Referral services

 

Sparks Senior Ctr. – Washoe County

97 Richards Way, Sparks, NV 89413

(775) 353-3110

Community focal point on aging where older                        persons as individuals or in groups come                    together for services and activities which                          enhance their dignity, support their
independence and encourage their
involvement in the community, assistance                               program on sliding scales, social activities,                              art classes, lunches 5 days/week, other food                  programs – Call for info, Special lunches,                                Library, Exercise, Blood pressure, Movies

 

Walker River Paiute Tribe Senior Center

1031 B Hospital Rd., Schurz, NV 89427

(775) 773-2224 Mineral County

Congregate meals at the center, Mon. and
Thurs., 11am-Noon, Fri. 8:30am-9:30am.

Meals on Wheels to homebound seniors,                                Provides trips for entertainment, shopping,                  errands, etc. Meals are delivered from                                  10:15am to 12:00pm

 

Washoe Tribe of NV & Senior Ctr

801 Washeshu Way, Gardnerville, NV

(775) 265-6426 Douglas County

Provides recreational activities, nutritional                       congregate meals on-site (11am-1pm),
Meals on Wheels for homebound seniors,
SAFE advocate, Homecare & Caregiver service

 

Washoe County Senior Services

1155 E. 9th Street, Reno, NV 89512

(775) 328-2575, www.washoecounty.us

Homecare, social services, legal program,                            recreational activities, adult day care, SHIP                program, mental health & nutrition, Senior                          Dance Club of Nevada Fri 8pm-11pm

 

White Pine Nutrition Center

1000 Campton St., Ely NV 89301

(775) 289-2742 White Pine County

Serves seniors in McGill, Ely, Nevada.

Provides meals (Noon at the center) Ely,

Meals on Wheels to McGill and Ruth for                              homebound seniors, social, recreational                    activities for seniors over 60, medical van to                      appointments out of town

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!