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Life Extension: The Modern Anti-Aging Movement – Are We Standing at the Threshold of Immortality?

July 17, 2016 by · Comments Off on Life Extension: The Modern Anti-Aging Movement – Are We Standing at the Threshold of Immortality?
Filed under: General 

Why is skincare the focus of longevity research? I guess a cell is a cell, and if you can crack the code for one human cell, it is only a matter of time to solving the puzzle with different types of cell – and skin is without doubt the most visible cells each of us have. And it’s our faces in particular we often judge ourselves and others by, and we are in turn quickly scrutinized, and often opinions reached in a fraction of a second. Our faces often show the most visible signs of aging, and for many in modern society age is by nature “bad” and young or looking young is the ideal. That is why billions and billions of dollars each year are poured by consumers into all sorts of treatments to minimize wrinkles, to push back the effects of gravity, and to turn back the hands of time. And with that much money to be spent by consumers, there are many manufacturers eager to find the next step in arresting Father Time – and at least detaining him until the next stagecoach arrives, where hopefully he can be encouraged to move on before too much damage can be done.

The Entire Issue Explained – In A Pair of Shoelaces

Some time ago a friend gave me a simple analogy that puts this entire issue in perspective. The science may not win a Nobel Prize, but it gave me the necessary ah-ha moment.

The double helix of the DNA strand – our most basic foundation for life – is held together at each end by things that act in the same way as the hard plastic bits on the end of shoelaces do – preventing the DNA from unraveling, and the individual chromosomes scattering across the floor like dropping a string of pearls down a marble staircase. These things are called telomeres.

Somewhere programmed into these tiny telomeres is the entire basis to how long the DNA stays intact – and by inference these are the keys to the length of life of the organism. Somewhere written into the telomere is a great musical score but like all musical scores it has a double bar somewhere to signify the end; but is it to be a minuet or a Wagnerian epic? But sure enough, when the time comes, and the telomeres blow the full time whistle, the DNA strand will unravel and die – and the circle of life begins again. Telomeres govern how often our skin cells are replaced; why a puppy and a child born on the same date may age exactly the same chronologically, but the puppy has become a geriatric before the child reaches puberty.

Telomeres, my friend explained, occasionally go on the fritz (that must have a very specific scientific meaning). One of the ways this occurs is they may forget their programming to release and unravel, and they just hang on, allowing the cells thus affected to multiply again and again without dying. In fact, when this occurs often they become very difficult to kill and to all intents and purposes once the telomeres act in this way, the cell – and those it propagates – are effectively immortal.

This condition has a name which we all know. Cancer.

But, what if we were able in some way to persuade the telomeres within a cancer to behave normally – would that not be the “magic bullet” cure for cancer? And the other side to that equation – if the telomeres in healthy cells could be persuaded to act as they do in a cancer – then is this the recipe for a healthy cell that does not die? Does the cure for cancer and immortality hang on just this one thread?

Whatever your views may be, the reality is that some of the world’s finest research scientists are working on that exact question and some would say it is only a matter of a decade or two before this is neither conjecture nor science fiction, but a reality to face up to. The changes that would take place in society even if life expectancy were to take a leap forward by say 10 or 20 years are enormous, but we should all be thinking that this is a distinct possibility.

From the dab of lanoline a generation ago to what I know hold in my hand as an anti aging skincare treatment is more than just a revolution – and I have no doubt in a few years I will be saying this cream will not just slow the aging process and reduce the visible signs of aging, making your face appear younger – but it will actually be younger.

But before that, let’s look back at how this whole engagement with life extension and anti-aging started. Mankind has always striven for longevity and mused about immortality – but the past 50 years has seen some dramatic steps in reality toward this goal.

Genesis

The thought of extending life has been on the mind of mankind for millennia. References to the search for ways to prolong life can be found as far back as the Epic of Gilgamesh.

Gilgamesh was reputedly the fifth king of the kingdom of Uruk, the modern-day Iraq, around 2500 BC. According to the Sumerian list of kings, he reigned for 126 years. The Torah or Old Testament records Methuselah as living over 900 years, with life spans measured in centuries apparently commonplace before the time of Noah.

Throughout the development of scientific thought from the Reformation onwards, scholars have applied themselves to solving this riddle and these endeavors continue today at the very leading edge of scientific progress.

Unraveling Secrets

As the secrets of our existence are unraveled in ever more minute detail, we are beginning to understand what it is that makes us grow from tiny babies into adults. We now know, for example, that cell functions slow down as the body ages and that production of certain substances required by the body to regenerate decrease or cease completely.

Skin, for instance, needs two substances to retain strength and firmness.
The production of these substances namely collagen (strength, tightness) and elastin (flexibility) decreases with age. The decreases in production together with other factors that include the threat of free radicals make the skin age and become wrinkly. Free radicals are essentially incomplete oxygen molecules causing destructive chain reactions within cells.

The same kind of thing happens in every cell, every tissue and organ around the human body. For example, people develop frown lines, crow’s feet and wrinkles. Nutrients are no longer absorbed easily and vital cell functions, hormones and other substances are produced at decreased rates resulting in the body aging.

A Brief History of the Life Extension Movement

Science has been looking for ways to slow down this process for centuries. The forming of life extension movements, however, did not really begin until around 1970.

➢ In this year, Denham Harman, the originator of the so-called ‘free radical theory of aging’, decided that an organization dedicated to the research and information sharing between scientists working in biogerontology (the field of science concerned with the biological aspects involved in the aging process) was needed. As a result, the American Aging Association was formed.

➢ In 1976, two futurists, Philip Gordon and Joel Kurtzman wrote a book on the research into extending the human lifespan. This popular volume was titled ‘No More Dying. The Conquest Of Aging And The Extension Of Human Life’.

➢ Kurtzman was then invited to speak at Florida’s House Select Committee (HSC) of Aging, which was chaired by Claude Pepper, an American politician and spokesman for the elderly. The aim of this talk was to discuss the impact on Social Security by life extension.

➢ In 1980, Saul Kent, a prominent activist in the field of life extension, published the book ‘The Life Extension Revolution’ and founded the nutraceutical (from ‘nutrition’ and ‘pharmaceutical’, in other words, a nutrition supplement) firm known as ‘The Life Extension Foundation’.

This foundation is a non-profit making organization promoting dietary supplements and publishing the periodical ‘Life Extension Magazine’. Kent was later involved in work relating to cryogenics. He was jailed in the course of this work over a dispute at one point, although charges were dropped at a later stage.

➢ In 1982, American health writer and life extension advocate Sandy Shaw and her co-writer, Durk Pearson, popularized the term ‘life extension’ even further with the bestseller ‘Life Extension: A Practical Scientific Approach’.

➢ Roy Walford, a gerontologist and life-extensionist, published ‘Maximum Lifespan’, another popular book on the subject. He and Richard Weindruch, his student, followed this up in 1988 with their summary on the research they had conducted into the ability to prolong the life of rodents through calorie restriction. The title of this book is ‘The Retardation of Aging and Disease by Dietary Restriction’.

Although this ability to extend life with calorie restriction had been known since the 1930’s, when gerontologist, biochemist and nutritionist Clive McCay did some research into the subject, it was the work of Walford and Weinbruch that gave solid scientific grounding to the McCay’s findings.

Walford’s scientific work was driven by a personal interest in life extension. He practiced calorie restriction as part of his own life and eventually died at the age of 80. The cause of his death was amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a progressive motor neuron disease.

➢ A4M, the ‘American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine’ was founded in 1992 to create a medical specialty for anti aging that was distinctly separate from geriatrics. This allowed scientists and physicians interested in this particular field of science to hold conferences and discuss the latest developments.

➢ The sci.life-extension, a Usenet group, was created by California-born author, philosopher and translator Brian M. Delaney. This represented an important development within the movement of life extension. It made it possible, for example, for the CR (Calorie Restriction) Society to be created.

➢ A more recent development is the proposal of Dr A. de Grey, a biogerontologist at Cambridge University. This proposal suggested that damage to cells, macromolecules, organs and tissues can be repaired with the help of advanced biotechnology. This is evident in hair restoration products, for instance.

More than Books

Although it would appear that most of the work revolving around life extension has been done solely by writing books or founding societies or organizations of some kind or another, the reality is that these books were written in response to or based on very specific, detailed scientific research that have yielded positive results.

They are no longer the works of hopeful minds, but the works of dedicated scientists who have spent their lives working on discovering facts about aging and trying to find ways to slow down, or even reverse the process.

Many breakthroughs have been made, and in many ways, we are already able to extend lives to a certain extent. The average lifespan of a human being is already far greater than it used to be as a result of medical, pharmaceutical and nutritional advances brought about by research and development.

The work continues, and scientists around the world are continually conducting research, comparing results, discussing options and making advances on our behalf.

Driving Forces behind the Development of the Life Extension Movement

What factors are driving this movement into ever greater efforts to find solutions to the extension of Life? The answer to this question actually includes a whole range of factors.

Expectations Have Risen

As the ‘baby boomer’ generation (born between 1946-1964) enters retirement age, expectations of this group are dramatically different from those of the preceding generations. They have greater expectations and desires to enjoy their life as pensioners to the fullest and for as long as is possible. This expectation covers not only length of life, but quality of life as well and this is not a passive request but an active and strident demand in many cases.

Pharmacology

Progress in pharmacology has led to a wide selection of drugs that allow people to live longer and fuller lives being developed over the last two decades or so. The work is still very much in progress and many more drugs are being developed daily.

One of the classic examples of a drug raising the quality of life for older individuals are erectile dysfunction treatments – notably Viagra, Cialis and Levitra. These drugs have dramatically reduced the number of fatalities or serious injury resulting from elderly men rolling out of bed, as well as a number of more qualitative benefits.

Advances in Genetics

Some of the latest scientific research and subsequent advances made in biotechnology and genetics are providing some hope that it may be possible to hold back some of the fundamental causes of aging.

As we outlined previously, chromosomes containing DNA strings are essentially capped with a binding substance known as telomeres. In effect, the telomeres are consumed during cell division and over time, they become shorter and shorter.

This was first observed by a scientist called Leonard Hayflick, and the process of limited cell division was subsequently named the Hayflick Limit. Advocates of life extension work on the thought that lengthening the telomeres through drugs or gene therapy may ultimately extend the Hayflick Limit and thereby fool the cells, and as such the body, into ‘thinking’ it is younger than it actually is.

Developments in Precision Manufacture

Advances made in the fields of nanotechnology, miniaturization, computer chips and robotics also provide hope for potentially life extending solutions.

In the 1970’s, a popular TV series starred Lee Majors as the ‘Six Million Dollar Man’? Science fiction then. Today, it is science fact. Millions of people now walk through life with artificial ankle, knee and hip joints and healthy feet. A generation ago, mass production of this kind of technology was a distant dream.

The same applies to many individuals with artificial limbs. Artificial legs used to be crude wooden contraptions that were just able to keep a person balanced. Today’s artificial limbs are almost fully functional.

The Blessings of Medical Progress

Who would have thought even 50 years ago that it would become possible to bypass a coronary artery, or even replace a heart completely? Yet there are hundreds of thousands, if not millions of individuals enjoying their lives after having this kind of surgery – few of whom would be alive just half a century ago.

Millions of people no longer have to wear glasses, because of the availability of laser surgery. This, too, was science fiction just a few years ago. Today, it is advertised next to shampoo in magazines and on TV.

In other words, science is moving rapidly towards not only extending life, but making the quality of these extra years better as well.

Is it Science, Science Fiction or Lunacy?

What should the average person believe? This question is almost as difficult to answer as finding solutions to extended life. Even among scientists, opinions are divided. Some do believe that extending the quality of life is as possible as extending life in general.

Others brush off the thought as un-scientific nonsense. This is often simply based on the fear of anything ‘new’ disturbing the status quo of established limits. Fortunately, real scientists do keep on looking, because if every single scientist had decided that some of the advancements already in medical, pharmaceutical and technological fields could not be possible, we would all still be dying at 30.

So where does that leave us?

There is no doubt what-so-ever that there are many charlatans out there trying to make a quick buck out of people’s desire to retain their youth. Even today, many products being sold in their millions are essentially non-effective – often given fantastic names and have the most bewildering ingredients to make them look scientific to consumers and justify their cost.

But the facts are while many advancements are being made and research points to the possibility of eventually finding the key to maintaining youth for longer, the scientific community is still warning the public that many of the products being sold today are unreliable to say the least.

➢ Although food supplements may assist in keeping a body healthier – something that can often be achieved by simply adopting a healthier life style and diet – there is as yet no categorical and undeniable proof that they slow down aging as such.

➢ The same goes for many hormone treatments. Although they may have a short term effect of some kind, it is not yet scientifically proven that they will actually work in the long run. The fear that it may not work is based on the fact that taking hormones, a good example is the hormonal acne treatment, will ultimately actually slow down the body’s own production of these hormones.

In addition, many treatments may have potential (and yet unknown) side effects in the long run that could be harmful to the user’s health. This includes the fears that such hormone treatments could increase the risk of cancer, diabetes and other major illnesses.

➢ Other ideas, like the calorie restriction method, are working for rodents. In fact, studies conducted with rats on 30 to 50 per cent restricted diets have shown to almost double the life span of rats.

Similar studies conducted on primates have also shown tendency to extend life to a certain extent and prevent a list of age related illnesses. There are as yet no studies on humans, although some are actually living on calorie restricted diets. Whether this will prolong their lives, however, is a question of having to wait and see.

The theory is that by reducing calorie intake, the metabolism of the body is slowed down, thereby slowing the aging process as well. Nutritionists say there is a certain amount of calories a body of a certain size and weight needs to have to maintain health. Reducing this amount by up to 50 per cent is hardly a good idea in the long term.

Time will tell, as they say, but how will anyone be able to tell the difference? If a person lives to the age of 80, is this because they are on this diet or would they have lived to this age anyway?

Where Will This Lead?

Many believe there is realistic hope and expectation of making significant strides in the area of longevity within the next two decades. This group typically believes the answer will ultimately lie within genetics and biotechnology. It is too early to make definite predictions, but the research so far shows promise and, as mentioned earlier, some of the results of this research are already being used in certain treatments to improve patients’ lives.

At present, overall aging is difficult to slow down, to say the least. Some products indicate they will assist in maintaining overall health/longevity, but the area we are seeing the first commercial products being developed is in the area of skin care and given the size of this market, it is likely that this will continue to be the weather-vane of longevity treatments.

Science or Snake Oil?

It will be difficult to tell these two apart for many years. Charlatans are likely to about, because it is difficult to disprove many theories easily. Equally difficult will be positive proof from those with an ethical perspective on the trail of a real breakthrough, as products based on valid research and using technology or ingredients that will actually have an effect rarely promise overnight results. This is something that anyone looking to find improved youthful looks, etc, will have to bear in mind. None of these products can perform miracles. Even the best of them will take time and regular use in order to achieve the desired effect.

The bottom line is that where we stand now, we can be sure there are some things which are ineffective or even harmful; there are some that show some promise and there are some that are starting to cross the line of being able to demonstrate results – albeit modestly at this point.

In the meantime, it is wise to research products very carefully and to refuse to be baffled by weird and wonderful sounding ingredients or fantastic sounding promises of instant youth. Regeneration will take time – let’s face it, it has taken a lifetime to get to this point, turning back the clock can never be possible over night.

Skin Care and the Life Extension Movement

One may well ask just what all this, and in particular the life extension movement as such, could possibly have to do with skin care, health and beauty products. The fact is, much of the research into life extension is resulting in new approaches to skin care as a kind of by-product.

A greater understanding of how genetics and cellular processes affect the aging and condition of skin allows these research and development teams to investigate different compounds, their compatibility with human cells and genetic make up.

Many compounds found in nature are not just compatible to human skin but in fact the skin cells actually have natural receptors for these compounds. Because life extension research has discovered these receptors, skin care developers can now use this knowledge and create the formulae for their products to provide maximum effect.

Another skin care ‘by-product’ of life extension research is the use of nanotechnology. The use of nanotechnology, or, to be more precise, nanoparticles, has had a huge impact on the way nutrients and other components of skin care products are being delivered to the skin cells. In some ways, nanotechnology has already revolutionized skin care. It is now possible to use active ingredients previously difficult to effectively deliver to the skin, as well as making old, proven ingredients even more effective. Some ingredients used in cosmetics for hundreds, if not thousands of years by certain cultures can now be even more effectively used to improve skin condition and maintain a healthy, youthful look.

Even the moisturizing effect of skin care products can be improved with nantechnology. For this effect, so-called nanosomes are used. Nanosomes are small, pocket-like particles that melt or disintegrate on skin contact. By doing this, the moisturising effect is accelerated, assisting the skin faster and more efficiently.

Nanotechnology plays a key part not only in slowing the aging of skin, but is believed to actively assist in repairing and healing skin cells and tissue.

Another breakthrough in life extension research that is beginning to make itself felt in skin care products is the research into stem cells. Stem cells are elements of all life, plant, animal and human. Stem cells have two properties other cells do not have. These properties are the ability to develop into any kind of cell type and the ability to divide almost indefinitely. The use of plant stem cell extracts in skin care is likely to become one of the next ‘big things’ in the industry. And prepare for the debate when human stem cells are proposed as part of an anti-aging skincare regime, as will inevitably occur!

One thing we can be certain of, is that science will continue to search for answers to the question of life extension, and business will drive the commercialization of discoveries. But whether these lead us to a utopian future or potentially a minefield of strife as we debate who will use and who will benefit from these new godlike powers. In the meantime, at a practical level in the skincare, health and beauty industry we remain hopeful and expectant we will see the emergence of products that not only promise results, but produce them.

David Christensen is a veteran of Asia Pacific business, currently residing in Bangkok, Thailand and heading up the business he was a co-founder of, Royal Siam Natural Health & Beauty – who can be located at [http://www.royalsiam.asia], and the information supporting site at [http://www.royalsiam.info]. Royal Siam was established after careful planning in early 2011, spending 2011 concentrating on building the necessary business infrastructure and concentrating on the domestic Thai market. Early in 2012 Royal Siam launched its international website and online store, and in April 2012 publicly declared the ambition to be among the world’s top 20 premium health and beauty brands by the year 2020. Royal Siam is a unique business, operating in the premium skincare, anti aging, and related fields. At its core, one mission is to commercialize and bring to a global market the immense wealth of knowledge about the healing and beneficial properties of Thai and South East Asian plants – a knowledge base carefully built up over the last thousand years. At the same time, the mission is to bring to market the very latest in scientific advances in the area of anti aging… resulting in the unique position of having a Thai heritage and offering the best of nature, tradition, and science.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/David_D_Christensen/1317312

Living with diabetes? Watch your mouth!

January 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

11723Living with diabetes? Watch your mouth!

 

(Family Features)  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people with diabetes are two times more likely to develop gum disease. In fact, about one-third of people with diabetes have severe gum disease.

 

Why are those with diabetes more vulnerable to gum disease? High blood glucose levels impair the body’s ability to heal from oral infections and uncontrolled diabetes can make treating gum disease more difficult, according to the American Diabetes Association. The Association is joining with Colgate to launch a new “Watch Your Mouth!” campaign to help raise awareness surrounding the often over-looked link between oral health and diabetes. Here are some tips to help you live well with diabetes:

 

  • Watch your mouth! Begin to develop healthy oral care habits, like brushing, flossing and visiting the dentist regularly. Research shows that brushing twice a day with Colgate Total toothpaste can help improve gum health in as little as four weeks.*
  • Don’t miss out on your favorite foods. Just eat healthier versions that everyone in your family can enjoy. Making simple substitutions to most dishes can help increase nutritional value, while not sacrificing on taste.
  • Use the right tools. Stay organized with a journal large enough to keep your diet, exercise, goals and health information together. Keep a week’s worth of prescriptions in one place with a handy pill case.
  • Know your risks. The American Diabetes Association lists the common risk factors for diabetes as being 45 or older, being overweight, not exercising regularly, having high blood pressure and being a part of certain racial and ethnic groups.
  • Visit your dentist. While your doctor and certified diabetes educator play an important role in helping with your diabetes, so does your dentist. If you don’t see a private-practice dentist, you can visit dental schools that provide services at a fraction of the cost to help you keep your mouth healthy.

 

For more expert tips and information, visit www.OralHealthAndDiabetes.com.

 

*Results improve with continued twice daily use, as shown in 6 month clinical studies of the general population.

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Tips on Finding a Good and Reputable Senior Citizen Dating Service by David N Kamau

April 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

When interested in a senior citizen dating service, it is not a bad idea to  take a little time out to perform some minor research into how all the dating  sites work. No, that does not mean you need to invest an enormous amount of  effort looking into every phase and facet of how online dating works.

Well, you could do this if you were so inclined by it really would not be all  that necessary. What you need to know are the basics of how an online dating  site operates. This way, when you join up with such a site or service, there is  little or no lag time involved. You can get right into the mix and take  advantage of the social interactions the site offers.

As with anything else, being prepared plays a large role in getting the most  out of any venture. For some, the words “getting prepared” leads people into  believing that they need to invest a lot of time micromanaging their preparation  prior to becoming involves with a venture.

This is really not the case as, sometimes, a little minor preparation is all  that is needed in order to achieve the desired result. It can also lead to  getting a little extra bang for the proverbial buck and succeeding with one’s  goals with a senior citizen dating service.

In short, reading about how a senior citizen dating service works, the type  of communications devices used in such a service, common online dating protocol,  and a general concept of the type of people that use the service will all lead  to the enhanced and increased potential of positive results deriving from  working with an online dating site.

Far too many people will jump immediately into the mix without preparation.  While some succeed anyway despite such a cavalier attitude, others learn that  they should have taken a step back and read up a little bit on how dating sites  work. This would have saved them a lot of hassle.

Some may rush in and join a free site assuming they will save cash on the  venture. While they may save some money, they soon discover free is not worth it  when the realization that the quality of the service is decidedly lacking when  compared to the pay sites. That is just a fact of life learned the hard way that  those with an understanding of how dating sites work would have avoided.

So, rather that find yourself bouncing around wondering how to get the most  of a senior citizen dating service, it would be a much better plan to look  towards reading up on the subject prior to signing up. This would be a much  better plan.

Seeking a good senior citizen dating service? Now find reputable senior dating sites and choose the right one for you. David  Kamau is offers dating service  reviews at his website and blog.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_N_Kamau

 

Where Are Senior Citizens Job Opportunities? by Raymond Angus

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Are There Really Senior Citizens Job Opportunities Out There?

Are you a senior, and have you convinced yourself that there aren’t any more  senior citizens job opportunities lurking in the underbrush these days, let  alone walking down main street U.S.A.? Do you subscribe to the notion that all  senior citizens job opportunities are now being grabbed up by smooth  complexioned youngsters that don’t remember a world with Ted Williams and Frank  Sinatra in it doing their thing?

Wake up! Look around you. Sure the economy is in some pretty sorry straits,  but this kind of down turn has happened numerous times throughout history and  men and women have all survived it. There are real, honest to goodness senior  citizens job opportunities out there right now needing someone with your unique  talents and skills to fill them. You’re right. Maybe you don’t know where the  senior job openings are. But they don’t know where you are either and they’re  sure not going to come knocking on your door while you’re watching TV soap  operas.

You have to stand up straight and tell yourself your new mantra. I am  proactive. Write it on a piece of paper and stick it on your refrigerator with  one of those little magnet gizmos made for such things. Things don’t happen to  you, you’re now going to take charge of your senior citizens job opportunities  search and make things happen. Sit down at your table or desk, grab a tablet of  paper and a pen and make a list of five topics. Understand that first of all  this is your personal work sheet and is not available for public consumption.  It’s not a resume or a pitch for employment. This is your outline for a  proactive battle plan to find the perfect employment for you.

1. What kind of job do you really want. Don’t list employment that you  suspect is available. Write down what you really and truly want to do.

2. List the jobs that you’ve actually held during your life. Did you deliver  newspapers as a kid? Write it down and decipher the skills needed later.

3. List the jobs you actually performed for past employers. If you cleaned  floors, washed windows, ran machinery, waited on customers, kept records; list  them, they are building blocks for your action plan.

4. How did your personal activities at each employer affect the overall  operation of the business?

5. This is a tough one and it will require giving some clarity of thought.  Why did you leave each job? If you were terminated, it would be best to be less  than forthright.

You’re not finished yet. Make a list of your hobbies. Don’t laugh! Think  about it. Do you like bowling or fishing? How about gardening? Can you imagine  the skills you’ve amassed from these endeavors, let alone the factual knowledge  related to them. Are you a guy and do you do some of your automobile work  yourself.

Think about all of this and then contact employers that would find your  skills invaluable. Most important! There are senior citizens job opportunities  all over the landscape. But only go after the ones your actually would enjoy  doing.

Be proactive! After all is said and done, getting a job is in your hands  alone.

Raymond Angus is the best selling author of http://www.TheSeniorsLife.com. He writes about how seniors  find employment in today’s ever changing world. Are you a senior and do you want  tips on how to work and live in this bleak economy? Go to http://www.TheSeniorsLife.com and click on  employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Raymond_Angus

 

Tips For Senior Citizen Travelers by Gerry Restrivera

April 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Traveling is one thing that even older people can enjoy. Whether you are a  seasoned traveller or someone who is just beginning to enjoy traveling, these  travel advice can help you plan a safe and enjoyable trip. Here are some helpful  tips for senior citizen travelers:

Prepare your documents as early as possible. Passport is the most important  document and you can apply in person, through passport agencies and by mail.  When you receive your passport, be sure to fill in the information page so that  your family and friends can be notified in case of accident or emergency. Most  countries requires visa, so after acquiring a valid passport, you also need a  valid visa. These documents need time for processing and for senior citizen  travelers, it is best to apply 2-3 months before your trip to avoid stress and  rushing that could be bad for you.

Do not bring more than you need. Bring only the things that you need because  it will be so tiring to carry heavy suitcases. Senior citizen travelers, should  not burden themselves with too much luggage.  Wash and wear clothing is a  good idea so that you will not bring too many clothes.  Avoid bringing  valuable things like jewelries and dress simply to avoid being a target of  thieves. Bring only reasonable cash with you. Bring your additional budget in  the form of traveler’s check, credit card and ATM card.

Senior citizen travelers should check their health condition with their  doctor before traveling. Find out if you need immunization before traveling to  protect you from serious diseases abroad. If you are under medications, it is  important to bring enough supply to maintain your health. Bring your medicines  in its original packages or bottles and bring your doctor’s prescription to  avoid narcotics issues in foreign countries or airports. Review your insurance  policy and check if it covers your medical expenses abroad, if not it is best to  buy a policy that covers your travel medical expenses.

Read and get information about the country you want to visit. It is best for  senior citizen travelers to know the current situation of their destination in  terms of security, weather, culture, people, laws and other important things  about your destination.  You can protect your health, security and enjoy  more on your trip if you know more about your destination.

Don’t stress yourself. Senior citizen travelers should not subject themselves  to stressful situations. Even if this is the travel you’ve been waiting all your  life, it is not wise to stress yourself and fill in all your time with a lot of  activities. Take time to relax, you will not enjoy if you are too  tired.

Look for best deals to get the best out of your travel. Traveling could be  really expensive if you do not know where to find the best deals. There are a  lot of perks available especially for senior citizen travelers. Getting  discounts on your accommodation and airfare will give you more opportunity to  enjoy your trip. Find out how to get cheap airfare visit Your World Travel Guide  [http://www.yourworldtravelguide.com/]

To travel on a budget visit Travel Secrets

Gerry Restrivera writes informative articles on various subjects including  Tips for Senior Citizen Travelers. You are allowed to publish this article in  its entirety provided that author’s name, bio and website links must remain  intact and included with every reproduction.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Gerry_Restrivera

 

Know More About a Senior Citizen Deposit Plan by Jesica Johnson

April 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Most commonly known as the best option for senior citizens’ finance needs,  Senior Citizen Deposit Plans act as secure funding for needs in the golden years  of your life. After retirement or after official renouncement of business, the  first concern is a source of income. One should start planning in advance to  avoid being in an unwanted situation and an ideal way is a Senior Citizen’s  Deposit Plans. These plans can be put to use only after 60 years of age. So, in  case you haven’t invested from the active years of employment, this is the  prudent alternative. It helps you sort your money needs in a systematic and  organised manner without any rush and hassles.

There are some factors that you need to consider before investing in senior  citizen’s deposit plans:

• Age requirements – It is of special importance to note that this deposit  plans are available only after the age of 60 years. In case one has retired on  superannuation or taken a voluntary retirement scheme, they can invest, but the  age limit needs to be at least 55 years. Retirement from defence and army  services calls for a different set of rules again. There is no age limit but  certain extra conditions apply too.

• Other restrictions – You have to be an Indian citizen to be able to open  the this deposit plan. If you are not a resident of India or are just a person  of Indian origin or come under the Hindu Undivided Families criteria, you are  not allowed to book this plan.

• Funds generation – If you are between 55 and 60 years of age, the funding  has to come from the retirement benefits money. But if you have crossed the age  limit of 60 years, the source of income does not really matter. In fact, there  is no restriction as to how you fund the deposit.

• Maturity – The senior citizen’s deposit plan can be set to mature anywhere  between 1 to 5 years. Also, pre-mature withdrawals are allowed, subject to  certain rules and regulations.

• Rate of interest – Senior citizen deposit plans have a preferential rate of  interest. They are generally at par with other deposits. Also, the interest  payable is calculated and paid out every 3 months.

• Income Tax – Under section 80 C, the investment made is tax-free but the  interest earned is subject to taxes.

• Joint account – It can be opened with a joint account holder who  necessarily has to be the spouse.

Jesica Johnson writes articles on various kinds of investment plans like senior citizen deposits plan, mutual fund investment, fixed deposit plan etc.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jesica_Johnson

 

Gift Ideas For Senior Citizens Perplexing You? 5 Tips to Finding the Perfect Gift For Baby Boomers by Diane Carbo

April 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Gift ideas for senior citizens can be perplexing. Not to worry, I have  5 tips to help you find the perfect gift for seniors citizens in your life. Many  gift givers have the perception that as we age, we have accumulated everything  we need in life. In some case that may be so, but, just because we are getting  older, does not mean we don’t enjoy or appreciate a meaningful and well thought  out gift.

Tip #1 As we age, our needs change. Our thoughts focus on our past, what we  accomplished, what we wanted to do, but postponed due to life’s responsibilities  that came our way. Many fondly recall the dreams, plans and hopes of their  youth. There are many that have things in their life that they miss or wish they  had a chance to do. Now, because of their age, they think that this is no longer  a possibility. Trust me, there is a gift giving idea in those postponed dreams  and plans. And all you have to do is discover what they are.

Tip # 2 Every aging senior has different personalities, lifestyles,  interests, financial and health situations. This should be considered when  exploring gift giving options.

Take time to consider the senior adult for whom you want to choose the  perfect gift.

Are they an active senior, with lots of ability to get around independently?  Are they involved in church, community or group activities? Do they live  alone? Do they have limited access to social functions or activities due to  illness or inability to drive? What keeps them from getting out an about?   Do they have hobbies or outside interests? Have they had a change in  their physical or mental abilities that has affected their lifestyle?  Are  they able to take care of their home environment, yard or pets?  Is their  financial situation a problem or is money never a concern?  Are they an  individual that is open to trying new things? Or are they an individual set in  their ways?

More Gift Ideas for Senior Citizens Perplexing You? 5 Tips to  Finding the Perfect Gift for Baby Boomers…

Tip #3 To accomplish the goal of finding the perfect gift for the aging  senior in your life will take a little thought and exploration on your part.  Take time in your everyday conversations to ask questions about the past and the  present interests. Make this a part of your regular conversation. Gift ideas  will present themselves. Don’t hesitate to ask “Is there any thing that you  wished you had done?”  “Is there any thing that you miss doing or would like  to do some day?”  “Have you ever considered ________(this may be dancing  lessons, painting, doing wood working, trying a computer etc) ?”

Tip # 4 If you have done your exploration, you should have come up with some  great gift ideas. Or maybe you still feel stuck on finding the perfect gift. Now  it is time to be creative. If you have assessed the aging senior’s situation,  you can determine what is important to them. Would they benefit from some  special one on one time with you? Spending uninterrupted and unrushed time,  to do something that your aging senior will enjoy, not only will be appreciated,  but will have the benefit of creating a memory for you and your aging senior.   If they are an active senior, they may be open to trying something new and  different. You may want to plan a trip or activity that would be fun. Don’t  forget that learning is a lifelong activity. Check out the local colleges,  YMCA’s and online courses that may be of interest to your aging senior. You may  be able to introduce a new hobby or activity that will improve or maintain mind  and physical fitness.

Tip #5 Do not discount home made gifts or projects. Plan a family project  where the entire family can get involved. You may want to create a family tree,  organize family pictures. Create a slide show with old family pictures and have  your senior incorporate family stories behind those pictures. Or create a video  of your aging senior talk about the family history. This could be an on going  project with a planned family debut. Plan a party and ‘red carpet’ event for the  entire family to view.

Finding gift ideas for seniors can give you an opportunity to learn  and create a stronger bond between you. Finding a gift for baby boomers is  giving something needed, something wanted or something they have longed for, but  never expressed. Given with lots of love, will make it the “perfect”  gift.

Diane Carbo Registered Nurse has more than thirty five years in the nursing  field. Her experience as a geriatric care manager, makes her uniquely qualified  to help those who want to live out their lives in their own homes. Diane has  developed a web site to make people aware of issues and options. You will find  the answers to many of your questions as well as helpful information that will  be continually updated. Please visit http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com/gift-ideas-for-senior-citizens.html for more information on gifting baby boomers and senior adults. Sign up for The  Caring Advocate Ezine her free newlsetter and receive a complimentary  copy of the Home Health Care Planning Guide.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2267649

Charleston Heights Arts Center Hosts Rainbow Company Musical And Summer Conservatory

April 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Las Vegas, Press-Media Releases 

Musical “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale” Presented April 26-May 5  

Join the fun as Rainbow Company Youth Theatre presents the hilarious musical “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale,” created by the musical team of Janet Yates Vogt and Mark Friedman of “How I Became a Pirate” fame.  Everyone knows Rapunzel has the longest hair, but “Lady Za Za” has the biggest hair in Rainbow Company’s wacky version of the favorite fairy tale. Off-beat and up-beat characters abound as the plot unfolds, and surprise after surprise will entertain audiences of all ages.

The play will be performed April 26-27 and May 3-4 at 7 p.m., and April 28 and May 4-5 at 2 p.m., at the Charleston Heights Arts Center, located at 800 S. Brush St. Tickets are available now at $7 for adults, $5 for teens/seniors/military; and $3 for children age 12 and younger. To purchase tickets, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-6383 or 229-6553.

The Rainbow Company also will be offering a two-week actor training conservatory June 17-29 for youth ages 8-16 of all theater experience levels. Guest artists and award-winning staff will conduct classes and rehearsals leading up to a performance on the main stage of Charleston Heights Arts Center June 29. The cost is $225 per youth. Space is limited. Registration is open now and will remain open until full. Youth ages 8-11 will attend morning sessions from 8 a.m. to noon; ages 12-16 will participate from 1 to 5 p.m. For more information about the Rainbow Company or to register for the conservatory, call (702) 229-6553 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

The Rainbow Company is a nonprofit, community theatre operated by the city of Las Vegas. The theater group holds auditions open to both adults and young people throughout the year. The staff offer classes in all aspects of theatre for ages 4 through high school at Charleston Heights Arts Center, and presents four productions annually that bring the magic of live theatre to family audiences. In its 35-year tenure, Rainbow Company has received numerous accolades, including the Governor’s Arts Award, Nickelodeon’s Parents’ Picks Award, the National Recreation and Park Association First-Place Dorothy Mullen Arts & Humanities Award, and many more.

Registration For Senior Idol Talent Showcase Auditions Under Way

April 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Las Vegas, Press-Media Releases 

Registration For Senior Idol Talent Showcase Auditions Under Way

Auditions To Be Held May 8-9 

Registration for the 2013 Senior Idol Talent Showcase auditions is under way for the 10th annual competition that will be held Thursday, June 13, at 3 p.m., at the Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St.

This showcase is for talented, performers age 50 years and older, and includes a variety of categories for individuals and groups to compete in. Categories include, but not limited to, singing, dance, musical instruments and comedy. Each year the array of talent has been some of the best Las Vegas has to offer, and this year will be no different.

To get a registration packet, contact the Las Vegas Senior Center at 229-6454, or stop by at 451 E. Bonanza Road. Packets must be completed and returned to the Las Vegas Senior Center by 6 p.m., Friday, April 26. Invitations to audition will be mailed out, and auditions will be held May 8 and 9at the Las Vegas Senior Center.

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts April 2013 Calendar Of Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts

April 2013 Calendar Of Events

495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101

Contact:  Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993                              Feb. 28, 2013

Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org

City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

 

 

 

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

 

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)

Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m.
Admission: $4 dollars per person per week at the door.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of fun learning international dance styles, including Arabic, Armenian, Bulgarian, Chinese, Greek, Israeli, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian and Turkish folk dances. No need to bring a partner. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.

 

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)

Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.

Admission: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

 

Contra Dance (ages 8+)
Saturday, April 13. Group lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7 to 10 p.m.
Admission: $10 adults; $5 members, students & military; $3 children under 16 & non-dancers; pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance to a live acoustic band playing joyful fiddle tunes, driving reels and a waltz or two. All dances are taught and called; newcomers and families welcome. No need to bring a partner. Wear comfortable flat-soled shoes and casual clothing. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

 

Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’Ole Concert (all ages)
Saturday, April 13, 7 p.m.
Cost: $10 in advance, $15 event day.
Historic Fifth Street School Auditorium, 401 S. 4th St., (702) 229-3515.
Five-time Na Hoku Hanohano Award-winner Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’ole was honored at the 2009 awards as Male Vocalist of the Year.  An accomplished hula dancer and singer in the Hawaiian language, he brings a love of the Hawaiian culture to his performance. For more information on the artist, go to www.kaumakaiwakanakaole.com/. For tickets and information, call (702) 229-3515 or (702) 229-6469, or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Downtown Cultural Series – Rocky and Ruthie Lombardo Songs from the “American Songbook” (all ages)
Friday, April 19, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.

Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
Bring your lunch to enjoy a concert by Rocky and Ruthie Lombardo. The jazz duo will offer selections from the American Songbook featuring American composers from 1920 to the present. For more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org, or call (702) 229-3515.

Poets’ Corner

Friday, April 19, 7:30 p.m.

Admission is free.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.

Hosted by Keith Brantley, this monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants features the best local poetry talent.

 

USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, April 20, 7 to 11 p.m. Dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Admission: $5 members, military and students ages 13-25; $10 for non-members. Pay at door.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St. (702) 229-6383.
Presented by USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. For more information, call (702) 813-6694 or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org.

 

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Presents “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale”

April 26 and 27, May 3 and 4 at 7 p.m.; April 28, May 4 and 5 at 2 p.m.

Cost: $7 adults; $5 teen/senior/military; $3 children age 12 and younger.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The classic fairy tale of Rapunzel comes to life in this lively musical appropriate for the whole family. Enjoy the new twist on the old tale, from the writing team that created “How I Became a Pirate.” This production is ideal for anyone of any age who loves to laugh! For tickets and information, call 229-6383 or 229-6553, or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

 

African-American Midwives Film Series — “Bringin’ In Da Spirit” (ages 14+)

Saturday, April 27, 3 p.m.

Admission is free.  Call (702) 229-4800 to reserve a space.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.

“Bringin’ In Da Spirit” is a film about the history of African-American midwives from slavery to current times. This film was able to capture the interviews of “grand” midwives that worked in the segregated South. Most African-Americans born in the segregated South prior to the mid-1960s were born into the hands of a midwife. The sparse number of black physicians and the poverty of many blacks meant that not only did midwives “catch” babies, but they did most of the “doctoring” in the community. With the development of Medicaid and other social and political changes, midwives were no longer relied upon for healthcare. Martha-Marie Drohobyczer will moderate a discussion after the film to examine some of the reasons African-American women have the highest infant mortality rate in the United States, three times the rate of white Americans, and what we can do to reduce this rate.

Exhibitions

 

“African-American Heritage”

Artist Lolita Develay

Through April 18, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.

Free admission and open to the public.

Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.

Lolita Develay is a 2014 Master of Fine Arts candidate at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She lived in Hollywood, Calif., prior to moving to Las Vegas in 2008. Her works are well painted surfaces which reflect her interest in traditions of realism, often focusing on the intrigue of light acting on an object. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Sculptures in Glass”
Artists Larry Domsky and Barbara Domsky

Through May 30, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.

Free admission and open to the public.

Las Vegas City Hall Grand Gallery, 495 S. Main St., First floor, (702) 229-1012.

Glassworks designed and created by this husband-and-wife team will be displayed. The work will include newer pieces that fit the format and space of City Hall as well as pieces from their collection of glassworks. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Spirit Journeys”

Artist Rainer Bertrams

March 21-May 4, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Artist’s reception March 21, 6 to 8 p.m.

Free admission and open to the public.

CharlestonHeightsArtCenter, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.

The images will focus on meditative subjects and themes that explore human kind’s existential struggles for a universal understanding of human nature. For questions about this exhibit or the gallery program, call 229-1012 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Equinox”

March 28-June 8, during reception and by appointment only.

Artists’ reception March 28, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

Admission is free.

HistoricFifthStreetSchool, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.

For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

 

“Celebrating Life! 2013” (ages 50+)

Tuesday-Wednesday, April 23-24 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. entry submission drop off.

CharlestonHeightsArtsCenter, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.

This is the 13th annual juried exhibit for ClarkCounty resident artists age 50 and better. It is free to enter and each artist may submit only one entry. There are six media categories, each awarded first, second, third and honorable mention awards: Drawing/Pastel, Painting, Mixed Media, Photography, Sculpture and Ceramics, Watercolor and Gouache. There is also a best of show award. This program is sponsored by the city of Las Vegas Arts Commission. For more details, or to receive a prospectus, call (702) 229-1012.

# # #

Editor’s Note: Photos are available for download at

ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/Exhibitions/.

ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/April_2013/

No password is required.

Advance Auto Parts Monster Jam ® and Beads of Courage® Put Patients at Renown Children’s Hospital in Driver’s Seat

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Monster Jam Drivers Nicole Johnson and Chuck Werner Visit Patients and Distribute Monster Jam Bead of Courage ®

 

On March 8, Nicole Johnson, driver of Scooby Doo and Chuck Werner, driver of El Toro Loco celebrated the crushing power of courage and confidence with patients at Renown Children’s Hospital, 1155 Mill St., in Reno.

 

Patients spent one-on-one time with Nicole and Chuck, received autographs and took photos with the duo, who are performing at LivestockEventsCenter this weekend. In addition, Nicole and Chuck sat with patients and helped them create a Monster Jam Thriller Necklace – including the Monster Jam Bead of Courage ® and eight other beads to further encourage the children during their challenging journey. Patients at Renown Children’s Hospital were among the first in 2013 to receive the Monster Jam Bead of Courage ® – recognizing the importance of courage and confidence to conquer fears! Nicole and Chuck also took the time to visit patient rooms.

 

PHOTOS AND VIDEO

Attached with this press release are three photos from the visit, with caption information below. If you would like unedited video from the event, please call Mark Earnest, Communications, Renown Children’s Hospital, at (775) 982-6774, or write Mark at mearnest@renown.org

 

ABOUT BEADS OF COURAGE

Beads of Courage, Inc. is a 501(c)3 tax-exempt organization that strengthens resilience and coping in children coping with serious illness through innovative arts-in-medicine programs. Through the Beads of Courage Program, children are given

beads to represent significant treatment milestones during their journey. Beads of Courage programs have supported

over 30,000 children and their families in over 100 hospitals worldwide. Every bead tells a story of strength, honor and hope. More information is available at www.beadsofcourage.org.

 

ABOUT FELD MOTOR SPORTS ®

Feld Motor Sports®, Inc. is the world leader in specialized arena and stadium-based motor sports entertainment. Feld Motor Sports, Inc. productions include Advance Auto Parts Monster Jam®, Monster Energy Supercross, AMA Arenacross Series, Nuclear Cowboyz®, and IHRA® Nitro Jam®. Feld Motor Sports, Inc. is a division of Feld Entertainment, the world’s largest producer of live family entertainment. For more information on Feld Entertainment, visit www.feldentertainment.com. Advance Auto Parts Monster Jam ® has the privilege of visiting hospitals nationwide in the cities they visit each year. Advance Auto Parts Monster Jam ® will be at Livestock Events Center in Reno on March 8, 9 and 10. For more information, visit www.monsterjam.com.

 

ABOUT RENOWN CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Renown Health, Reno’s only locally owned, not-for-profit integrated health network, is home to the region’s only NACHRI-affiliated Children’s Hospital; the region’s only hospital affiliated with Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals; the region’s only Children’s ER; the region’s only Wilbur D. May Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, the largest Neonatal ICU in northern Nevada; The John & Sue Dermody Children’s Healing Garden; northern Nevada’s only Cystic Fibrosis Program; and the region’s only Children’s Specialty Care, treating patients with tumors, cancer, blood disease and other major illnesses. For more information, visit renown.org/children.

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts March 2013 Calendar Of Events

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts March 2013 Calendar Of Events

495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101
Contact: Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993 Feb. 11, 2013
Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org
City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Spring Class Registration at Charleston Heights Arts Center (ages 2-adult)
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
March 1-April 3 registration for 7- to 8-week session of classes April 3-May 24.
Offered courses include ballet, jazz, hip hop, ballroom dancing, visual arts and private lessons in music and dance by appointment. For more information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org. Register for classes at www.artslasvegas.org/classes/register.htm beginning March 1.

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Spring Drama Class Registration (ages 4-17)
Registration Opens March 1 for 7-week class sessions that begin the week of April 3.
Cost: Fees range from $49 to $70.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
To register or for more information, call (702) 229-6553 or 229-6383, or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m.
Admission: $4 dollars per person per week at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of fun learning international dance styles, including Arabic, Armenian, Bulgarian, Chinese, Greek, Israeli, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian and Turkish folk dances. No need to bring a partner. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Contra Dances (ages 8+)
Saturdays, March 2 and 23. Group lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7 to 10 p.m.
Admission: $10 adults; $5 members, students & military; $3 children under 16 & non-dancers; pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance to a live acoustic band playing joyful fiddle tunes, driving reels and a waltz or two. All dances are taught and called; newcomers and families welcome. No need to bring a partner. Wear comfortable flat-soled shoes and casual clothing. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.
Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Auditions for “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale”
Saturday, March 2, 2013, 1 p.m.
No fee to audition.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Auditions for the Rainbow Company musical production of “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale” will start promptly at 1 p.m. Roles are available for ages 12 through adult. Comfortable clothes that allow for movement should be worn and a prepared song is strongly recommended. The show will be performed April 26-May 5. For more information, call 229-6553.

“The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle” presented by Target and ArtsPower (all ages)
Saturday, March 9, 10:30 a.m.
Cost: $3 general admission.
Historic Fifth Street School Auditorium, 401 S. 4th Street, 229-3515.
ArtsPower’s “The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle” tells the uplifting story of an ordinary train that performs an extraordinary feat of strength and courage. The story follows the adventures of The Little Blue Engine, who dreams of someday pulling the Piney Vale Ex¬press just like her best friend Rusty. For tickets and information, call 229-3515 or 229-6469 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, March 9, 7 to 11 p.m. Dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Admission: $5 members, military and students ages 13-25; $10 for non-members. Pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St. (702) 229-6383.
Presented by USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. For more information, call (702) 813-6694 or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org.

Downtown Cultural Series – Bill & Kate Isles Concert (all ages)
Friday, March 15, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
Bring your lunch to enjoy a concert by Bill and Kate Isles, an acoustic singer/songwriter duo based in Duluth, Minn. They tour nationally, entertaining audiences with a wide variety of musical styles, catchy melodies and memorable songs. For more information, visit www.billandkateisles.com or www.artslasvegas.org, or call (702) 229-3515.

Poets’ Corner
Friday, March 15, 7 p.m.
Admission is free.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Hosted by Keith Brantley, this monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants features the best local poetry talent.

St. Patrick’s Day Dance (adults)
Saturday, March 16, 7 p.m.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Admission: $10 in advance; $15 event day.
It’s easy to be green! Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day early by dancing to songs from the 1940s- 70s, from swing and foxtrots to Latin and jazz, performed by the Carl Grove Combo.
For tickets or information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.
Women and Young Women’s Conference 2013 (ages 14+)
“The Spirit Of A Woman…Body & Soul”
Saturday, March 23, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Admission is free, but advance registration is required. Call (702) 229-4800 to register.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
This dynamic event will promote personal empowerment and mentorship, with a focus on sisterhood. The purpose of the event is to strengthen communication between women and young women, creating and enhancing opportunities for understanding. A series of specialized workshops will be offered throughout the day to benefit and assist women as they share, teach, and learn from each other. Participants are asked to wear comfortable active wear for the workshops. Each adult participant is encouraged to bring a young lady or mentee of high school age, friend, mom, sister, or aunt to the event. The event is cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District.

Spring II Class Registration at the West Las Vegas Arts Center (all ages)
March 23-April 6 registration for 6-week session of classes April 10-May 18.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Cultural arts classes include African Drum; African Dance for Children and African Dance for Teens/Adults; Keep it Moving…Ballet & Tap; Ballet–Beginner/Intermediate; Modern Dance; Hip Hop; Zumba; Tae Kwon Do; Video & Documentary Creation; Music Production; Arts & Crafts – Kids Create and Craft It Up; and Private Piano/Voice lessons. To register, or for more information, call (702) 229-4800 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Folk Celebration and Stage Performance (all ages)
Saturday, March 23, 12:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Admission: $10.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Admission includes a 2 p.m. theatre concert performance in the Jeanne Roberts Theatre, featuring international dance artist “Zarnia,” who specializes in Middle Eastern dances with elaborate costuming, musician RJ Fox playing Flamenco-style guitar accompanied by flamenco dancers, and talented Las Vegas Kaminari Taiko Drummers, a performance group affiliated with the Japanese American Citizens League. View demonstrations and information 12:30-1:45 p.m., take dance lessons 3:30-6:30 p.m. A concert ticket stub will provide half off admission to the Contra Dance at 6:30 p.m. A food vendor will be on site from 12:30 to 6 p.m. This event coincides with the 2013 National Folk Organization’s Las Vegas conference. For tickets or information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Rainbow Company Spring Break Drama Workshop (grades 2-6)
Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Cost: $135. Advance registration is required.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Students will enjoy five full days of drama, with a performance on the main stage Saturday, March 30. For information and registration, call 229-6553 or 229-6383 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Spring Break Dance Camp (ages 12-18)
Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 3:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Cost: $75. Advance registration is required. Registration opened Feb. 1.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dedicated young dancers will flourish within this weeklong intensive and disciplined atmosphere available to intermediate- and advanced-level students (or students with a minimum of one year of dance instruction). Instruction led by Jackie Koenig and Jennifer Kidder. Dance attire required; please bring snacks. A student demonstration for family and friends at 6:30 p.m. Friday will conclude the camp. To register or more information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.
Spring Break Arts Workshop (ages 10-18)
Wednesday-Friday, March 27-29, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Admission is free, but advanced registration is required.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
This will be a heritage development workshop, exploring traditions and discovering individualities. Call (702) 229-4800 for information and registration.

Life Skills & Job Readiness Workshop (ages 14-19)
Saturday, March 30, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Admission is free, but registration is required.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Life Skills Training is a dynamic, skills-based program that promotes health and personal development. It is designed for those facing the new roles and responsibilities of becoming young adults transitioning into the workplace. The workshop focuses on goal setting, communication, decision making, risk, and maintaining relationships. The program is cosponsored by Nevada Partners. For more information and registration, call (702) 924-2134.
Exhibitions

“Narratives of Progress”
Artist Armin Mühsam
Through March 16, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
About his work, Mühsam says, “My work focuses on the relationship between the natural and the human-built. I imagine the land after technology has rendered it nearly uninhabitable, despite its promises to create a better world. I paint the absence of humans but not of humanity — man-made, sterile landscapes after the disappearance of the natural.” For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

“African-American Heritage”
Artist Lolita Develay
Through April 18, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
Lolita Develay is a 2014 Master of Fine Arts candidate at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She lived in Hollywood, Calif., prior to moving to Las Vegas in 2008. Her works are well painted surfaces which reflect her interest in traditions of realism, often focusing on the intrigue of light acting on an object. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

“Sculptures in Glass”
Artists Larry Domsky and Barbara Domsky
Feb. 26-May 30, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Grand Gallery, 495 S. Main St., First floor, (702) 229-1012.
Glassworks designed and created by this husband-and-wife team will be displayed. The work will include newer pieces that fit the format and space of City Hall as well as pieces from their collection of glassworks. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.
Nevada Watercolor Society’s 2013 Signature Members’ Exhibit
Feb. 28-March 23, during the reception and by appointment.
Artists’ reception Feb. 28, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information about the city gallery programs, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org. More information about the Nevada Watercolor Society can be found at www.nvws.org/.

“Spirit Journeys”
Artist Rainer Bertrams
March 21-May 4, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Artist’s reception March 21, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The images will focus on meditative subjects and themes that explore human kind’s existential struggles for a universal understanding of human nature. For questions about this exhibit or the gallery program, call 229-1012 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

“Equinox”
March 28-June 8, during reception and by appointment only.
Artists’ reception March 28, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

City Of Las Vegas Presents Musical Theatre And Concerts Feb. 15-17

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Enjoy Rainbow Company’s “Across The Truckee” At The Historic Fifth Street School

The city of Las Vegas offers family entertainment options Feb. 15-17. The Rainbow Company Youth Theatre’s upcoming production of “Across The Truckee” combines musical theatre, Nevada history and audience participation in a “one-of-a-kind” experience that is bound to please audiences of all ages. “Across the Truckee” is the latest original chapter in the company’s on-going “Nevada Series.” Each year a play with music is developed that highlights Nevada’s exciting history and colorful characters. This season, four of Nevada’s most unusual historic figures are included: Eilley Oram, known as “The Washoe Seeress”; Henry T. Comstock, of Comstock Lode fame; Timothy H. O’Sullivan, ground-breaking photographer of the Civil War; and Adolph Sutro, known as the “the king of the Comstock.” The ending of the play may vary from performance to performance, since the audience will participate with choices! The show will be performed Feb. 15-17 at the Historic Fifth Street School, located at 401 S. Fourth St. Showtimes are 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, with additional 2 p.m. shows Saturday and Sunday. Ticket prices are $7 for adults, $5 for teens/seniors/military and $3 for children ages 12 and younger. For tickets and information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-6553 or 229-6383.

Bring your lunch at noon Friday, Feb. 15, to enjoy the latest installment of the city of Las Vegas’ Downtown Cultural Series of free concerts at the Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse Jury Assembly Room at 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South. Open to the public, the hour-long concert will feature the Emanuel Schmidt Quartet, led by guitarist Emanuel Schmidt. Swiss-born Schmidt earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Music Performance at the Wesley Institute in Sydney, Australia, as well as a doctorate in Communication Processes in Jazz Performance from the Sydney Conservatorium of Music. A versatile musician, he plays drums, keyboards, bass and guitar, and composes/arranges music for a full orchestra. For more information on the artist, go online to http://emanuelschmidt.com/ or call (702) 229-3515 for more details.

Tickets are on sale now for the 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, Guy Davis concert at the Charleston Heights Arts Center, located at 800 S. Brush St. Davis is a musician, composer, actor, director and writer. But most importantly, Davis is a bluesman. The blues permeates every corner of Davis’ creativity. Throughout his career, he has dedicated himself to reviving the traditions of acoustic blues and bringing them to as many ears as possible through the material of the great blues masters, along with African-American stories and his own original songs, stories and performance pieces. For more information on Davis, visit www.guydavis.com/. Priced at $10 in advance and $15 on event day, tickets are available online at www.artslasvegas.org or by calling (702) 229-6383.

City Of Las Vegas Offers Weekend Concerts Feb. 22-23

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Music Aficionados Have Multiple Concert Choices

Everyone is invited to share an evening with the legend¬ary singer/songwriter Peter Yarrow Friday, Feb. 22, starting at 8 p.m. at the Historic Fifth Street School, located at 401 S. Fourth St. A member of the renowned folk-rock group “Peter, Paul and Mary,” Yarrow will look back over his career, telling stories and singing some of the many hits that won Peter, Paul and Mary worldwide acclaim. For more information on the artist, visit http://peteryarrow.net/.

Tickets, priced at $10 in advance and $15 on event day, are available at www.artslasvegas.org or by calling (702) 229-3515. Limited free parking is available at the Historic Fifth Street School. Metered parking is available across the street in parking lots both directly south and west of the school.

Audiences of all ages will enjoy a classical music concert by Walt Boenig’s Dynamic Trombone Quartet Saturday, Feb. 23, beginning at 2 p.m. at the Charleston Heights Arts Center, located at 800 S. Brush St. Tickets are free but require a reservation. For more information on the entertainers, visit www.waltboenigbigband.com/bio.html. For more information or to reserve tickets, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-6383.

The Jester Hairston Music Association, Inc. and community youth will present “Why Do We Sing – The Evolution of African-American Music” Saturday, Feb. 23, beginning at 3 p.m. at the West Las Vegas Library Theatre, located at 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd. The historical music genres of jazz, spirituals and gospel will be explored and performed at this festive occasion. Admission is free, but tickets are required and may be picked up in advance at the West Las Vegas Arts Center, located next door at 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd. Call (702) 229-4800 for tickets and information. For more information on the performers, visit www.facebook.com/pages/Jester-Hairston-Music-Association/165817596783533?sk=info. The program is cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District.

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts – February 2013 Calendar Of Events

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
Centers will be closed Feb. 18 for holiday observance.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $5 dollars per person per week at door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $4 dollars per person per week at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of international fun learning Armenian, Bulgarian, Israeli, Arabic, Macedonian, Russian, Greek, Turkish, Chinese, Serbian folk dances, and more. No need to bring a partner. Cosponsored by the Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing Club of Las Vegas, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 562-9889 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Spring Class Registration Opens Feb. 2 (all ages)
Registration for the six-week spring 2013 classes Feb. 20-March 30 is open Feb. 2-16.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Cultural arts classes include African Drum; African Dance for Children and African Dance for Teens/Adults; Keep it Moving…Ballet & Tap; Ballet–Beginner/Intermediate; Modern Dance; Hip Hop, Yoga–Health & Wellness; Tae Kwon Do; Video & Documentary Creation; Music Production; and Private Piano/Voice lessons. The West Las Vegas Arts Center also will offer two new exciting classes exploring the creativity and sheer fun of arts and crafts. They are: Kids Create and Craft It Up. To register, or for more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-4800.
Sweethearts Square Dance (ages 8+)
Saturday, Feb. 2; introductory lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7:30 to 10 p.m.
Admission: $12 per person at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Enjoy square dancing to callers such as Andy Finch, Joe Valvo, Vern Vernazarro and Ron Sowash of Las Vegas and with guest cuer Ron Hartzell. No need to bring a partner. Class-level dances, Plus and Round dances will be included, as well as a chance to win door prizes. Refreshments will be available. Cosponsored by the Stardusters, Las Vegas Square & Round Dance Club, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 348-4906 or (702) 229-6383, or visit www.lasvegassquarenrounddancers.org

Valentine Dance with Boyd Coulter & the Good Times Band
Saturday, Feb. 9, at 7 p.m.
Tickets: $10 advance purchase; $15 per person at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance the evening away with Big Band music. Step back to a sweeter time when Big Band swing was the thing and romance was the theme. Enjoy an evening of dancing to great tunes made famous by the bands of Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey and Benny Goodman; romantic standards from the ‘50s and ‘60s; cha-chas, tangos, and more. For more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call 229-6383.

Downtown Cultural Series – Emanuel Schmidt Quartet “The Music of Miles” (all ages)
Friday, Feb. 15, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
An excellent and experienced musician, Emanuel Schmidt has performed at schools, clubs, cafés and festivals – for intimate crowds as well as for thousands – in Australia, Switzerland and in the U.S.A. According to Schmidt’s peers and educators, he is “an outstanding and versatile guitarist of exceptional ability, and an extraordinarily thoughtful and hardworking musician.” Described by The Australian Music Centre’s Ian Shanahan as an “accomplished and imaginative composer,” Schmidt has written for a full orchestra and performs reflective, emotive and adventurous original compositions with his groups. This group will perform selections from albums such as “Kind Of Blue,” “My Funny Valentine,” “ESP,” and more. Call (702) 229-3515 for more details.

The Poets’ Corner
Hosted by Keith Brantley
Friday, Feb. 15, 7 p.m.
Admission is free.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
A monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants, featuring the best local poetry talent.

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Presents “Across The Truckee” (all ages)
Friday-Sunday, Feb. 15-17; 2 p.m. shows Saturday and Sunday; 7 p.m. shows Friday and Saturday.
Tickets: $7 for adults, $5 for teens/seniors/military; and $3 for children under age 12.
Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St., (702) 229-3515.
Who knew Nevada’s history could be so rich in entertainment? Don’t miss the chance to see the main stage version of “Across The Truckee,” the newly created and lively production about Nevada history, before it goes on tour. Meet colorful characters galore and tap your toes to music that sets you to humming—whatever your age! For tickets and information, call (702) 229-6383 or 229-6553, or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.
Guy Davis in Concert
Saturday, Feb. 16, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $10 advance purchase; $15 per person at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, Jeanne Roberts Theatre, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Guy Davis is a musician, composer, actor, director, and writer. But most importantly, Guy Davis is a bluesman. The blues permeates every corner of Davis’ creativity. Throughout his career, he has dedicated himself to reviving the traditions of acoustic blues and bringing them to as many ears as possible through the material of the great blues masters, along with African-American stories and his own original songs, stories and performance pieces. For more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call 229-6383.

An Evening with Peter Yarrow (all ages)
Friday, Feb. 22, 8 p.m.
Tickets: $10 in advance/$15 event day
Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St., (702) 229-3515.
Share an intimate evening with legendary singer/songwriter and activist Peter Yarrow (Peter, Paul & Mary, Puff the Magic Dragon, Operation Respect). Inspirational as well as humorous, Peter will look back over the career of Peter, Paul & Mary, telling stories and singing some of the many hits that won them acclaim worldwide. Call 229-3515 for more information.

The Jester Hairston Music Association, Inc. Presents “Why Do We Sing – The Evolution of African-American Music” (all ages)
Cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District.
Saturday, Feb. 23, 3 p.m.
Admission is free, but tickets are required and may be picked up in advance at the West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd.
West Las Vegas Library Theatre, 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 507-3989.
The Jester Hairston Music Association (JHMA) chorus, along with youth from the community, share reasons and circumstances of why we sing. The historical music genres of jazz, spirituals, and gospel will be explored and performed in this festive occasion. Please call (702) 229-4800 for more information.

USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, Feb. 23, 7 to 11 p.m.; dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Cost: $10 per person at the door; $5 for USA Dance members, military, and students ages 13-25.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Cosponsored by the USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national organization USA Dance. USA Dance Las Vegas is a volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. Call (702) 813-6694 or (702) 229-6383 for more information, or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org.
Exhibitions
“Second Wind” Exhibition
Artist Robin Stark
Nov. 26, 2012-Feb. 14, 2013; Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Grand Gallery, 495 S. Main St., First floor, (702) 229-1012.
Inspiration for this work was influenced by the work of American sculptor David Smith. The artist’s ceramic sculptural forms have a reference to the traditional ceramic vessel, yet deviate from functionality and focus on expressive formal elements (surface shapes defined by sharp edges and bold color) to suggest visual movement and momentum. The pieces treat the surface as a two-dimensional format to imply motion already established in the three-dimensional form through repetition and layering of various shapes and colors. The purity and intensity of the hues generate an emotional quality, which is critical to the overall nature of the pieces.

“Narratives of Progress” Exhibit
Artist Armin Mühsam
Jan. 18-March 16, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Snake Exhibit
Jan. 31-Feb. 23, by appointment only. Artists’ reception Jan. 31, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
Chinese Year of the Snake begins Feb. 10. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

African-American Heritage Exhibit
2013 Featured Artist: Lolita Develay
Feb. 7-April 18, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Nevada Watercolor Society’s 2013 Signature Members’ Exhibit
Feb. 28-March 23, during the reception and by appointment.
Artists’ reception Feb. 28, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

# # #
High-resolution photos are available for download at ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/Feb_2013_Events/ and ftp://ftp.lasvegasnevada.gov/ls/Exhibitions/.
No password is required.
Media Contact:
Margaret Kurtz
Public Information Officer
City of Las Vegas
495 S. Main St., 7th Floor
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702) 229-6993
Cell (702) 249-1828
E-mail: mkurtz@lasvegasnevada.gov

Impress Your Guests with Pork

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Impress Your Guests with Pork

(Family Features) Looking to impress your guests this party season? Treat their taste buds to a pork loin dish that is as versatile as it is delicious.

This Simply Saucy Bacon-Wrapped Pork Loin is sure to be a crowd pleaser since, after all, everything is better when wrapped in bacon. This delectable dish offers a new and memorable approach to standard party food with four different accompanying sauces to suit any party goer’s palate. Add a fruity twist with crushed pineapple sauce, or spice things up with a kick of jalapeño chilies. Go savory with a touch of Dijon, or smoky with chipotle chilies in adobo sauce. Whatever type of event you are planning, your guests will leave with mouthwatering memories.

For more seasonal inspiration and pork recipes, visit the National Pork Board at www.PorkBeInspired.com, www.Facebook.com/PorkBeInspired and www.Pinterest.com/PorkBeInspired. Also, be sure to follow @allaboutpork on Twitter for timely recipes and tips.

Simply Saucy Bacon-Wrapped Pork Loin
Serves 10 (6-ounce portions )

4 pound boneless center-cut pork loin roast, (untied), fat and silver skin trimmed
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon black pepper, freshly ground
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
8 to 9 slices bacon
1 cup barbecue sauce, purchased

Preheat oven to 450ºF.

Sprinkle pork with salt and pepper.

Heat oil in large skillet over medium-high heat. Add pork and brown on all sides, about 6 minutes. Transfer to plate and cool for 10 minutes.

Wrap bacon slices vertically around pork roast; do not overlap bacon. Tie lengthwise and crosswise with kitchen string to hold bacon in place; tuck loose ends of bacon under string. Place on a rack in a roasting pan, tucked-bacon side down.

Roast on rack for 15 minutes. Turn pork over and reduce temperature to 350ºF and roast for 15 minutes. Remove rack and return pork to pan, tucked-end side up. Roast, turning occasionally until bacon is browned and an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center of the roast reads 145ºF, about 50 minutes. Remove from oven and let stand for 10 minutes.

Skim fat from pan juices, leaving browned juices in pan. Add barbecue sauce and preferred ingredient (*see below) and bring to simmer over medium heat, stirring to loosen browned bits in pan; simmer 2 minutes. Remove strings, carve pork, and serve with sauce.
*Preferred Ingredient

• Savory: Whisk 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard into the sauce.
• Spicy: Stir in 2 tablespoons pickled jalapeño chilies (nacho sliced), drained and finely chopped, into the sauce.
• Fruity: Stir one 8.25-ounce can crushed pineapple, drained, into the sauce.
• Smoky: Stir in 1 or 2 minced canned chipotle chilies in adobo into the sauce.

 

 

Stir up Some Party Fun

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Stir up Some Party Fun

(Family Features) No matter what the reason for the party, you can stir up some fun with easy-to-make appetizers that are sure to please the whole crowd.

These four recipes are a breeze to make and all share one simple secret ingredient – Musselman’s Apple Butter. Here are some delicious ideas for turning these dips and sauces into great party appetizers.

Quick and Easy BBQ Sauce: Brush on chicken wings or shrimp during the last few minutes of grilling. It is simple to make BBQ pulled pork, as well as the sauce for a crockpot of meatballs or bacon-wrapped smoked sausages.

Apple Butter Mustard Dip: Delicious with just hard or soft pretzels. Set out a plate of cheese cubes or mini egg rolls for dipping, and you have easy snacking.

Kickin’ Horseradish Sandwich Spread: This tastes great with roast beef, chicken, or pork – try mini sandwich sliders or pinwheel wraps. Another great idea is to use the spread as a dip for chicken tenders, sweet potato fries or even veggie chips.

Caramel Apple Dip: Set a dish of this warm dip on a pretty tray and surround it with freshly sliced apples or pears, and simple gingersnap cookies. For a family fun dessert, dip marshmallows and then roll them in chopped nuts.

For more ways to stir up some fun at your party, visit www.musselmans.com.

Quick and Easy BBQ Sauce
Makes: 6 to 8 servings

1 cup Musselman’s Apple Butter
1 cup chili sauce

Mix ingredients.

Apple Butter Mustard Dip
Makes: 6 to 8 servings

1 cup Musselman’s Apple Butter
1/2 cup Dijon mustard

Mix ingredients.

 
Kickin’ Horseradish Sandwich Spread
Makes: 6 to 8 servings

1 cup Musselman’s Apple Butter
Creamy horseradish sauce depending on spice level (1/4 cup for light, 1/2 cup for mild, 1 cup for hot)

Mix apple butter with desired amount of horseradish.

Caramel Apple Dip
Makes: 6 to 8 servings

1 cup Musselman’s Apple Butter
1/2 cup caramel sauce

Mix ingredients.
Photo Captions
Main:
Caramel Apple Dip, Quick and Easy BBQ Sauce, Kickin’ Horseradish Sandwich Spread, Apple Butter Mustard Dip

Secondary:
Quick and Easy BBQ Sauce

 

Daily Dental Care Tips

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Daily Dental Care Tips

(Family Features) While regular visits to the dentist’s office for routine cleanings are important for dental health, taking care of your teeth and gums each day is paramount to keeping your mouth healthy. Here are some brushing-and-beyond tips to help prevent oral health problems down the road.

Preventative care is imperative. Basic hygiene practices can help maintain the health of your mouth. Remember to:

• Regularly brush with toothpaste, floss and visit your dentist. Brush at least twice a day.

• Purchase a brush with soft bristles and make sure to use light pressure while brushing so you don’t wear away tooth enamel. A great option is a battery-powered toothbrush like the ARM & HAMMER® Spinbrush® ProClean®.

• Pay attention to your toothbrush. Does it need to be replaced? A good rule is to purchase a new toothbrush every three to four months.

• Speak with your dentist about best brushing and flossing practices, as well as the recommended number of visits to the dentist’s office each year. The number of necessary visits may vary depending on specific patient needs.

Preventing enamel loss. Consuming too many acidic foods or soft drinks, and a long list of other factors, can weaken enamel. Enamel loss can lead to cavities, tooth sensitivity, discoloration and other oral health problems. To help maintain your tooth enamel, try to avoid drinks such as soda and fruit juices, and foods such as those high in citric acid or sugar content whenever possible.

You can also look to products such as ARM & HAMMER® Complete Care™ Enamel Strengthening Toothpaste, which is specially formulated with Fluoride and Liquid Calcium® to help rebuild enamel. In addition, the baking soda within the toothpaste will help neutralize acids left behind by food and liquid.

When to call the dentist. Between dental visits, patients may experience symptoms of oral health problems. Make sure you call a doctor if you notice:

• Tooth pain
• Tooth decay or cavities
• Receding gum lines
• Bleeding of the gums
• Increased tooth sensitivity
• Discoloration of teeth
• Lumps on the lip or in the mouth or throat
To learn more about how to protect your teeth, visit www.myoralcare.com.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Cultural Arts – December 2012 Calendar Of Events

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Cultural Arts
December 2012 Calendar Of Events
495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101
Contact: Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993 Oct. 2, 2012
Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org
City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

 

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
Centers will be closed Dec. 25 for holiday observance.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Winter Class Registration Opens (all ages)
Saturday, Dec. 1, 8 a.m.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Registration is open through Dec. 29, for six-week class sessions to be held Jan. 2-Feb. 9, 2013. Offered cultural arts instruction includes African Drum – Beginner / Intermediate / Advanced; African Dance for Children; African Dance Teens/Adults; Baby Ballet & Tap; Ballet – Beginner / Intermediate; Modern Dance; Hip Hop – Beginner / Intermediate; Yoga – Health & Wellness; Tae Kwon Do – Beginner / Intermediate / Advanced; Video & Documentary Creation; Music Production; and Private Piano / Voice lessons. To register or for more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call 229-4800.

Winter Class Registration Opens (ages 2-adult)
Saturday, Dec. 1, 10 a.m.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Registration is open through Jan. 9, 2013, for 10-week sessions of classes to be held Jan. 12-March 23. Offered courses include Ballet, Jazz, Hip Hop, Zumba, Salsa Rueda, Drawing, Art for Youth & Teens, private music lessons, private or semi-private dance lessons and Saturday tots classes in dance for ages 2 years and up. Registration is open the same dates for Rainbow Company youth theatre classes for ages 4-17. To register or for more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-6383.

Toys for Tots Square Dance (ages 8+)
Saturday, Dec. 1; introductory lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7:30 to 10 p.m.
Cost: $6 with new unwrapped toy; $8 without toy. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Square dance to help the U.S. Marines make children’s Christmas wishes come true. Enjoy callers Andy Finch, Joe Valvo, Vern Vernazarro and Ron Sowash of Las Vegas and caller Arlen Miller of Northridge, Calif., with guest cuer Ron Hartzell. Newcomers and families are welcomed. No need to bring a partner. Class-level dances, Plus and Round dances will be included, as well as a chance to win door prizes. Refreshments will be available. Cosponsored by the Stardusters, Las Vegas Square & Round Dance Club, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 348-4906 or 229-6383, or visit www.lasvegassquarenrounddancers.org.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m., Dec. 5 and 12.
Cost: $4 dollars per person per week. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of international fun learning Armenian, Bulgarian, Israeli, Arabic, Macedonian, Russian, Greek, Turkish, Chinese and Serbian folk dances, and more. No need to bring a partner. Cosponsored by the Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing Club of Las Vegas, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 562-9889 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.
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Afternoon Delight Tea Dances (adults)
Thursdays, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., Dec. 6 and 13.
Cost: $5 general admission per person. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Great music and a friendly atmosphere welcome dancers of all levels to the center’s beautiful ballroom dance floor. Loy Au will lead the dance instruction and demonstrations for new dances each week. A themed dance will be featured each month. Invite your friends and bring snacks to share. No dance will be held Dec. 20 or 27. For more information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m., Dec. 7 and 14.
Cost: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Presents “Honk!” (all ages)
Dec. 7, 8, 14 and 15 at 7 p.m.; Dec. 9, 15 and 16 at 2 p.m.
Cost: $7 adults; $5 teen/senior/military; $3 children age 12 and younger.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
And for the holidays, join the Rainbow Company Youth Theatre for “Honk!,” the musical story of Ugly, whose odd looks incite prejudice among his family and neighbors, until he discovers his true and glorious destiny. Tickets are available by calling 229-6383 or 229-6553, or online at www.artslasvegas.org.

Downtown Cultural Series – Danny Wright “An Intimate Christmas” (all ages) – canceled
Friday, Dec. 21, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
Call (702) 229-3515 for more details. A replacement performer may be scheduled.

The Poets’ Corner
Hosted by Keith Brantley
Friday, Dec. 21, 7 p.m.
Admission is free.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
A monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants, featuring the best local poetry talent.

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Kwanzaa 2012 (all ages)
A Celebration of Culture and the Rites of Passage Graduation ‘Crossing Over’ Ceremony
Cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District
Saturday, Dec. 22, 3 p.m.
Admission is free, but tickets are required and may be picked up in advance at the West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd.
West Las Vegas Library Theatre, 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 591-3989.
Join the community celebration to share the meaning of Kwanzaa and embrace and celebrate the accomplishments of our youth graduate participants in the annual Rites of Passage mentoring workshops. Please call (702) 229-4800 for more information.

Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks Present “Holidaze in Hicksville” (all ages)
Saturday, Dec. 22, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $10 in advance, $15 at the door.
Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St., (702) 229-3515.
Hicksville show will feature a live performance of songs from the acclaimed album Crazy for Christmas, as well as several Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks classics. Free limited parking available at the Historic Fifth Street School; metered parking available in metered lots across the street both west and south of school. For tickets and information, call 229-3515 or 229-6383, or go online to www.artslasvegas.org. For more information on the performers, visit www.danhicks.net/.

Exhibitions

Public Employee Art Exhibit
Oct. 18-Dec. 6, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
The Public Employee Art Exhibit was open to any artist who resided in Southern Nevada and is employed by the state, county or city government. Only original artwork was accepted. If you have any questions, contact gallery coordinator, Jeanne Voltura, at 229-1012 or e-mail to jvoltura@lasvegasnevada.gov. For more information, go to www.artslasvegas.org.

“Mountains and Valleys Without End”
Artist Daniel Gottsegen
Through Dec. 8; Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The artist’s experience working in and studying the environment from both a scientific (naturalist) and personal orientation has shaped the way he considers (and constructs) his world and his work. He is interested in the tension and duality between our romantic conceptions of nature and the reality of the potential environmental calamities we are facing. He seeks to embody this tension in his work by the use of technology (video that he shoots) to derive image sources, or in recent work (the Wanderungen series) by juxtaposing images. For more information on the gallery program call (702) 229-1012 or go to www.artslasvegas.org.

“Gnot The Proper Gnomenclature” (all ages)
Through Jan. 17, 2013, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall, 495 S. Main St., second-floor outside patio, (702) 229-4631.
The public is invited to enjoy two whimsical garden gnome sculptures by Las Vegas artist Jesse Smigel. On display for viewing, photos and videos, the gnomes are carved from dense foam. One standing gnome is 9 feet tall; the second reclining gnome is approximately 9 feet long. No sitting or standing on the sculptures, please.
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City of Las Vegas Halloween & Harvest Happenings

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City Offers Many Special Events And Activities For Children And Adults

The city of Las Vegas offers special events and activities for children and adults for Halloween and harvest fun. These activities are just a sampling of the many programs available throughout the year. For a full list of classes and activities available, go online to download the Fall/Winter 2012-2013 Recreation Guide at www.lasvegasparksandrec.com or call any of the facilities below. All activities are subject to change. Please call to confirm before attending. Most centers are closed Oct. 26. Most activities require advance registration. Most programs at senior centers and active adult centers require a $2 annual membership in the city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all city of Las Vegas senior and active adult centers.

Oktoberfest Luncheon (ages 50+)
Thursday, Oct. 18, 11:30 p.m.
Cost: $5.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Celebrate the rich heritage of the German people with bratwurst, sauerkraut and a great party!

Halloween Luncheon (ages 50+)
Friday, Oct. 19, 11 a.m. seating; 11:30 a.m. luncheon. Advance reservations required.
Cost: $5.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.
Dress in costume for this annual luncheon that includes salad, dessert, beverages, and dinner served in a pumpkin!

Free Ward 6 Movie In The Park
Friday, Oct. 19, 7 p.m.
Centennial Hills Amphitheatre, 7101 N. Buffalo Drive, at Deer Springs Way.
Enjoy the PG-rated family film, “Scooby-Doo,” in the park, sponsored by Lexus of Las Vegas. Bring your picnic, blankets or folding chairs to be more comfortable. Food will be available for purchase from Curbside Café. For more information, call 229-6154 or visit www.lasvegasnevada.gov/ward6.

Cooking Club: What Can You Make from a Pumpkin? (ages 50+)
Tuesday, Oct. 23, 11 a.m.
Cost: $5.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Ghost & Ghouls Breakfast (ages 50+)
Thursday, Oct. 25, 8:30 to 10 a.m.
Cost: $3.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Enjoy a ghoulish serving of pancakes with bloody scrambled eggs and slices of bacon.

Howling Halloween Carnival (all ages)
Thursday, Oct. 25, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
Doolittle Community Center, 1950 N. J St., (702) 229-6374.
There will be a costume contest, games, drawings and candy for the kids. There will also be a Haunted Hallway designed to frighten all who enter.

Halloween Costume Dance with the Jerry Tiffe Band (adults)
Saturday Oct. 27, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $10 in advance, $15 event day.
Charleston Heights Arts Center Ballroom, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Get in the spirit of the season and “monster mash” at the annual Halloween-themed dance. Dress in your favorite costume and dance the night away to the music of Jerry Tiffe and his combo band. Band members are Jerry Tiffe (leader/singer/trumpet), Dale Sweetland (drums/vocals), Thomas San Filippo (keyboards/bass) and Brian Bissell (guitar). Call 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org for tickets and information. For more information on the band, go online to www.jerrytiffe.com.
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Halloween Costume Luncheon & Celebration (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Oct. 31, 11:30 a.m. Advance registration required.
Cost: $5.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Dress in costume to enjoy a spooky meal and carnival-style games. Prizes will be awarded to the best costume, creepiest costume, funniest and more. Space is limited, so sign up early.

Halloween Fun! (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Oct. 31, 1 to 3 p.m. Advance registration required by Oct. 26.
Cost: $2.
East Las Vegas Community/Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.
Come dressed in costume to celebrate Halloween and two lesser-known holidays, Carve a Pumpkin Day and National Candy Corn Day! “Carve” a pumpkin and enjoy treats made with candy corn!

Scarecrow Making (ages 50+)
Wednesday, Nov. 7, 10:30 a.m. Registration begins Oct. 22.
Cost: $5 with a current annual $2 senior membership. Advanced registration is required.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
The PVC “skeleton” and base will be provided; the rest is up to you! Bring an old pair of jeans and shirt, or dress and shoes — it’s up to you to create a scarecrow that will be used to decorate the center. You’ll also enjoy a fall snack. Call 229-1702 for more information.

Harvest Festival Potluck (ages 50+)
Thursday, Nov. 8, 11:30 a.m.
Free with a dish to share.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.

Cultural Arts – September 2012 Calendar Of Events

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Cultural Arts – September 2012 Calendar Of Events

495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101
Contact: Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993 July 26, 2012
Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org
City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Centers will be closed Monday, Sept. 3, for holiday observance.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m.
Cost: $4 dollars per person per week. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of international fun learning Armenian, Bulgarian, Israeli, Arabic, Macedonian, Russian, Greek, Turkish, Chinese and Serbian folk dances, and more. No need to bring a partner. For more information, call 229-6383.

Afternoon Delight Tea Dances (adults)
Thursdays, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Cost: $5 general admission per person. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Great music and a friendly atmosphere welcome dancers of all levels to the center’s beautiful ballroom dance floor. Loy Au will lead the dance instruction and demonstrations for new dances each week. A themed dance will be featured each month. Invite your friends and bring snacks to share. For more information, call 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Cost: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – Crystal Bookmark Award Nominations
Aug. 13-Sept. 21.
The Vegas Valley Book Festival launches its annual awards project to honor a local individual and an organization for advancing the cause of literature in the Las Vegas Valley. Nominations from the public are requested Aug. 13-Sept. 21. Nominations can be submitted online at www.vegasvalleybookfestival.org, or call (702) 229-5431 for a nomination form. The deadline for submittal is 5 p.m. Sept. 21. Nominees must reside in Southern Nevada. The two awards will be presented at the festival at 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, p.m. in the auditorium of the Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St.
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Contra Dances (ages 8+)
Saturday, Sept. 1, 15. Group lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7 to 10 p.m.
Cost: $10 adults; $5 members, students and military; $3 children under 16 and non-dancing adults. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance to the live music of an acoustic band playing joyful fiddle tunes, driving reels and a waltz or two. All dances are taught and called; newcomers and families are welcomed. No need to bring a partner. Wear comfortable flat-soled shoes and casual clothing. For more information, call 656-9513 or 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – “Create an Artist’s Sketchbook” (ages 3-12)
Sept. 1-2; Saturday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m.
Programs are free with paid admission. $10 for adults; $8 for seniors, military and children 12 and over; $5 for ages 3-11; free for children 2 and under.
Las Vegas Natural History Museum, 900 Las Vegas Blvd. N., 384-3466.
In this workshop inspired by the famed book series, “Dinotopia,” written and illustrated by James Gurney, kids ages 3-12 can create an imagined dinosaur utopia using watercolors and sketchbooks. Paleontology experts will answer questions on Saturday.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – “Smart Chicks Kick It Tour” (ages 13+)
Tuesday, Sept. 11, 7 to 9 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Shakespeare Las Vegas, Reed Whipple Cultural Center, 821 Las Vegas Blvd. North.
Seven best-selling young adult authors stop in Las Vegas as part of their six-city tour of North America. Authors Kelley Armstrong, Melissa Marr, Rachel Caine, Kim Derting, Kami Garcia, Richelle Mead and Veronica Roth will read excerpts from their own works, followed by a spirited question-and-answer session, book signings and reception. Call 229-5431 for more information.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – “The First Lady of Las Vegas” (all ages)
Saturday, Sept. 15, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Cost: $1 for ages 13+; free for ages 12 and younger.
Old Las Vegas Mormon Fort State Historic Park, 500 E. Washington Ave., (702) 486-3511.
Nevada author Carrie Townley Porter talks about the life of the pioneer heroine who helped found our city — and signs her book, “Helen J. Stewart: The First Lady of Las Vegas.”

Downtown Cultural Series – The Sweet Potatoes (all ages)
Friday, Sept. 21, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd South.
Bring your lunch to enjoy this noontime concert. The Sweet Potatoes play original, acoustic Americana- style music with a fresh twist. This trio will bring a smile to your face with their sweet harmonies and finely crafted songwriting. Call (702) 229-3515 or visit www.artslasvegas.org. For more information on the band, visit http://thesweetpotatoes.com/.

The Poets’ Corner
Hosted by Keith Brantley
Friday, Sept. 21, 7:30 p.m.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
A monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants, featuring the best local poetry talent.
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USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, Sept 22, 7 to 11 p.m.; dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Cost: $5 for USA Dance members, military, and students ages 13-25; $10 for non-members. Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Cosponsored by the USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national organization USA Dance. USA Dance Las Vegas is a volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. Call (702) 813-6694 or (702) 229-6383 for more information, or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org. Pay at the door.

Community Artist Series: Mohummed-Rafee Shakir “Shamanic Syntax”
Saturday, Sept. 29, 3 p.m.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Mohummed-Rafee Shakir provides an unusual opportunity for audience members to connect with the mysteries of the ancient world through a variety of artistic mediums within an environment of “sacred sound.” The concept of “sacred sound” is a reference to the concept that vibration is the underlying connective force of the universe.

Pride & Prejudice and Zombies English Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, Sept 29, 7 to 10 p.m.
Cost: $10 adults; $5 members, students and military; $3 children under 16 and non-dancing adults. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Featuring a combination of English and Scottish dances and more. Costumes are encouraged, but not required. Caller Marsden Macrae leads a program that is enlivened by her vast knowledge of the history, historical setting and social customs of each dance. Only a brief reminder of choreography will be available, prior to the start of each dance. Attendees can gain a familiarity of the dances by attending dance sessions that are available before Sept 29. For more information, call 656-9513 or 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization.

Exhibitions

“You are Here” Exhibition (all ages)
Artist David Lindsay
June 29-Sept. 1; Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Arts Center Gallery, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
David Lindsay grew up in the San Francisco bay area. After high school, he lived in northern Italy for two years. Although his purpose was not to study art, he could not help but be influenced by the art and architecture of that country. The influence of Italian painting and architecture can be seen in his work, but in a combination that is unique and creative. His work has been exhibited all over the United States, as well as in Italy and Romania. He currently is working on projects for venues in Las Vegas, Texas, Germany and Italy.

“Celebrating Life! 2012 Winners Circle” (all ages)
July 26-Sept. 6, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
Enjoy this collection of award-winning pieces from the annual juried exhibit for adults 50 and better that takes place each spring.
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“Νeothta” (Youth)
Aug. 23-Oct. 27, by appointment only and during artists’ reception.
Meet-the-Artists reception Aug. 23, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. 4th St.
A selection of artists explore idealistic images of children. Call (702) 229-1012 for more information.

“Object Illusion”
Artist Joanne Vuillemot.
Aug. 30-Nov. 15, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Terrace Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
This local artist and educator will exhibit her silver and mixed-media metalwork.

“Mountains and Valleys Without End”
Artist Daniel Gottsegen
Sept. 7-Nov. 21; Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The artist’s experience working in and studying the environment from both a scientific (naturalist) and personal orientation has shaped the way he considers (and constructs) his world and his work. He is interested in the tension and duality between our romantic conceptions of nature and the reality of the potential environmental calamities we are facing. He seeks to embody this tension in his work by the use of technology (video that he shoots) to derive image sources, or in recent work (the Wanderungen series) by juxtaposing images. For more information on the gallery program call (702) 229-1012.

Hispanic-American Heritage Exhibit
Sept. 13-Oct. 11, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Meet-the-Artists reception Sept. 13.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.

“Absolutly Abstract”* *Editor’s Note: Spelling of exhibit name is correct as listed.
Artist Thurman Hackett
Sept. 15-Nov. 17, Wednesday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Meet-the-Artist Reception: Saturday, Sept. 22, 3 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
After spending 25 years as an interior designer, Thurman Hackett came to realize his artistic talent. He began to find new freedoms of expression through painting. As years passed, Hackett developed his own style of abstract painting. Although his subjects relate to American and African history, American jazz artists and automobiles of the 1940s, this show focuses on Africa.

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Incontinence and Senior Falls (Nevada Senior Guide)

September 27, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Seniors who have urinary incontinence have been shown to have 3 times the risk of falls as compared to seniors without urinary incontinence. The connection between urinary incontinence and falls is surprising but studies do show that when you are able to care for your bladder issues you will have a less likely chance of dealing with falls. Falls in the elderly can lead to severe problems like hip fractures and in many cases hip surgery may be too hard to recover from and can lead to death.

There are close to 1.9 million emergency room visits each year due to senior falls. If managing your urinary incontinence problems will prevent or decrease your risk of senior falls, it is important to figure out how you can start taking control of these urinary issues. So why are senior falls and urinary incontinence linked in some way? Most of the studies indicate that there is an issue with falls when a senior is rushing to get to the bathroom. They may trip over furniture and even over their own feet in their rush to relieve their bladder before it starts to dribble. Not only are the bladder muscles to blame for incontinence they are also to blame for senior falls. Weak bladder muscles actually aid in controlling our balance and when they are not strong, they will lead to serious issues.

What can you do in order to prevent falls in the home? It helps to make the home into a safer environment by installing safety devices like railings and using a walker to help you get around. It is also important to keep the home clean and organized in order to prevent piles from getting in the way when you are walking around. Grab bars in the bathtub and next to the toilet will also be able to help prevent falls from occurring when you are rushing to get to the restroom.

Strengthening the pelvic core muscles will also aid in managing urinary incontinence along with helping to prevent falls from occurring. Studies done on women dealing with urinary incontinence and balance problems find that when a woman is able to strengthen her pelvic core muscles she will have a lower change of dealing with dribble throughout the day and her body will respond quickly if she does slip or trips over something.

Muscles do get weak but they can be strengthened and retrained at any age, allowing you to fix bladder control problems even if you have dealt with them in the past. Some seniors find relief when they start to exercise but they do notice they still have dribble when they laugh or get excited. This is completely normal and it helps to have some urinary incontinence products that can make living with urinary incontinence easier.

Some of the best exercises you can do in order to improve the pelvic core muscles include Kegel exercises. These exercises are commonly used during pregnancy to help prepare a woman’s body to give birth by making her lower region stronger. What you will focus on doing is squeezing the muscles that are used to stop the flow or urine. They are great for building muscle tone around your urethra and will aid in controlling the flow or urine when the bladder tries to release it.

Another exercise to do is to lie on your back with your knees at a 90 degree angle (feet flat on the floor) and to lift up your entire lower region and hold it tight for 10 seconds and release it back to the floor. Do this exercise daily to help strengthen your lower region as it will aid in providing you with stronger pelvic core muscles and preventing falls and problems with senior falls.

About the Author:
Incontinence products
Dianna Malkowski is a Board Certified Physician Assistant and Mayo Clinic trained nutritionist specializing in diabetes, cancer, wound healing, therapeutic diets and nutrition support.
Visit the Care Giver Partnership for more info on Incontinence supplies

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Dianna_Malkowski

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6560115

Nevada-Senior-Guide Medicine Disposal Program

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

www.paininthedrain.com

PAIN IN THE DRAIN

IN THE COMMUNITY!

Did You Know… …You can dispose of your expired and unused medicine at any Police Department in Clark County?
Drop Boxes are now located in the lobby of the Boulder City Police Department, the City of Henderson Police Department Substations, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department substations, the North Las Vegas Police Department substations and the Mesquite Plice Department substations.

Don’t Rush to Flush!  Dispose of your expired medicines properly!

Only public employees may access public manholes for maintenance or monitoring activities. Other, illegal discharges might result in:

  • Clogged or overflowing sewer lines
  • Disruption of wastewater treatment plant processes
  • Damage to sewer lines and laterals
  • Buildup of toxic gases in the lines
  • Harmful discharges into the environment

An example of an illegal discharge is a commercial vacuum truck dumping its contents of grease interceptors, sand/oil interceptors and septic tanks into the sewer system. Illegal dumping into public manholes is most likely to occur at night and away from major streets. If you see a potentially unauthorized discharge, please contact the Water Reclamation District at 702-668-8354.

Introducing F.O.G.G.

The Clark County Water Reclamation District and the Cities of Las Vegas, Henderson and North Las Vegas have teamed up to ask our residents to Just Can It! and help keep cooking fat, oils, grease and grit (FOGG) out of our community’s sewer systems. These agencies maintain extensive collection systems of several thousand miles of pipeline underneath the streets to deliver wastewater from homes, businesses and schools to the treatment facilities.
We call it wastewater, but it is not wasted at all. We reclaim every drop of this valuable resource by treating it to very high levels until suitable for reuse- for golf courses, soccer fields, industrial cooling and, most importantly, for return to Lake Mead and the Colorado River system for Return Flow Credits. In order to clean the water to the very high standards necessary, these agencies must keep the wastewater flowing through the pipelines to reach the plants for treatment.

F.O.G.G. FAQs

Q:  What is FOGG, and is it a problem? A:  FOGG is made up of fat, oil, grease, and grit, and it is a very BIG problem! FOGG does not mix with water because its components are insoluble and have a tendency to separate from a liquid solution. When fat, oil and grease are poured down the drain, they stick to the sewer pipe walls creating layers of buildup that restrict the wastewater flow. This problem requires pipes to be cleaned more frequently, causes pipes to be replaced sooner than expected, and causes blockages that can result in sewer overflows.

Q:  How does fat, oil, grease, and grit (FOGG) create a sewer blockage? A:  Fat, oil, grease, and grit in a warm, liquid form may appear to be harmless since they flow easily down the drain. However, as the liquid cools, the FOGG solidifies and floats to the top of the other liquid in the sewer pipes. The layer of FOGG sticks to the sewer pipes and over time, the flow of wastewater becomes restricted and can cause a backup or overflow. The gritty particles, including coffee grinds, eggshells, aquarium gravel, grain, rice, seeds, etc. get trapped in the greasy buildup, accelerating the problem rapidly.
Over time, FOGG accumulates in the sewer system in much the same way that cholesterol accumulates in our arteries. As FOGG builds in the pipes, wastewater becomes increasingly restricted. Suddenly, sometimes without warning, a sewer pipe backs up and overflows, similar to a heart attack. The result is a home flooded with sewage, or sewage overflowing in the street, where it flows – untreated – into area waterways.

Q:  What products contain fat, oil, grease, and grit (FOGG) A:  Fat, oil, grease and grit are natural by-products of the cooking and food preparation process. Common sources include food scraps, meat fats, cooking oils, lard, baked goods, salad dressings, sauces, marinades, dairy products, shortening, butter and margarine, coffee grinds, eggshells, grain, rice, seeds, etc. Anything put through the garbage disposal adds to the buildup.

Q:  What can I do to keep fat, oil, grease, and grit (FOGG) out of the sewer and help prevent a grease related sewer overflow from occurring in my house or on my street? A:  Everyone plays a role in preventing FOGG from damaging our sewer system. The following easy tips can help prevent a sewer overflow in your home or neighborhood.

  1. Fat, oil, grease, and grit should NEVER be poured down the sink. Sink drains and garbage disposals are not designed to handle these materials properly.
  2. Before washing, scrape and dry wipe pots, pans and dishes with paper towels and dispose of materials in the trash.
  3. Pour fat, oil, grease and grit into a disposable container, such as an empty glass jar or coffee can. Once the liquid has cooled and solidified, secure the lid and place the container in the trash.
  4. Disconnect, or at least minimize use of the garbage disposal to get rid of food scraps. The garbage disposal chops up food into small pieces, but can still cause a blockage in the pipe. Use sink strainers to catch food items, and then empty the strainer into the trash.

Q:  Why is it important to dispose of FOGG properly? A:  Sewer system maintenance in neighborhoods that experience sewer blockages and backups due to fat, oil, grease, and grit is expensive and can contribute to the amount that customers pay for sewer service. A sewer blockage or backup can also result in expensive repairs to the home.

Q:  What should I do if I experience a sewer blockage or overflow? A:  Call your sewer service provider at one of the following numbers:

  • Clark County Water Reclamation District: 702-434-6600
  • City of Las Vegas: 702-229-6594
  • City of Henderson: 702-267-2500
  • City of North Las Vegas: 702-633-1275

Pain in the Drain | Why Flushing is Bad

Why Flushing is a Bad Idea When you flush medication down your drain, it ends up at one of our treatment facilities. These ingredients can remain in the treated water when it is released into the water cycle. Handful of PillsWhen prescription or over-the-counter drugs are flushed down the sink or toilet, their chemical components may be added to the water supply. The presence of these substances in the environment is emerging as an important national and international issue. Although the concentration levels of these products in the environment is very low, research and monitoring are continuing worldwide.
Putting medications down the drain is not just a local concern. Increasingly, prescription and non-prescription medications, many of which are not effectively destroyed by sewage treatment plants, are finding their way into streams and drinking water supplies. A study conducted by the United States Geological Survey found that 80 percent of the 139 streams sampled across 30 states detected very low concentrations of chemicals commonly found in prescription drugs. While the concentration levels of these products are very low, they may be enough to cause adverse effects in the environment and to human health.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Oakhill Apartments – Las Vegas

www.oakhillseniorliving.com

Welcome to Oak Hill Senior Living!

Oak Hill Senior Living offers 121 beautiful retirement apartments in Las Vegas, Nevada. Our apartments include studio, one-bedroom and two-bedroom units. Many include a charming kitchenette and spacious bath.

Enjoy three excellent meals each day in our beautiful dining room. At Oak Hill, you can enjoy a full activity calendar with both inside and outside events to engage your mind, body and spirit. Weekly housekeeping and scheduled transportation is also part of your reasonable monthly fee.

Throw away your vacuum cleaner! Get rid of your toilet brush! Donate the lawnmower! Because at Oak Hill Senior Living Community, we take care of the chores so you don’t have to.

Oak Hill is more than a place to live – it’s a place to call home and it is a community for you to enjoy. If you have not been in for a tour, call us today for a complementary lunch and personal tour of this wonderful opportunity.

Amenities

Life in Our Community

Living at Oak Hill is an ideal lifestyle. Three meals are available to you each and every day; we do the cooking and the dishes. Or if you opt, your beautiful kitchenette gives you opportunity to enjoy a meal in your apartment.

You have worked hard for a long, long time. Put your feet up and let Oak Hill’s housekeepers do the vacuuming, the dusting, mop the bathrooms, and clean out the shower each and every week. They even change the flat linen.

Here you’ll find personal touches and activities unique to our vibrant community. Oak Hill’s activity program allows the flexibility to be as relaxed or active as you like. Here you have the option of taking up new hobbies as well as continuing with old favorites.

We’ve taken extra effort to ensure each detail at Oak Hill is above par when it comes to your enjoyment and convenience.Frequent trips around town will enable you to continue your active lifestyle while still enjoying extras such as weekly housekeeping, linen service, and landscaping. Escape to Oak Hill Senior Living and join us for the good life.

Your monthly rental rate includes the following programs and services:

  • Three delicious meals each day along with a 7:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. beverage bar
  • Weekly housekeeping
  • Paid utilities (except cable and personal telephone)
  • 24-hour security
  • Maintenance and grounds-keeping service
  • Scheduled transportation to doctor’s appointments, shopping, outings, tours, and more
  • Planned group activities and special events

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!